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African Migrants Seek Aid in Rome
Rome
By Francesco Pistilli
15 Jun 2015

Hundreds of refugees and asylum seekers from the Horn of Africa gather and seek help to cope with their humanitarian situation at the Baobab Center, a small aid association in Rome. 

They are rescued from boats in Lampedusa and now wait for the chance to depart to Northern Europe. Baobab is a citizen association with volunteers that gives aid to refugees by providing food and shelter.

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Global Refugee Crisis: The Worst Sinc...
Beirut
By b.yaacoub
11 Jun 2015

June 20 is World Refugee Day.

In 2014, global refugee numbers were higher than they have ever been since World War II. In 2015, the problem has only gotten worse.

There are currently over 50 million refugees in the world and more than %50 of them are children. Approximately half of the world's refugees are from just three countries: Afghanistan, Syria, and Somalia.

The response to this massive international crisis has been limited, with most refugee aid programs desperately underfunded. Amnesty International has called the lack of robust international response "A Conspiracy of Neglect." With little help on the way, the future of the world's displaced remains uncertain.

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Battle of Bakara Market
Mogadishu
By Noe Falk Nielsen
29 Apr 2015

The internationally recognised Somali Government, the Transitional Federal Government, had been under siege since the Ethiopian Army pulled out in January 2009. Protected by a small force of Ugandan and Burundian soldiers deployed as the African Union's Mission to Somalia (AMISOM) the government was functioning in a 25 km2 pocket in the capital, Mogadishu, consisting of the State House Complex, the port and the airport base, where AMISOM had their HQ. In the fall of 2010 Al Shabaab attempted to push the government and the AMISOM forces into the sea in a large offensive referred to as the Ramadan Offensive, but AMISOM held their ground and eventually fought back. One of the main turning points of the conflict appeared at the end of July and beginning of August 2011, where combined AMISOM and government forces managed to push Al Shabaab out of Mogadishu, leaving the group wiht only limited footholds in the north and east of the capital.
The present collection depicts the fighting on the first two days of the offensive, where AMISOM and government forces attacked the Bakara Market in the attempt to dislodge the group from it main stronghold in the city.  

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Faces of Somalia
Mogadishu, Somalia
By Noe Falk Nielsen
29 Apr 2015

A collection of pictures that shows many faces of Somali people, and how religion and culture affects them in their daily life. 

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Somalia: Seven Killed in Garowe Attack
Garowe
By Hornconnect Broadcast Services
20 Apr 2015

A bombing has targeted UNICEF staff in Garowe in the Puntland region of eastern Somalia, killing seven and wounding another seven. According to local officials, four foreign nationals were killed in the attack.

UNICEF staff were in their bus to work when an IED exploded next to their vehicle, possibly the work of a suicide bomber, officials say.

This video shows the aftermath of the attack: the destroyed UNICEF vehicle, stained vitcims' blood.

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Europe-bound Migrants Held in Libyan ...
Misrata
By Mohamed Lagha
20 Apr 2015

Misrata, Libya
April 21, 2015

Dozens of men, women and children are held in deplorable conditions in a jail in Misrata, controlled by the security forces loyal to the Islamist Libyan government in Tripoli. The detainees who appear in this video, most of whom come from east African countries, were caught in Libya on their way to try to reach Europe. An office that controls immigration is deporting the detainees to their countries through their countries’ embassies in Tunisia. However, Somalian and Eritrean detainees cannot return because of the instability plaguing their countries. Some of them have been in this prison for five months.

An interviewed female detainee from Eritrea, who introduced herself as Yodit, said that she was arrested with her cousin and other immigrants in the Libyan desert as they were heading to Europe. The group had started their clandestine journey in Khartoum, Sudan. Yodit said that they spent one month on the road before being arrested. By the time of the interview, she had spent two weeks in custody and was worried that her family back home might think that she was dead. The woman, who appears to be in her twenties, also complained that the detention center is overcrowded and lacks proper ventilation.

Various shots of detainees.

TRANSCRIPT
Soundbite (Arabic/English, Woman) Yodit, Female Eritrean detainee

00:48 – 04:14

"Q: What is your name? [Arabic]

A: What? [Arabic]

Q: Your name. [Arabic]

A: Yodit.

Q: How long have you been here?

A: Just one week.

Q: One week?

A: Yeah.

Q: Where are you from?

A: From Eritrea.

Q: You came by… the desert?

A: Yeah, the desert.

Q: How exactly? Through which country?

A: By the Khartoum to the Libya desert. [UNINTELLIGIBLE] When [we] came here, they catch us.

Q: Where?

A: In the desert of Libya.

Q: Where?

A: In Libya, but the place exactly, what it’s called…. I don’t know.

Q: In the desert, or a gate?

A: Desert, desert.

Q: The desert?

A: Yeah.

Q: Is it near from here?

A: I think [it is] far.

Q: One hour? Two hours? How much time?

A: Four hours from here.

Q: And then what are you doing here? What did they tell you?

A: We want to travel to Europe. So they catch us, they arrest us… even before here, just one week another place, the place which kept us. We came also here one week. That means two weeks under arrest. So they… you see they are stand up all night here. The [UNINTELLIGIBLE] is bad It smells bad all night. There is no air. The place is bad, really. [UNINTELLIGIBLE]The condition is bad, seriously.

Q: What did they tell you? Did they tell you that they are going out? Did they call your embassy?

A: No. No phone. We families don’t know where we are.

Q: They didn’t call your families?

A: Yeah. Because we don’t have a phone here. So no one knows where they are. I don’t know. Maybe our families they think [we] die or something.

Q: You are here alone? You don’t have any family here?

A: She’s my cousin. So we are two.

Q: Now you are here for one week.

A: Here. But another place also one week. The way…. but one month is in the way in the desert. We are hungry, there is no water, there is no anything. We were about to die. But that is good, they save us and keep us here. But I don’t know [UNINTELLIGIBLE] about time I don’t know anything.

Q: Thank you.

A: You’re welcome. Thank you, too.”

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The Horror of War - Somalia
Lafole, Somalia
By Noe Falk Nielsen
16 Apr 2015

A Medic sees the fireball followed by thick billowing smoke from a helicopter heading south from Mogadishu. As she calls it in the incident has already been reported to HQ and an AMISOM Quick Reaction Force has been mobilized. The convoy moves aggressively through the congested streets of Mogadishu heading out of the capital towards Lafole 20 kilometres away. We reach the site of the incident 50 minutes after an Al Shabaab operative detonated his car bomb. The suicide bomber was targeting an AMISOM Armoured Personnel Carrier, which was scorched and incapacitated, but otherwise fine, and all the passengers could exit the vehicle by own means. This was, however, not the case for the two civilian minibuses located on the other side of the car bomb as it detonated. When we arrive the wrecks of the two busses are still smoldering, while cans of food litter the surrounding area some having exploded spilling their mangy content due to the intense heat. One mini bus has been sent 20 meters off the road by the explosion and is left as a burning wreck, while the charred bodies and interior continue to smolder. Next to the bus lies the remains of a woman, whose white teeth are clearly visible in the charred face, as she lies half covered in car parts with her hands up to protect her face. At her feet lies another body, this one of a man whose skin has been burned clear off lying entangled in the remains of the bus half way out of the passenger cabin. Inside the cabin are the remains of at least six people of which at least four were children. The remains are too small to be adults. In the back of the burned out bus sits the remains of a child, where only the top of the torso is left. The top of the skull has been sawn clean off and lies below the seat. Another body lies on a seat and consists of a very small skull and a small pile of ashes. A third is nothing but a charred skeleton entangled with the remains of the interior of the bus. The smell of burned meat and rubber is heavy and sickening and lingers over the entire area. A bit of charred meat and bloody clothes lie on the ground some 30 meters away. Back on the road the other bus is left a short distance down the road. The bus was mostly hit from behind and was luckily not a passenger bus, but carried provisions. Next to it lies the remains of the suicide bombers vehicle, which by now is nothing more than unrecognizable junk. Spectators move about and inspect the scene of destruction. Death fascinates. The body of the woman outside of the first bus is photographed and inspected. An older Somali man uses his cane to point out the remains of a child to another man. Others stand around and watch. Covering their noses and mouths to avoid the stench. More photos are taken. Some take selfies. I photograph it all. The spectacle is terribly and tragic. At least 12 were killed and 27 injured. All civilians. Statistics in the real world.

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Al-Shabaab Attack Government Building...
Mogadishu
By Hornconnect Broadcast Services
14 Apr 2015

Somali security forces kill seven al-Shabaab militants after they attacked the Ministry of Higher Education in Mogadishu. A car laden with explosives rammed the wall surrounding the compound and exploded, after which gunmen stormed the building, killing eight bystanders and two officials.

The video includes scenes outside the ministry as authorities enter a gun battle with militants inside, as well as images of the aftermath of the explosion that started the attack.

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"I was Al-Shabaab"
Nairobi, Kenya
By Antonella Palmieri
10 Jan 2015

Ali's voice becomes shrill when he remembers the exact moment when he decided to flee al-Shabaab in 2007.

"I spent one year with the Shabaab, training with them, fighting, assaulting villages,” he said. “Then one day we went to a village whose inhabitants did not want to pay us taxes. They were all massacred. At least forty children were killed. I couldn’t do it anymore. I saw all the blood, those dead children, and I hid and I started to cry. Why do the Shabaab not accept that their soldiers weep? Especially in the face of the dead. If they see your tears, they kill you. That day I decided to run away.”

Ali (a nickname he’s chosen for security reasons) is a 29-year-old Kenyan who was enlisted by al-Shabaab, a Somali militant group affiliated with al-Qaeda, in Kenya in 2005 and was sent to fight in Somalia. He doesn’t remember how many people he killed, but his eyes are bright with tears when he talks about attacks on villages, defenceless people being killed, children massacred. I met Ali on the roof of a building in the Muslim Quarter in Nairobi city that in recent years has suffered several terrorist attacks in which hundreds were killed.

FULL ARTICLE AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST

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Six Months Later: Funeral of Lebanese...
Kharayeb, Lebanon
By [email protected]
22 Dec 2014

A funeral was held today for five members of a Lebanese family killed in the crash of an Air Algerie passenger jet in July in Mali.
Bilal Dhieny and his wife Korean Bienrit and their three children, Malik, Olivia and Rayan were among 116 people onboard the flight that crashed July 26, 2014 in a remote area near the border with Burkina Faso. Twenty Lebanese were killed in the crash.
The family funeral was held in the family's hometown of Kharayeb , South Lebanon .

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"I was Al-Shabaab"
Nairobi, Kenya
By Antonella Palmieri
11 Nov 2014

Ali's voice becomes shrill when he remembers the exact moment when he decided to flee al-Shabaab in 2007.

"I spent one year with the Shabaab, training with them, fighting, assaulting villages,” he said. “Then one day we went to a village whose inhabitants did not want to pay us taxes. They were all massacred. At least forty children were killed. I couldn’t do it anymore. I saw all the blood, those dead children, and I hid and I started to cry. Why do the Shabaab not accept that their soldiers weep? Especially in the face of the dead. If they see your tears, they kill you. That day I decided to run away.”

Ali (a nickname he’s chosen for security reasons) is a 29-year-old Kenyan who was enlisted by al-Shabaab, a Somali militant group affiliated with al-Qaeda, in Kenya in 2005 and was sent to fight in Somalia. He doesn’t remember how many people he killed, but his eyes are bright with tears when he talks about attacks on villages, defenceless people being killed, children massacred. I met Ali on the roof of a building in the Muslim Quarter in Nairobi city that in recent years has suffered several terrorist attacks in which hundreds were killed.

FULL ARTICLE AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST

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Somalia: Routing Al-Shabab 08
Mogadishu
By Noe Falk Nielsen
08 Sep 2014

A Somali soldier stands in front of one of two minibuses that were hit by a suicide car bomb (VBIED) 20Km outside of Mogadishu on 9 September 2014.

12 civilians were killed and 27 wounded. Despite being weakened, Al Shabab were still able to carry out ambushes and attacks using improvised explosive devices (IEDs). These would often hit military targets, but would end up killing and maiming scores of civilians. Al Shabab displayed a blatant disregard for civilian casualties in their fight agains AMISOM/the government.

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The horror of War - Somalia 1
Lafole, Somalia
By Noe Falk Nielsen
08 Sep 2014

On 8 September 2014 a car bomb tore through two civilian mini busses in the course of an attack on an AMISOM convoy some 20 Ks outside of Mogadishu. 12 were killed and 27 wounded, all civilians and mostly children.

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The horror of War - Somalia 2
Lafole, Somalia
By Noe Falk Nielsen
08 Sep 2014

On 8 September 2014 a car bomb tore through two civilian mini busses in the course of an attack on an AMISOM convoy some 20 Ks outside of Mogadishu. 12 were killed and 27 wounded, all civilians and mostly children.

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The horror of War - Somalia 3
Lafole, Somalia
By Noe Falk Nielsen
08 Sep 2014

On 8 September 2014 a car bomb tore through two civilian mini busses in the course of an attack on an AMISOM convoy some 20 Ks outside of Mogadishu. 12 were killed and 27 wounded, all civilians and mostly children.

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The horror of War - Somalia 4
Lafole, Somalia
By Noe Falk Nielsen
08 Sep 2014

On 8 September 2014 a car bomb tore through two civilian mini busses in the course of an attack on an AMISOM convoy some 20 Ks outside of Mogadishu. 12 were killed and 27 wounded, all civilians and mostly children.

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The horror of War - Somalia 5
Lafole, Somalia
By Noe Falk Nielsen
08 Sep 2014

On 8 September 2014 a car bomb tore through two civilian mini busses in the course of an attack on an AMISOM convoy some 20 Ks outside of Mogadishu. 12 were killed and 27 wounded, all civilians and mostly children.

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The horror of War - Somalia 6
Lafole, Somalia
By Noe Falk Nielsen
08 Sep 2014

On 8 September 2014 a car bomb tore through two civilian mini busses in the course of an attack on an AMISOM convoy some 20 Ks outside of Mogadishu. 12 were killed and 27 wounded, all civilians and mostly children.

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The horror of War - Somalia 7
Lafole, Somalia
By Noe Falk Nielsen
08 Sep 2014

On 8 September 2014 a car bomb tore through two civilian mini busses in the course of an attack on an AMISOM convoy some 20 Ks outside of Mogadishu. 12 were killed and 27 wounded, all civilians and mostly children.

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The horror of War - Somalia 8
Lafole, Somalia
By Noe Falk Nielsen
08 Sep 2014

On 8 September 2014 a car bomb tore through two civilian mini busses in the course of an attack on an AMISOM convoy some 20 Ks outside of Mogadishu. 12 were killed and 27 wounded, all civilians and mostly children.

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The horror of War - Somalia 9
Lafole, Somalia
By Noe Falk Nielsen
08 Sep 2014

On 8 September 2014 a car bomb tore through two civilian mini busses in the course of an attack on an AMISOM convoy some 20 Ks outside of Mogadishu. 12 were killed and 27 wounded, all civilians and mostly children.

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Somalia: Routing Al-Shabab
Mogadishu
By Noe Falk Nielsen
31 Aug 2014

2011-2014

These photos profile the efforts over the past years of the African Union Mission to Somalia (AMISOM) to route Al-Shabab from its strongholds in Somalia.
Beginning with a large offensive in 2011, aimed at ending Al-Shabab rule in Somalia, Mogadishu was quickly retaken. Since then, AMISOM forces were able to steadily push Al-Shabab militants out of the outlying areas under their control.
In the summer and fall of 2014, AMISOM launched Operation Indian Ocean, which was another offensive aimed at eradicating pockets of Al-Shabab fighters still stationed in the Somali countryside. 

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Somalia: Routing Al-Shabab 07
Mogadishu
By Noe Falk Nielsen
31 Aug 2014

Soldiers from UPDF 62 battalion sit in a Casspir Armoured Personnel Carrier on the way to join in the attack on KurtunWaraay on 31 August 2014. Somalia is big and mobility is key to AMISOM's ability to reclaim Al Shabaab controlled territory. Offensives thus involved a variety of armored personnel carriers to allow for movement of troops.

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Somalia: Routing Al-Shabab 11
Beled Amin
By Noe Falk Nielsen
29 Aug 2014

Ugandan AMISOM soldier guarding the outer perimeter at the forward operating base in Beled Amin during Operation Indian Ocean on 29 August 2014.

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Somalia: Routing Al-Shabab 06
Mogadishu
By Noe Falk Nielsen
29 Aug 2014

As Al Shabaab lost their footholds around Mogadishu, and forces from other countries joined AMISOM, Somalia was carved up in sectors, each under control of an AMISOM contingent. Here a Ugandan Army colonel stands in front of his tank battalion in preparation for Operation Indian Ocean to reclaim the cities of Bulo Marer, Kurtunwaraay and eventually Barawe, in Lower Shabelle. 29 August 2014.

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Demonstration in Support Of and Solid...
Tmbuktu, Mali
By TTM Contributor 11
22 May 2014

May 21& 22, 2014

Timbuktu, Mali

Thousands of people have staged marches in the streets of Timbuktu in support of the government and armed forces of Mali.
The marchers condemned the action of the Tuareg rebel group National Movement for the Liberation of Azawad (MNLA), for the deaths of 20 Malian soldiers who were killed and another 30 wounded in fighting between the separatist militia and government forces in the key northern town of Kidal.
The army had launched an offensive to retake control of the MNLA stronghold of Kidal after clashes erupted while Prime Minister Moussa Mara was visiting the town on May 17, 2014.

Interviewees:
Ammi Touré, Peul ethnicity
At Umrami Abib, Arab ethnicity
Al Assane, Meiga, Sonraï ethnicity
Fatohumata Walet, Tamashek ethnicity

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Somali Women in Little Mogadishu, USA 9
Minneapolis, United States of America
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
16 Dec 2013

Somali women in Minneapolis, Somalia's largest diaspora in the Western world, hold the destiny of an entire community abroad, badly bruised by more than 20 years of civil war, in their hands. They realize that America offers them opportunities they would never dream of in their own country. And while they are taking advantage of what America has to offer, Somali women are also determined to preserve their African and Muslim identity while raising their children. Successful, hard-working, they are three times more likely than their male counterparts to study in Minnesota, the northern U.S. state that is home to the largest Somali diaspora in the western world. Yet this success is coupled with an unexpected challenge: how to find a Somali husband when you’re so qualified. The problem is so acute that some of these female refugees have no choice but to return to Africa to track down a man.

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Somali Women in Little Mogadishu, USA 4
Minneapolis, United States of American
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
08 Dec 2013

Somali women in Minneapolis, Somalia's largest diaspora in the Western world, hold the destiny of an entire community abroad, badly bruised by more than 20 years of civil war, in their hands. They realize that America offers them opportunities they would never dream of in their own country. And while they are taking advantage of what America has to offer, Somali women are also determined to preserve their African and Muslim identity while raising their children. Successful, hard-working, they are three times more likely than their male counterparts to study in Minnesota, the northern U.S. state that is home to the largest Somali diaspora in the western world. Yet this success is coupled with an unexpected challenge: how to find a Somali husband when you’re so qualified. The problem is so acute that some of these female refugees have no choice but to return to Africa to track down a man.

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Somali Women in Little Mogadishu, USA 6
Minneapolis, United States of America
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
08 Dec 2013

Somali women in Minneapolis, Somalia's largest diaspora in the Western world, hold the destiny of an entire community abroad, badly bruised by more than 20 years of civil war, in their hands. They realize that America offers them opportunities they would never dream of in their own country. And while they are taking advantage of what America has to offer, Somali women are also determined to preserve their African and Muslim identity while raising their children. Successful, hard-working, they are three times more likely than their male counterparts to study in Minnesota, the northern U.S. state that is home to the largest Somali diaspora in the western world. Yet this success is coupled with an unexpected challenge: how to find a Somali husband when you’re so qualified. The problem is so acute that some of these female refugees have no choice but to return to Africa to track down a man.

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Somali Women in Little Mogadishu, USA 8
Minneapolis, United States of America
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
08 Dec 2013

Somali women in Minneapolis, Somalia's largest diaspora in the Western world, hold the destiny of an entire community abroad, badly bruised by more than 20 years of civil war, in their hands. They realize that America offers them opportunities they would never dream of in their own country. And while they are taking advantage of what America has to offer, Somali women are also determined to preserve their African and Muslim identity while raising their children. Successful, hard-working, they are three times more likely than their male counterparts to study in Minnesota, the northern U.S. state that is home to the largest Somali diaspora in the western world. Yet this success is coupled with an unexpected challenge: how to find a Somali husband when you’re so qualified. The problem is so acute that some of these female refugees have no choice but to return to Africa to track down a man.

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Somali Women in Little Mogadishu, USA
Minneapolis, United States of America
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
07 Dec 2013

Somali women in Minneapolis, Somalia's largest diaspora in the Western world, hold the destiny of an entire community abroad, badly bruised by more than 20 years of civil war, in their hands. They realize that America offers them opportunities they would never dream of in their own country. And while they are taking advantage of what America has to offer, Somali women are also determined to preserve their African and Muslim identity while raising their children. Successful, hard-working, they are three times more likely than their male counterparts to study in Minnesota, the northern U.S. state that is home to the largest Somali diaspora in the western world. Yet this success is coupled with an unexpected challenge: how to find a Somali husband when you’re so qualified. The problem is so acute that some of these female refugees have no choice but to return to Africa to track down a man.

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Somali Women in Little Mogadishu, USA 1
Minneapolis, United States of America
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
07 Dec 2013

Somali women in Minneapolis, Somalia's largest diaspora in the Western world, hold the destiny of an entire community abroad, badly bruised by more than 20 years of civil war, in their hands. They realize that America offers them opportunities they would never dream of in their own country. And while they are taking advantage of what America has to offer, Somali women are also determined to preserve their African and Muslim identity while raising their children. Successful, hard-working, they are three times more likely than their male counterparts to study in Minnesota, the northern U.S. state that is home to the largest Somali diaspora in the western world. Yet this success is coupled with an unexpected challenge: how to find a Somali husband when you’re so qualified. The problem is so acute that some of these female refugees have no choice but to return to Africa to track down a man.

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Somali Women in Little Mogadishu, USA 7
Minneapolis, United States of America
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
07 Dec 2013

Somali women in Minneapolis, Somalia's largest diaspora in the Western world, hold the destiny of an entire community abroad, badly bruised by more than 20 years of civil war, in their hands. They realize that America offers them opportunities they would never dream of in their own country. And while they are taking advantage of what America has to offer, Somali women are also determined to preserve their African and Muslim identity while raising their children. Successful, hard-working, they are three times more likely than their male counterparts to study in Minnesota, the northern U.S. state that is home to the largest Somali diaspora in the western world. Yet this success is coupled with an unexpected challenge: how to find a Somali husband when you’re so qualified. The problem is so acute that some of these female refugees have no choice but to return to Africa to track down a man.

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Somali Women in Little Mogadishu, USA 5
Minneapolis, United States of America
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
07 Dec 2013

Somali women in Minneapolis, Somalia's largest diaspora in the Western world, hold the destiny of an entire community abroad, badly bruised by more than 20 years of civil war, in their hands. They realize that America offers them opportunities they would never dream of in their own country. And while they are taking advantage of what America has to offer, Somali women are also determined to preserve their African and Muslim identity while raising their children. Successful, hard-working, they are three times more likely than their male counterparts to study in Minnesota, the northern U.S. state that is home to the largest Somali diaspora in the western world. Yet this success is coupled with an unexpected challenge: how to find a Somali husband when you’re so qualified. The problem is so acute that some of these female refugees have no choice but to return to Africa to track down a man.

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Somali Women in Little Mogadishu, USA 3
Minneapolis, United States of American
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
03 Dec 2013

Somali women in Minneapolis, Somalia's largest diaspora in the Western world, hold the destiny of an entire community abroad, badly bruised by more than 20 years of civil war, in their hands. They realize that America offers them opportunities they would never dream of in their own country. And while they are taking advantage of what America has to offer, Somali women are also determined to preserve their African and Muslim identity while raising their children. Successful, hard-working, they are three times more likely than their male counterparts to study in Minnesota, the northern U.S. state that is home to the largest Somali diaspora in the western world. Yet this success is coupled with an unexpected challenge: how to find a Somali husband when you’re so qualified. The problem is so acute that some of these female refugees have no choice but to return to Africa to track down a man.

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Dadaab
Somalia, Africa
By Transterra Editor
30 Sep 2013

Can a shelter become a prison? "We cannot leave the camp neither go back to our country nor prosper". At the same time, can a shelter become homeland? "In this place I grow myself, I studied, worked and became father. I feel home". This is a contradiction faced by refugees of the largest camp worldwide, Dadaab, in north-eastern Kenya.

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Reactions in Nairobi to Westgate Mall...
Nairobi, Kenya
By Transterra Editor
25 Sep 2013

The Westgate Mall in Nairobi, Kenya, was recently the site of a terrorist attack, claimed by Al Qaeda-linked militant group, Al-Shabab, based in the horn of Africa. 67 people were killed and 62 injured in the dramatic 4-day siege that came to a close on Tuesday, September 24.

Filmed by Sam Charo.
http://transterramedia.com/users/1388

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For Clan and Country (1 of 12)
Hargeisa, Somaliland
By mcseaniew
19 Jul 2013

Fans arrive at Hargeisa Stadium ahead of the Somaliland Regional (aka Clan) Cup Final.

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For Clan and Country (4 of 12)
Hargeisa, Somaliland
By mcseaniew
18 Jul 2013

Players of Hawd pose for the camera ahead of kick-off. In a repeat of last year's final, they play fierce local rivals Maroodi-Jeh for the highest prize in Somaliland sport.

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For Clan and Country (7 of 12)
Hargeisa, Somaliland
By mcseaniew
18 Jul 2013

The referee keeps a close eye on the fierce challenges that fly in from all directions. After 90 minutes of hot, tireless action the game is deadlocked at nil-nil.