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African Migrants in Rome 15
Rome, Italy
By Francesco Pistilli
16 Jun 2015

Hundreds of refugees and asylum seekers from the Horn of Africa gather and seek help to cope with their humanitarian situation at the Baobab Center, a small aid association in Rome.
They are rescued from boats in Lampedusa and now wait for the chance to depart to Northern Europe. Baobab is a citizen association with volunteers that gives aid to refugees by providing food and shelter.

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African Migrants in Rome 16
Rome, Italy
By Francesco Pistilli
16 Jun 2015

Hundreds of refugees and asylum seekers from the Horn of Africa gather and seek help to cope with their humanitarian situation at the Baobab Center, a small aid association in Rome.
They are rescued from boats in Lampedusa and now wait for the chance to depart to Northern Europe. Baobab is a citizen association with volunteers that gives aid to refugees by providing food and shelter.

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African Migrants in Rome 17
Rome, Italy
By Francesco Pistilli
16 Jun 2015

Hundreds of refugees and asylum seekers from the Horn of Africa gather and seek help to cope with their humanitarian situation at the Baobab Center, a small aid association in Rome.
They are rescued from boats in Lampedusa and now wait for the chance to depart to Northern Europe. Baobab is a citizen association with volunteers that gives aid to refugees by providing food and shelter.

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African Migrants Seek Aid in Rome
Rome
By Francesco Pistilli
15 Jun 2015

Hundreds of refugees and asylum seekers from the Horn of Africa gather and seek help to cope with their humanitarian situation at the Baobab Center, a small aid association in Rome. 

They are rescued from boats in Lampedusa and now wait for the chance to depart to Northern Europe. Baobab is a citizen association with volunteers that gives aid to refugees by providing food and shelter.

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African Migrants in Rome 02
Rome, Italy
By Francesco Pistilli
15 Jun 2015

Hundreds of refugees and asylum seekers from the Horn of Africa gather and seek help to cope with their humanitarian situation at the Baobab Center, a small aid association in Rome.
They are rescued from boats in Lampedusa and now wait for the chance to depart to Northern Europe. Baobab is a citizen association with volunteers that gives aid to refugees by providing food and shelter.

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African Migrants in Rome 03
Rome, Italy
By Francesco Pistilli
15 Jun 2015

Hundreds of refugees and asylum seekers from the Horn of Africa gather and seek help to cope with their humanitarian situation at the Baobab Center, a small aid association in Rome.
They are rescued from boats in Lampedusa and now wait for the chance to depart to Northern Europe. Baobab is a citizen association with volunteers that gives aid to refugees by providing food and shelter.

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African Migrants in Rome 04
Rome, Italy
By Francesco Pistilli
15 Jun 2015

Hundreds of refugees and asylum seekers from the Horn of Africa gather and seek help to cope with their humanitarian situation at the Baobab Center, a small aid association in Rome.
They are rescued from boats in Lampedusa and now wait for the chance to depart to Northern Europe. Baobab is a citizen association with volunteers that gives aid to refugees by providing food and shelter.

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African Migrants in Rome 05
Rome, Italy
By Francesco Pistilli
15 Jun 2015

Hundreds of refugees and asylum seekers from the Horn of Africa gather and seek help to cope with their humanitarian situation at the Baobab Center, a small aid association in Rome.
They are rescued from boats in Lampedusa and now wait for the chance to depart to Northern Europe. Baobab is a citizen association with volunteers that gives aid to refugees by providing food and shelter.

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African Migrants in Rome 06
Rome, Italy
By Francesco Pistilli
15 Jun 2015

Hundreds of refugees and asylum seekers from the Horn of Africa gather and seek help to cope with their humanitarian situation at the Baobab Center, a small aid association in Rome.
They are rescued from boats in Lampedusa and now wait for the chance to depart to Northern Europe. Baobab is a citizen association with volunteers that gives aid to refugees by providing food and shelter.

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African Migrants in Rome 07
Rome, Italy
By Francesco Pistilli
15 Jun 2015

Hundreds of refugees and asylum seekers from the Horn of Africa gather and seek help to cope with their humanitarian situation at the Baobab Center, a small aid association in Rome.
They are rescued from boats in Lampedusa and now wait for the chance to depart to Northern Europe. Baobab is a citizen association with volunteers that gives aid to refugees by providing food and shelter.

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African Migrants in Rome 01
Rome, Italy
By Francesco Pistilli
15 Jun 2015

Hundreds of refugees and asylum seekers from the Horn of Africa gather and seek help to cope with their humanitarian situation at the Baobab Center, a small aid association in Rome.
They are rescued from boats in Lampedusa and now wait for the chance to depart to Northern Europe. Baobab is a citizen association with volunteers that gives aid to refugees by providing food and shelter.

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African Migrants in Rome 25
Rome, Italy
By Francesco Pistilli
15 Jun 2015

Hundreds of refugees and asylum seekers from the Horn of Africa gather and seek help to cope with their humanitarian situation at the Baobab Center, a small aid association in Rome.
They are rescued from boats in Lampedusa and now wait for the chance to depart to Northern Europe. Baobab is a citizen association with volunteers that gives aid to refugees by providing food and shelter.

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Libyan Coast Guard Seizes Migrant Boat
Tripoli
By Taha Zag
06 Jun 2015

Libyan coast guard vessels intercept a boat carrying 120 African migrants in the Mediterranean Sea and force it to return to the port of Tripoli.

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Colonel Claude Mademba
Nimes
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
08 Apr 2015

Colonel Mademba fought in North Africa and Italy with British and French forces as an infantryman against German forces.

"On May 5th 1945, I fired my last shell from my Sherman tank at Hitler's Berghof complex," he said.

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Lahcen Majid
Saint Remi
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
08 Apr 2015

Lahcen Majid fought as an infantrymen in Italy as part of a Moroccan outfit attached to Free French forces, against the German army.

"On May 11th 1944, right before the last major push for Monte Cassino, I saw the entire countryside light up with an artillery barrage," he said. "By 2:00 a.m. hundreds of Allied soldiers were already arriving at our hospital to be treated."

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Joel D. Pasado
Los Angeles, CA
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
08 Apr 2015

Joel D. Pasado was a rebel fighter in the Philippines against Japanese forces.

"We surrounded the hospital," he said. "The defenders fought hard, as they had to fight room to room throwing grenades and using bayonets. On one occasion I stormed a room filled with Japanese soldiers. One tried to stab me, but was shot by one of my soldiers and was killed. He saved my life."

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Portrait of a Generation: WWII Vetera...
New York City, NY
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
07 Apr 2015

The Second World War was fought by an entire generation of men from more than 60 nations. Americans, Canadians, Russian, British, Chinese, South Africans and many others fought the Japanese, Spaniards, Italians, Germans, Slovaks and more, all were embroiled in a war which killed over 50 millions soldiers and civilians alike, making this conflict the bloodiest in Human history. The 1921/22-generation is today often known as a sacrificed generation, which fought for a various array of beliefs all intertwined in self-sacrifice and honor. In Germany alone 5.2 million soldiers were killed or missing in battle in a six-year period, Japan lost over 2 million men in combat, while the United States suffered 409 thousand men killed in action. However Russia holds the morbid record, with more than 10 million killed between 1941 and 1945. These astounding numbers show the brutality in which this war was fought in the air, on land and in the seas.

As a journalist, always in search for a certain historical truth within today’s framework, the stories of each of these men interviewed and photographed is a treasure of human perseverance. The project contains no pretense to judge or criticize the actions or decisions taken by these men, but it is rather a recollection of a period drastically different from ours. Their testimony is relevant in a historical sense, which should not be lost in time, as the next generations to come can and should learn from this generation.

The project itself differs from other veteran type shoots, in the sense that it tries to combine so many different nationalities. This combination was hard to achieve. It took no less than 5 years and travels to over 12 countries to meet, photograph, and interview these men. As a photojournalist, it was not only the photo shoot that was interesting, but also the search to meet these veterans, especially the ex Waffen SS and the foreign elements who fought within its ranks; and the more obscure nationalities who fought alongside major powers, like Croatians or Senegalese.

The photography project deals with as many nationalities as possible, for the simple reason that many nations were involved in the fighting. So far I have photographed Germans, Russians, Armenians, Karabastis, French, Belgium, Poles, Americans, Nepalese, Croatian, Czechs, Latvians, Japanese Americans, Pilipino, Hungarians and more…, which includes 221 men from 59 different nationalities.  Each man is interviewed on his experience through out the war. The goal of this project is to reunite as many veterans as possible from most of the nations involved in the Second World War.

FULL ARTICLE AND INTERVIEWS AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST

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Milan Prepares for Expo 2015
Milan, Italy
By GC
05 Feb 2015

Scenes from Milan ahead of the opening of Expo 2015.

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Refugees in Italy Create a Football Team
Mineo
By Jobard Olivier
24 Jan 2015

Refugees in Italy create a football club that plays in Italian official league. ASD Cara Mineo was created in 2013 after residents at a migrant reception centre began holding football tournaments among themselves. Now their team of 25 players is officially registered by the Italian football federation, and has joined the 10th tier of the football league known as Category Three. The team had to miss the first three games because players could not be registered without residence permits, which still have not arrived. But after "a little goodwill from everyone," they were allowed to participate, their spokesman told a local newspaper. Originally, the team consisted of refugee footballers from countries around Africa, who lived on 2.5 euros a day and three free meals offered them in the camps.

"Rice, pasta, fruits, it's a nice diet for a football player,” said Mohamed Traore, a 24 year-old defender who plays for the team.

Abou Daouda, 23 years old from Ghana (last photo) did not want to play with the team. He loves football but he does not like the level nor the style of the team. "Me, I play Brazilian football,” he said, so he prefers to run alone, and to stay fit following his own regime.

These young migrants dream of entering Europe legally and making a life for themselves and their families through football. So far, all of the players who started the team now live on the European continent and have secured residency.

Thousands of migrants land in Sicily each year after making the crossing from north Africa, often by boat. About 4,000 people are held at the reception centre in Mineo, which formerly housed the families of US military personnel stationed at the nearby Sigonella Nato base.

FULL ARTICLE AVAILABLE ON REQUEST

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Milan 02
Milan
By GC
11 Jan 2015

Milan (Italy) 2/5/2015 Street Gabriele D'Annunzio:
The redevelopment of the new Dock for Expo 2015 (pictured in the advertisement of the area where jobs, targeted by vandals who have changed the words) and that must end before the opening of Expo 2015 the 5/1/2015

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Milan 03
Milan
By GC
11 Jan 2015

Milan (Italy) 2/5/2015 Piazza XXIV Maggio:
The redevelopment works of the new Dock for Expo 2015 (pictured Ticinello bridge) that must finish before the opening of Expo 2015 the 5/1/2015.

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Milan 04
Milan
By GC
11 Jan 2015

Milan (Italy) 2/5/2015 Street Gabriele D'Annunzio:
The redevelopment of the new Dock for Expo 2015 (pictured in the advertisement of the area where jobs, targeted by vandals who have changed the words) and that must end before the opening of Expo 2015 the 5/1/2015.

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Milan 06
Milan
By GC
11 Jan 2015

Milan (Italy) 2/5/2015 Piazza XXIV Maggio:
Monumental oak in piazza XXIV Maggio, the oldest in Milan with its 117 years. Its probably la quercia the most famous of all the Milan Quercus Rubra American born in 1895 and was brought in piazza XXIV Maggio in 1924 becoming then a war memorial of the great war. Supportive interventions are initiated some years ago, when they were placed among the branches and tie crutches that ticcano the ground (do you see in the picture).

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Milan 13
Milan
By GC
11 Jan 2015

Milan (Italy) 2/5/2015 Street Santa Marta:
A five star hotel Santa Marta Suites in the Centre of Milan, an eloquent sign down below the logo. A problem for years and that you cannot solve by educating dog owners to collect bins in their droppings.
The sign says: Please no pee no pup of dogs.

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Milan 11
Milan
By GC
22 Dec 2014

Milan (Italy) 2/5/2015 Cathedral of Milan:
The renovation of the Cathedral of Milan wrapped in fog, an expenditure of money that involves several institutions.

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Milan 08
Milan
By GC
21 Dec 2014

Milan (Italy) 2/5/2015 Alzaia Naviglio Grande:
Tags on the walland the plaque on the AlzaiaNaviglio Grande, where a few months ago we are redoing the channel some collapsed from neglect.

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Syrian Palestinian Refugees Risk thei...
Beirut, Lebanon
By wissam fanash
18 Dec 2014

Beirut, Lebanon

December 15, 2014

The humanitarian situation in Syria continues to deteriorate as the war there nears its fourth year. Palestinian refugees in Syria fled war and malnutrition in the besieged Yarmouk camp near Damascus and moved to Shatila camp near Beirut. But conditions in their new host country were far from what they had hoped for.

Palestinian refugees whose families arrived to Lebanon in 1948 already struggle with unemployment and poverty and the newcomers did not fare any better.

For many, the only solution was to pay huge amounts of money to smugglers who promise to take them illicitly to Europe by sea or across the African desert. Most of them, however, disappear or get caught by authorities in transit countries.

This video tells the story of people whose family members already took the dangerous road to Europe but did not make it.

The video also features a Skype call between a Palestinian refugee who wishes to travel illicitly to Italy and a people smuggler who says he is based in Sudan. The smuggler gives all the details about going from Lebanon to Sudan, and then across the desert to Libya before being smuggled by sea to Italy.

Shot List

1 M/S and W/S of the streets

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, woman) Siham Jumaa

(00:07) He met a smuggler through Sudan who helped him prepare a visit to Sudan. He booked on a flight (Transit) from Beirut Airport (00:13).

(00:14) When he arrived to Sudan he called me to tell me that he is safe, and he is going to Libya after. He arrived safely to Libya after three days in the desert. After that, I got no news from him, and it has been three months now (00:28).

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Skype between Palestinian refugee Ibrahim al-Khatib and a people smuggler in Sudan.

(00:29) We have the path of Sudan, a bit cheap, but dangerous (00:34).

(00:36) You have to spend five to seven days in the desert and face many risks. You might face kidnappers or robbers. We cannot control these things; this is a matter of destiny. You will have to count on God if you want to take that road. In all cases, there is not any other road (00:59).

(01:00) We charge $3,200 for the trip from Sudan all the way to Italy (01:07).

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Syrian Palestinian Refugees Risk thei...
Beirut, Lebanon
By wissam fanash
18 Dec 2014

Beirut, Lebanon
December 15, 2014

The humanitarian situation in Syria continues to deteriorate as the war there nears its fourth year. Palestinian refugees in Syria fled war and malnutrition in the besieged Yarmouk camp near Damascus and moved to Shatila camp near Beirut. But conditions in their new host country were far from what they had hoped for.

Palestinian refugees whose families arrived to Lebanon in 1948 already struggle with unemployment and poverty and the newcomers did not fare any better.

For many, the only solution was to pay huge amounts of money to smugglers who promise to take them illicitly to Europe by sea or across the African desert. Most of them, however, disappear or get caught by authorities in transit countries.

This video tells the story of people whose family members already took the dangerous road to Europe but did not make it.

The video also features a Skype call between a Palestinian refugee who wishes to travel illicitly to Italy and a people smuggler who says he is based in Sudan. The smuggler gives all the details about going from Lebanon to Sudan, and then across the desert to Libya before being smuggled by sea to Italy.

Shot List

1 M/S and W/S of the streets
2 Various of children
3 Various of woman at home
4 Various of children playing in the street
5 C/S of Yasser Arafat’s photos on camp wall
6 M/S of streets in camps
7 Various of streets

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman), Lama Baqlouni

(00:41) This is my son Mustafa, he is 15 years old. He is imprisoned in Egypt now. And this is my daughter Nisrine, she is also detained with her brother in Egypt (00:57).

(00:58) My children are orphans now, their father died. We need someone to help them get out of prison. It has been two months, they are tired and sick. We need someone to help them move to another country so they can continue their lives as normal people (01:15).

(01:17) We left Lebanon to Homs where I got a smuggler’s number. I called him and he told me to take them to Hama with $250 for each. We went to Hama and paid the amount needed, and then he took them to Turkey, where they stayed in a hotel. We got the contacts of smugglers who will be able to take them to Italy. The fees ranged between $5,000 and $6,000 for each child, depending on the smuggler. We asked people for money – people we knew and others that we did not. They took them to the Turkish coasts to be transported to Italy, and made them wait from 7PM to 1AM (02:15).

(02:18) They were supposed to take them first in a small boat, and then move them to a bigger ship. They were stopped by the coast guards and imprisoned in Turkey for a day, on condition to make them sign a pledge that they will never get out of Turkey again. They were freed the next day. On the same day they got out of jail, the smuggler said they will try to leave Turkey one more time. They got on board on the same day, but the captain kept going in circles in the sea for five days (02:59).

(03:10) They arrived to an island and the captain ordered them to leave the boat. They did not agree at first, but he told them he will get them accommodations in Egypt, and they were threatened by guns and knives. My daughter told me that they got very scared. Everybody started to scream, and they threw four men in the sea (03:27).

(03:35) Syrians were sent back to Turkey but Palestinians were allowed to go there (03: 39).

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman), Siham Jumaa

(04:07) This is my husband’s passport, he sent it to the smuggler to get a visitor’s visa to Sudan (04:16).

(04:32) We lost our house and everything because of the war in Syria. Life is hard here in Lebanon, we should pay a monthly rent for our house and life is expensive. This is the main reason why my husband decided to do this trip, and if I had money, I would do the same thing (04:49).

(04:52) He met a smuggler through Sudan who helped him prepare a visit to Sudan. He booked on a flight (Transit) from Beirut Airport. He travelled to Dubai first and then to Sudan. When he arrived to Sudan he called me to tell me that he is safe, and he is going to Libya after. He arrived safely to Libya after three days in the desert. After that, I got no news from him, and it has been three months now. His plan was to go to Italy after Libya, either from the coasts of Benghazi or Tripoli. He paid $4,000 for the whole trip from Beirut to Italy. But I heard nothing from him since he got to Libya (05:58).

(06:05) I do not have money. I sold all my jewelry and my wedding ring, and I even had to beg for money from people so we can get the 3000USD for his trip. Once he arrived to Libya, his brothers donated 1000USD for his trip. The whole trip cost $4,000 (06:21).

SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Skype conversion between Ibrahim al-Khatib and smuggler based in Sudan

(07:18) Ibrahim al-Khatib: I want to travel. Smuggler: Welcome, I will help you
Ibrahim al-Khatib: Can I please know what the process is? I am a Syrian Palestinian, and I am in Lebanon.
Smugglers: Where would you like to go?
Ibrahim al-Khatib: I want to go to Europe; I want to know the procedures, and how much it costs. This is the most important thing. We have no money and I have to borrow money if I want to travel. You have to give me discount and help me, please.
Smuggler: The person who told you about me, did he not tell you where I can take you?
Ibrahim al-Khatib: The person who told me about you went to Sudan. He went from Sudan to Libya and then to Italy.
Smuggler: Are you seriously intending to do it?
Ibrahim al-Khatib: Yes, I am, I am asking about the expenses because I have a wife and children and I want to know [how much money] I should leave for them and how much to take with me, I want to know about the road, if it is safe, or not, and how this whole thing is going to be arranged. I want to know how I am going to give you the money, or my passport. Will I receive a visa, or not? I do not want to go without knowing anything.
Smuggler: We have the path of Sudan, a bit cheap, but dangerous. You will go from [Lebanon] to Sudan - the road is easy - but from Sudan to Libya, we have five days in the desert. You have to think of all the odds, the desert is more dangerous than the sea. The sea is also unstable, but we can go across it and count on God to help us.
Ibrahim al-Khatib: What is your name?
Smuggler: I am Abu Yehya.
Ibrahim al-Khatib: What I want to know is that, if I decide to go to Sudan, how will you get me the visa? Is it an invitation, or a visa, how can I guarantee that the process will go as agreed?
Smuggler: You will get a regular visa, and you should not be concerned with how you receive it – you will have it.
Ibrahim al-Khatib: I heard that some people are being fooled and they are getting visas that do not work. Is that true of is it lying? Can I be sure that it will work?
Smuggler: It is not true, the trip to Sudan is fully legitimate, and you can make sure yourself.
Ibrahim al-Khatib: What about the cost?
Smuggler: Concerning the cost, the visa alone will cost you $1,500 and you have to pay for the plane ticket. From Sudan to Libya it will cost you $1,800. The trip from Sudan to Italy will cost you $3,200.
Ibrahim al-Khatib: I heard that from Libya to Italy, it costs $2,200, why do you charge $3,200? Is it more expensive now?
Smuggler: We charge $3,200 for the trip from Sudan all the way to Italy.
Ibrahim al-Khatib: Alright, now I understand. Will I have to cross the desert from Sudan to Libya?
Smuggler: Yes, the only road we have is through the desert. You have to spend five to seven days in the desert and face many risks. You might face kidnappers or robbers. We cannot control these things; this is a matter of destiny. You will have to count on God if you want to take that road. In all cases, there isn’t any other road.
Ibrahim al-Khatib: What about Turkey, do you know anyone there?
Smuggler: Yes, I do. Syrian-Palestinians are not allowed to travel to Turkey, but we can arrange something. However, the trip to Turkey will cost you 10,000 euros.
Ibrahim al-Khatib: What is the process?
Smuggler: We can travel by sea, on plane or by bus.
Ibrahim al-Khatib: Is there a way to go to Turkey from Lebanon, through the sea?

Smuggler: No, not at all, everyone used to say that they can go from Lebanon, but it is not possible. And I am not even in Lebanon, I am in Sudan.
Ibrahim al-Khatib: Yes, I can see that you have a Sudanese number.

Smuggler: Yes, that is right, and I heard about many people who got caught while being smuggled out of Lebanon. If you are determined to go, send me a copy of your passport and $1,000 and you will give me the rest of the money when you get there.
Ibrahim al-Khatib: Since I do not know you and you do not know me, how can I guarantee that you will not take the money and disappear? I want some sort of a guarantee.
Smuggler: I might send people to meet you, but at the end this is your choice; this how it is done, you chose either to do it or not. Many others have done it and if someone is afraid, then it would be better he did not do it.
Ibrahim al-Khatib: I wanted to ask about the procedure, and I am intending to go, I just have to figure out how to get the money, because it is available.
Smuggler: You can contact me if you want and we will make an agreement.
Ibrahim al-Khatib: Some people are getting caught in Turkey. They are reaching an area in the middle of the sea, and then they are being handed over to the Egyptian police. We heard about a few Syrian-Palestinians who are now imprisoned in Egypt.

You said that through the desert, whatever happens, you cannot be held responsible. But what about going by the sea? How can you be sure about what might happen? Smugglers themselves handed people over to the Egyptian police.
Smuggler: You have to consider the fact that you are going to be smuggled, and you are not traveling legally. You have to keep in mind all the troubles that can happen. You are not going legally, we are smuggling you. I am not trying to scare you, most of the people that we smuggled have made it there, unless if the person was unlucky – this is something else.

Ibrahim al-Khatib: Just as you are telling me that some people reached safely, I heard of other who drowned, women and children died.
Smuggler: Are you interrogating me or what?

Ibrahim al-Khatib: No, I am not interrogating you; do not get me wrong, but I am paying money and I am traveling with my family. I want to guarantee my safety.
Smuggler: Let me tell you something; if you want to leave, count on God, and leave. But if you keep telling me that this happened to those people and you will keep thinking of that, you will never travel. If you will keep thinking in a negative way, stay in Lebanon.

Ibrahim al-Khatib: My whole point is that I am going with my family, if something happens to me, it will be fine, I will manage, but my wife and children would not be able to survive.
Smuggler: count on God, God will have mercy on them.

Ibrahim al-Khatib: Alright, I will contact you again when I get the money, and think more about it. I am sorry for taking too much of your time. Thank you
Smuggler: No problem, you are welcome.

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Milan 01
Milan
By GC
14 Dec 2014

Milan 2/5/2015: Street Gorizia
An advertisement on the new Dock for Expo 2015 pictured a self-portrait of Leonardo Da Vinci cleverly retouched by writers in the area where redevelopment work.

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Milan 05
Milan
By GC
14 Dec 2014

Milan (Italy) 2/5/2015 Street Gorizia:
The redevelopment works of the new Dock for Expo 2015 that must finish before the opening of Expo 2015 the 5/1/2015.

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Milan 07
Milan
By GC
14 Dec 2014

Milan (Italy) 2/5/2015:
The final design of the new Harbour redevelopment which will be definitively returned to Milan before the opening of Expo 2015 the 5/1/2015.

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Milan 18
Milan
By GC
09 Dec 2014

Milan (Italy) 2/5/2015 piazza XXIV Maggio:
The headquarters of Unicredit Bank in Ticinese and district where a clochard used it as a dormitory at night and a guy crosses with his skateboard.

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Milan 15
Milan
By GC
25 Oct 2014

Milan (Italy) 2/5/2015 Subway station St.Augustine M2:
The green line M2 station of St. Augustine in Milan completely damaged by underground seepage of groundwater elevation. In addition to this, other stops of the same yellow line and are interested in this huge problem.

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Milan 23
Milan
By GC
25 Oct 2014

Milan (Italy) 2/5/2015 Viale Ludovico Scarampo:
Is the new skyscraper Architect Isozaki (on right in photo) a Fiera Milano City, next to the exhibition spaces where many people come to an event and try to disentangle the frantic construction work of the new M5 Metro line that will not be ready for Expo 2015.

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Milan 09
Milan
By GC
24 Oct 2014

Milan (Italy) 2/5/2015 Street Alzaia Naviglio Pavese:
The Alzaia naviglio pavese behind the dock today in these conditions of degradation where it is used as landfill in the evening by the guys who frequent nightclubs. You may notice some ducks in the small channel surrounded by garbage.

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Milan 10
Milan
By GC
24 Oct 2014

Milan (Italy) 2/5/2015 Street Alzaia Naviglio Pavese:
The Alzaia naviglio pavese behind the dock today in these conditions of degradation where it is used as landfill in the evening by the guys who frequent nightclubs.

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The Lake Avernus Vineyards
Pozzuoli
By Piero Castellano
15 Oct 2014

Pozzuoli, Italy

October 15, 2014

While Italy is caught in a seemingly endless economic recession, some people are finding success by turning their backs to the disappointments of modern jobs and reverting to agriculture and traditional activities.

In Pozzuoli, near Naples, a crater lake that ancient Romans considered to be the gate to the Underworld has become the entryway to a new life for descendants of sharecropping farmers, turned producers of amazing wines.

Lake Avernus, one of the many craters of Phlegraean Fields (“Campi Flegrei”, “Burning Fields”) volcano, was so deadly in ancient times that birds flying over it were said to fall dead because of poisonous fumes. An oracle, the Cumaean Sybil, lived in a cave by the lake, and prophesized while intoxicated by exhalations. Later, the Romans used it as a training base for their warships, building temples and thermal baths on the hot springs, the ruins of which still dot the crater. In September 1538 CE a sudden eruption, lasting just one month, raised a new 133-meter tall crater, the Monte Nuovo (“New Mountain”) on the eastern side of the lake. Less than 4 kilometers away, the still active Solfatara crater is a tourist attraction, with its sulfurous fumaroles.

Today, the Lake Avernus area is a lavish green oasis that lies in amid a heavily urbanized area, although sometimes mysterious bubbling kills scores of fish. Joggers and cyclists trail around the lake and on holidays families from nearby Naples flock to the area, part of the natural park “Parco Regionale dei Campi Flegrei”.

Thanks to the fertile volcanic soil and Mediterranean climate, the region is famous for its varietal wines, produced under the Campi Flegrei D.O.C. appellation (“Denominazione di Origine Controllata”, Controlled Designation of Origin). Almost half of the surface inside the Avernus crater is covered with vineyards.

Like much of the Italian farmland, it was neglected and gradually abandoned for decades because farming was not lucrative enough.
For the larger part of the 20th century, Italian governments pursued an industrial development strategy in the region. All that remains of it are an abandoned steel mill that stretches over an enormous area near Naples and an empty information technology facility in Pozzuoli.

Emilio Mirabella and Umberto Guardascione were both children of unrelated families farming vineyards in Lake Avernus, the aristocratic owner of which lived far away and seldom visited it.

Predictably, both Umberto and Emilio chose jobs and ways of life different than those of their parents: while Emilio was fascinated by the sea and became a sailing yacht skipper, Umberto was an electronic technician.

They were doing well, but just before the economic crisis started to ravage the Italian economy, both of them received a call from their respective parents. The owner wanted to sell the land and they were asking for their children’s help to buy it and farm it on their own.

They faced a tough dilemma. Either they let their parents down by abandoning the town where they were born and raised or they had to give up their careers and everything they had done. Emilio had just gotten married and his wife had soon discovered she had seasickness. After a brief heart-wrenching discussion, they decided to sell the boat and buy his father’s share of the land.

“I miss the sea,” the sailor turned winemaker confides. “But this lake is like a small Mediterranean. Here is everything I could wish for.”

For Umberto the choice was easier: “I always loved farming the land and making wine – especially making wine. When I was a boy it wasn’t possible to make a living with it, but when my father called I saw a great opportunity.”

Times had changed indeed and Italian winemaking had gained worldwide appreciation, becoming lucrative and popular. In post-industrial times, the Phlegraean Fields area was trying to preserve what was left of its farming, winemaking and typical food traditions.

The trend led to a rediscovery of farming culture, which included traditional music and dances. Until the 19th century, croppers harvested grapes to the sound of improvising bands. As in many other agricultural societies around the world, the harvest season was also a time for courting. Musicians, who were mostly farmers or croppers themselves, played the romantic “Canti della Vendemmia” (“Harvest Songs”) and were paid with wine.

The winemakers of Lake Avernus are trying to revive these traditions, inviting folk music bands to perform in the vineyards, at the banquets they host and during the harvest.
Meanwhile, the former croppers, now neighbors, began a slow but successful improvement of the vineyard and the wines with the help of professional oenologists.
The vineyards of Lake Avernus have a rare distinction: they are some of the very few wines in the world that survived the devastating “Phylloxera Plague” of mid-19th century, which wiped out most of Europe’s vineyards. The sandy, sulfuric soil of the volcanic crater was too resistant for the vine-killing aphids.

“A few plants were affected, but most survived,” Emilio Mirabella explains.

Both the Mirabella and the Guardascione Vineyards can sport the appellative “historical,” and for a good reason.

“Unlike almost all the vineyards in Europe, we do not need to graft the plants on American vines, to make them resistant to Phylloxera,” he added. Ungrafted vines can live much longer.

“We have been visited by officials from the regional authority recently. They counted more than 1,900 historical plants, some of which are them 150 years old,” Umberto Guardascione, who owns the oldest surviving part of the original vineyard, said proudly.

Lake Avernus wine production is very small; Emilio only produces 4,000 bottles per year and Umberto sells his wine mostly to locals. But both have bigger plans. While Emilio is restoring one of the buildings to offer accommodation, like a real “agriturismo” destination, Umberto has finally accomplished his dream of obtaining a restaurant license to offer his homemade food to visitors.
But the fight through the quagmires of Italian bureaucracy has been exhausting.
“Bureaucracy is the real problem for economy in Italy,” Umberto complains. “After I worked hard to comply with thousands of regulations, an inspector claimed that I was disposing waste frying oil into the lake. In spite of contract and records with a disposal company, I had to pay for a report to prove my regularity.”

Umberto, however, will not give up.

“We will go on. We owe it to our ancestors; we owe it to the land,” he said. “After all, this place has produced wine for thousands of years, nothing could stop us - not even volcanoes.”

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Otro Cielo (Another Sky) - An Uruguay...
Montevideo
By Francesco Pistilli
22 Sep 2014

Another Sky is a journey into Uruguayan daily life at the time of Pepe Mujica, a documentary work focused on social changes taking place in the country. Looking for answers, I drove over 1300km from the capital Montevideo, to the north (the poorest regions) and to the east, to learn the truth about a people who craves change and hope for a new brighter future.
Another Sky is a road-trip along the utopia, through civil rights, rural culture, African religion and alternative lifestyles.

The country's economy currently is growing stronger, but in the remote countryside an old culture seems untouched by globalization. Almost 100 thousand people, Gauchos, Peones or farmers still share the environment with animals. With three cows per person Uruguay, is one of the biggest "meat-economies" in the world; and 75% of the country's exports are agriculture related.

In Montevideo, where about one-third of the country population lives, you find a place where politics and football dominate discussions and social life.

Uruguay is a place where sailors, European immigrants and African slaves left their stories, their incomprehensible melancholy and their different traditions. Uruguay is a "latin hope" spiced with meat, cerveza, Umbanda (an Afro-Brazilian faith) and Socialism.

Photo collection: http://www.transterramedia.com/collections/2678

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Otro Cielo (Another Sky) - An Uruguay...
Montevideo
By Francesco Pistilli
21 Sep 2014

Another Sky is a journey into Uruguayan dailylife at the time of Pepe Mujica, a documentary work focused on social changes taking place in the country. Looking for answers, I drove over 1300km from the capital Montevideo, to the north (the poorest regions) and to the east, to learn the truth about a people who craves change and hope for a new brighter future.
Another Sky is a road-trip along the utopia, through civil rights, rural culture, african religion and alternative lifestyles.

The country's economy currently is growing stronger, but in the remote countryside an old culture seems untouched by globalization. Almost 100 thousand people, Gauchos, Peones or farmers still share the environment with animals. With three cows per person Uruguay, is one of the biggest "meat-economies" in the world; and 75% of the country's exports are agriculture related.

In Montevideo, where about one-third of the country population lives, you find a place where politics and football dominate discussions and social life.

Uruguay is a place where sailors, European immigrants and African slaves left their stories, their incomprehensible melancholy and their different traditions. Uruguay is a "latin hope" spiced with meat, cerveza, Umbanda (an Afro-Brazilian faith) and Socialism.

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Lake Avernus Vineyards 22
Rampa I Averno, 80078 Pozzuoli, Naples, Italy
By Piero Castellano
16 Sep 2014

Pozzuoli (Italy): The Lake Avernus crater with the vineyards visible in the foreground. The slope visible on the left is the Monte Nuovo, a volcanic cone that sprouted with a furious eruption in only one month, in 1538 CE. (Photo by Piero Castellano)