Frame 0004
Rock Climbing in Palestine
Ein Qinia
By Ibrahim Husseini
05 Dec 2014

Rock climbing is an emerging sport in the occupied Palestinian territories. Two American climbers with the help of an Italian climber are bolting rocks and teaching Palestinians how to rock climb.

The following footage was taken in Ein Qinia, near Ramallah, on Friday December 5, 2014.

This location was picked by Tim and Will for at least two important reasons. The first is because the rock is suitable for bolting and climbing and also makes a challenging climb. The second reason is the geographical location. The proximity of Ein Qinya village to Ramallah makes it unlikely for Israeli settlers to venture in. There are other climbing areas in the OPT but they are close to Israeli settlements and therefore are avoided by Palestinian climbers for fear of getting in trouble with the settlements guards and the Israeli army. Hundreds of Israeli checkpoints across the OPT makes movement a nightmare to Palestinians. Lack of outdoor recreation in Palestine makes climbing attractive to Palestinians and contribute to the overall quality of life for those who value outdoor activities.

More about Tim and Will (taken from the wadiclimbing.com website)

Timothy Bruns was a Political Science major and Arabic Language minor at Colorado College and is deeply interested in development in Palestine. Tim has been rock climbing for many years. He has extensive experience teaching hard skills, technique, and rope skills. He has built rock-climbing walls in the U.S. and is helping to construct an expansion at a local Colorado climbing gym. Tim is a certified lead climber and Wilderness First Responder. Additionally, he has spent past summers working with children and teenagers; leading wilderness trips in New Hampshire and North Carolina and working at a leadership camp with Palestinian youth in Maine.
Will Harris was a Colorado College Economics and Business major, Arabic Language minor and is an accomplished athlete. Will loves rock climbing and worked part time at a local Colorado rock climbing gym. He has devoted his academic career to business development in the Middle East and wrote his thesis on foreign direct investment in Jordan, where he spent four months living and studying.

1st Interview: Nour Awad. Palestinian climber.
2nd Interview: Timothy Bruns- Wadi Climbing Co-Founder
3rd Interview: Wael Hassouneh. Palestinian climber
4th Interview: Victor
5th Interview: Will Harris. Wadi Climbing Co- Founder
6th Interview: Dario Franchetti. Climber & adviser to Wadi Climbing. Italy. Works and lives in the OPT
7th Interview: Edmee Van Rijn. Climber. Holland.Works and lives in the OPT.

Frame 0004
Al Aqsa and the Conflict in Jerusalem
Jerusalem, Israel
By Iliay
27 Nov 2014

November 2014
Jerusalem

As tensions in Jerusalem boil over into open conflict between Israelis and Palestinians, the issue of the Al-Aqsa Mosque complex remains one of the key issues in the conflict. This story explores the cultural and religious significance of the complex to the two sides and illustrates how the area has yet again become a catalyst for violence. Some fear this newest round of violence may lead to a third Palestinian Intifada.

Frame 0004
It's All in Lebanon (French)
Beirut
By Charaf
25 Nov 2014

2011
Beirut, Lebanon

Since the end of the Lebanese civil war in 1990, Lebanon has become a hot bed of both entertainment and news media production in the Arab world. Amongst the melee of risque Arabic music videos and luxury television commercials, the Shia political movement Hezbollah has proved to be one of the most media savvy institutions in the country, using film, television, music, and masterful political stagecraft to further its image in the minds of Lebanese and the international community. From the flashy music videos of Haifa Wehbe to the resistance videos of Hezbollah, this film follows the tumultuous post-civil war history of Lebanon through its fertile media industry.

Thumb sm
Palestine- when a school is illegal 12
Khan Al Ahmar, Palestine
By Vinciane Jacquet
16 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014
Khan Al-Ahmar, Palestine

The straw and mud structure of the school is not solid. Inside the classrooms, the walls have been starting to fall apart.

While lack of funds is one reason for the poor structure of the school, the other major factor is an Israeli law banning the use of cement for construction by Palestinians in Area C of the West Bank. The school is located in Area C, which is the part of the West Bank under total Israeli military control.

Thumb sm
Palestine- when a school is illegal 07
Khan Al Ahmar, Palestine
By Vinciane Jacquet
16 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014
Khan Al-Ahmar, Palestine

The school of Khan Al-Ahmar has classes from grades 1 to 9. Children from five different Bedouin communities attend classes there. Every year, their number grows. There were 120 children for the 2013-2014 school year. In September 2014, 146 came to register.

Thumb sm
Palestine- when a school is illegal 08
Khan Al Ahmar, Palestine
By Vinciane Jacquet
16 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014
Khan Al-Ahmar, Palestine

English class for 3rd grade children. All the children are eager to learn. They want to keep studying after the 9th grade, and often want to become doctor or lawyers because there are no medical or legal services in their community. While medical services are a basic essential for any community, legal services are significant to the West Bank Bedouin because they need lawyers to help them battle eviction orders from Israeli courts and the Israeli Army.

Thumb sm
Palestine- when a school is illegal 01
Khan Al Ahmar, Palestine
By Vinciane Jacquet
16 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014.
Khan Al-Ahmar, Palestine.

Teachers run in the rain between their classrooms and the "teachers room" to bring handouts for their students.

Thumb sm
Palestine- when a school is illegal 10
Khan Al Ahmar, Palestine
By Vinciane Jacquet
15 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014
Khan Al-Ahmar, Palestine

Children in the 8th grade studying, with the shape of the tires appearing in the wall. The goal of many of the students is often to enter into a profession that is not represented in their community, like medical or legal.

Every year the school administration goes to court in order to postpone the demolition of the institution. So far, they have managed to avoid a final demolition, but the orders remain, and it is uncertain how much longer the school will remain.

Thumb sm
Palestine- when a school is illegal 04
Khan Al Ahmar, Palestine
By Vinciane Jacquet
15 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014
Khan Al-Ahmar, Palestine

Among the classrooms built of soil and rubber tires, two are built of sheet metal. These more sturdy structures are sponsored by the European Union. The State of Israel did not authorize their construction and, as a consequence, they are hidden under tents and tarps.

When materials are donated by foreign donors, like the European Union, they are still at risk of confiscation by Israeli authorities when they are shipped into the area. In February of 2014, Italy donated playground equipment. However, the entire shipment was confiscated by the Israeli Army and materials never made it to the school.

Thumb sm
Palestine- when a school is illegal 13
Khan Al Ahmar, Palestine
By Vinciane Jacquet
15 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014
Khan Al-Ahmar, Palestine

Every time it rains, the classrooms get wet and humid, and the water leaks into where the students sit. There is also no heater for the cold winter of the desert.

Thumb sm
Palestine- when a school is illegal 11
Khan Al Ahmar, Palestine
By Vinciane Jacquet
15 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014
Khan Al-Ahmar, Palestine

Harema Zhaeqq is the headmaster of the school. She is highly respected by the teachers, as they say that she is always able to find the necessary furniture for the classes, by canvassing companies in Palestine and abroad. Some companies in Palestine are hesitant to donate, because they fear sanctions from Israel. However, Ms. Zhaeqq is usually able to convince them anyway. Here, she stands beside the supplies for science classes.

Thumb sm
Palestine- when a school is illegal 09
Khan Al Ahmar, Palestine
By Vinciane Jacquet
15 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014
Khan Al-Ahmar, Palestine

English class. The children study with bowls on the tables to capture the rain falling into the classrooms.

Thumb sm
Palestine- when a school is illegal 05
Khan Al Ahmar, Palestine
By Vinciane Jacquet
15 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014
Khan Al-Ahmar, Palestine

Two young girls are go to class amidst murals used to add color to the otherwise mundane surroundings.

Thumb sm
Palestine- when a school is illegal 03
Khan Al Ahmar, Palestine
By Vinciane Jacquet
15 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014
Khan Al-Ahmar, Palestine

Children have to buy their notebooks and school supplies themselves. However, when a family is too poor to pay for school supplies, the teachers gather money to cover the child's expenses.

Thumb sm
Palestine- when a school is illegal 02
Khan Al Ahmar, Palestine
By Vinciane Jacquet
15 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014
Khan Al-Ahmar, Palestine

Recreation time at the school. A young boy strikes a pose for the camera.

Thumb sm
Palestine- when a school is illegal 15
Khan Al Ahmar, Palestine
By Vinciane Jacquet
15 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014
Khan Al-Ahmar, Palestine

A young student runs back to class after playtime. The recreation area is muddy and wet due to heavy rain. The teachers wish the children could have a better space to play in because the ground is not suitable for child recreation.

Thumb sm
Palestine- when a school is illegal 14
Khan Al Ahmar, Palestine
By Vinciane Jacquet
15 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014
Khan Al-Ahmar, Palestine

The school playground for the Bedouin children of Khan Al-Ahmar is built of tires, mud, and other scrap materials.

Thumb sm
Palestine- when a school is illegal 06
Khan Al Ahmar, Palestine
By Vinciane Jacquet
15 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014
Khan Al-Ahmar, Palestine

Signs are made visible outside of the classrooms to thank the public sponsors of the school. While thankful for the funds, the headmaster pointed out that funds are limited and they only receive funds from the European Union and Italy.

Thumb sm
Palestine: When a School is Illegal
Khan al-Ahmar
By Vinciane Jacquet
14 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014
Khan al Ahmar, West Bank, Palestine

The Khan al-Ahmar School serves the children of the Jahalin Bedouin community in the West Bank and has been declared illegal by Israeli authorities. It is now facing possible demolition. Built in 2009, the school was constructed with mud and tires due to a lack of funds and an Israeli law that bans Palestinians in Area C of the West Bank from building structures made of cement. The children now attend school in poorly equipped classrooms with no heating, leaking ceilings, and little electricity. However, it is possible that even this primitive learning environment could be snatched from them at a moment's notice. Over 140 students are currently enrolled in the school. The nearest alternative school is located about 45 minutes away by car. The school's imminent demolition is part of a plan by Israeli authorities to displace the Jahalin Bedouin living in "Area C" of the occupied West Bank. The Khan Al-Ahmar School and Bedouin community is located in the Jerusalem periphery, between the Israeli settlements of Ma'ale Adumim and Kfar Adumim. While the Jahalin Bedouin have a longstanding presence in this area (they settled in the area in 1948, after being evicted by Israel from their lands in the Negev desert), the community and school present an obstacle to Israel's planned settlement expansion and construction of the separation barrier. The community lives with the constant threat of displacement. Every year, the school administration goes to court in order to postpone the planned demolition of the school. This year they were lucky and the court sided with them. However, the order still stands and next year they may not be so lucky.

Tents and tombstones- israeli bedouin...
Araqib
By Vinciane Jacquet
11 Nov 2014

November 12, 2014. Al Araqib, Israel.

The men of Al Araqib pray. They say they want a normal life, and they just want to make their area beautiful. "The government just wants to gather the maximum of Arabs in the minimum of land. But we have our history here. We won't leave".

Tents and tombstones- israeli bedouin...
Araqib
By Vinciane Jacquet
11 Nov 2014

November 12, 2014. Al Araqib, Israel.

Aziz, chief of the village (center):

"When the Israeli government started, in 1997, the new ministry 'Department of Negev and Galilee', headed by Shimon Peres, we thought that maybe the situation would change because Peres was a Nobel prize man. However instead, every year, from 1999 and until 2003, they sprayed us with Round Up weed killer. [They killed] the grass and over 200 sheep, 16 Arab horses and 2 camels. They want to kill the relationship between the Bedouins and the land".

Tents and tombstones- israeli bedouin...
Araqib
By Vinciane Jacquet
11 Nov 2014

November 12, 2014. Al Araqib, Israel.

Sally is the wife of the mayor. Gathered in the plastic tarp are all of their belongings, included cooking utensils and a little bit of food, like canned tuna.

Tents and tombstones- israeli bedouin...
Araqib
By Vinciane Jacquet
11 Nov 2014

November 12, 2014. Al Araqib, Israel.

The cemetery area of Al Turi is empty of animals. The Bedouins there only own 3 horses and a few ducks and chickens. They used to have sheep and camels. The sheep have been killed and the camels confiscated. Once, a camel caused a car accident. Since then, as soon as the soldiers see a camel in the desert, they take it and bring it to a "camel farm" that they have opened. They keep the camel there one month and send us the bill for the food and care. If we cannot pay after this month, the camel is lost forever. And they then sell us the camel milk that we love so much.

Tents and tombstones- israeli bedouin...
Araqib
By Vinciane Jacquet
11 Nov 2014

November 12, 2014. Al Araqib, Israel.

Sally:

"Before Israel chased us away, we worked, cultivated our land, had sheep, chickens, vegetables, trees. Our home was very simple, but we had everything, including a kitchen and toilets. Today we have nothing, we cannot take a shower everyday. They made the area and our homes illegal. Because Israel says our way of life is not normal. I asked [the Israelis], how can I make my home legal? [They had] no answer."

Tents and tombstones- israeli bedouin...
Araqib
By Vinciane Jacquet
11 Nov 2014

November 12, 2014. Al Araqib, Israel.

The entrance of Al Turi cemetary in Al Araqib. 22 families used to live here. Since July 27th, 2010, the " Black Day" as the Bedouins call it, only 12 people are still living in Al Araqib, confined in the graveyard. The "Black Day" is the day where the village was totally demolished by the Israeli army. They came at 4am, destroyed 65 houses, uprooted 4.500 olive trees and 700 fruit trees and killed dozens of chickens.

Tents and tombstones- israeli bedouin...
Araqib
By Vinciane Jacquet
11 Nov 2014

November 12, 2014. Al Araqib, Israel.

Maryam is the dean of Al Araqib. She has suffered all kinds of harassment since 1948 at the hands of the Israeli army and various Zionist gangs. In her lifetime, Israeli authorities or vigilanties have destroyed or vandalized her home and land more than 70 times (33 of those raids took place after 2010).

Tents and tombstones- israeli bedouin...
Araqib
By Vinciane Jacquet
11 Nov 2014

November 12, 2014. Al Araqib, Israel.

Saba plays with her daughter Araqib before she begins cooking dinner. Saba says: "I do nothing during the day except watching to see if the police or soldiers are coming so I can hide everything that wouldn't be already hidden among the graves".

Tents and tombstones- israeli bedouin...
Araqib
By Vinciane Jacquet
11 Nov 2014

November 12, 2014. Al Araqib, Israel.

The last time the army came to Al Araqib's cemetery was October 14, 2014. They took fridges and cars. Now the men live under the trees and sleep in the 2 cars that are left.

Tents and tombstones- israeli bedouin...
Araqib
By Vinciane Jacquet
11 Nov 2014

November 12, 2014. Al Araqib, Israel.

Saba lives in the graveyard with her husband, daughter, brothers, sisters, and grand-mother. Everyday, she hides all of their belongings among the graves to prevent the soldiers from confiscating them. Then, when night comes, she goes to take the carpets and blankets so the family can sleep.

Tents and tombstones- israeli bedouin...
Araqib
By Vinciane Jacquet
11 Nov 2014

November 12, 2014. Al Araqib, Israel.

Araqib is 2 years old and a half. She is the youngest inhabitant of the graveyard of Al Araqib. She has been named after the village.

Tents and tombstones- israeli bedouin...
Araqib
By Vinciane Jacquet
11 Nov 2014

November 12, 2014. Al Araqib, Israel.

The three youngest children of Al Araqib from left to right: Araqib (2 1/2), Mohamed (14) and Khaled (12). Mohamed and Khaled go by foot to school everyday in the recognized Bedouin village of Rahat.

Tents and tombstones- israeli bedouin...
Araqib
By Vinciane Jacquet
11 Nov 2014

November 12, 2014. Al Araqib, Israel.

On July 12th, 2014, after the Israeli army came and destroyed everything around the graveyard, they set up a military zone in the Negev, not far from Al Araqib. Police and army were present 24/7.

In September, the police left. Aziz, the chief of the village describes the current situation:

"They still come from time to time, look at what's happening and leave. Sometimes, they destroy something, took our clothes, blankets, carpets and any personal belonging."

Tents and tombstones- israeli bedouin...
Araqib
By Vinciane Jacquet
11 Nov 2014

November 12, 2014. Al Araqib, Israel.

In June 2014, the two families that are still living in Al Araqib decided to move into the graveyard. Before that, they actually lived next to it, but the army came anyway and destroyed everything they could. However, according to Aziz, the chief of the family, "the graves are like a border. The police don't intervene".

Tents and Tombstones: Bedouins in Isr...
Al-Araqib
By Vinciane Jacquet
10 Nov 2014

November 12, 2014
al-Araqib, Israel

Al Araqib is one of the 46 Bedouin villages in the Negev desert that the state of Israel refuses to recognize. The residents of the village, both past and present, inherited these lands from their fathers and grandfathers. Harassment from the Israeli Army and vigilanties has become commonplace for the Araqib Bedouin. The harassment dates back to 1948, when a gang of Zionist militants rounded up 14 Bedouin men working in a field in al-Araqib and summarily executed them. Since 1948, homes and properties in al-Araqib have been regularly destroyed and stolen. On July 27th, 2010, the village was totally demolished. Since then, the village has been re-built and destroyed 33 times. However, many residents were unable to stay and moved to the recognized village of Rahat. Those who did choose to stay are confined to the area of the Al-Turi cemetary and have been living under harsh conditions, always scared of an unexpected visit from the soldiers.

Frame 0004
Gazans Use Propane to Fuel Cars (Shor...
Gaza
By Yasser Abu Wazna
05 Nov 2014

Gaza, Palestinian Territories
November 4, 2014

The ongoing Israeli blockade on the Gaza Strip and the recent closure of most the tunnels used for smuggling goods from Egypt has led to a severe fuel shortage. As a result, some Gazans are modifying their car engines and generators to make them run on propane instead of gasoline. Propane is widely used for cooking in Gaza.

Shot list:

00:00 – 00:05
A general shot shows cars driving in both directions on a main road in Gaza City.

00:06 – 00:11
A close shot shows the exhaust pipe of a taxi as it drives away.

00:12 – 00:18
A medium shot shows many parked taxis and men standing and chatting; a female passenger gets out of one of them.

00:19 – 00:20
A medium shot shows a street-food shop.

00:21 – 00:27
A medium shot shows the same street-food shop from a different angle.

00:31- 0:34
A medium shot shows an electric generator running and connected to a gas canister.

00:35 – 01:01
Interview with Ahmad Abu al-Anzi, a male curtain store owner, Arabic/ interview transcript below

01:02 – 01:07
A medium shot shows Ahmad Abu al-Anzi, a male curtain store owner at work.

01:08- 01:10
A wide shot shows the façade of Daban Company for gas supply.

01:11- 00:14 A medium shot shows two men standing and another around gas canisters.

00:14 – 00:19
A pan right movement shows a man carrying a gas canister.

00: 20 – 00:34
Traveling shot from inside a taxi shows the car stopping to pick up a female passenger.

00:35-01:53
Interview with Mustafa Eid, male taxi driver/ interview transcript below

01:54 – 02:06
Interview with Haneen Abu Medean, a female passenger, Arabic/ interview transcript below

02:07 – 02:40
Interview with Ayman Seidam, a mechanic, Arabic/ interview transcript below

02:41- 03:35
Interview with the spokesman of the Ministry of Transportation Khalil Mosbah al-Zayyan/ interview transcript below

Interviews

00:35 – 01:01
Interview with Ahmad Abu al-Anzi, a male curtain store owner, Arabic
“Because of the gasoline shortage, you have to use propane to fuel electric generators and carry on with your work… There are power shortages that could last from six to seven hours and the power is on during the night while you cannot work. You have to use any alternative kind of fuel to keep working.”

00:35-01:53
Interview with Mustafa Eid, male taxi driver
“I altered the car because of the gasoline shortage... In the past, we used to get gasoline through tunnels from Egypt, but they were closed about a year ago, so we switched to propane to save money.”

01:54 – 02:06
Interview with Haneen Abu Medean, a female passenger, Arabic

-Do you know that this car is running on gas?

-Yes, I know.

-What do you think of that?

-This is normal, because there is no gasoline but [propane] is available.

02:07 – 02:40
Interview with Ayman Seidam, a mechanic, Arabic
“I am disconnecting the filter because I want to set the propane machine. It is not working properly. The propane machine does not change the engine; it only stops the flow of gasoline. Gasoline is expensive here, so people have to switch to using propane. We install a small device to pump propane instead of gasoline into the engine using the injection system. “This is the propane device. It is made in Turkey and called Fima.”

02:41- 03:35
Interview with the spokesman of the Ministry of Transportation Khalil Mosbah al-Zayyan, Arabic
“Altering taxis to make them run on propane is against the law, but due to the siege on the Gaza Strip and the large assault against the Palestinian people that comes with it, many taxi drivers are customizing their cars to make them run on propane. It is against the law and the ministry of transportation does allow the installation of propane pipes in cars because it is dangerous… for the passengers. The ministry of transportation, in cooperation with the traffic police, is trying to resolve this problem by monitoring people who buy propane pipes [used in altering vehicles].

Thumb sm
Handicapped in the rubble of gaza 21
Gaza
By Sanaa Kamal , Zaher ghoul
21 Oct 2014

October 22, 2014
Gaza, Palestine

Jamil Attia Za'anin with his mother Donia Za'anin. Jamil, 21, developed a spinal condition 16 years ago when he was just a child. Poor healthcare infrastructure in Gaza meant that doctors could not properly treat Jamil, so the disease spread to his brain, leaving him handicapped. Jamil lives with his ten family members in a shack in the town of Beit Hanoun in the north of the Gaza Strip. He has a younger brother Mohammed, 19, who is also handicapped and the family's situation was made even worse after their house was destroyed in the recent war with Israel.

Frame 0004
Recycling the Rubble of War in Gaza
Gaza
By Yasser Abu Wazna
20 Oct 2014

October 16, 2014
Gaza, Palestine

Gazans are salvaging construction materials from the rubble of buildings that were destroyed by Israeli military action in the 2014 summer war. Over 45,000 houses were destroyed in the war and the ongoing Israeli blockade is preventing Gazans from importing cement for rebuilding purposes. Instead, Gazans are left to find creative ways to rebuild their communities, including recycling rubble.

Burj Al Basha, in the heart of Gaza city, was completely demolished during the last Israeli war against Gaza. The building was one of the main landmarks in Gaza city. Its bombardment left huge amounts of rubble to the extent that it closed off two of the main streets in the city. Tens of workers using heavy equipment are trying to clear a path for the traffic. During the process workers try to recycle iron bars from the rubble to be used for future construction projects. They are also recycling pieces of concrete for street paving projects.

Abu Ali Daloul is one of the main traders of recycled iron bars in Gaza. He bought tons of the iron bars removed from the rubble of the recent war. He fixes the bars and prepares them to be used again for construction purposes.

The concrete rubble are transported to stone breaking workshops in order to be turned into pebbles for use on road paving projects. Abu Lebda is a stone breading workshop which recycles concrete rubble and provides brick manufacturers with pebbles to make bricks with

Malaka concrete bricks factory brings the pebbles from Abu Lebda's stone breaking workshop and puts the amounts in its stores hoping the cement to pass through the crossings to be able to produce bricks suffecient to rebuild Gaza.

Despite the strenuous efforts Gazans are undertaking to create new methods to rebuild their shattered communities, cement is still the biggest challenge for them as the blockade on the coastal enclave remains.

Shot List:
Shots of a machine breaking concrete in Burj Al Basha site.
Shots of a bulldozer removing the rubble.
Shots of workers collecting and rehabilitating iron bars.
Shots of Abu Ali Daloul's store for recycled construction iron bars
Shots of Abu Lebdda concrete stone breaking manufactory recycling the rubble
Shots of Malaka's concrete bricks factory

Interviews:

(02:00) Waleed, a worker in Burj al-Basha (man, Arabic):
"We are in Gaza at the gates of Burj al-Basha (al-Basha tower) that was shelled by Israel. We modify iron so we can reuse it. We do this so we can rebuild Burj al-Basha (al-Basha tower). As you know, the iron factories are not working, so we have to work with the rubble. We take the iron that came from the rubble of Burj al-Basha (al-Basha tower) and we work on it so we can reuse it to rebuild the area."

(02:37) Mohamad, a worker in Burj al-Basha site (man, Arabic):
"We are now in front of Burj al-Basha (al-Basha tower) , it is a factory for modifying iron. There are about 25 workers here in addition to a modifying expert. Our job is to remove the rubble from the buildings that were destroyed by Israel. We separate the iron from the concrete. We modify the iron and store it in a storage room to be reused in the future. And we also put the concrete in special storage units to be reused later, it can be used for construction or as asphalt for the roads. We work on re-appropriating iron from the buildings that were destroyed so we can use it in construction work or other things.

(04:06) Abu Ali Daloul, Iron trader in Gaza: We did not think of taking this as a profession before and we never thought about it. However, because of the destruction that happened, we had to resort to what we call 'self-sufficiency'. If the roads are closed and we are sieged, we need to build the country and we need this material. At first we started separating the iron, some of the iron is junk, some is appropriate for manufacturing. It can be used for construction, but mostly it is used for manufacturing, it can be used for shielding windows, making nails and other similar aspects. The rest of the iron which is in good condition goes to construction. The closest site to us was Burj al-Basha, and Burj al-zafer, and also in 8th street, there used to be a building near Ali Bin Abi Taleb Mosque. Its rubble blocked the road, so we had to remove them quickly because it was affecting the traffic. At the moment, all the iron that we have is from Burj al-Basha. We were able to take out of Burj al-Basha about 45 tons the first time we tried salvaging. Most of the iron we extracted is already sold, but the problem of the lack of concrete is what is postponing the construction process. No matter what, we will build our country, which our iron, our products, our work and effort.

(07:17) Abu Mohamad Abu lebdda, owner of a concrete breaking factory:
After the war, and after Israel had destroyed the houses and blocked paths, we did not have concrete entering Gaza. So we had to recycle the rubble, to produce concrete, and to make bricks to be used in construction. We also reuse the metal after adjusting it. As you can see, the workers here, separate the rubble from the wood, the clothes, plastic and of the remaining found under the rubble. We clean it then crush it using machines, and we produce gravel, the soft one for building bricks and the rough one is used as concrete.
As I already stated, there are two types of gravel, the rough one we call "lentil", used as concrete, and the soft one we call it "sesame seeds", used to build bricks.

(09:21) Lad Malaka:
We build these bricks from the gravel made by the rubble recycling factories in Gaza. This type of brick is used for building roofs. We need good quality, so the brick has to pass through a test, we take it and examine it near the Islamic University. This brick passed the test and was made according to the required quality. We increase the cement [the small amount of cement available, which is mixed with the rubble] a bit, and it gives us a great quality.

Thumb sm
West Bank Bedouins Face Eviction
Tubas
By Seth Herald
15 Oct 2014

October 16, 2014
Tubas, Jordan Valley, West Bank

The Tuobas region of the northern Jordan Valley is home to around 600 Bedouin families, all of them sheep herders and farmers, who are now being slowly forced off their land by encroaching Israeli settlements and military installations. Bedouins throughout the Central West Bank and the Jordan Valley face what is known as a “ Push Factor”, in which restrictions of movement are imposed, dictating where they can graze their animals, and permits to build solid structure housing are routinely rejected. The bedouin, some %60 of them children, currently live in tents without running water and working electricity. They instead rely on solar power for their basic needs. Having witnessed settler violence and having been targeted during Israeli military training, the bedouin of the Northern Jordan Valley lead a rough life, "Everyday they are building new houses and a university and always increasing but we can't build anything. One day the soldiers and settlers came to us and said: ‘as far as my eyes can see I’d like it to be without you there'", explained bedouin shepherd Mohammed Awad. According to UN OCHA, 540,000 Israelis settlers live in the West Bank settlements, which were built illegally and against international law. They receive preferential treatment in terms of the allocation of land and the planning and provision of services. With the forceful relocation and mass evictions of Bedouin communities, up to 12,000 families will be moved to the dedicated relocation site. Bedouins could face a difficult time learning to coupe with each other, as each group holds it own way of life and traditions.

Frame 0004
Gaza Enjoys Abundant Olive Harvest
Gaza
By Yasser Abu Wazna
12 Oct 2014

October 12, 2014
Gaza, Palestine

The olive harvest is considered to be the backbone of Gaza’s agricultural economy. According to officials, the harvest of the current season is estimated to double what it was in the last year, despite the devastating recent war. The current olive harvest reached 25,000 tons, while last season’s yielded just 10,000 tons. Palestinians have a distinctive relationship with the olive tree. To them, it is a symbol of Palestinian resistance against the Israeli occupation. It is also a holy and sacred tree for Palestinian Muslims and, on top of this, a world symbol for peace.

In an olive field owned by the Salmany family in Biet Lahya, the harvest has begun. Family members collect the olives with hired workers from their neighborhood. To them, this season is distinctive since it will increase their income. Members of the Salmany family are mainly villagers; however, some of them used to work inside Israel but have been unemployed since 2000, the year when Israel stopped employing Gazan workers after the second Intifada. Since then, olives have become their only source of income.

Shot List:

General overview of Biet Lahya
Shots of workers in the olive fields
Shots of the olive trees
Shots of workers collecting olives
Shots of Salmany children
Shots of Alaa Salmani singing while working
Interviews with Alaa Salmani, Omar Salmani
Interior and exterior shots of the factory

Transcription:

(01:57) “Olives here in Palestine represent what is important, Jerusalem, al-Aqsa. We do not forget the Palestinian prisoners. In the olive season we always remember the prisoners, and the martyrs.”

Interviewer: How do you remember them?

“We remember how they used to help us and stand by us, we remember the huge role they play. My brothers is a prisoner, when we come to harvest the olives, we remember him. And not only him, many of our friends and neighbors are also prisoners.”

“The production is much less now, especially after the water and the compost were cut for 52 days. It affected the olives a lot so. A rock would melt under that heat.”

“Thank God that, despite of all the people who want to harm us, our plants are fine.”

“My original job was a driver in Israel, and my brother and my father were also drivers in Israel. But ever since Israel was blocked we have nothing except agriculture. Which is something we are famous for here in the north and especially in Gaza.”

“Olive trees are known not to yield the same amount of olives in every season. One season, they bear a lot, the next year less, and the next they rest.”

“But this year, despite the war, the fact that we were busy protecting ourselves, and did not take good care of the olive trees, but they still gave a good season. Thank God, he blessed us, and this season gave double the amount of last year.”

(05:09) “Olives are a blessing from God, they are a symbol of peace. We hope for Abu Mazen to keep ruling us, and to rule all the Arab countries. I heard that he was coming, and we welcome him.”

“Olives are the symbol of Palestine, remember when Abu Ammar used to carry the olive branch and say that it is the symbol of peace. The situation in this country is horrible. The strong hurt the weak. Nobody helps us or cares about us, we lost so many things, and we are willing to sacrifice everything for Abu Mazen.”

(08:37) “The love season is good for everyone, the farmers, workers, merchants, and all people. Even though many farms were ruined, it is beneficial for everyone. And also olive oil, it becomes cheap for everyone.

“The olive tree is our heritage, in Ariha, we have the most ancient olive tree, and it is over 500 years old. It is very important to us and the olives are mentioned in the holy Qura'n. We are highly attached to this tree; it is one of the most important products of Palestine. And we always try to maintain it and every time an olive tree is ruined we plant a new one, it is the symbol of the Palestinian.”

Thumb sm
Qalandiya Festival: Celebrating Pales...
West Bank
By adrian
08 Oct 2014

October 2014,
West Bank, Palestine

The second 'Qalandiya International' contemporary arts biennial drew to a close on Thursday 13 November after nearly a month of exhibitions, performances, installations, conferences and film screenings. Held in cities across 'Historic Palestine', the festival brought together more than 100 Palestinian and international artists to respond to issues relating to Palestinian life, politics and history. Over recent years, various Palestinian contemporary artists have been the recipients of major international awards. Amongst others, Emily Jacir won the Golden Lion at the 2007 Venice Biennial and Mona Hattoum was awarded the Prize Joan Miro in Barcelona in 2011. Earlier, critically acclaimed Palestinian film-maker Elia Suleiman had won the Jury Prize at the 2002 Cannes Film festival. Despite the ever-growing international profile of Palestinian contemporary arts, Qalandiya International is one of the first attempts to launch a regular contemporary arts festival within Palestine itself. Taking place amidst ongoing violence in Jerusalem and following soon after the killing of more than 2000 Palestinians over the summer in Gaza, it was unsure at one stage whether the festival should go ahead as planned. Yet organisers decided to push ahead in the spirit of 'sumoud' (steadfastness), and to some people these artistic interventions continued to demonstrate the significant role that Palestinian art and culture has played in the context of resistance since the days of Ghassan Kanafani, Mahmoud Darwish and Naji al-Ali.