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Riace michele-cirillo-16
Riace
By Mike
11 Apr 2016

Antonio, 52, 40 years of work at the "Bar Gervasi" in the main square of Riace. Like many Riace inhabitants sees the arrival of immigrants in a positive way in his country.

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Riace michele-cirillo-17
Riace
By Mike
11 Apr 2016

Inside the embroidery workshop where Caterina, a volunteer of Citt‡ Futura (on the left) embroidered with Tahira, from Afghanistan and from two years in Riace with her two sons.

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Riace michele-cirillo-18
Riace
By Mike
11 Apr 2016

Sandro Lucano, 50, is the younger brother of the mayor. He along with other friends, helped to incorporate Domenico in the Civic List that elected him mayor. Sandro has three sons and is currently unemployed.

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Riace michele-cirillo-19
Riace
By Mike
11 Apr 2016

Mirella, 32, is a Romanian girl from 10 years lives in Riace. Before working in the bar of her husband in Riace, she was breeding cows in one of the Calabrian countryside. Now she has two wonderful sons aged 4 and 7 years: Cosimo and Maria Cosimina.

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Riace michele-cirillo-20
Riace
By Mike
11 Apr 2016

The sewing workshop where Selma from Somalia work, Fthacuit from Eritrea and Zahra Afghanistan.

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Riace michele-cirillo-21
Riace
By Mike
11 Apr 2016

Mohammed, 38, comes from Iran. From 4 months it works with restructuring the homes of immigrants in Riace.

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Riace michele-cirillo-22
Riace
By Mike
11 Apr 2016

In Riace also live many under age children, for them there's an a football field and a playground that allow fun and active recreation, besides schools and many educational activities.

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Riace
By Mike
11 Apr 2016

An Eritrean boy carrying groceries on his bike through the streets of Riace.

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Riace michele-cirillo-24
Riace
By Mike
11 Apr 2016

A view of Riace Superiore. Inside its village there are more than 30 houses given to families and to individual immigrants of all nationalities. Many people are worried about the future of the country, wondering until when it'll be possible to maintain this level of integration and development that is good for both immigrants and citizens of the small town.

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Hannibal Kadhafi Files
Tripoli, Libya
By mchreyteh
17 Dec 2015

In August 2011, a group of militiamen, who were fighting against the Libyan president Mummer Kadhafi, entered the house of Kadhafi’s youngest son, Hannibal, in Tripoli, and found a tablet device which they believe was his personal device.

The device was turned over to a group of media activists in Tripoli, who examined the content. On the device they found thousands of photos and videos, including personal and family images. In a folder titled “Bosleem” there were videos that appeared to show prisoners being tortured during questioning, and photos of what are believed to be prisoners including their names, some appearing to be injured. The content also included Word documents and power point presentations some of which are encrypted.

The media activists have posted on social media a number of photos of Hannibal Kadhadi and his family, and several videos of prisoners being tortured. The activists group says one of its members was kidnapped and his fate remains unknown. Since then they have felt that they are in danger and have had to change locations frequently. They decided to move the content of the device outside of Libya. They contacted Lebanese journalist Mohamad Chreyteh, and one the the activists travelled to Lebanon in 2014 and gave the journalist the content.

Mr. Chreyteh says he has been working on organizing and verifying the content over the last year. He says he decided to make some of the content public on Sunday December 13, 2015, after hearing news that Hannibal Kadhafi is being held in detention. Kadhafi was turned over to Lebanese Internal Security official by gunmen who had seized him in Baalbek on Thursday December 10. Kadhafi is under investigation and official are trying to determine if he can be put on trial in Lebanon, in connection with the disappearance in Libya of Lebanese Shiaa spiritual leader and founder of the Amal Party, Moussa al-Sadr, in 1978.

The content includes many items that have not yet been made public:

  • More than 700 photos and videos, of Hannibal Kadhafi, his wife, children, homes, yacht, private jet and international travels.
  • More than 1700 photos and names of who are believed to be detainees held at Bosleem prison in Tripoli.
  • More than 50 video clips showing what appears to be the interrogation and torture of prisoners.
  • More than 35 documents including letters from investigators in Kadhafi’s security forces to senior officials, lists with names of wanted people, lists with names of detainees, lists with names of people recommended to be set free, notes detailing prisoner interrogations, letter from a senior military police official to a senior judge.
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Family Photo (089)
tripoli
By mchreyteh
15 Dec 2015

Hannibal Kadhafi and his Lebanese born wife Aline Skaf in what is believed to be their home.

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Doc 1
tripoli
By mchreyteh
15 Dec 2015

A portion of a lengthy undated document from 2011, that appears to be a report by a Libyan security official to a superior on the uprising against the Kadhafi regime in 2011.
The subject "Summary of the current incidents based on investigations of detainees".
The report says that what it refers to as the 'conspiracy', started in Benghazi on February 7, 2011, blaming it on what are called "crusader countries" including the US, France, Italy, and the UK.
The report goes on to also blame Arab countries including Qatar, UAE and the Arab League, as well as external opposition and "internal traitors".

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Doc 2
tripoli
By mchreyteh
15 Dec 2015

This is a of a portion of an undated document from 2011, that appears to be a reply by a Libyan security official to a letter from his superior dated May 18 2011. The document appears to be a report of interrogations of prisoners who have identified other people as participants in the uprising against the Kadhafi regime.

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Doc 3
tripoli
By mchreyteh
15 Dec 2015

A portion of a document dated June 24, 2011, that appears to be a list of detainees at the 'central prison', believed to be Bosleem Prison. The document lists the names of 385 prisoners showing their file number, nationality, and location and date of their apprehension.

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Doc 4
tripoli
By mchreyteh
15 Dec 2015

A portion of an undated document from 2011, that appears to be a letter by a Libyan security officer to a superior, accusing a police officer named Sufian Fawzi al-Seid al-Zarkani, of participating in the uprising against the Kadhafi regime.
The report also claims that the officer hid members of the opposition in his house, and did not allow his family to watch Libyan state television and instead allowed them to watch external channels such as al-Jazeera and al-Arabiya.

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Circus Pays Tribute to Icon Moira Orfei
Brescia, Italy
By Cosimo Attanasio
16 Nov 2015

Video shows the performers of the famous Circus Orfei paying tribute to Moira Orfei, known as the queen of the Italian circus, after she passed away on November 15, during the circus' tour in Brescia, Italy.
Moira Orfei was an undisputed icon of the circus. She also appeared in many movies with Mastroianni, Gassman, Toto, Sordi and Monicelli.
Despite the grief, on November 16th, her family run the show in Brescia with their usual professionalism, at the end of which a long applause paid homage to the "Queen".

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Pagi: the Migrant Football Team in Italy
Sassari, Sardinia
By Alice Sassu
15 Nov 2015

Pagi is a migrant soccer team in Saridinia, one of the poorest regions in Italy, but a place where migrants were welcomed by immigration centers as a response to the immigrants’ needs, mostly boys from Sub-Saharan Africa.
 All asylum seekers want to find a job, however it is very difficult for them to do so in one of the poorest regions of Italy. For this reason the Cooperative decided to create this team to motivate and help these boys, who fled from wars, hunger and poverty that find themselves playing around a ball.
In Sassari, north of Sardinia, one of these centers called "Centro di Prima Accoglienza di Predda Niedda" created the football club ASD PAGI to help with the integration of young migrant boys.
Later, this club was officially registered in the second amateurs league. This is the first case in Italy in which a football club, entirely composed of immigrants without a residence permit and seeking international protection, has obtained from the FGC (Italian Football Federation) authorization to participate in the regional championship.
The immigration center was a hotel before, and it was called "Hotel Pagi". Nowadays, it is managed by the Cooperative ASD which created the football club ASD PAGI. It is the new home of approximately three hundred boys, most of whom come from different Sub-Saharan African countries like Nigeria, Gambia, Senegal, Togo and Mali. All of them are waiting the result of the Territorial Commission; the process can be concluded with the recognition of refugee status or subsidiary protection status, or a rejection, against which the applicant may appeal.

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Pagi: the Migrant Football Team in Italy
Sassari, Sardinia
By Alice Sassu
15 Nov 2015

ShortDoc by Alice Sassu and Francesco Pistilli
A positive story of sports and integration coming from Sardinia, Sassari. Boys who fled from wars, hunger and poverty have ended up playing with a ball.

In Sardinia, one of the poorest regions in Italy, migrants are welcomed at immigration centres as a response to their emergency condition. The former "Hotel Pagi", located in the industrial area of the city, is now the "Centro di Prima Accoglienza di Predda Niedda", directed by the ASD Cooperative. Pierpaolo Cermelli, Fabiana Denurra and a cultural mediator, named Ali Bouchouata, have decided to create a football team to motivate the young boys and to promote their social integration. The "ASD Pagi" team, coached by Mauro Fanti, faces now the final stages of the championship, in the second regional division.

For the first time in the Italian history, an immigration centre gets approval from the Italian Football Game Federation to participate in a regional football league with a team entirely comprised by asylum seekers, waiting for a residence permission.

The centre homes approximately three hundred young people from different countries in sub-Saharan Africa (such as Nigeria, Gambia, Senegal, Togo, Mali). Some of these people ran away from family feuds, religious conflicts and dictatorial governments. Some others found themselves without a family, or are simply looking to change their "luck". But they all dream with starting a new life in Europe.

Pending on the resolution of the Territorial Commission, these asylum seekers follow the legal steps of a process that will finish with one the following possible outcomes: a recognition of their refugee status, a subsidiary or humanitarian protection, or their deportation. The bureaucracy is way too slow, and the majority of them must wait at least two or three years to know their fate. Meanwhile, some of them try to defy the football teams of one of the poorest regions of Italy.

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PAGI Migrant Football Team 13
Sassari; Sardinia
By Alice Sassu
15 Nov 2015

After traveling thousands of miles across multiple countries, the players of ASD Pagi use their soccer matches as a temporary escape and a way to forget that they are still in search of a permanent home. Running on their dusty field with their teammates offers a sense of freedom and, perhaps more importantly, a temporary family.

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PAGI Migrant Football Team 04
Sassari; Sardinia
By Alice Sassu
15 Nov 2015

Compared to other regional teams, ASD Pagi sometimes struggles to practice before the season begins. At the season opener, they played on their home field but lost.

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PAGI Migrant Football Team 15
Sassari; Sardinia
By Alice Sassu
08 Nov 2015

With Sardinia already one of Italy's poorest regions, it i€™s challenging for refugees to find a job. Sometimes they are reduced to begging for change from passerby.

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PAGI Migrant Football Team 02
Sassari; Sardinia
By Alice Sassu
06 Nov 2015

Part of the all-migrant football team living inside an immigration centre in a suburb of Sassari, in Sardinia, Italy. Sometimes the ASD Pagi football club organizes friendly games with other teams composed of refugees at other immigration centres.

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PAGI Migrant Football Team 16
Sassari; Sardinia
By Alice Sassu
05 Nov 2015

Mujeeb Adebisi, 19 years-old, from Nigeria. Mujeed was football player in his country. Mujeed lost his sister in a car accident in which he was the driver. After her death he faced many problems in the neighbourhood and had to leave. Mujeeb during his journey north he has passed through Niger before arriving in Libya. In Libya he was kidnapped and had to live for two months in a small room with many other refugees. Mujeeb is a new player for the all-refugee football club "ASD Pagi".

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PAGI Migrant Football Team 21
Sassari; Sardinia
By Alice Sassu
29 Oct 2015

Part of the Nigerian team on the bench. Sometimes the ASD Pagi football club organizes friendly games with another team composed of others migrants hosted in the same Immigration Centre.

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PAGI Migrant Football Team 25
Sassari; Sardinia
By Alice Sassu
29 Oct 2015

Sometimes ASD Pagi will play other teams composed of refugees. For Orobosa Andrew, an ASD player, and Collins, a fellow refugee playing on another team, it’s a chance to reconnect.

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PAGI Migrant Football Team 14
Sassari; Sardinia
By Alice Sassu
27 Oct 2015

At €œCentro di Prima Accoglienza di Predda Niedda, Nigerian boys are playing football on the lay-by. There are almost 100 Nigerians inside this centre. Most of them have received the first negative response by the Territorial Commission. The process can be concluded with the recognition of refugee status, subsidiary protection status, or a rejection, against which the applicant may appeal.

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PAGI Migrant Football Team 11
Sassari; Sardinia
By Alice Sassu
24 Oct 2015

Konate Adama, 18, is from Ivory Coast. Adama lost his parents during the Ivory Coast war (2011). He lived with his uncle, however when he decided to sell the land of the family, Adama and his brother refused and they had to escape. He left his country and in his journey crossed Burkina Faso, Niger until to Libya.

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PAGI Migrant Football Team 08
Sassari; Sardinia
By Alice Sassu
24 Oct 2015

ASD Pagi home open was a tough game, mainly because the team had only been able to begin training one month before the beginning of the season.

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PAGI Migrant Football Team 05
Sassari; Sardinia
By Alice Sassu
19 Oct 2015

Nigerian boys on the lay-by of the Centre. The day after, they had to play with the official football club Pagi. Sometimes the ASD Pagi football club organizes friendly games with another team composed of other migrants hosted in the same Immigration Centre.

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PAGI Migrant Football Team 09
Sassari; Sardinia
By Alice Sassu
19 Oct 2015

18 year-­old Yousuf Lawal and 20 year-­old Victory Fgene both traveled to Italy via Libya from Nigeria. Victory'€™s mother was killed by his father, he said. Today, he is ASD Pagi's best player.

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PAGI Migrant Football Team 17
Sassari; Sardinia
By Alice Sassu
17 Oct 2015

Part of the ASD Pagi team on the bench. They played at home and lost the game. The team began training only a month before the beginning of the regional football league season.

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PAGI Migrant Football Team 22
Sassari; Sardinia
By Alice Sassu
17 Oct 2015

The team'™s matches draw in a mix of local and refugee spectators. For many of the migrants housed at the center, waiting is a common activity as €”they cannot€™ leave the center for more than two days at a time and cannot™ look for work until their applications for refugee or protected status are approved.

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PAGI Migrant Football Team 24
Sassari; Sardinia
By Alice Sassu
16 Oct 2015

Part of the Nigerian team on the bench. Sometimes the ASD Pagi football club organizes friendly games with another team composed of others migrants hosted in the same Immigration Centre.

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PAGI Migrant Football Team 23
Sassari; Sardinia
By Alice Sassu
15 Oct 2015

Asylum seekers on the field in Caniga, a suburb of Sassari, where they train and will play the championship match.

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PAGI Migrant Football Team 01
Sassari; Sardinia
By Alice Sassu
15 Oct 2015

Many of the team members have traveled a long way to get here. Yusuf Lawal spent two months in transit to reach Italy.

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PAGI Migrant Football Team 19
Sassari; Sardinia
By Alice Sassu
10 Oct 2015

Cinthya Collins nursing her baby during a match of Pagi's football club at the home field. Cinthya was hosted in an immigration centre in the South of Sardinia while she was pregnant and her husband Collins was living at the centre in Sassari. The baby will be born in Sassari this July and now they are living all together in Sassari. Collins is a player at Pagi's football club.

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PAGI Migrant Football Team 03
Sassari; Sardinia
By Alice Sassu
10 Oct 2015

Scifo Mohamed Diallo inside the immigration centre. Scifo, 19 years-old, is from Conarky, Guinea. He lost his entire family during the stadium massacre in September 2009. The massacre was lead by military junta Captain Moussa Dadis Camara. Security forces raped, killed, and wounded protesters during a protest rally in the stadium. Scifo survived, living on the streets in Senegal fro two years until he decided to start the long journey to Libya. After two years working in Libya, he planned the journey by boat to Europe. Now, Scifo is waiting for the result of the Territorial Commission and plays in the Pagi football club.

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PAGI Migrant Football Team 06
Sassari; Sardinia
By Alice Sassu
10 Oct 2015

Mousa Balde, 18 years old, from Senegal and Omar Kartu, 18 years old, from Gambia are members of the football club Asd Pagi. Mousa left his country for religious issues. All of his community is Muslim but his mother and Mousa are Christians and their lives were in danger. Like most people from Gambia, Omar has had political problems with the military government of Yahya Jammeh. His brother is in the military and did something the regime is angry with and they were no longer safe.

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PAGI Migrant Football Team 07
Sassari; Sardinia
By Alice Sassu
10 Oct 2015

Mousa Balde, 18, fled Senegal because he said his family'€™s Christian faith was not tolerated in their predominantly Muslim community. Omar Kartu, also 18, fled the Gambia when his brother, a member of the national military, ran afoul of the country'€™s dictator Yahya Jammeh, he said.

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PAGI Migrant Football Team 20
Sassari; Sardinia
By Alice Sassu
09 Oct 2015

Alhagie Amadou Jallow, 24 years old, was born in Gambia. One day, he was kidnapped by secret agents in Gambia, tortured, and accused of being part of the regime's opposition. Alhagie was kidnapped by secret agents in Gambia, tortured, and accused of being part of the regime's opposition. They had recorded a chat with a friend where he was talking about the regime. Gambia’s president Yahya Jammeh is frequently accused of human rights abuses, extra-judicial killings, torture and the muzzling of journalists. Jallo escaped and started the long journey to Libya and later to Europe. In Sicily he was accused of being a smuggler only because he was helping to save the lives of everyone on the boat. Jallo lived for some months in a jail in Sicily and was then released and transferred to the immigration centre in Sassari. Now, Jallo is waiting for the recognition of international protection, he knows a little Italian and he is helping the coach by translating in English, French, Mandinka and Wolof for all the players.