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Grossglockner High Alpine Road 1
Grossglockner High Alpine Road
By Anita Kovacevic
06 Jul 2016

The Grossglockner High Alpine Road is Austria's highest situated pass road and is considered the most beautiful panoramic road in Europe. It is under preservation order and should become a UNESCO World Heritage site. It was open in August 1935 and has annually about 900,000 guests from all over the world. It leads into the heart of the Hohe Tauern National Park and to the foot of the highest mountain in Austria, the 3,798m high Grossglockner. The Road is open at the end of April, beginning of May until the end of October, beginning of November and it takes you from SalzburgerLand in the North to Carinthia in the South. The summer visit to the Grossglockner High Alpine Road makes an unforgettable experience and is the ideal destination for families, nature lovers, hikers, bikers and cyclists.

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Winning and Losing
Vienna
By Shervin Sardari
15 Jun 2016

“Golden Baby” Eva Voraberger is going for it: the 26-year-old super flyweight champion of the world is going to fight Esmeralda Moreno of Mexico. Eva is up against a tough boxer: Moreno is currently number three in the world and has more than twice the points Eva does. But for Eva, there is more at stake than her three world championship titles. The winner of the coming fight has a shot at the top: an international match in Las Vegas against the number one in the world.

The documentary “Goldrausch” (“Winning and Losing”) is an intimate portrait of the Austrian boxer Eva Voraberger, showing the intense preparations for this all-or-nothing fight. Adding to the physical demands of training comes an emotional blow as she learns that her boyfriend has cancer. But in the same way he has her back in the ring, she has his in the fight against his disease.

Video: XDCAM HD422, 50mbps, 1080i50
Audio: CH 1/CH2 = natural sound + music (stereo)

FULL CONFORMED SCRIPT AND CUE SHEET AVAILABLE: https://goo.gl/8ZoY8v

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Refugees in Red Cross Tents in Austri...
Nickelsdorf, Austria
By danubestory
07 Sep 2015

Thousands of refugees entered Austria on foot from Hungary on Saturday and Sunday. Austria and Germany opened borders for them after they got stuck in Budapest train station Keleti for several days. Refugees walked on foot and were later taken by 60 buses from Hungarian authorities to the border which they crossed on foot. After stopping buses, some people decided to walk to Austria, some were donated with train and bus tickets from Hungarian citizens and charities and some were driven to the border by people in private cars.
In Austria, exausted refugees got warm welcome from Red Cross people, social workers of Bundeswehr and volunteers. People donated food, drinks, clothes, toys to them.
In the bordertown of Nickelsdorf, refugees can rest and wait for trains and buses to Vienna and Germany. German police took controll over the situation and trains are guarded by German policemen. Refugees wait near railway station or in the hangar built originally for famous Nova Rock music festival. There are hygienical facilities, warm blankets, field beds, food, drinks, donated clothers and shoes. For children, toys and various activities are prepared.
Numbers of refugees resting in hangar are changing. At this time, approximately 300 people are waiting for next transport to Germany. Another 100 is waiting in the railway station. For those crossing the border by foot, the buses are waiting directly there and transport them to the train.
„Austria is perfect,“ thanks Ibrahim, young man from Syria for everything. „Austrian people gave us smile, hug, food. We feel welcomed here.“ They blame Hungary for getting them closed in railway station in Budapest with no facilities and for police actions they experienced there. Despite all, children are full of energy. They discover new toys and want to try each facility the hangar and outside land offer to them. They can draw, paint, bicycle, play footbal, take toys which they like. They want to spend every moment by playing and doing things so natural for their age – and different from those they experienced along their journey from war zones.
There are also newborn babies. Nadja whose parents are from Afghanistan was born on the way, in Greece, six weeks ago. Her young mother managed to continue walking to Austria.
Further she will continue in comfortable speed train, offered for free by Austrian and German authorities.
During the weekend, 12 000 asylum seekers entered Austria and continued towards Germany.

00:00: W/S: Hangar originally built for Nova Rock music festival is now full of refugees who rest here before last part of their journey, to Germany.
00:07: W/S: Young men playing football in front of a hangar in Nickelsdorf while waiting for transport to Germany.
00:14: M/S: Man resting in front of a hangar in Nickelsdorf while waiting for transport to Germany.
00:21: W/S: People resting after exhausting walk thru Hungary towards Austrian border.
00:28: M/S: Refugees discussing while resting and waiting for transport to Germany in a hangar in Nickelsdorf.
00:35: M/S: Refugees receiving food from volunteers in hangar in Nickelsdorf, Austria.
00:42: M/S: Refugees receiving food from volunteers in hangar in Nickelsdorf, Austria.
00:49: M/S: Refugees resting and waiting for transport to Germany in a hangar in Nickelsdorf.
00:56: D/S: Man resting before next journey to the Germany.
01:03: SOT: Sabine Lamberti, a volunteer:
No, not really. Why sould we be afraid? I mean, there are bad people, maybe there are bad people, but you also have bad people in Austria. Do you know what I mean? I mean in every country you have good people and you have bad people. It does have nothing to do with the nationality.
01:28: D/S: Welcome to Europe – Austrian volunteers have written on the Hungarian – Austrian border to show to the refugees different attitude towards them as they experienced in Budapest.
01:35: D/S: Sabine Lamberti welcoming new refugees who already reached Austria.
01:45: D/S: Woman trying to find suitable clean clothers for her family among things donated by Austrian people.
01:53: W/S: Ambulance vehicles and mobile toilets near the railway station in bordertown of Nickelsdorf from where special refugee trains to Vienna and Germany depart.
01:59: M/S: Refugees waiting for train to Germany in Nickelsdorf railway station.
02:07: M/S: TV crews working on Nickelsdorf railway station, covering the migration crisis.
02:15: W/S: Refugees entering the special train in railway station in Nickelsdorf which will transport them to Vienna for the next train to Germany.
02:22: W/S: Refugees entering the special train in railway station in Nickelsdorf which will transport them to Vienna for the next train to Germany.
02:29: W/S: Special train for refugees is departing from Nickelsdorf.

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Refugees in Red Cross Tents in Austria
Nickelsdorf, Austria
By danubestory
07 Sep 2015

Thousands of refugees entered Austria on foot from Hungary on Saturday and Sunday. Austria and Germany opened borders for them after they got stuck in Budapest train station Keleti for several days. Refugees walked on foot and were later taken by 60 buses from Hungarian authorities to the border which they crossed on foot. After stopping buses, some people decided to walk to Austria, some were donated with train and bus tickets from Hungarian citizens and charities and some were driven to the border by people in private cars.
In Austria, exausted refugees got warm welcome from Red Cross people, social workers of Bundeswehr and volunteers. People donated food, drinks, clothes, toys to them.
In the bordertown of Nickelsdorf, refugees can rest and wait for trains and buses to Vienna and Germany. German police took controll over the situation and trains are guarded by German policemen. Refugees wait near railway station or in the hangar built originally for famous Nova Rock music festival. There are hygienical facilities, warm blankets, field beds, food, drinks, donated clothers and shoes. For children, toys and various activities are prepared.
Numbers of refugees resting in hangar are changing. At this time, approximately 300 people are waiting for next transport to Germany. Another 100 is waiting in the railway station. For those crossing the border by foot, the buses are waiting directly there and transport them to the train.
"Austria is perfect,“ thanks Ibrahim, young man from Syria for everything. "Austrian people gave us smile, hug, food. We feel welcomed here." They blame Hungary for getting them closed in railway station in Budapest with no facilities and for police actions they experienced there. Despite all, children are full of energy. They discover new toys and want to try each facility the hangar and outside land offer to them. They can draw, paint, bicycle, play footbal, take toys which they like. They want to spend every moment by playing and doing things so natural for their age – and different from those they experienced along their journey from war zones.
There are also newborn babies. Nadja whose parents are from Afghanistan was born on the way, in Greece, six weeks ago. Her young mother managed to continue walking to Austria.
Further she will continue in comfortable speed train, offered for free by Austrian and German authorities.
During the weekend, 12 000 asylum seekers entered Austria and continued towards Germany.

Shotlist:
00:00 SOT: Sabine Lamberti, a Austrian volunteer:
No, not really. Why sould we be afraid? I mean, there are bad people, maybe there are bad people, but you also have bad people in Austria. Do you know what I mean? I mean in every country you have good people and you have bad people. It does have nothing to do with the nationality. I by myself I own a castle, Schloss Konigshof, that´s in Bruckneudorf, and I should get first refugees next week who will live in my castle because my castle is very big, I have 60 500 square metres just living alone with two dogs. So I said: Okay, there are such a lot of people who are sleeping on the street in Traiskirchen who don´t have anymore a place, living in tents in the street, on the floor. So I open my castle and I will have the people to say: Welcome and live in my castle. Next week I should get the first.
I am here because I want to help that people who are such a long time on the trip to come in a country where is no war, where nobody is behind them, and to help them and to say: Hello, welcome, welcome, welcome.
There were people with who I was crying when the came from the bus. They are so nice. They are coming here with nothing, with flipflops on their feet, and yesterday evening it was so cold and such a wind. And to help them – everybody has to do it. They are human beings and we should all together help them.
00:09: W/S: Hangar originally built for Nova Rock music festival is now full of refugees who rest here before last part of their journey, to Germany.
00:16: W/S: Young men playing football in front of a hangar in Nickelsdorf while waiting for transport to Germany.
00:23: M/S: Man resting in front of a hangar in Nickelsdorf while waiting for transport to Germany.
00:30: W/S: People resting after exhausting walk thru Hungary towards Austrian border.
00:38: M/S: Refugees discussing while resting and waiting for transport to Germany in a hangar in Nickelsdorf.
00:44: M/S: Refugees receiving food from volunteers in hangar in Nickelsdorf, Austria.
00:51: M/S: Refugees receiving food from volunteers in hangar in Nickelsdorf, Austria.
00:58: M/S: Refugees resting and waiting for transport to Germany in a hangar in Nickelsdorf.
01:05: D/S: Man resting before next journey to the Germany.
01:12: SOT: Sabine Lamberti, a volunteer
01:20: D/S: Welcome to Europe – Austrian volunteers have written on the Hungarian – Austrian border to show to the refugees different attitude towards them as they experienced in Budapest.
01:28: D/S: Sabine Lamberti welcoming new refugees who already reached Austria.
01:38: D/S: Woman trying to find suitable clean clothers for her family among things donated by Austrian people.
01:45: W/S: Ambulance vehicles and mobile toilets near the railway station in bordertown of Nickelsdorf from where special refugee trains to Vienna and Germany depart.
01:52: M/S: Refugees waiting for train to Germany in Nickelsdorf railway station.
01:59: M/S: TV crews working on Nickelsdorf railway station, covering the migration crisis.
02:27: W/S: Refugees entering the special train in railway station in Nickelsdorf which will transport them to Vienna for the next train to Germany.
02:15: W/S: Refugees entering the special train in railway station in Nickelsdorf which will transport them to Vienna for the next train to Germany.
02:22: W/S: Special train for refugees is departing from Nickelsdorf.

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Asylum: Majd's Perilous Journey
Beirut
By Transterra Editor
19 Jun 2015

When we talk about the problems that face the world, we often discuss them in magnitude and numbers. We speak of millions displaced, hundreds of thousands dead, and many wounded.

However, what is often lost below the melee of statistics and news headlines are the stories of the individuals who endure these tragedies. Their personal experiences are what humanize all of the numbers and talking heads.

22-year-old Majd Bayoush was driven out of his hometown of Kafranbel, Syria by war. Desperate to start a new life abroad, he was smuggled to Europe via a long and dangerous underground railway.

He first travelled overland to Turkey, and then took a dangerously overloaded inflatable boat from Turkey to the Greek island of Samos. Once in Greece, he was registered with the Greek authorities and held in a migrant detention center.

After his release from the migrant detention center he began a perilous and exhausting overland journey from Greece to Germany. He trudged on foot over mountains and through forests in the bitter European cold.

Despite his tribulations, Majd was one of the lucky ones. He reached his destination of Hamburg…alive.

Majd’s story is just one of millions of stories about migrants risking their lives over sea and land to have a chance at a better life.

June 20th marks World Refugee Day. The commemoration is an opportunity to pause and consider that, with 50 million displaced people worldwide, today's refugee crisis is the biggest since World War 2.

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Human Trafficking: A Migrant's Story
Kafranbel
By Transterra Editor
30 Apr 2015

Majd Bayoush is a 22-year-old who fled his hometown of Kafranbel in north Syria with the aim of smuggling himself into Europe. After a perilous and complicated journey that lasted for nearly three months, he reached Germany, where he is waiting for the final procedures before he is granted political asylum.

The following is his story as told to Transterra Media.

I arrived to the port city of Izmir, Turkey on September 22, 2014. On the same day, I took an inflatable boat with 47 other migrants and sailed to the Greek island of Samos. We reached our destination after 2.5 hours. The boat deflated and sank after it hit the rocky shore.   

We had agreed with the smuggler Abu Abdu, a Syrian man nicknamed ‘the Tiger’, to surrender to the Greek police once we reach the island. Before leaving Turkey, I deposited 8,000 euros at a money transfer office called ‘al-Saeed’ controlled by the smuggling gang.  [This transfer company has offices in other countries.] Abu Abdu took 2,500 euros out of that sum.

We climbed a mountain on the island of Samos and reached a police station, where policemen confiscated all our possessions, including our mobile phones, and detained us for three days. On Sept. 25, the police authorities placed us below the deck in a cruise boat, which headed to an island near Samos. I do not know its name. There was a camp that held other captured illegal migrants who were Afghans, Asians and Palestinians. However, most of them were Syrians. 

FULL TEXT IS AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST

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Human Trafficking: A Migrant's Story 03
Samos
By Transterra Editor
28 Apr 2015

Majd and other migrants at the ferry boat dock before the voyage to Athens after being released from a detention camp near Samos, Greece.

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Human Trafficking: A Migrant's Story ...
Kafranbel
By Transterra Editor
27 Apr 2015

Majd Bayoush is a 22-year-old who fled his hometown of Kafranbel in north Syria with the aim of smuggling himself into Europe. After a perilous and complicated journey that lasted for nearly three months, he reached Germany, where he is waiting for the final procedures before he is granted political asylum.

SHOTLIST

Shot of migrants on climbing a mountain after reaching the Greek island of Samos

OFF CAMERA
00:09 – 00:16
“This is the boat after UNINTELLIGIBLE."

Shot of the migrants on the boat to Athens

NAT Sound
01:01 – 01:03
“Film where we were staying.”

01:08 – 01:11
“Film the mountain there.” Shot of the migrants walking along railroad tracks from Greece to Macedonia

OFF CAMERA
01:31 – 01:32
“The road to Macedonia.”

Shot of migrant encampment near the Greek-Macedonian border

NAT Sound
01:52- 01:56
“I hope you have not filmed me.”

02:07 – 02:10
“We need light bulb and electricity.”

Shot of a Macedonian soldier overseeing the migrant’s tents on the border after burning them

OFF CAMERA
02:25 – 02:31
“The Macedonian army. The Greek-Macedonian border.” 02:39 - 02:43
“All you do is film.” Shot of burnt tents near the Greek-Macedonian border
Shot of migrants around a fire in Gevgilija, Macedonia

OFF CAMERA
03:16 -03:24
“The Macedonian-Greek border. Syrian and Iraqi refugee.”

Shot of migrants in the outdoors in an unnamed area near the Macedonian-Serbian border
Shot of migrants walking railroad tracks near the Greek-Macedonian border

OFF CAMERA
03:54 – 03:56
“The Macedonian border.”

Shot inside the central prison in Gazi Baba, Skpoje

OFF CAMERA
04:30 – 05:14
“This is the bathroom. This is where we wash. Even animals are washed in a better place. Animals are washed in a place that is better than this. These are the sinks. We are in Skopje.[SHOWING A WATER HEATER] They have cut the wires so that we do not shower with hot water. This is the toilet.”

Shot of migrants arriving to a house owned by a Pakistani smuggler who called himself Ahmad.

OFF CAMERA
05:18
“The Macedonian-Serbian border.” 05:34
“The Macedonian-Serbian border.”

Shot of the courtyard of a house owned by a Pakistani smuggler who called himself Ahmad
Shot of migrants walking at night in the outdoors in Serbia

NAT Sound
05:57
“-Are you filming? -Yes.”

Shot of migrants being transported by tractor in Serbia

Shot of migrants walking at night in the outdoors in Serbia
Exterior shot of the house in which Majd lives in the village of Tönning near Hamburg

06:38
OFF CAMERA
“This is the house to which I was moved in Hamburg. They gave me this house until my residency permit is issued. This is a village called Tunning to the north of Hamburg.”

Traveling shot of a street in Tönning, near Hamburg

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Human Trafficking: A Migrant's Story 22
Lojane
By Transterra Editor
28 Nov 2014

Migrants gathered in the house of a Pakistani smuggler called Ahmad in Lojane, Macedonia.

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Human Trafficking: A Migrant's Story 19
Skopje
By Transterra Editor
27 Nov 2014

The Moroccan smuggler nicknamed The Desert Man (al-Sahrawi) appears on the right, wearing a white sweatshirt, inside a camp for illegal migrants in Skopje, Macedonia. This smuggler had bribed the guards to allow him to move freely in and out of the camp.

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Pilots Go Head-to-Head in Red Bull Ai...
Vienna
By Carsten Snejbjerg
20 Nov 2014

Photo and text by Carsten Snejbjerg

The Red Bull Air Race World Championship in Spielberg, Austria would be decided among three seasoned pilots, going wing-to-wing to capture the top spot on the podium and to take the big trophy home. Among the three was the hometown favorite Hannes Arch. Excitement around the race was palpable as the pilots prepared to take to the sky.

With an arena filled to capacity and a picturesque landscape with a clear blue sky, big green trees and mountains that almost framed the arena, conditions were perfect for the Air Race season's grand finale. 35,000 fans from around the world flocked to Spielberg and settled into a huge campsite right in front of the sold-out Red Bull Ring. A large proportion of these were Austrians who came to see the local hero Hannes Arch.

Going into the race in second place in the overall standings and with a fresh course record, set during the week's training, Arch was favored to take home the title of world champion, just 30 minutes drive from the town he grew up in.

Sunday's grand finale was also an important race for the 50-year-old British pilot Paul Bonhomme, for whom a victory would have meant becoming the only pilot in the world with three World Championship titles. But after a disappointing qualifying in which he made only 6th place, he was under serious pressure to prepare and review the lines he’d be flying. Line Selection is central to avoiding penalty seconds, the most crucial factor in a Red Bull Air Race.

Despite the extra pressure on Paul's shoulders, he spent his Sunday quietly preparing in the hangar. After a good breakfast, briefing he rest of the team, his strategy was finalized. After the plane’s final check, it was polished to a shine.

"If we win, it will probably be difficult to get hold of me when I start to drink beer," Bonhomme laughed.

Paul ended up drinking beer on Sunday night, but not because he lifted the trophy.
The finale ended up being a race between local favorite Hannes Arch and the 58-year-old Englishman Nigel Lamb. All the shortlisted favorites were among the top eight, but since the four fastest pilots in the qualifier were made it to the final four, Bonhomme was out due to his 6th-place best time.

Local fans covered the tribunes of the recently revamped Red Bull Ring in Austrian colors and held giant letters that together formed "GO HANNES." After breaking out in wild cheers several times, the Austrian fans packed into the stadium held their breath when Nigel Lambs aircraft approached the start gate.

The crowd was even further out on chairs edge when Nigel Lamb only recorded the second best time of the event, leaving Arch a golden opportunity to knock Lamb down to third place and win the title. However, on his on the last lap, approximately 15 seconds from goal, he made a mistake that cost him the title. A tiny error in his manoeuvre cost him two penalty seconds, giving Nigel Lamb - the second oldest pilot in competition - the World Championship title.

A man with plenty of British humor, the Oxford-based Lamb was not slow to thank Hannes Arch for his title-giving mistake.

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Human Trafficking: A Migrant's Story 06
Gevgelija
By Transterra Editor
08 Nov 2014

Migrants pose for a photo at their makeshift camp inside Macedonian territory near the border with Greece.

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Human Trafficking: A Migrant's Story 15
Macedonia
By Transterra Editor
08 Nov 2014

A tent in the makeshift encampment in Gevgilija, Macedonia where the migrants waited for a smuggler on their second attempt to cross into Serbia

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Human Trafficking: A Migrant's Story 05
Polykastro
By Transterra Editor
07 Nov 2014

Migrants walk along the railroad tracks starting from Polykastro, Greece. This was their second attempt to reach the border with Macedonia.

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Human Trafficking: A Migrant's Story 14
Polykastro
By Transterra Editor
07 Nov 2014

Migrants walk along the railroad tracks starting from Polykastro, Greece. This was their second attempt to reach the border with Macedonia.

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Human Trafficking: A Migrant's Story 12
Gevgelija
By Transterra Editor
27 Oct 2014

Migrants waited in this makeshift encampment in Gevgilija, Macedonia for the smuggler who would escort them to Serbia.

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Human Trafficking: A Migrant's Story 13
Gevgelija
By Transterra Editor
27 Oct 2014

Migrants waited a day at this makeshift encampment in Gevgilija, Macedonia for the smuggler who would take them to Serbia.

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Human Trafficking: A Migrant's Story 11
Gevgelija
By Transterra Editor
26 Oct 2014

Macedonian soldiers burned these tents, in which the migrants stayed on the Macedonian-Greek border.

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Human Trafficking: A Migrant's Story 09
Polykastro
By Transterra Editor
24 Oct 2014

Migrants had to walk along this railroad track for 11 hours as they attempted to reach Macedonia.

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Human Trafficking: A Migrant's Story 10
Polykastro
By Transterra Editor
24 Oct 2014

Migrants faced an 11 hour trek along this railroad track as they attempted to reach Macedonia for the first time.

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Human Trafficking: A Migrant's Story 20
Athens
By Transterra Editor
10 Oct 2014

Majd took this photo of fellow migrants in Athens, Greece.

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Human Trafficking: A Migrant's Story 02
Samos
By Transterra Editor
05 Oct 2014

Majd on a dock near the ferry boat that will transport him with other migrants to Athens after being released from a detention camp near Samos, Greece.

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Human Trafficking: A Migrant's Story 04
Samos
By Transterra Editor
05 Oct 2014

Migrants who traveled with Majd inside the police vehicle that was taking them to a port near Samos, after being released from a detention camp.

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Human Trafficking: A Migrant's Story 21
Samos
By Transterra Editor
05 Oct 2014

The detention camp for illegal migrants on an island near Samos, Greece.

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Danube Story
Bratislava
By danubestory
23 Sep 2014

DanubeStory tells stories of people and their relationship to the second longest river in Europe, the Danube. Slovakian filmmakers Jana Cavojska and Vladimir Kampf traveled on and along the 3 000 kilometer-long river several times, upstream and downstream, in search of people and practices to tell the story of their country and region. A colorful mix of their lives and livelihoods is beautifully intertwined with the simple story of the river. Despite of the fact that the richest are close to the source of the Danube, and the standard of living goes down with the stream of the river, none of the stories lament a destiny, but rather celebrate this unique mix of lively cultures and practices.

In part 1 of the film viewers will flow downstream in the summer and meet a biofarmer and guardian of a river spring in Germany, a traditional wooden ship builder in Austria, a biologist and underwater photographer in Slovakia, a bridge maintainer in Hungary, an ornithologist in Croatia, a gallery owner in Serbia, a distiller in Bulgaria, a musician in Moldova, a photographer in Ukraine and a frog hunter in Romania.

In part 2 of the film viewers will head upstream in wintertime and meet a hotel manager in Ukraine, a speech pathologist in Moldova, a choir master in Bulgaria, a kayak trainer in Romania, a ferry operator in Serbia, a mercenary soldier in Croatia, a mask maker in Hungary, a shipman in Slovakia, a café owner in Austria and a hat maker in Germany.

This film may also be viewed as a series of 5 minute videos on each character.

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Human Trafficking: A Migrant's Story 07
Samos
By Transterra Editor
22 Sep 2014

Majd takes a 'selfie' with a friend after reaching the Greek island of Samos from Izmir, Turkey.

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Human Trafficking: A Migrant's Story 08
Samos
By Transterra Editor
22 Sep 2014

Migrants climb a hill on the Greek island of Samos following the voyage from Izmir, Turkey.

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Human Trafficking: A Migrant's Story 16
Samos
By Transterra Editor
22 Sep 2014

Majd and two other migrants on an inflatable boat sailing from Izmir, Turkey to Samos, Greece.

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Human Trafficking: A Migrant's Story 17
Samos
By Transterra Editor
22 Sep 2014

Migrants pose for a photo on an inflatable boat sailing from Izmir, Turkey to Samos, Greece.

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Human Trafficking: A Migrant's Story 18
Izmir
By Transterra Editor
18 Sep 2014

The receipts Majd received after depositing 8,000 euros at the money transfer office run by the smugglers in Izmir, Turkey on September 18, 2014.

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Franz1_Vienna_2908
Italienische Nationalkirche Maria Schnee, 1010 Wien,Austria
By Ignat Solovey
16 Aug 2014

Monument to the Emperor Franz I Habsburg of Austro-Hungary at Vienna Hofburg in the evening with a dramatic cloudy sky. Silhouette, image includes part of Vienna skyline

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Austrian President Visits Lebanon for...
Beirut, Lebanon
By Video Cairo Sat
26 Apr 2012

Austrian President Heinz Fischer arrived in Beirut on Thursday, April 26, for a two-day visit at the invitation of his Lebanese counterpart Michel Suleiman, who held a welcome ceremony at the presidential palace for Fischer's arrival.

The visit began with a private discussion between the two presidents, and later included talks with senior Lebanese officials.

President Fischer’s visit marks the first time an Austrian head of state has paid an official visit to Lebanon.

Local News Agency: Middle East Bureau / VCS
Shooting Dateline: April 26, 2012
Shooting Location: Beirut, Lebanon
Publishing Time: April 26, 2012
Length: 0:01:03
Video Size: 52.4 MB
Language: Arabic
Column:
Organized by:
Correspondent:
Camera: VCS

SHOTLIST:
1. Various shots of the arrival of Austria’s President Heinz Fischer and his reception by Lebanese President Michel Suleiman
2. Various shots of the welcome ceremony held at the presidential palace for Fischer
3. Various shots of a meeting between Fischer and Suleiman
4. Zoom out, an Austrian plane moving