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Child Labor Tourism 17
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

Kon Mai, 15, stands atop a mountain of garbage from which he looks defiantly towards a group of tourists. He started to work in the garbage dump at 12 years-old. He had to leave school because his parents constantly travel from one place to another in the country, or even outside Cambodia, looking for work to support him and his five young brothers. His parents now also work at the garbage dump. At home, he faces domestic violence, and he wants to leave as soon as possible. In the future, he would like to work in construction.

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Child Labor Tourism 18
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

A truck from GAEA, the company in charge of landfill Anlong Pi, arrives at the landfill full of garbage from Siem Reap. From dawn to dusk, for a minimum of 12 hours per day, people working in the landfill, children and adults, scavenge through tons of waste, looking for recyclable materials or any items with value that can be sold like plastic, paper, copper, glass, etc. to eek out a living.

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Child Labor Tourism 19
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

More than 50 minors work in this garbage dump with their families from different regions of the country.

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Child Labor Tourism 20
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

Japanese tourists cover their faces with masks to avoid breathing in toxins or bacteria. One woman takes photos of children working in the garbage dump.

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Child Labor Tourism 21
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

More than 50 minors work in this garbage dump with their families from different regions of the country.

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Child Labor Tourism 22
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

The increase in tourism has generated an increase of garbage in Siem Reap. This situation has worsened conditions for families living and working in Anlong Pi. The landfill is being expanded by GAEA. This company earns big money with the business of garbage and recycling.

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Child Labor Tourism 23
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

Kon Mai is 15 years old. He had to leave school because his parents constantly travel from one place to another in the country, or even outside Cambodia, looking for work to support him and his five young brothers. His parents now also work at the garbage dump. At home, he faces domestic violence, and he wants to leave as soon as possible. In the future, he would like to work in construction.

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Child Labor Tourism 24
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

A group of tourists leave on the bus that brought them to the garbage dump of Anlong Pi. Children say goodbye to tourists, hoping to receive more sweets or some money. Tourists continue taking pictures as they say goodbye to the children and residents of the garbage dump.

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Child Labor Tourism 25
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

Sigen Rathy is 12 years old. She returns to work as the tourists leave the landfill after their tour. She wants to be a doctor in the future. Working alongside her parents, she earns about 4000 rieles daily, or just under one dollar.

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child labor in venezuela 01
Pueblo Llano, Venezuela
By Manaure Quintero
06 Nov 2014

A group of children laborers poses for a photograph before starting another day of work in the potatoes field in Pueblo Llano, Venezuela. Pueblo Llano is the main potatoes and carrot producer of Venezuela, most of the children leave the school to start working with the crops at the age of 9.

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child labor in venezuela 08
Pueblo Llano, Venezuela
By Manaure Quintero
06 Nov 2014

A group of children laborers take cover from the cold rain during work on a potatoes field in Pueblo Llano, Venezuela. Pueblo Llano is the main potatoes and carrot producer of Venezuela, most of the children leave the school to start working with the crops at the age of 9.

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child labor in venezuela 11
Pueblo Llano, Venezuela
By Manaure Quintero
06 Nov 2014

A teenager works on a potatoes harvest in Pueblo Llano, Venezuela. Pueblo Llano is the main potatoes and carrot producer of Venezuela, most of the children leave the school to start working with the crops at the age of 9.

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child labor in venezuela 15
Pueblo Llano, Venezuela
By Manaure Quintero
06 Nov 2014

Josein, a 13 year old worker, prepares his gloves during a potatoes harvest. Pueblo Llano is the main potatoes and carrot producer of Venezuela, most of the children leave the school to start working with the crops at the age of 9.

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child labor in venezuela 05
Pueblo Llano, Venezuela
By Manaure Quintero
04 Nov 2014

Cemetery of Pueblo Llano, Venezuela, a town with the highest suicide rate in Venezuela, 18 per 100.000 inhabitants.

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child labor in venezuela 14
Pueblo Llano, Venezuela
By Manaure Quintero
04 Nov 2014

Teenagers mark some words in a wall inside Pueblo Llano's cemetery. In this place women have been raped several times by drunk men. One of the reasons of suicides in Pueblo Llano is related with relationship problems.

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child labor in venezuela 02
Pueblo Llano, Venezuela
By Manaure Quintero
31 Oct 2014

Children play on their break from work with the crops inside the Adela Rojas Public School in Las Agujas zone in Pueblo Llano, Venezuela. Pueblo Llano is the main potatoes and carrot producer of Venezuela, most of the children leave the school to start working with the crops at the age of 9.

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child labor in venezuela 06
Pueblo Llano, Venezuela
By Manaure Quintero
31 Oct 2014

Luis is 11 and prefers to help the adults harvest crops than to go to school in Pueblo Llano, Venezuela. Pueblo Llano is the main potatoes and carrot producer of Venezuela, most of the children leave the school to start working with the crops at the age of 9.

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child labor in venezuela 07
Pueblo Llano, Venezuela
By Manaure Quintero
31 Oct 2014

It is common to see children playing with their toys around the crops in Los Andes, that is how easy children can obtain pesticides that farmers leave behind in the fields. In Pueblo Llano, pesticides are the main weapon for suicides in agriculture zones around the world.

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child labor in venezuela 13
Pueblo Llano, Venezuela
By Manaure Quintero
31 Oct 2014

Teenager workers drive a motorbike inside the town of Pueblo Llano, Venezuela. Most of the children who leave the school in Pueblo Llano dreams about getting a motorbike or a big truck to get the girls' attention.

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child labor in venezuela 16
Pueblo Llano, Venezuela
By Manaure Quintero
31 Oct 2014

Several empty packages of pesticides are seen around the fields, schools, houses and neighborhoods in Pueblo Llano without warning. Pesticides are the main weapon of suicide in agriculture zones around the world.

Frame 0004
Child Labor in Yemen
Sana'a, Yemen
By dustweare
24 Sep 2014

Saleh Abdallah al-Raymi has been a labourer in the capital Sanaa since the age of seven. But his is, unfortunately, not an extraordinary case. He's one of more than a million child labourers in Yemen, and the numbers are increasing as the country is plunging deeper into its political and financial crisis.

Shotlist:

Saleh pushes his wheelbarrow towards work in the old city of Sanaa
Close up of Saleh's face while he speaks in off
Interview of Saleh in the living room of his family's house
Saleh lifting cage full of groceries in the market
Saleh's employer talking while Saleh loads the car
Video portrait of a kid at work in Old Sanaa
Sanaa cityscape. Women veiled walking, cars passing by, barbed wire, mountains in background
Soldiers controlling cars in a check point in Sanaa city
Saleh walking the street towards his house
Close up of Saleh's dad while he speaks in off
Saleh's father sitting in the house's living room while he is interviewed
Saleh entering the house
Saleh's father praying in the living room
Saleh's walking up the stairs of the house
Saleh's father sitting in the house's living room while he is interviewed
pot pouring steam in the kitchen
Saleh's brothers and father eat in the living room

Script:

Saleh Abdallah al-Raymi walking through the streets of Sana'a.

SALEH Abdallah al-Raymi (Arabic): “Here you find real heritage, and it's pretty. Tourists come here to visit.”

VO: “Through the narrow, historical streets of the old city in Sana'a. [Two-second pause] Through architecture you only find here in Yemen. A unique place. But also the workplace of many children.”

SALEH (Arabic): “My name is Saleh Abdallah Hassan Ahmad al-Maswari, and I'm 16 years old.”

Saleh BEING INTERVIEWED

SALEH (Arabic): “I get up in the morning, and then I go to school. I stay there till 12 o'clock, before going back home. At home I eat lunch, and then I go to work.”

Saleh WHILE HE'S WORKING

SALEH (Arabic): “I work with a wheel-barrow at the market place. I transport vegetables and fruit. Anything really.”

VO: “Saleh Abdallah al-Raymi started working when he was seven years old. But his story is not unique. [Pause for two seconds]. In Yemen there are 1,3 million child labourers. Children as young as 5 are seen working in the Yemeni capitol. And the work is tough.”

VO: “The country has seen years of political and economical unrest, and can't seem to turn the tide. As a result, many families are forced to send their children to work. For most of them, it's not a choice.”

Saleh WALKING TOWARDS THE HOUSE

ABDALLAH Hassan al-Raymi (Arabic): “I'm the father of Mohammed, the oldest, and then Saleh, Mokhtar, Aziz, Fikri, Osama, Amira, Uthnan. All in all we're twelve people in the family.”

VO: “Abdallah Hassan al-Raymi WANTS the best for his children. But kidney failure has made him unable to work. And with no functioning welfare state in Yemen, three of his sons are now the family providers. [Pause, two seconds] Their father has bigger dreams for them.”

ABDALLAH Hassan al-Raymi (Arabic): “For example for Saleh to go study, and then get work in company or at a factory. That's better. What they do now is hard. It's really hard work to be at the market with the wheel-barrows. But if they could work somewhere with a steady paycheck, that would be a lot better. Then they would be able to cover all the expenses we have.”

VO: “Their biggest worry right now is their landlord threatening them with eviction. They are not able to pay the full rent every month.”

STAND-UP: It’s here through historical streets inaccessible by car where childern like Saleh Abdallah al-Raymi are needed. The problem of child labor in Yemen has become severe, maybe too severe to be solved in the near future.

NOOR al-Kasadi, Child Protection Specialist, UNICEF (English): “It affect them negatively actually. It deprive the children ...”

VO: “He's working every day, but says he has been lucky. He hasn't been exposed to any kind of severe harassment. But, it's a hard life. A life he doesn't want for his younger siblings.”

SALEH (Arabic): “A man can do this job easily. But a boy isn't able to do it as well. [PAUSE] I see myself as a boy -- still.”

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Cameroon Gold Mining 04
Batouri, Burundu Foro, Cameroon
By annamayumi
21 Aug 2014

Artisanal mining in the village of Bunduru Foro is done with rudimentary tools as tin bowls, plastic buckets, showels, and simple sieves.

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Cameroon Gold Mining 03
Batouri, Burundu Foro, Cameroon
By annamayumi
21 Aug 2014

The village of Burundu Foro was built in order to access the mineral rich soil close to the border with the Central African Republic.

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Cameroon Gold Mining 05
Batouri, Burundu Foro, Cameroon
By annamayumi
21 Aug 2014

The village of Burundu Foro was built in order to access the mineral rich soil close to the border with the Central African Republic. Many children regularly fail to attend school in order to support join their families from a very young age working in the mines. 18-year-old Pier sold a gram of gold for 10,000 XAF. He might get a better price (up to 14,000) but doesn't want to wait, he said.

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Cameroon's Informal Mines 07
Batouri, Burundu Foro, Cameroon
By annamayumi
21 Aug 2014

Artisanal mining in the village of Burundu Foro is done with rudimentary tools as tin bowls, plastic buckets, showels, and simple sieves. Familiy members organize themselves throughout various stations of digging and washing the soil. The physically stronger male members of the community dig up the mineral rich soil in unsecured quarries dozens of meters below the surface.

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Cameroon Gold Mining 09
Batouri, Burundu Foro, Cameroon
By annamayumi
21 Aug 2014

Only a few minutes away of the small mining Village of Burundu Foro a Chinese Company (not wanting to be named) started a semi-industrial mine. They praise themselves for not employing children as compared to the artisanal mines in the region. Jean Pierre Ngandu, Chief of Burundu Foro meanwhile criticized their illegal acquisition of the mining ground.
According to the law about 30 percent of the revenue of exporting gold and diamonds should be paid in taxes. But even government officials operating in the mining sector confirmed that theory and praxis are poles apart.

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Cameroon Gold Mining 10
Batouri, Burundu Foro, Cameroon
By annamayumi
21 Aug 2014

Only a few minutes away of the small mining Village of Burundu Foro a Chinese Company (not wanting to be named) started a semi-industrial mine. They praise themselves for not employing children as compared to the artisanal mines in the region. Jean Pierre Ngandu, Chief of Burundu Foro meanwhile criticized their illegal acquisition of the mining ground.
According to the law about 30 percent of the revenue of exporting gold and diamonds should be paid in taxes. But even government officials operating in the mining sector confirmed that theory and praxis are poles apart.

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Cameroon Gold Mining 11
Batouri, Burundu Foro, Cameroon
By annamayumi
21 Aug 2014

Villagers from Burundu Foro washing soil dug up in a nearby quarry in a rivlet.
Artisanal mining in the village of Burundu Foro is done with rudimentary tools as tin bowls, plastic buckets, showels, and simple sieves. Familiy members organize themselves throughout various stations of digging and washing the soil.

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Cameroon Gold Mining 12
Batouri, Burundu Foro, Cameroon
By annamayumi
21 Aug 2014

Only a short walk away international companies have established semi-industrial mines. In Burundu Foro artisanal miners keep working with rudimentary equipment.

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Cameroon Gold Mining 13
Batouri, Burundu Foro, Cameroon
By annamayumi
21 Aug 2014

Burundu Foro was constructed as a mining village. The living conditions are poor. Almost half of the Cameroonian population lives under the poverty line. For artisanal miners there is not much hope to climb the ladder in the trade business of precious minerals.

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Cameroon Gold Mining 15
Batouri, Burundu Foro, Cameroon
By annamayumi
21 Aug 2014

The continuing outbreaks of violence in the neighboring Central African Republic has forced hundreds of thousands of people to flee their homes. Ten thousands are hiding in the bush close to the border with Cameroon and actively participate in artisanal mining activities - among them are many children - in order to fight starvation.

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Cameroon Gold Mining 01
Batouri, Burundu Foro, Cameroon
By annamayumi
21 Aug 2014

A girl carrying a tin pan in the gold mine next to the village of Bunduru Foro in eastern Cameroon. The village was built in proximity to mineral rich grounds. The entire community depends on the gold and diamond economy. They sell one gram of gold for as little as XAF 10,000 (USD 17) to middle-men, melting the fine grains into nuggets or simple jewelry and reselling with high margins. Children regularly fail to attend school in order to support their families.

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Cameroon Gold Mining 16
Batouri, Burundu Foro, Cameroon
By annamayumi
21 Aug 2014

The continuing outbreaks of violence in the neighboring Central African Republic has forced hundreds of thousands of people to flee their homes. Ten thousands are hiding in the bush close to the border with Cameroon and actively participate in artisanal mining activities - among them are many children - in order to fight starvation.

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Cameroon Gold Mining 17
Batouri, Burundu Foro, Cameroon
By annamayumi
21 Aug 2014

The continuing outbreaks of violence in the neighboring Central African Republic has forced hundreds of thousands of people to flee their homes. Ten thousands are hiding in the bush close to the border with Cameroon and actively participate in artisanal mining activities - among them are many children - in order to fight starvation.

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Cameroon Gold Mining 18
Batouri, Burundu Foro, Cameroon
By annamayumi
21 Aug 2014

The continuing outbreaks of violence in the neighboring Central African Republic has forced hundreds of thousands of people to flee their homes. Ten thousands are hiding in the bush close to the border with Cameroon and actively participate in artisanal mining activities - among them are many children - in order to fight starvation.

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Cameroon Gold Mining 19
Batouri, Bunduru Foro, Cameroon
By annamayumi
21 Aug 2014

Artisanal mining in the east of Cameroon is done with rudimentary tools as tin bowls, plastic buckets, shovels, and simple sieves. Family members organize themselves throughout various stations of digging and washing the soil.

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Cameroon Gold Mining 20
Batouri, Burundu Foro, Cameroon
By annamayumi
21 Aug 2014

The continuing outbreaks of violence in the neighboring Central African Republic has forced hundreds of thousands of people to flee their homes. Ten thousands are hiding in the bush close to the border with Cameroon and actively participate in artisanal mining activities - among them are many children - in order to fight starvation.

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Cameroon Gold Mining 21
Batouri, Burundu Foro, Cameroon
By annamayumi
21 Aug 2014

Villagers of Bunduru Foro grinding dug up soil from the quarry in preparation to be washed in the rivlet.
Artisanal mining in the east of Cameroon is done with rudimentary tools as tin bowls, plastic buckets, shovels, and simple sieves. Family members organize themselves throughout various stations of digging and washing the soil.