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A Village Divided Between Lebanon and...
Dhaira
By wissam fanash
03 Jan 2015

Various elder residents of a Lebanese village on the border with Israel tell the story of how their village and families came to be divided by the creation of Israel in 1948. Part of the Aramsha clan, their lands included four of five villages that lay on both side of the future Lebanese-Israeli border prior to 1948. Today, they live in constant surveillance (a drone can be seen in the video) and are separated from their kin living in Israel by tank patrols, barbed wire and land mines. One resident speaks of how she lost her leg to a land mine laid by Israelis when attempting to attend her father's funeral on the other side of the border. Since she can no longer obtain a permit to visit her relatives, it has been 20 years since she last saw her family.

SHOTLIST AND TRANSCRIPT

Various of Fakhri Fanash with grandchildren walking in garden
Various of Israeli armored vehicles driving along Israeli-Lebanese border

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Fakhri Fanash, Dignitary of Aramsha Clan
01:26 – 04:49

“We are part of the Aramsha clan, which live in about four or five villages. This is Dhaira; over there are the villages of Idmith, Iribbin and Jordeh. We are all cousins, brothers and relatives. The lands that can be seen within the occupied territories are ours. I can name them: over there is Safra, Bater, Jordeh, Jrad Moussa; this Khallet al-Adas or Khallet al-Saheb. All of these lands were ours. We were part of one tribe. The Israeli invasion, or colonialism, divided this land. Some people are here in Dhaira – about one quarter [of the clan] and three quarters stayed there. There were four brothers, two of whom stayed there and two came here.

After 1948, they [Israelis] started annexing lands and [planting] mines and barbed wires. They set up the land the way they wanted. They took this part of the land.
In the Lebanese part of these territories, which is still with us, there are landmines over there where these olive trees are planted.

Behind Jordeh there is a cemetery, called the Aramsha Cemetery. This was both ours and theirs. You see, when my grandfather died, people were crying. There was a Lebanese Army patrol to keep people apart. All of our relatives from Palestine came to the cemetery, but we were about two meters away from each other. When the Army saw that people were crying and concerned for each other, it allowed people from both sides to come together. There were no barbed wires or landmines in that spot. All people came together, and the funeral became like a wedding because people were able to reunite.

Look at that patrol [DRONE CAN BE SEEN IN THE SKY]. It goes on day and night. There are also armored vehicles and tanks. We have property deeds form the Ottoman era that prove [our ownership over] the land that you can see in front of you, which is vast. We have documents written by the notary of Acre. During peace negotiations between Lebanon and the Israeli enemy, the ministry of foreign affairs asked us to present these papers, which we did. Afterwards, things went bad among Arab countries and we did not get anything from this.”

Wide of Israeli patrol
Wide/ zoom out of Fakhri Fanash’s grandchildren watch Israeli armored vehicle on other side of the border.
Various of Khairiya al-Moghais walking

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman) Khairiya al-Moghais, Aramsha Clan Member

05: 14 – 09:05

“This is my sister [SHOWING PHOTOS]. These are my brother and his wife. This is also my brother and his wife. And this is my daughter.

It has been about 20 years. I used to visit them before, using a permit. Now I cannot go anywhere. I have not seen her for 20 years. This is also my brother. This is my daughter and this is my other daughter. When I see [their photo] I cry. I wish I could meet them.

I left my parents and ran away to Lebanon when I met my husband. I stayed at my sister’s, and then they took me to Beirut. I was sentenced to one month [in prison].

I have not seen my parents for 40 years.

Interviewer: Are you not communicating with them?
- No Interviewer: You do not know what is happening to them either?
- No, no. They forbid them… we used to shout to each other, but since the liberation we have not dared to talk to them. They do not dare to talk with us either.
Interviewer: Who is preventing you from doing that?
- We are scared. We are scared here. We do not dare. And over there, [Israeli] patrols guard the barbed wire.

I once heard an announcement over the loud speaker coming from the village of Jordeh. I thought my father died. I stepped on a wire. I was not thinking of the wire, I was only thinking of my father. I heard a sound and I thought I had stepped on a metal can. I did not realize it was a landmine. I walked a bit further and the landmine went off. I fell on the ground. I saw that my leg was cut off. I started to scream and people came in a hurry from Dhaira and from the other side, but people could not talk to each other.

I was lying in the middle; Israel was on this side and Lebanon on the other. Then they carried me away.

I stayed on the floor. I then extended my hand to a soldier from a patrol because I was in a lot of pain. I wanted him to lift me. He waved his hand as if to say “no.” They removed the landmines then took me in an ambulance.

I wish I could see my family and daughters before I… Then, I would not care if I died… All my relatives and family… we were all living together happily. Nobody did anything to us. This is our life.”

Wide of Israeli military post
Wide/ traveling of Israeli Humvee driving on other side of border
Wide of United Nation border demarcation barrel
Wide of territory across barbed wires
Various of landmine warning signs
Close up of flour/ demarcation barrel in background
Wide of car moving on other side of the Israeli border
Wide of Israeli military post
Various of landmine warning signs and border fence
Traveling of Jordeh, a village inhabited by Aramsha clan and held by Israel
Various of Israeli military transmission tower
Traveling of United Nations helicopter
Traveling of village Mazraat al-Aramsha, a village inhabited by Aramsha clan and controlled by Israel
Wide of woman walking by border fence on the Israeli side
Various of trees
Wide of houses on Israeli side of the border
Wide of children and cattle on Israeli side of border
Wide of landmine warning sign
Various of children on side of border

NAT Sound (Arabic) conversation across the border
-We are from Palestine. - What is your name? -Mohammad. - Mohammad what? -[UNINTELLIGIBLE] -Mohammad what? -Mohammad Jomaa. We are Arabs, not Jews. - Who are you? -Ahmad -Omar, Ali, Ahmad, Hammoudi, Lyn”

Children on Lebanese side waving the Palestinian flag.
Wide of Israeli Humvee driving by

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Palestine- when a school is illegal 12
Khan Al Ahmar, Palestine
By Vinciane Jacquet
16 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014
Khan Al-Ahmar, Palestine

The straw and mud structure of the school is not solid. Inside the classrooms, the walls have been starting to fall apart.

While lack of funds is one reason for the poor structure of the school, the other major factor is an Israeli law banning the use of cement for construction by Palestinians in Area C of the West Bank. The school is located in Area C, which is the part of the West Bank under total Israeli military control.

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Palestine- when a school is illegal 07
Khan Al Ahmar, Palestine
By Vinciane Jacquet
16 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014
Khan Al-Ahmar, Palestine

The school of Khan Al-Ahmar has classes from grades 1 to 9. Children from five different Bedouin communities attend classes there. Every year, their number grows. There were 120 children for the 2013-2014 school year. In September 2014, 146 came to register.

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Palestine- when a school is illegal 08
Khan Al Ahmar, Palestine
By Vinciane Jacquet
16 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014
Khan Al-Ahmar, Palestine

English class for 3rd grade children. All the children are eager to learn. They want to keep studying after the 9th grade, and often want to become doctor or lawyers because there are no medical or legal services in their community. While medical services are a basic essential for any community, legal services are significant to the West Bank Bedouin because they need lawyers to help them battle eviction orders from Israeli courts and the Israeli Army.

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Palestine- when a school is illegal 01
Khan Al Ahmar, Palestine
By Vinciane Jacquet
16 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014.
Khan Al-Ahmar, Palestine.

Teachers run in the rain between their classrooms and the "teachers room" to bring handouts for their students.

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Palestine- when a school is illegal 10
Khan Al Ahmar, Palestine
By Vinciane Jacquet
15 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014
Khan Al-Ahmar, Palestine

Children in the 8th grade studying, with the shape of the tires appearing in the wall. The goal of many of the students is often to enter into a profession that is not represented in their community, like medical or legal.

Every year the school administration goes to court in order to postpone the demolition of the institution. So far, they have managed to avoid a final demolition, but the orders remain, and it is uncertain how much longer the school will remain.

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Palestine- when a school is illegal 13
Khan Al Ahmar, Palestine
By Vinciane Jacquet
15 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014
Khan Al-Ahmar, Palestine

Every time it rains, the classrooms get wet and humid, and the water leaks into where the students sit. There is also no heater for the cold winter of the desert.

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Palestine- when a school is illegal 11
Khan Al Ahmar, Palestine
By Vinciane Jacquet
15 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014
Khan Al-Ahmar, Palestine

Harema Zhaeqq is the headmaster of the school. She is highly respected by the teachers, as they say that she is always able to find the necessary furniture for the classes, by canvassing companies in Palestine and abroad. Some companies in Palestine are hesitant to donate, because they fear sanctions from Israel. However, Ms. Zhaeqq is usually able to convince them anyway. Here, she stands beside the supplies for science classes.

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Palestine- when a school is illegal 09
Khan Al Ahmar, Palestine
By Vinciane Jacquet
15 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014
Khan Al-Ahmar, Palestine

English class. The children study with bowls on the tables to capture the rain falling into the classrooms.

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Palestine- when a school is illegal 05
Khan Al Ahmar, Palestine
By Vinciane Jacquet
15 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014
Khan Al-Ahmar, Palestine

Two young girls are go to class amidst murals used to add color to the otherwise mundane surroundings.

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Palestine- when a school is illegal 03
Khan Al Ahmar, Palestine
By Vinciane Jacquet
15 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014
Khan Al-Ahmar, Palestine

Children have to buy their notebooks and school supplies themselves. However, when a family is too poor to pay for school supplies, the teachers gather money to cover the child's expenses.

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Palestine- when a school is illegal 02
Khan Al Ahmar, Palestine
By Vinciane Jacquet
15 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014
Khan Al-Ahmar, Palestine

Recreation time at the school. A young boy strikes a pose for the camera.

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Palestine- when a school is illegal 15
Khan Al Ahmar, Palestine
By Vinciane Jacquet
15 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014
Khan Al-Ahmar, Palestine

A young student runs back to class after playtime. The recreation area is muddy and wet due to heavy rain. The teachers wish the children could have a better space to play in because the ground is not suitable for child recreation.

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Palestine- when a school is illegal 14
Khan Al Ahmar, Palestine
By Vinciane Jacquet
15 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014
Khan Al-Ahmar, Palestine

The school playground for the Bedouin children of Khan Al-Ahmar is built of tires, mud, and other scrap materials.

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Palestine- when a school is illegal 06
Khan Al Ahmar, Palestine
By Vinciane Jacquet
15 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014
Khan Al-Ahmar, Palestine

Signs are made visible outside of the classrooms to thank the public sponsors of the school. While thankful for the funds, the headmaster pointed out that funds are limited and they only receive funds from the European Union and Italy.

Tents and tombstones- israeli bedouin...
Araqib
By Vinciane Jacquet
11 Nov 2014

November 12, 2014. Al Araqib, Israel.

The men of Al Araqib pray. They say they want a normal life, and they just want to make their area beautiful. "The government just wants to gather the maximum of Arabs in the minimum of land. But we have our history here. We won't leave".

Tents and tombstones- israeli bedouin...
Araqib
By Vinciane Jacquet
11 Nov 2014

November 12, 2014. Al Araqib, Israel.

Aziz, chief of the village (center):

"When the Israeli government started, in 1997, the new ministry 'Department of Negev and Galilee', headed by Shimon Peres, we thought that maybe the situation would change because Peres was a Nobel prize man. However instead, every year, from 1999 and until 2003, they sprayed us with Round Up weed killer. [They killed] the grass and over 200 sheep, 16 Arab horses and 2 camels. They want to kill the relationship between the Bedouins and the land".

Tents and tombstones- israeli bedouin...
Araqib
By Vinciane Jacquet
11 Nov 2014

November 12, 2014. Al Araqib, Israel.

Sally is the wife of the mayor. Gathered in the plastic tarp are all of their belongings, included cooking utensils and a little bit of food, like canned tuna.

Tents and tombstones- israeli bedouin...
Araqib
By Vinciane Jacquet
11 Nov 2014

November 12, 2014. Al Araqib, Israel.

The cemetery area of Al Turi is empty of animals. The Bedouins there only own 3 horses and a few ducks and chickens. They used to have sheep and camels. The sheep have been killed and the camels confiscated. Once, a camel caused a car accident. Since then, as soon as the soldiers see a camel in the desert, they take it and bring it to a "camel farm" that they have opened. They keep the camel there one month and send us the bill for the food and care. If we cannot pay after this month, the camel is lost forever. And they then sell us the camel milk that we love so much.

Tents and tombstones- israeli bedouin...
Araqib
By Vinciane Jacquet
11 Nov 2014

November 12, 2014. Al Araqib, Israel.

Sally:

"Before Israel chased us away, we worked, cultivated our land, had sheep, chickens, vegetables, trees. Our home was very simple, but we had everything, including a kitchen and toilets. Today we have nothing, we cannot take a shower everyday. They made the area and our homes illegal. Because Israel says our way of life is not normal. I asked [the Israelis], how can I make my home legal? [They had] no answer."

Tents and tombstones- israeli bedouin...
Araqib
By Vinciane Jacquet
11 Nov 2014

November 12, 2014. Al Araqib, Israel.

The entrance of Al Turi cemetary in Al Araqib. 22 families used to live here. Since July 27th, 2010, the " Black Day" as the Bedouins call it, only 12 people are still living in Al Araqib, confined in the graveyard. The "Black Day" is the day where the village was totally demolished by the Israeli army. They came at 4am, destroyed 65 houses, uprooted 4.500 olive trees and 700 fruit trees and killed dozens of chickens.

Tents and tombstones- israeli bedouin...
Araqib
By Vinciane Jacquet
11 Nov 2014

November 12, 2014. Al Araqib, Israel.

Maryam is the dean of Al Araqib. She has suffered all kinds of harassment since 1948 at the hands of the Israeli army and various Zionist gangs. In her lifetime, Israeli authorities or vigilanties have destroyed or vandalized her home and land more than 70 times (33 of those raids took place after 2010).

Tents and tombstones- israeli bedouin...
Araqib
By Vinciane Jacquet
11 Nov 2014

November 12, 2014. Al Araqib, Israel.

Saba plays with her daughter Araqib before she begins cooking dinner. Saba says: "I do nothing during the day except watching to see if the police or soldiers are coming so I can hide everything that wouldn't be already hidden among the graves".

Tents and tombstones- israeli bedouin...
Araqib
By Vinciane Jacquet
11 Nov 2014

November 12, 2014. Al Araqib, Israel.

The last time the army came to Al Araqib's cemetery was October 14, 2014. They took fridges and cars. Now the men live under the trees and sleep in the 2 cars that are left.

Tents and tombstones- israeli bedouin...
Araqib
By Vinciane Jacquet
11 Nov 2014

November 12, 2014. Al Araqib, Israel.

Saba lives in the graveyard with her husband, daughter, brothers, sisters, and grand-mother. Everyday, she hides all of their belongings among the graves to prevent the soldiers from confiscating them. Then, when night comes, she goes to take the carpets and blankets so the family can sleep.

Tents and tombstones- israeli bedouin...
Araqib
By Vinciane Jacquet
11 Nov 2014

November 12, 2014. Al Araqib, Israel.

Araqib is 2 years old and a half. She is the youngest inhabitant of the graveyard of Al Araqib. She has been named after the village.

Tents and tombstones- israeli bedouin...
Araqib
By Vinciane Jacquet
11 Nov 2014

November 12, 2014. Al Araqib, Israel.

The three youngest children of Al Araqib from left to right: Araqib (2 1/2), Mohamed (14) and Khaled (12). Mohamed and Khaled go by foot to school everyday in the recognized Bedouin village of Rahat.

Tents and tombstones- israeli bedouin...
Araqib
By Vinciane Jacquet
11 Nov 2014

November 12, 2014. Al Araqib, Israel.

On July 12th, 2014, after the Israeli army came and destroyed everything around the graveyard, they set up a military zone in the Negev, not far from Al Araqib. Police and army were present 24/7.

In September, the police left. Aziz, the chief of the village describes the current situation:

"They still come from time to time, look at what's happening and leave. Sometimes, they destroy something, took our clothes, blankets, carpets and any personal belonging."

Tents and tombstones- israeli bedouin...
Araqib
By Vinciane Jacquet
11 Nov 2014

November 12, 2014. Al Araqib, Israel.

In June 2014, the two families that are still living in Al Araqib decided to move into the graveyard. Before that, they actually lived next to it, but the army came anyway and destroyed everything they could. However, according to Aziz, the chief of the family, "the graves are like a border. The police don't intervene".

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West Bank Bedouins Face Eviction
Tubas
By Seth Herald
15 Oct 2014

October 16, 2014
Tubas, Jordan Valley, West Bank

The Tuobas region of the northern Jordan Valley is home to around 600 Bedouin families, all of them sheep herders and farmers, who are now being slowly forced off their land by encroaching Israeli settlements and military installations. Bedouins throughout the Central West Bank and the Jordan Valley face what is known as a “ Push Factor”, in which restrictions of movement are imposed, dictating where they can graze their animals, and permits to build solid structure housing are routinely rejected. The bedouin, some %60 of them children, currently live in tents without running water and working electricity. They instead rely on solar power for their basic needs. Having witnessed settler violence and having been targeted during Israeli military training, the bedouin of the Northern Jordan Valley lead a rough life, "Everyday they are building new houses and a university and always increasing but we can't build anything. One day the soldiers and settlers came to us and said: ‘as far as my eyes can see I’d like it to be without you there'", explained bedouin shepherd Mohammed Awad. According to UN OCHA, 540,000 Israelis settlers live in the West Bank settlements, which were built illegally and against international law. They receive preferential treatment in terms of the allocation of land and the planning and provision of services. With the forceful relocation and mass evictions of Bedouin communities, up to 12,000 families will be moved to the dedicated relocation site. Bedouins could face a difficult time learning to coupe with each other, as each group holds it own way of life and traditions.

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Inconvenient to all, West Bank Bedouins
West Bank, Israel
By Transterra Editor
03 Oct 2013

The Arab al-Jahalin is the biggest bedouin community that lives in the West Bank Area called E-1, part of the Area C, where Israel retains control over security as well as planning and zoning, and holds strategic significance for further expansion of illegal Israeli settlements, approved by the last Israeli government even if they are considered illegal by International laws. Following the 1948 conflict, the majority of the Negev Bedouin were forcibly evicted from their ancestral lands in the Negev by the Israeli authorities. Clans from five of the Negev tribes subsequently moved to the West Bank and registered as refugees with UNRWA. Forced to abandon nomadism and become permanent, the Palestinian Bedouin living in the Jerusalem periphery are now in a very poor, dramatic and emergency situation. In the last 15 years the Bedouin communities have been subject to demolition, requisition of cattle, attacks by settlers, aimed to get away from the area.
But despite this, the communities have shown determination and unbelievable resilience, who led the Israeli military authorities to draw up a "plan of relocation" so-called Nuweimeh Plan, which seeks to solve the ‘Bedouin problem’ by relocating the approximately 2300 Bedouins of the E1-zone to a town named Nuweimeh near Jericho. The lands of Nuweimeh, however is unsuitable for the animals to graze, and in addition there is no job opportunities, which is why the Bedouins who already are settled there live almost solely on UN food parcels. By the other side, the Palestinian Authorities do not provide any significant support to these communities, which are considered as a second class population.

By: Giuliano Camarda

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Bedouin in North Sinai
Egypt
By Virginie Nguyen
22 Sep 2013

Ibrahim Abu Elayah, a bedouin chief Aldhouhair, a village related to Sheikh Zuwaied city, North Sinai.

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Israeli Forces Demolish Bedouin Camp ...
Al Araqib, Israel
By Transterra Editor
27 Aug 2013

Al-Araqib, an unrecognized village of the Al-Turi Arab Bedouin tribe (8 km north of Beersheba), was demolished for the 54th times since July 2010. Israel Land Administration inspectors and some 40 riot police officers stormed the village and 2 bulldozers knocked down three shacks.

Photos By: Eloise Bollack

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Israeli Forces demolish Al Araqib for...
Al arakib, Israel
By Elo B
26 Aug 2013

Al-Araqib, an unrecognized village of the Al-Turi Arab Bedouin tribe (8 km north of Beersheba), was demolished for the 54th times since July 2010. Israel Land Administration inspectors and some 40 riot police officers stormed the village and 2 bulldozers knocked down three shacks.

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Israeli Forces demolish Al Araqib for...
Al araqib, Israel
By Elo B
26 Aug 2013

Al-Araqib, an unrecognized village of the Al-Turi Arab Bedouin tribe (8 km north of Beersheba), was demolished for the 54th times since July 2010. Israel Land Administration inspectors and some 40 riot police officers stormed the village and 2 bulldozers knocked down three shacks.

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Israeli Forces demolish Al Araqib for...
Al araqib, Israel
By Elo B
26 Aug 2013

Al-Araqib, an unrecognized village of the Al-Turi Arab Bedouin tribe (8 km north of Beersheba), was demolished for the 56th time since July 2010. Israel Land Administration inspectors and some 40 riot police officers stormed the village, and 2 bulldozers knocked down three shacks.

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Israeli Forces Demolish Bedouin Camp ...
Al araqib, Israel
By Elo B
26 Aug 2013

Al-Araqib, an unrecognized village of the Al-Turi Arab Bedouin tribe (8 km north of Beersheba), was demolished for the 56th time since July 2010. Israel Land Administration inspectors and some 40 riot police officers stormed the village and 2 bulldozers knocked down three shacks.

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Israeli Forces demolish Al Araqib for...
Al araqib, Israel
By Elo B
26 Aug 2013

Al-Araqib, an unrecognized village of the Al-Turi Arab Bedouin tribe (8 km north of Beersheba), was demolished for the 54th times since July 2010. Israel Land Administration inspectors and some 40 riot police officers stormed the village and 2 bulldozers knocked down three shacks.

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Bedouins in North Sinai
Egypt
By Virginie Nguyen
06 Aug 2013

Bedouins are hanging out togheter after iftar in Aldhouhair, a village related to Sheikh Zuwaied city, North Sinai.

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Portrait of Bedouin child
Assir, Israel
By Elo B
24 Jul 2013

Bedouin family threatened of displacement by the Prawer plan stand in their village of Assir in the Negev desert in Israel.The Israeli government is expecting the Knesset to pass a law confiscating over 850,000 dunums in the Negev, uprooting approximately 40 villages which will lead to the displacement of between 30,000 to 40,000 Palestinian Bedouins.