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Nigerian Army Implicated in Village A...
Jos
By jfaden
08 Jul 2015

At the moment when the world is focusing its attention on reporting on Boko Haram atrocities, the Nigerian army in its bid to fight insurgency on its soil was accused of committing human right abuses.
Amnesty International has report evidence of human right abuses perpetrated by the Nigerian Army in the North Eastern part of Nigeria with proof based on dozens of military documents, interviews with victims and eyewitnesses.
However the Nigerian Army has since denied the authenticity of the report through the Chief of Administration of Nigeria Army, Major General Adamu Baba Abubakar who said they have commenced investigation into Amnesty International’s allegations against them saying the allegations against the Nigerian troops can dampen the spirit and morale of troops.
Major-General Adamu also accused Amnesty International of not cooperating with the Nigerian Army in the investigation saying the Nigerian military is a conventional and professional military that is driven by international standards and best practices.
Meanwhile the people living in villages around Jos in North Eastern Nigeria are not buying the military’s version of the story as they have been crying out over what they termed as unfair harassment and brutal treatment by the army sent for peace keeping in the volatile area.
The villages in the North Eastern part of Nigeria close to Jos City have been a battle ground with an average of 10 people murdered weekly by what security operatives called 'unknown gunmen' who many suspected to be Boko Haram insurgents running from the Nigerian Army in the north east and looking for a more peaceful settlement like the north central region.
The villagers have been raising alarm over the influx of strangers in the area which makes many to flee from their ancestral homes. The Gunmen killed and sacked dozens of villages rendering thousands homeless (at the moment it is dangerous to go in and film the destruction in the interior).
The Army is stationed in those villages but the attacks were going on unabated which makes the villagers to be suspicious of the army and accuse them of complicity in the attacks.
Whenever there was an attack on any village in the area and the villagers demand to know why they were been attacked with the army around instead they will be harassed, beaten, threatened to be arrested and sometimes shot at by the military without explanation.
Things went out of hand on the 17th of June last month in the village of Heipang about 20kms from Jos city when women protesting the army stationing their armored tank close to where the women displayed their ware for sale by the roadside as that will scared customers were shot at directly by the soldiers, two women were hit by bullets and died on the spot, one was shot at with a baby on her back as she ran into a shop for protection.
First week of this month, for three days, the army came to the village around Foron about 35 kms to Jos in Hilux trucks and armored tanks breaking into the houses of the villagers who fled on seeing the soldiers, destroying properties and even killing animals, despites the villagers demand for explanation, they refused to explain what they were looking for and ruled out any compensation.
The Army also refused to be interviewed on tape instead they accused the villagers of attacking soldiers which they said is what led to the house to house assault and refused to also produce evidence supporting the statement on attacks on their men.

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Nigeria: Witnesses Describe Village A...
Foron Village, Jos, Nigeria
By jfaden
08 Jul 2015

At the moment when the world is focusing its attention on reporting on Boko Haram atrocities, the Nigerian army in its bid to fight insurgency on its soil was accused of committing human right abuses.

Amnesty International has report evidence of human right abuses perpetrated by the Nigerian Army in the North Eastern part of Nigeria with proof based on dozens of military documents, interviews with victims and eyewitnesses.

In this video, witnesses of an attack on Foron, a small village near Jos, tell their stories, and speak out against the perpetrators of the attacks.

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Nigeria: Witnesses Describe Village A...
Heipang Village, Jos, Nigeria
By jfaden
08 Jul 2015

At the moment when the world is focusing its attention on reporting on Boko Haram atrocities, the Nigerian army in its bid to fight insurgency on its soil was accused of committing human right abuses.

Amnesty International has report evidence of human right abuses perpetrated by the Nigerian Army in the North Eastern part of Nigeria with proof based on dozens of military documents, interviews with victims and eyewitnesses.

In this video, witnesses of an attack on Heipang a small village near Jos, tell their stories, and speak out against the perpetrators of the attacks.

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Eyewitness Footage of Attack on Niger...
Heipang Village, Jos, Nigeria
By jfaden
17 Jun 2015

Mobile footage captured by a local villager showing a woman allegedly killed by the Nigerian Army.

On the 17th of June in the village of Heipang, about 20 kms from Jos city, women were protesting against the army stationing their armored vehicle close to where they displayed their wares for sale by the roadside, as that would scare customers. These women were shot at directly by the soldiers. Two women were hit by bullets and died on the spot, one was shot at with a baby on her back as she ran into a shop for protection.

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Blood Sugar: life in the Cambodian su...
Cambodia
By Ruom
04 Jul 2014

Human rights organisations have estimated that 12,000 people in Cambodia have been forced off their land to make way for a new surge of sugar production. The European Union’s initiative ‘Everything but Arms’, which allows Cambodian sugar to be sold duty-free on the European market at a minimum price per tonne, has created a “sugar rush” in Cambodia. As a result, crops have been razed. Animals have been shot. Homes have been burned to the ground. Thousands of people have been left destitute. Some have been thrown in jail for daring to protest. Given no option but to accept inadequate compensations, villagers gave up their homes and farmlands.

The EU is, to date, yet to investigate these reports.

In the meantime, families forced off their land, who have lost their only source of income, have little choice but to work for the very companies who have claimed their land, either at factory level, or cutting and bundling sugar canes for rates as low as US$2.50 per day. The dire economic situation means that children also work in the cane fields but still the families earn barely enough money to survive.

On March 2013, a lawsuit was filed in the UK against Tate&Lyle, the multi-national sugar giant, to which the majority of exports from the Koh Kong plantation are being sent. 200 Cambodian farmers are suing the company for violating their rights as, under Cambodian law, the fruits of the land belong to the landowner (or lawful possessor in this case). According to humanitarian organizations Tate&Lyle is knowingly benefiting from the harvest of stolen land, and the rightful owners of the harvest are not receiving their share of sugar sales.
Land ownership in Cambodia is difficult to establish, due to the country’s evolving legal and political structures following the fall of the Khmer Rouge regime, and the country is slowly trying to re-establish land titling through government programs. Though in the past, and still for the time being, small-scale farmers and poor households are often forced to give up their land for little compensation.

Fair development and industrialization is a struggle for this South East Asian nation, where, for the right price, powerful landowners, wealthy businessmen, and foreign investors have their pick of the country’s prime real estate.

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Skiing Afghanistan
Bamiyan
By Christina Feldt
23 Jun 2014

The Bamiyan Valley is one of the most beautiful places Afghanistan has to offer but it is best known for the destruction of the ancient Buddha statues by the Taliban in 2001. Before skiing arrived to Bamiyan, winter was a desolate time of unemployment. Now, skiing has attracted visitors and is one sign of repose.

For most Afghans, skiing is a very alien concept and there is a severe lack of gear and equipment for all new ski enthusiasts. Many villagers make their own poles and skis out of wood with metal sheeting shaped and nailed to the skis. The Bamiyan ski club and the Aga Khan Foundation are determined to attract more people and spectators to the sport and enable more and more locals to enroll in this new unlikely activity. To promote skiing and tourism in the region, the Bamiyan Ski Club organizes the Afghan Ski Challenge every year in March. The event gathers skiing enthusiasts from Afghanistan and Switzerland.

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The Gold Fever of Lombok
lombok
By Elisabetta Zavoli
29 Apr 2014

Indonesia has a long tradition of gold mining. The country is in fact one of the world’s top gold producers. But when the price of gold increased in 2007 and early 2008, an illegal gold rush began. “Before 2009, people in the Mount Prabu area were all farmers or day workers. In 2008, people from Java and Kalimantan came here to teach us how to extract gold from the soil and rocks. Since then, everyone wants to be a miner”, Dina, an inhabitant, explains. The reason behind people's interest in gold mining is easy to understand. An average daily income for a farmer or a fisherman, living in central and south Lombok, is about 10 thousand Rupees, less than one US Dollar, while the daily earnings from gold mining activity can be five to ten times that amount.. At first, villagers became wealthy quickly because the first layers of ground were naturally rich in gold. Between 2008 and 2009, there were 10 to 20 grams of gold in every 30 kilogram bag of ore. However, in 2014 the concentration of gold in the soil has decreased to less than one gram per bag. The situation has drastically changed but villagers have not been able to save or invest the gains they made during the first years of activity. Most of them have spent all their money on consumer goods such as motorbikes, jewelry and hi-tech items. “When there will be no more ore to be processed for gold, I’ll come back to be a farmer”, Dina says. The gold rush in Lombok has not only changed the economy of a region, it has also had a serious impact on the environment. Today, the hills in Sekotong Province look like a gruyere cheese. Hundreds of meters of tunnels have been dug and now form a dense network that has weakened the hills from inside. Miners, most of whom are former farmers without any kind of knowledge of mining, dig tirelessly on land owned by someone else. As modern sharecroppers, they give the owner 5 bags full of soil for every 15 bags they collect, without knowing the concentration of gold in each bag. They keep the other 10 bags as their salaries. What remains is equally divided among the miners working in the same tunnel. Gold mining is a hazardous job. Many miners died when a tunnel collapsed on them. Mercury and cyanide slurry are everywhere. Miners use them without any kind of protection. Mercury accumulates in the body, degrading the nervous system and leading sometimes to madness. In 2011, Sekotong Province counted around 12 thousand grinders. Each grinder can mill 5 kilograms of raw ore and needs a hundred grams of liquid mercury to extract gold. Usually, the family of the miner can do two to three cycles of processing per day, using the same mercury for several extractions. Although the use of mercury in gold mining is illegal in Indonesia, it is commonly used to extract gold. Every year, tens of tons of mercury are released in the environment. In Lombok, gold fever seems to be more dangerous than dengue fever.

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Yörük village
Karaman, Turkey
By Amy Hume
09 Apr 2013

This village is in Kılbasan, an area of Karaman. The buildings are protected by the government so that no more construction can take place.

The Yörük, nomads of Anatolia and the Balkans, rely on animals as their livelihood. Due to the introduction of modern technology, education and government subsidies, some of the shepherds have become sedentary. For those that still migrate in the traditional way, they live in the lowlands during the winter and the mountains in the summer. For the modern families, they live in the villages or cities in the winter and have summer homes on the seaside. For the younger generations, there is struggle between keeping with tradition and evolving into modern life, which is threatening the culture of these historical nomads.

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Yörük sheperd, Bayram Bulut
Karaman, Turkey
By Amy Hume
09 Apr 2013

Bayram has 4 children, 3 that are educated and live in other cities, and a son who has remained to work with his father. He says you can become educated or you can look a goat in the ass. These are the options for modern day nomads.

The Yörük, nomads of Anatolia and the Balkans, rely on animals as their livelihood. Due to the introduction of modern technology, education and government subsidies, some of the shepherds have become sedentary. For those that still migrate in the traditional way, they live in the lowlands during the winter and the mountains in the summer. For the modern families, they live in the villages or cities in the winter and have summer homes on the seaside. For the younger generations, there is struggle between keeping with tradition and evolving into modern life, which is threatening the culture of these historical nomads.

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Kuzu "Sheep"
Davraz, Turkey
By Amy Hume
16 Feb 2013

Sheep are on their way back home after a day grazing on the mountainside.

The Yörük, nomads of Anatolia and the Balkans, rely on animals as their livelihood. Due to the introduction of modern technology, education and government subsidies, some of the shepherds have become sedentary. For those that still migrate in the traditional way, they live in the lowlands during the winter and the mountains in the summer. For the modern families, they live in the villages or cities in the winter and have summer homes on the seaside. For the younger generations, there is struggle between keeping with tradition and evolving into modern life, which is threatening the culture of these historical nomads.

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3 Generations, Hasan Ali, Mehmet and ...
Davraz, Turkey
By Amy Hume
16 Feb 2013

Hasan Ali, 92 years old, insists the way of life for the Yörük is finished.

The Yörük, nomads of Anatolia and the Balkans, rely on animals as their livelihood. Due to the introduction of modern technology, education and government subsidies, some of the shepherds have become sedentary. For those that still migrate in the traditional way, they live in the lowlands during the winter and the mountains in the summer. For the modern families, they live in the villages or cities in the winter and have summer homes on the seaside. For the younger generations, there is struggle between keeping with tradition and evolving into modern life, which is threatening the culture of these historical nomads.

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“WITH TIBET IN SIGHT: A TALE OF ONE M...
Pangong Tso Lake, India
By Andreanewilliams
20 Sep 2012

Nearly 14 000 feet above sea level, on the arid shores of Pangong “Tso” (lake), flies a lone Tibetan flag.

On occasion, travellers manage to make the 5-hour journey here from Leh during the short summer season, stopping at monasteries and roadside yurts along the way. And if they travel as far down the lakeside as possible - without stepping into Chinese territory - to the remote village of Spangmik, they will undoubtedly see it whipping about in the wind.

In democratic India, this flag's presence may seem benign - but on the opposite shore of Pangong Tso’s salty waters, lies Tibet; and just a few kilometers south of Spangmik, lies an army checkpost.

In such close proximity to Tibet, 68-year-old Tsering Dondup is literally flying the Tibetan flag in the face of China.

Pangong Lake sits on the Sino-India Line of Actual Control, with more than 60 per cent of its 134km length being under Chinese control.

Dondup, himself, first arrived in India in 1959 after his parents were killed in clashes with Chinese troops at the height Tibet’s occupation in the 1950s. Initially motivated to avenge the death of his parents, Dondup went on to join the Indian Army in Mussoorie, northern India, in 1968.

Fifteen years later, he met and fell in love with a young woman from Spangmik village. In 1989, they married.

He smacks his lips together and lets out a sigh, as he reflects on his relationship with his wife of 23 years. “My wife may be illiterate, but she loves me so deeply.”

Following his marriage, he became focused on creating a home - in plain sight of Tibet - with his new wife on the rocky banks of Pangong Tso.

But as a reminder of his past, Dondup flies a little piece of his history on the flagpole outside of his home, with the hope of one day returning to Tibet.

“I want to see the birds, the sheep, the horses. I want to see them again," he says. "Are they there, or not? I don’t know."

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25 Aug 2012 protest in "Jal Satyagrah...
India Narmada
By Editor's Picks
25 Aug 2012

51 villagers from Madhya Pradesh in India protesting in neck-deep water for the 17th day, against their local government, asking for a compensation for their land that got submerged after the height of two dams - Indira Sagar and Omkareshwar Dam - was raised. The Madhya Pradesh government finally blinked to their demands seeking to reduce the water level to 189 metres.

The 520 MW Omkareshwar project is one of the several big dams on the Narmada river, built by the Narmada Hydroelectric Development Corporation, a joint venture between NHPC Ltd and the government of Madhya Pradesh. The protesters say increasing the water level in the dam would submerge their lands spread across several villages.

Life had been tough every passing day for the protesters who spent on an average around 20 hours in water. While the 51villagers of Khandwa finally heaved a sigh of relief, calling off their Jal Satyagraha, in another part of Madhya Pradesh another group of villagers continue their protest against the Govt's decision to raise the water level.

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Protest in "Jal Satyagrah" in Madhya ...
india narmada
By shuriahn
25 Aug 2012

September 10, 2012

51 villagers from Madhya Pradesh in India protesting in neck-deep water for the 17th day, against their local government, asking for a compensation for their land that got submerged after the height of two dams - Indira Sagar and Omkareshwar Dam - was raised. The Madhya Pradesh government finally blinked to their demands seeking to reduce the water level to 189 metres.

The 520 MW Omkareshwar project is one of the several big dams on the Narmada river, built by the Narmada Hydroelectric Development Corporation, a joint venture between NHPC Ltd and the government of Madhya Pradesh. The protesters say increasing the water level in the dam would submerge their lands spread across several villages.

Life had been tough every passing day for the protesters who spent on an average around 20 hours in water. While the 51villagers of Khandwa finally heaved a sigh of relief, calling off their Jal Satyagraha, in another part of Madhya Pradesh another group of villagers continue their protest against the Govt's decision to raise the water level.

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Protest in "Jal Satyagrah" in Madhya ...
india narmada
By shuriahn
25 Aug 2012

September 10, 2012

51 villagers from Madhya Pradesh in India protesting in neck-deep water for the 17th day, against their local government, asking for a compensation for their land that got submerged after the height of two dams - Indira Sagar and Omkareshwar Dam - was raised. The Madhya Pradesh government finally blinked to their demands seeking to reduce the water level to 189 metres.

The 520 MW Omkareshwar project is one of the several big dams on the Narmada river, built by the Narmada Hydroelectric Development Corporation, a joint venture between NHPC Ltd and the government of Madhya Pradesh. The protesters say increasing the water level in the dam would submerge their lands spread across several villages.

Life had been tough every passing day for the protesters who spent on an average around 20 hours in water. While the 51villagers of Khandwa finally heaved a sigh of relief, calling off their Jal Satyagraha, in another part of Madhya Pradesh another group of villagers continue their protest against the Govt's decision to raise the water level.

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Protest in "Jal Satyagrah" in Madhya ...
india narmada
By shuriahn
25 Aug 2012

September 10, 2012

51 villagers from Madhya Pradesh in India protesting in neck-deep water for the 17th day, against their local government, asking for a compensation for their land that got submerged after the height of two dams - Indira Sagar and Omkareshwar Dam - was raised. The Madhya Pradesh government finally blinked to their demands seeking to reduce the water level to 189 metres.

The 520 MW Omkareshwar project is one of the several big dams on the Narmada river, built by the Narmada Hydroelectric Development Corporation, a joint venture between NHPC Ltd and the government of Madhya Pradesh. The protesters say increasing the water level in the dam would submerge their lands spread across several villages.

Life had been tough every passing day for the protesters who spent on an average around 20 hours in water. While the 51villagers of Khandwa finally heaved a sigh of relief, calling off their Jal Satyagraha, in another part of Madhya Pradesh another group of villagers continue their protest against the Govt's decision to raise the water level.

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Protest in "Jal Satyagrah" in Madhya ...
india narmada
By shuriahn
25 Aug 2012

September 10, 2012

51 villagers from Madhya Pradesh in India protesting in neck-deep water for the 17th day, against their local government, asking for a compensation for their land that got submerged after the height of two dams - Indira Sagar and Omkareshwar Dam - was raised. The Madhya Pradesh government finally blinked to their demands seeking to reduce the water level to 189 metres.

The 520 MW Omkareshwar project is one of the several big dams on the Narmada river, built by the Narmada Hydroelectric Development Corporation, a joint venture between NHPC Ltd and the government of Madhya Pradesh. The protesters say increasing the water level in the dam would submerge their lands spread across several villages.

Life had been tough every passing day for the protesters who spent on an average around 20 hours in water. While the 51villagers of Khandwa finally heaved a sigh of relief, calling off their Jal Satyagraha, in another part of Madhya Pradesh another group of villagers continue their protest against the Govt's decision to raise the water level.

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Protest in "Jal Satyagrah" in Madhya ...
india narmada
By shuriahn
25 Aug 2012

September 10, 2012

51 villagers from Madhya Pradesh in India protesting in neck-deep water for the 17th day, against their local government, asking for a compensation for their land that got submerged after the height of two dams - Indira Sagar and Omkareshwar Dam - was raised. The Madhya Pradesh government finally blinked to their demands seeking to reduce the water level to 189 metres.

The 520 MW Omkareshwar project is one of the several big dams on the Narmada river, built by the Narmada Hydroelectric Development Corporation, a joint venture between NHPC Ltd and the government of Madhya Pradesh. The protesters say increasing the water level in the dam would submerge their lands spread across several villages.

Life had been tough every passing day for the protesters who spent on an average around 20 hours in water. While the 51villagers of Khandwa finally heaved a sigh of relief, calling off their Jal Satyagraha, in another part of Madhya Pradesh another group of villagers continue their protest against the Govt's decision to raise the water level.

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Protest in "Jal Satyagrah" in Madhya ...
india narmada
By shuriahn
25 Aug 2012

September 10, 2012

51 villagers from Madhya Pradesh in India protesting in neck-deep water for the 17th day, against their local government, asking for a compensation for their land that got submerged after the height of two dams - Indira Sagar and Omkareshwar Dam - was raised. The Madhya Pradesh government finally blinked to their demands seeking to reduce the water level to 189 metres.

The 520 MW Omkareshwar project is one of the several big dams on the Narmada river, built by the Narmada Hydroelectric Development Corporation, a joint venture between NHPC Ltd and the government of Madhya Pradesh. The protesters say increasing the water level in the dam would submerge their lands spread across several villages.

Life had been tough every passing day for the protesters who spent on an average around 20 hours in water. While the 51villagers of Khandwa finally heaved a sigh of relief, calling off their Jal Satyagraha, in another part of Madhya Pradesh another group of villagers continue their protest against the Govt's decision to raise the water level.

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Protest in "Jal Satyagrah" in Madhya ...
india narmada
By shuriahn
25 Aug 2012

September 10, 2012

51 villagers from Madhya Pradesh in India protesting in neck-deep water for the 17th day, against their local government, asking for a compensation for their land that got submerged after the height of two dams - Indira Sagar and Omkareshwar Dam - was raised. The Madhya Pradesh government finally blinked to their demands seeking to reduce the water level to 189 metres.

The 520 MW Omkareshwar project is one of the several big dams on the Narmada river, built by the Narmada Hydroelectric Development Corporation, a joint venture between NHPC Ltd and the government of Madhya Pradesh. The protesters say increasing the water level in the dam would submerge their lands spread across several villages.

Life had been tough every passing day for the protesters who spent on an average around 20 hours in water. While the 51villagers of Khandwa finally heaved a sigh of relief, calling off their Jal Satyagraha, in another part of Madhya Pradesh another group of villagers continue their protest against the Govt's decision to raise the water level.

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Protest in "Jal Satyagrah" in Madhya ...
india narmada
By shuriahn
25 Aug 2012

September 10, 2012

51 villagers from Madhya Pradesh in India protesting in neck-deep water for the 17th day, against their local government, asking for a compensation for their land that got submerged after the height of two dams - Indira Sagar and Omkareshwar Dam - was raised. The Madhya Pradesh government finally blinked to their demands seeking to reduce the water level to 189 metres.

The 520 MW Omkareshwar project is one of the several big dams on the Narmada river, built by the Narmada Hydroelectric Development Corporation, a joint venture between NHPC Ltd and the government of Madhya Pradesh. The protesters say increasing the water level in the dam would submerge their lands spread across several villages.

Life had been tough every passing day for the protesters who spent on an average around 20 hours in water. While the 51villagers of Khandwa finally heaved a sigh of relief, calling off their Jal Satyagraha, in another part of Madhya Pradesh another group of villagers continue their protest against the Govt's decision to raise the water level.

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Protest in "Jal Satyagrah" in Madhya ...
india narmada
By shuriahn
25 Aug 2012

September 10, 2012

51 villagers from Madhya Pradesh in India protesting in neck-deep water for the 17th day, against their local government, asking for a compensation for their land that got submerged after the height of two dams - Indira Sagar and Omkareshwar Dam - was raised. The Madhya Pradesh government finally blinked to their demands seeking to reduce the water level to 189 metres.

The 520 MW Omkareshwar project is one of the several big dams on the Narmada river, built by the Narmada Hydroelectric Development Corporation, a joint venture between NHPC Ltd and the government of Madhya Pradesh. The protesters say increasing the water level in the dam would submerge their lands spread across several villages.

Life had been tough every passing day for the protesters who spent on an average around 20 hours in water. While the 51villagers of Khandwa finally heaved a sigh of relief, calling off their Jal Satyagraha, in another part of Madhya Pradesh another group of villagers continue their protest against the Govt's decision to raise the water level.

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Goats from Afeyen Village in Morocco
Afeyen, Morocco
By Martin Jay
03 Mar 2011

Footage that shows a shepherd tending to an herd of goats in the rural village of Afeyen, in Souss-Massa-Draa province, Morocco, 2009.

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Minorities in Georgia (36 of 37)
Talaveri, Georgia
By TemoBardzimashvili
15 Nov 2010

Villagers cut meat for Eid al-Adha festival near the mosque in Talaveri village, populated mostly by ethnic Azerbaijanis. In 2009 the construction of the mosque has stopped after a few Georgian Orthodox priests and members of ultra-religious organization The Union of the Orthodox Parents arrived to the village and demanded to stop the construction. The construction resumed in 2010 after the case was widely covered in the local media. The Union is notorious for its frequent protests, some of them ending with violence, against religious and sexual minorities, as well as public celebration of such "satanic" holidays as Halloween. Talaveri, 2010