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Great Match of Return Footages
Gaza
By Hind Khoudary
13 Apr 2018

Covering the Great March of Return since the 30th of March 2018. 
Footages from the borders near the fence, and injuries from the hospitals. 

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Yarmouk Camp Residents Suffer Bombing...
Damascus
By Rame ALsayaed
10 Apr 2015

Yarmouk Camp (Damascus), Syria
April 10, 2015

This video shows the aftermath of air bombing carried out by Syrian government forces on Yarmouk camp for Palestinian refugees, located in the outskirts of Damascus.
Interviewed camp residents aired their frustration, saying that the bombing has added to their to their long suffering due to a military siege by Syrian government forces and a dire shortage of food supplies, which has lasted for the past four years.

SHOTLIST AND TRANSCRIPT

Various night shots of destroyed buildings

VOICE OVER (Arabic)
00:16 – 00:21
“This is the aftermath of barrel bombs dropped on Yarmouk camp by regime forces after midnight.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Unnamed Camp Resident
00:26 – 01:12

“I was sleeping at home in the lounge. There was suddenly falling; something very loud was falling. As I lifted my head to see what was going on, I felt an earthquake… it was something like an earthquake. Something hit… as my head was up something hit me in the face. What was that? I did not know. I looked around and I saw dust. I opened the door and walked outside and started to shout, calling on the neighbors. One said, ‘I’m hit’ while the other did not answer. The one who did not answer me, may God rest his soul. He has been martyred.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Unnamed Camp Resident
01:13 – 01:55

“People were sleeping in peace. Are there any fighters here? Are there any rifles or mortars? Civilians were crushed under explosive barrels. Fear God! Have fear for God, Bashar! See how the civilians have been torn to pieces at the hospital – Palestine Hospital. Have fear for God, people. There are no fighters here. All the people here are civilians and children. Where can people go? We are suffering! We are suffering from hunger and thirst, and now you bomb us with explosive barrels at night? God is sufficient for us and He is the best guardian.”
[Standing next to dead cat] “We want to safeguard animal rights, not human rights. Westerners consider animals to be sacred.”

Wide of smoke rising during daytime

VOICE OVER (Arabic)
01:55 – 02:01

“God is greatest! Regime forces are bombing Yarmouk camp intensely. God is greatest!”

Wide of severely damaged buildings during daytime
Various of civilians walking amid the rubble

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman) Unnamed Camp Resident
03:10 – 05:05

“I am an old woman. I am 70 years old. I have been under siege alone for four years. My only son is outside the camp. My name is Um Mohamad. My only son and four daughters are outside the camp. We are suffering a lot. This is enough. We need bread, anything to feed on. I live in hunger. I am alone at home. What is happening to us is pitiful. We have had enough. We have suffered a lot we left Palestine and we are still suffering, while the entire world is standing against us. What is happening to us is pitiful. It is really pitiful. I do not have any energy to walk. Whenever I stand up I fall again. I live in the camp on my own.
This is outrageous! Until when will this keep going? All the other towns are receiving food – Beit Sahm, Yalda and Babilla – they have everything they need.
They say that we are receiving food aid; this is a lie. God is witness that we are not even getting a piece of bread or an egg. God knows where this food ends up.
I live on my own, and no one has knocked on my door to give me a loaf of bread or an egg. What is happening to us is pitiful. They should open the road before us. I want to leave; I do not want to stay here anymore. I have had enough. If they open the road I will leave. I stayed here to guard my house, because I have suffered a lot in my life and my husband 40 years ago. I struggled to build this three-story house and raise orphaned children. I cannot leave to be looted.
For God’s sake, find a solution for our camp. We have had enough. This is pitiful. What can I say? Everything is befalling the camp. Everything is befalling Palestinians. What have we done to deserve this?
This is outrageous. Everybody has a decent life except for us. What is our fault?”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Unnamed Camp Resident
05:05 – 05:32

“We have been under siege in the camp for four years. We have not gotten anything. We have not received any aid. All the organizations are giving aid to Beit Sahm and Babilla. We shall remain steadfast in Yarmouk camp. We thank you, Ahmed Majdalani [Palestinian Authority envoy to Syria], for the gifts you have sent three or four days ago. You have done this instead of giving us food or securing the road for us.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Unnamed Camp Resident
05:33- 06:17

“We live in the Yarmouk camp. We will not leave our homes, no matter what happens; even if they keep bombing us with barrels until we die. We want to eat and drink. Organizations are distributing food in Yalda and Babilla because they move there. We went there and registered our names, but we were told that only people living at schools can receive food. What about people living under bombing? What about someone who does not want to leave his home? They should open a safe road and let food in. We are suffering to get food. Only people with money can secure electricity. The problem is the same with water; you would have to keep going back and forth, carrying water with containers to be able to fill half a tank. How will this situation end?”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman) Unnamed Camp Resident
06:18 – 06:37

“We are civilians, living in Yarmouk camp. We have children and sick people. Treatment is not available. We do not have food or water. Let them open the road for us. We need to eat and drink. They should give us aid. We do not have food. What can we do? We cannot leave our homes. If we leave our homes our problem will even bigger.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman) Unnamed Camp Resident
06:38 – 06:42

“God willing, we will stay in the camp until we either die or return to Palestine.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman) Unnamed Camp Resident
06:42 – 07:15

“When we left Palestine I was seven years old. But I will not leave Yarmouk camp, now that I am 76 years old. Yarmouk camp is my soul. I dug its ground with my own hands. I transported construction material over my head to build my house – one building block at a time. I dug the foundations with my own hands. We shall remain steadfast in the camp, whatever happens.”

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Palestinians Commemorate Land Day on ...
Wadi Fukin
By Rich Wiles
01 Apr 2015

Palestinians from across the West Bank and Israel gathered in confiscated Palestinian villages, on both side of the 1967 Greenline, to commemorate Land Day. Land Day is seen as a day of resistance action in defense of Palestinian land. Annual Land Day events are held by Palestinian communities within the State of Israel, in the occupied territories, and in the Palestinian diaspora.

 

Land Day events in 2015 included a 'return march' by the community-in-exile of Lifta, many of whom today remain only a kilometer or two from their original homes. Today there remains a small but very active community-in-exile of Lifta's refugees in East Jerusalem, and it was this group, under the banner of their community grassroots organisation 'Sons of Lifta' who spent Land Day inside their home village. Although many of the village's houses remain intact and the refugees live only a ten minute journey away, they are denied their rights to return to live in the vilage by the State of Israel.

 

Land day first started on March 30,1976, when mass demonstrations broke out among Palestinian communities in the State of Israel in protest at an Israeli state plan to confiscate 20,000 dunums (2,000 hectares) of land around the Palestinian villages of Sakhnin and Arraba in the Galilee. This was one of the first examples of mass coordinated action being carried out by Palestinian citizens of Israel. Protests were held from the Galilee in the north all the way to the Negev (known as the 'Naqab' to Palestinians) in the south. Over the course of the day 6 Palestinians were shot dead and more than 100 were injured. Ever since these events, Palestinians have commemorated March 30th as 'Land Day', or 'Yom al-Ard' in Arabic.

 

In Another Land Day event, activists in the village of Wadi Fukin in the West Bank attempted to plant 350 olive tree saplings on land that is threatened with expropriation by the expansion of the Israeli settlement of Sur Hadassah. All Israeli settlements within the 1967 occupied Palestinian territory (oPt) are illegal under international law. Before more than a handful of trees could be planted in Wadi Fukin, Israeli soldiers rained clouds or tear gas on to the activists bringing the Land Day event to an abrupt halt. For Palestinians, Land Day is an important annual event which brings together many thousands of Palestinians across historic Palestine in the defence of Palestinian land.

 

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Land Day R
Wadi Fukin
By Rich Wiles
30 Mar 2015

As the Land Day action is brought to an abrupt halt in Wadi Fukin, the majority of the 350 olive tree saplings remain unplanted outside a house in the village after activists were forced to escape from clouds of tear gas that was fired by Israeli soldiers.
Wadi Fukin, West Bank, Palestine. March 30 2015.

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Land Day
Wadi Fukin
By Rich Wiles
30 Mar 2015

A Palestinian child watches from a rooftop in Wadi Fukin as Israeli soldiers fire rounds of tear gas at fleeing activists during a tree planting event to mark Land Day. In the background stands the huge Israeli settlement of Beitar Illit which is built partly on the land of Wadi Fukin.
Wadi Fukin, West Bank, Palestine. March 30 2015.

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Land Day 19
Wadi Fukin
By Rich Wiles
30 Mar 2015

Two elderly Palestinian women attempt to make their way down the hill in Wadi Fukin to escape from the tear gas that is being fired by Israeli forces.

Wadi Fukin, West Bank, Palestine. March 30 2015.

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Land Day 20
Wadi Fukin
By Rich Wiles
30 Mar 2015

An Israeli security helicopter circles above Wadi Fukin during the olive tree planting event to commemorate Palestinian Land Day on March 30th 2015.

Wadi Fukin, West Bank, Palestine. March 30 2015.

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Land Day 21
Wadi Fukin
By Rich Wiles
30 Mar 2015

Israeli soldiers line up on a hill top in Wadi Fukin as Palestinian activists watch from a distance during an olive tree planting event to commemorate Land Day in the Palestinian village of Wadi Fukin.

Wadi Fukin, West Bank, Palestine. March 30 2015.

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Land Day 4
Wadi Fukin
By Rich Wiles
29 Mar 2015

350 olive trees were brought to Wadi Fukin to be planted on the lands threatened by settlement expansion.

Wadi Fukin, West Bank, Palestine, March 30 2105.

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Land Day 5
Wadi Fukin
By Rich Wiles
29 Mar 2015

Activists make their way up a hill toward land that is threatened by the expansion of the Sur Haddasah settlement. In the background, the huge Beitar Illit settlement is also built on the land of Wadi Fukin.

Wadi Fukin, West Bank, Palestine, March 30 2015.

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Land Day 18
Wadi Fukin
By Rich Wiles
29 Mar 2015

Activists flee as Israeli forces rain tear gas down on them. The tear gas stopped the olive tree planting event being held to commemorate Land Day in the Palestinian village of Wadi Fukin.
Wadi Fukin, West Bank, Palestine. March 30 2015.

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Land Day 1
Wadi Fukin
By Rich Wiles
29 Mar 2015

A Palestinian youth raises a Palestinian flag from the top of settlement construction machinery within the construction site that is expanding the Israeli settlement of Sur Hadassah. Sur Hadassah is located on the land of the West Bank Palestinian village of Wadi Fukin and the land of the pre-Nakba Palestinian village of Ras Abu Ammar.

Wadi Fukin/Ras Abu Ammar, West Bank/Green Line, Palestine. March 30 2015.

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Land Day 2
Wadi Fukin
By Rich Wiles
29 Mar 2015

A small group of activists reach the construction site on the top of the hill in which Sur Hadassah settlement is being further expanded.

Wadi Fukin/Ras Abu Ammar, West Bank/Green Line, Palestinel. March 30 2015.

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Land Day 3
Wadi Fukin
By Rich Wiles
29 Mar 2015

An elderly Palestinian women plants an olive tree sapling on land of the village of Wadi Fukin, which is threatened with confiscation by the expansion of the Sur Hadassah Jewish settlement.

Wadi Fukin, West Bank, Palestine. March 30 2015.

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Trees of Protest in the West Bank
Beit Ummar
By Ibrahim Hamouz
02 Feb 2015

Palestinian villagers plant olive trees on land confiscated by Israeli settlers near the village of Beit Ummar in the occupied West Bank. The trees are a symbolic protest to ongoing Israeli policies of land confiscation and illegal Jewish settlement.

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Ground Zero: The Tug of War over Jeru...
Jerusalem, Israel
By Jonathan Giesen
28 Dec 2014

As tensions in Jerusalem boil over into open conflict between Israelis and Palestinians, the issue of the Al-Aqsa Mosque complex remains one of the key issues in the conflict. This story explores the cultural and religious significance of the complex to the two sides and illustrates how the area has yet again become a catalyst for violence. Some fear this newest round of violence may lead to a third Palestinian Intifada.

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After the Punishment: Home Demolition...
Silwan
By Ibrahim Husseini
24 Dec 2014

In Jerusalem, the Israeli Army has been destroying the family homes of militants as a form of collective punishment. This story explores what happens to those families after they have lost their home.

Article:

Text by Youssef Zbib

In October, 21-year-old Abdel Rahman Shalodi drove his car into a light rail train station on a line that connects Israeli settlements in Jerusalem. He killed a baby and a woman from Ecuador and wounded at least seven other people. This act was part of a recent series of attacks against Israelis, fueled in part by a religious conflict over the ownership of the holy site that Israelis call the Temple Mount and to which Palestinians refer as the Noble Sanctuary.
In retaliation for the attack, the Israeli government ordered the destruction of the Shalodi family’s apartment unit, located in the Silwan neighborhood near the disputed old center of Jerusalem. His mother, father and five siblings, are now without a home.

"Right now we are living in my brother-in-law’s apartment. He is in Jordan now and will come back in five months,” said Enas Shalodi, Abdel Rahman’s 43-year-old mother.

“We can only use the living room and one bedroom in the apartment in which we are staying, so the situation is a little difficult. Some of my children sleep at their grandmother's and some sleep here," she added.

The Israeli police have not left the family alone since the demolition. Police officers interrupted a reporter’s interview with Enas to inspect the apartment, something which has happened repeatedly since the family moved into their temporary residence.
“They came here when we moved in and said that we are not allowed to stay. [They show up whenever] a reporter comes here,”Enas said while her teenage daughter Nebras spoke with the police officers.

“The [Israeli police] are also threatening to demolish the home where we are staying now, which belongs to my brother-in-law (…) Since the demolition, approximately 34 days ago, they broke in here about 10 times,” Enas said.

Enas’s daughter Nebras finds it hard to deal with the family’s difficult circumstances.
“We have no computer, no TV, no devices and the house is too small. It is not enough," Nebras said.

Human Rights Watch (HRW) has labeled the demolition of the family homes of militants as a “war crime.”
“Justifying punishment of people who are not responsible for a criminal act just because they might ‘support’ it would set a dangerous precedent which could come back to haunt Israelis,” reads a statement issued by HRW in November 2014. Israeli critics of this policy, on the other hand, argue that it is ineffective because, as figures show, the number of attacks by Palestinians against Israel increases following house demolitions.

Demolition to expand settlements

In addition to demolishing homes as a punitive measure, Israeli authorities also destroy Palestinian homes built without a permit. Palestinians in the West Bank, however, usually cannot obtain such permits even if they apply for them.
According to the pro-peace Israeli monitoring group B’Tselem, Israel has demolished 545 houses that belong to Palestinians in east Jerusalem between 2004 and 2014. This has made 2,115 people homeless. Some people take down their homes with their own hands in order to avoid paying demolition charges to Israeli authorities, according to the organization’s official website.
The Zeer family, made up of a mother, a father and five children, now lives in a cave after Israeli authorities razed their house twice, without giving them a clear explanation.
“Sometimes they [Israeli authorities] claim that this is an agricultural area. At other times they claim that we do not a have a [building] permit,” said 40-year-old Khalid al-Zeer. “It seems that they want to uproot us and ethnically cleanse the original inhabitants from this land and move in settlers that they have gathered from around the world.” The small community of Israeli settlers in Silwan has recently expanded as dozens of them moved into the neighborhood in October, with the help of a right-wing organization called Ateret Kohanim that promotes Jewish settlement in east Jerusalem. The organization considers this influx a legitimate return to a village established by Yemenite Jews in the 1880s known in Hebrew as Kfar Hashiloah, which disappeared in the 1920s.
Eli Hazan, a member of the Israeli Likud party, defended his government’s policy of building settlements in the West Bank.
“We are going to stay in [the West Bank], therefore we are going to build in these places,” Hazan said. “We remember what happened from 1948 to 1967. Jews could not go to East Jerusalem. They could not go to the Western Wall and Mount of Olives.”

From the Palestinian point of view, however, this will only lead to more grief.

“This suffering and the suffering of every Jerusalemite will not be over until the end of the occupation,” said Enas Shalodi.

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Syrian Palestinian Refugees Risk thei...
Beirut, Lebanon
By wissam fanash
18 Dec 2014

Beirut, Lebanon
December 15, 2014

The humanitarian situation in Syria continues to deteriorate as the war there nears its fourth year. Palestinian refugees in Syria fled war and malnutrition in the besieged Yarmouk camp near Damascus and moved to Shatila camp near Beirut. But conditions in their new host country were far from what they had hoped for.

Palestinian refugees whose families arrived to Lebanon in 1948 already struggle with unemployment and poverty and the newcomers did not fare any better.

For many, the only solution was to pay huge amounts of money to smugglers who promise to take them illicitly to Europe by sea or across the African desert. Most of them, however, disappear or get caught by authorities in transit countries.

This video tells the story of people whose family members already took the dangerous road to Europe but did not make it.

The video also features a Skype call between a Palestinian refugee who wishes to travel illicitly to Italy and a people smuggler who says he is based in Sudan. The smuggler gives all the details about going from Lebanon to Sudan, and then across the desert to Libya before being smuggled by sea to Italy.

Shot List

1 M/S and W/S of the streets
2 Various of children
3 Various of woman at home
4 Various of children playing in the street
5 C/S of Yasser Arafat’s photos on camp wall
6 M/S of streets in camps
7 Various of streets

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman), Lama Baqlouni

(00:41) This is my son Mustafa, he is 15 years old. He is imprisoned in Egypt now. And this is my daughter Nisrine, she is also detained with her brother in Egypt (00:57).

(00:58) My children are orphans now, their father died. We need someone to help them get out of prison. It has been two months, they are tired and sick. We need someone to help them move to another country so they can continue their lives as normal people (01:15).

(01:17) We left Lebanon to Homs where I got a smuggler’s number. I called him and he told me to take them to Hama with $250 for each. We went to Hama and paid the amount needed, and then he took them to Turkey, where they stayed in a hotel. We got the contacts of smugglers who will be able to take them to Italy. The fees ranged between $5,000 and $6,000 for each child, depending on the smuggler. We asked people for money – people we knew and others that we did not. They took them to the Turkish coasts to be transported to Italy, and made them wait from 7PM to 1AM (02:15).

(02:18) They were supposed to take them first in a small boat, and then move them to a bigger ship. They were stopped by the coast guards and imprisoned in Turkey for a day, on condition to make them sign a pledge that they will never get out of Turkey again. They were freed the next day. On the same day they got out of jail, the smuggler said they will try to leave Turkey one more time. They got on board on the same day, but the captain kept going in circles in the sea for five days (02:59).

(03:10) They arrived to an island and the captain ordered them to leave the boat. They did not agree at first, but he told them he will get them accommodations in Egypt, and they were threatened by guns and knives. My daughter told me that they got very scared. Everybody started to scream, and they threw four men in the sea (03:27).

(03:35) Syrians were sent back to Turkey but Palestinians were allowed to go there (03: 39).

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman), Siham Jumaa

(04:07) This is my husband’s passport, he sent it to the smuggler to get a visitor’s visa to Sudan (04:16).

(04:32) We lost our house and everything because of the war in Syria. Life is hard here in Lebanon, we should pay a monthly rent for our house and life is expensive. This is the main reason why my husband decided to do this trip, and if I had money, I would do the same thing (04:49).

(04:52) He met a smuggler through Sudan who helped him prepare a visit to Sudan. He booked on a flight (Transit) from Beirut Airport. He travelled to Dubai first and then to Sudan. When he arrived to Sudan he called me to tell me that he is safe, and he is going to Libya after. He arrived safely to Libya after three days in the desert. After that, I got no news from him, and it has been three months now. His plan was to go to Italy after Libya, either from the coasts of Benghazi or Tripoli. He paid $4,000 for the whole trip from Beirut to Italy. But I heard nothing from him since he got to Libya (05:58).

(06:05) I do not have money. I sold all my jewelry and my wedding ring, and I even had to beg for money from people so we can get the 3000USD for his trip. Once he arrived to Libya, his brothers donated 1000USD for his trip. The whole trip cost $4,000 (06:21).

SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Skype conversion between Ibrahim al-Khatib and smuggler based in Sudan

(07:18) Ibrahim al-Khatib: I want to travel. Smuggler: Welcome, I will help you
Ibrahim al-Khatib: Can I please know what the process is? I am a Syrian Palestinian, and I am in Lebanon.
Smugglers: Where would you like to go?
Ibrahim al-Khatib: I want to go to Europe; I want to know the procedures, and how much it costs. This is the most important thing. We have no money and I have to borrow money if I want to travel. You have to give me discount and help me, please.
Smuggler: The person who told you about me, did he not tell you where I can take you?
Ibrahim al-Khatib: The person who told me about you went to Sudan. He went from Sudan to Libya and then to Italy.
Smuggler: Are you seriously intending to do it?
Ibrahim al-Khatib: Yes, I am, I am asking about the expenses because I have a wife and children and I want to know [how much money] I should leave for them and how much to take with me, I want to know about the road, if it is safe, or not, and how this whole thing is going to be arranged. I want to know how I am going to give you the money, or my passport. Will I receive a visa, or not? I do not want to go without knowing anything.
Smuggler: We have the path of Sudan, a bit cheap, but dangerous. You will go from [Lebanon] to Sudan - the road is easy - but from Sudan to Libya, we have five days in the desert. You have to think of all the odds, the desert is more dangerous than the sea. The sea is also unstable, but we can go across it and count on God to help us.
Ibrahim al-Khatib: What is your name?
Smuggler: I am Abu Yehya.
Ibrahim al-Khatib: What I want to know is that, if I decide to go to Sudan, how will you get me the visa? Is it an invitation, or a visa, how can I guarantee that the process will go as agreed?
Smuggler: You will get a regular visa, and you should not be concerned with how you receive it – you will have it.
Ibrahim al-Khatib: I heard that some people are being fooled and they are getting visas that do not work. Is that true of is it lying? Can I be sure that it will work?
Smuggler: It is not true, the trip to Sudan is fully legitimate, and you can make sure yourself.
Ibrahim al-Khatib: What about the cost?
Smuggler: Concerning the cost, the visa alone will cost you $1,500 and you have to pay for the plane ticket. From Sudan to Libya it will cost you $1,800. The trip from Sudan to Italy will cost you $3,200.
Ibrahim al-Khatib: I heard that from Libya to Italy, it costs $2,200, why do you charge $3,200? Is it more expensive now?
Smuggler: We charge $3,200 for the trip from Sudan all the way to Italy.
Ibrahim al-Khatib: Alright, now I understand. Will I have to cross the desert from Sudan to Libya?
Smuggler: Yes, the only road we have is through the desert. You have to spend five to seven days in the desert and face many risks. You might face kidnappers or robbers. We cannot control these things; this is a matter of destiny. You will have to count on God if you want to take that road. In all cases, there isn’t any other road.
Ibrahim al-Khatib: What about Turkey, do you know anyone there?
Smuggler: Yes, I do. Syrian-Palestinians are not allowed to travel to Turkey, but we can arrange something. However, the trip to Turkey will cost you 10,000 euros.
Ibrahim al-Khatib: What is the process?
Smuggler: We can travel by sea, on plane or by bus.
Ibrahim al-Khatib: Is there a way to go to Turkey from Lebanon, through the sea?

Smuggler: No, not at all, everyone used to say that they can go from Lebanon, but it is not possible. And I am not even in Lebanon, I am in Sudan.
Ibrahim al-Khatib: Yes, I can see that you have a Sudanese number.

Smuggler: Yes, that is right, and I heard about many people who got caught while being smuggled out of Lebanon. If you are determined to go, send me a copy of your passport and $1,000 and you will give me the rest of the money when you get there.
Ibrahim al-Khatib: Since I do not know you and you do not know me, how can I guarantee that you will not take the money and disappear? I want some sort of a guarantee.
Smuggler: I might send people to meet you, but at the end this is your choice; this how it is done, you chose either to do it or not. Many others have done it and if someone is afraid, then it would be better he did not do it.
Ibrahim al-Khatib: I wanted to ask about the procedure, and I am intending to go, I just have to figure out how to get the money, because it is available.
Smuggler: You can contact me if you want and we will make an agreement.
Ibrahim al-Khatib: Some people are getting caught in Turkey. They are reaching an area in the middle of the sea, and then they are being handed over to the Egyptian police. We heard about a few Syrian-Palestinians who are now imprisoned in Egypt.

You said that through the desert, whatever happens, you cannot be held responsible. But what about going by the sea? How can you be sure about what might happen? Smugglers themselves handed people over to the Egyptian police.
Smuggler: You have to consider the fact that you are going to be smuggled, and you are not traveling legally. You have to keep in mind all the troubles that can happen. You are not going legally, we are smuggling you. I am not trying to scare you, most of the people that we smuggled have made it there, unless if the person was unlucky – this is something else.

Ibrahim al-Khatib: Just as you are telling me that some people reached safely, I heard of other who drowned, women and children died.
Smuggler: Are you interrogating me or what?

Ibrahim al-Khatib: No, I am not interrogating you; do not get me wrong, but I am paying money and I am traveling with my family. I want to guarantee my safety.
Smuggler: Let me tell you something; if you want to leave, count on God, and leave. But if you keep telling me that this happened to those people and you will keep thinking of that, you will never travel. If you will keep thinking in a negative way, stay in Lebanon.

Ibrahim al-Khatib: My whole point is that I am going with my family, if something happens to me, it will be fine, I will manage, but my wife and children would not be able to survive.
Smuggler: count on God, God will have mercy on them.

Ibrahim al-Khatib: Alright, I will contact you again when I get the money, and think more about it. I am sorry for taking too much of your time. Thank you
Smuggler: No problem, you are welcome.

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Gazans Use Propane to Fuel Cars
Gaza
By Yasser Abu Wazna
04 Nov 2014

November 4, 2014
Gaza, Palestinian Territories

The ongoing Israeli blockade on the Gaza Strip and the recent closure of most the tunnels used for smuggling goods from Egypt has led to a severe fuel shortage. As a result, some Gazans are modifying their car engines and generators to make them run on propane instead of gasoline. Propane is widely used for cooking in Gaza.

Shot list

00:00 - 00:03
A medium shot shows a billboard advertising a reconstruction project in 2013.

00:04 – 00:07
A wide shot shows cars drive past the same billboard.

00:08 – 00:15
A general shot shows cars driving in both directions on a main road in Gaza City.

00:16 – 00:21
A close shot shows the exhaust pipe of a taxi as it drives away.

00:22 – 00:36
A medium shot shows many parked taxis and men standing and chatting; a female passenger gets out of a taxi.

00:37 – 01:03
Several shots show a street-food shop from different angles.

01:04 – 01:20
Several shots show an electric generator running and connected to a gas canister outside a curtain store and men inside the store.

01:21 – 01:48
Interview with Ahmad Abu al-Anzi, a male curtain store owner, Arabic/ interview transcript below

01:49 – 01:53
A medium shot shows Ahmad Abu al-Anzi, a male curtain store owner at work.

01:54 – 02:09
Several shots show the Daban Company for gas supply from outside.

02:10 – 02:13
A medium shot shows two men standing and another moving around gas canisters.

02:14 – 02:30
A pan right movement shows a man carrying a gas canister.

02:31- 03:01
Several shots show stored gas canisters.

03:03 – 03:26
Several shots show vehicles being filled with fuel at gasoline stations.

03:27 – 03:39
Several shots show cars driving by on main roads.

03:40 – 03:54
A traveling shot from inside a taxi shows the car stopping to pick up a female passenger.

03:55 - 04:14
Interview with Mustafa Eid, male taxi driver, Arabic / interview transcript below

04:15 - 04:28
Interview with Haneen Abu Medean, a female passenger, Arabic/ interview transcript below

04:29 - 05:23
Interview with Mustafa Eid, male taxi driver, Arabic / interview transcript below

05:24 – 05:37
Several shots show a car repair shop.

05:38 – 07:34
Interview with Aiman Seidam, male mechanic, Arabic/ interview transcript below

07:34 – 08:14
Several shots show a client driving his car into the repair shop and the mechanic Aiman Seidam working on the car.

08:15-08:46
Interview with Aiman Seidam, male mechanic, Arabic/ interview transcript below

08:47 – 09:26
A close shot shows the gas device installed on the engine while the mechanic explains how it works.
“This is the gas device, it is made in Turkey... It is connected to water pipes from the car and a gas pipe that can handle high pressure so it would not explode.”

09:27 – 10:12
A medium shot shows the mechanic Aiman Seidam standing next to the car.
“The gas device was not working properly so I am calibrating it.”

10:13 – 10:18
A wide shot shows the front of the car repair shop.

10:19 – 10:33
A tilt down movement shows the building of the Ministry of Transportation from outside.

10:34 – 10:41
A medium shot shows the spokesman of the Ministry of Transportation Khalil Mosbah al-Zayyan, sitting behind his desk and talking on the phone.

10:42 – 10:46
A close shot shows al-Zayyan’s desk plaque.

10:47 – 12:40
Interview with the spokesman of the Ministry of Transportation Khalil Mosbah al-Zayyan, man, Arabic/ interview transcript below

Interviews

01:21 – 01:48
Interview with Ahmad Abu al-Anzi, a male curtain store owner, Arabic

“Because of the gasoline shortage, you have to use propane to fuel electric generators and carry on with your work… There are power shortages that could last from six to seven hours and the power is on during the night while you cannot work. You have to use any alternative kind of fuel to keep working.”

03:55 - 04:14
Interview with Mustafa Eid, male taxi driver, Arabic
“I altered the car because of the gasoline shortage... In the past, we used to get gasoline through tunnels from Egypt, but they were closed about a year ago, so we switched to propaneto save money.”

04:15 - 04:28
Interview with Haneen Abu Medean, a female passenger, Arabic

-Do you know that this car is running on gas? -Yes, I know. -What do you think of that? -This is normal, because there is no gasoline but [propane] is available.

04:29 - 05:23
Interview with Mustafa Eid, male taxi driver, Arabic

“Today, a liter of Israeli gasoline costs 7 shekels [$1.85], it is expensive and drivers cannot afford it. Egyptian gasoline was sold for 3 or 3.5 shekels a liter. We were able to afford it and it was better for the car. But now we are forced to use propane. It is risky, but what can we do? We are under siege and things are out of our hands. The government turns a blind eye to altering cars because there is no alternative… there are no fines… There used to be Egyptian gasoline but now there is nothing. Only Israeli gasoline is available and it is very expensive.”

05:38 – 07:34
Interview with Aiman Seidam, male mechanic, Arabic

“Many people come to switch their car engines from gasoline to propane... [propane] devices come from Egypt and the road is closed, so the number of available devices is small. We can alter about two cars per week. The cost of altering a car depends on how much the propane device provider charges.
“People in Gaza started altering cars in 2007; the procedure used to cost 2,500 shekels. When propane devices became widely available the cost of altering cars dropped to 1,000 or 800 shekels. However, after the border crossing with Egypt was closed, the cost now varies between 900 and 1,000 shekels. “This is a propane device made in Turkey. You can connect the solenoid to it here. It does not affect the car’s mechanical system, but the propane that we are using is not suitable for cars. This is the solenoid, which complements the device. You can connect it here. “There could be risk if the person connects the device using ordinary propane tubes used for domestic purposes, which are usually blue or red. We use a special type of pipe, manufactured using high pressure.”

08:15-08:46
Interview with Aiman Seidam, male mechanic, Arabic

“I am disconnecting the filter because I want to set up the propane device. It is not working properly. The propane device does not change the engine; it only stops the flow of gasoline… We install a small device to pump propane into the engine instead of the gasoline injection system.”

10:47 – 12:40
Interview with the spokesman of the Ministry of Transportation Khalil Mosbah al-Zayyan, man, Arabic

“Altering taxis to make them run on propane is against the law, but due to the siege on the Gaza Strip and the large assault against the Palestinian people that comes with it, many taxi drivers are customizing their cars to make them run on propane. It is against the law and the ministry of transportation does allow the installation of propane pipes in cars because it is dangerous… for the passengers. The ministry of transportation, in cooperation with the traffic police, is trying to resolve this problem by monitoring people who buy propane pipes [used in altering vehicles].
“The [Israeli] occupation is mostly responsible for this problem because it does not allow allowing fuel and gasoline to enter the Gaza Strip, which has raised the price of gasoline. This adds to the ban on importing fuel from Egypt. This has largely affected the lives of Palestinian citizens… “When gasoline was imported from Egypt its price was not more than 3 shekels per liter. Now prices have gone up and the society in Gaza, which is poor and under siege, is being treated like the state of occupation [Israel], where there is a strong economy and a high income per capita.
“Israelis have very good living conditions in comparison with Palestinians, who probably live under the poverty line. Palestinians cannot afford these fuel prices.”

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Recycling the Rubble of War in Gaza
Gaza
By Yasser Abu Wazna
20 Oct 2014

October 16, 2014
Gaza, Palestine

Gazans are salvaging construction materials from the rubble of buildings that were destroyed by Israeli military action in the 2014 summer war. Over 45,000 houses were destroyed in the war and the ongoing Israeli blockade is preventing Gazans from importing cement for rebuilding purposes. Instead, Gazans are left to find creative ways to rebuild their communities, including recycling rubble.

Burj Al Basha, in the heart of Gaza city, was completely demolished during the last Israeli war against Gaza. The building was one of the main landmarks in Gaza city. Its bombardment left huge amounts of rubble to the extent that it closed off two of the main streets in the city. Tens of workers using heavy equipment are trying to clear a path for the traffic. During the process workers try to recycle iron bars from the rubble to be used for future construction projects. They are also recycling pieces of concrete for street paving projects.

Abu Ali Daloul is one of the main traders of recycled iron bars in Gaza. He bought tons of the iron bars removed from the rubble of the recent war. He fixes the bars and prepares them to be used again for construction purposes.

The concrete rubble are transported to stone breaking workshops in order to be turned into pebbles for use on road paving projects. Abu Lebda is a stone breading workshop which recycles concrete rubble and provides brick manufacturers with pebbles to make bricks with

Malaka concrete bricks factory brings the pebbles from Abu Lebda's stone breaking workshop and puts the amounts in its stores hoping the cement to pass through the crossings to be able to produce bricks suffecient to rebuild Gaza.

Despite the strenuous efforts Gazans are undertaking to create new methods to rebuild their shattered communities, cement is still the biggest challenge for them as the blockade on the coastal enclave remains.

Shot List:
Shots of a machine breaking concrete in Burj Al Basha site.
Shots of a bulldozer removing the rubble.
Shots of workers collecting and rehabilitating iron bars.
Shots of Abu Ali Daloul's store for recycled construction iron bars
Shots of Abu Lebdda concrete stone breaking manufactory recycling the rubble
Shots of Malaka's concrete bricks factory

Interviews:

(02:00) Waleed, a worker in Burj al-Basha (man, Arabic):
"We are in Gaza at the gates of Burj al-Basha (al-Basha tower) that was shelled by Israel. We modify iron so we can reuse it. We do this so we can rebuild Burj al-Basha (al-Basha tower). As you know, the iron factories are not working, so we have to work with the rubble. We take the iron that came from the rubble of Burj al-Basha (al-Basha tower) and we work on it so we can reuse it to rebuild the area."

(02:37) Mohamad, a worker in Burj al-Basha site (man, Arabic):
"We are now in front of Burj al-Basha (al-Basha tower) , it is a factory for modifying iron. There are about 25 workers here in addition to a modifying expert. Our job is to remove the rubble from the buildings that were destroyed by Israel. We separate the iron from the concrete. We modify the iron and store it in a storage room to be reused in the future. And we also put the concrete in special storage units to be reused later, it can be used for construction or as asphalt for the roads. We work on re-appropriating iron from the buildings that were destroyed so we can use it in construction work or other things.

(04:06) Abu Ali Daloul, Iron trader in Gaza: We did not think of taking this as a profession before and we never thought about it. However, because of the destruction that happened, we had to resort to what we call 'self-sufficiency'. If the roads are closed and we are sieged, we need to build the country and we need this material. At first we started separating the iron, some of the iron is junk, some is appropriate for manufacturing. It can be used for construction, but mostly it is used for manufacturing, it can be used for shielding windows, making nails and other similar aspects. The rest of the iron which is in good condition goes to construction. The closest site to us was Burj al-Basha, and Burj al-zafer, and also in 8th street, there used to be a building near Ali Bin Abi Taleb Mosque. Its rubble blocked the road, so we had to remove them quickly because it was affecting the traffic. At the moment, all the iron that we have is from Burj al-Basha. We were able to take out of Burj al-Basha about 45 tons the first time we tried salvaging. Most of the iron we extracted is already sold, but the problem of the lack of concrete is what is postponing the construction process. No matter what, we will build our country, which our iron, our products, our work and effort.

(07:17) Abu Mohamad Abu lebdda, owner of a concrete breaking factory:
After the war, and after Israel had destroyed the houses and blocked paths, we did not have concrete entering Gaza. So we had to recycle the rubble, to produce concrete, and to make bricks to be used in construction. We also reuse the metal after adjusting it. As you can see, the workers here, separate the rubble from the wood, the clothes, plastic and of the remaining found under the rubble. We clean it then crush it using machines, and we produce gravel, the soft one for building bricks and the rough one is used as concrete.
As I already stated, there are two types of gravel, the rough one we call "lentil", used as concrete, and the soft one we call it "sesame seeds", used to build bricks.

(09:21) Lad Malaka:
We build these bricks from the gravel made by the rubble recycling factories in Gaza. This type of brick is used for building roofs. We need good quality, so the brick has to pass through a test, we take it and examine it near the Islamic University. This brick passed the test and was made according to the required quality. We increase the cement [the small amount of cement available, which is mixed with the rubble] a bit, and it gives us a great quality.

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A Tale of Two Cities - Jerusalem
Jerusalem
By David Vaaknin
07 Oct 2014

October 2-5, 2014
Jerusalem

Perhaps the most culturally significant city in the world, Jerusalem is a mosaic of religions, cultures, and traditions. It is a city where the past and the present collide in a both harmonious and conflictual way. Hip shopping malls are frequented by both secular Israelis and orthodox Jewish clientele who adhere to an ancient way of life; Palestinians buy mobile phones from a telecommunications kiosk in the walled old city; and international tourists marvel at one of the world's oldest churches. On the Jewish holiday of Yom Kippur, the city's modern highways and light rail tramline stand empty as the use of all electronics is discouraged in recognition of the holiday. These photos illustrate the layers of this timeless, yet modern city.

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Erasing Palestine: Historic Village N...
Lifta
By Vinciane Jacquet
23 Sep 2014

September 7-19, 2014
Lifta, West Bank, Palestine

The last remaining deserted, pre-1948 Palestinian village in Israel is now facing possible destruction. Located on the outskirts of Jerusalem, the village of Lifta is now an empty collection of old stone houses falling into neglect. For the past 20 years, the Israeli government has been pushing to destroy the remaining buildings to make room for new luxury homes, hotels, a shopping mall, and a recreation park. The courts have rejected governmental requests to build, but the construction of a new railway line running through the village has many thinking that the end is near. In the meantime, local Israeli Jews use Lifta as a picnic spot and swim in its ancient spring. For the few surviving Palestinians who were born in Lifta, visiting their former village brings about a mix of emotions: nostalgia for an idyllic childhood spent amongst the olive groves, and bitterness at the destruction and appropriation of their home and heritage.

Lifta's inhabitants were systematically expelled by Israeli forces between 1947 and 1948. After the residents were expelled, Jewish immigrants, mostly from Yemen, moved into the empty homes. After the 6-Day War in 1967, the Israeli government offered the Jewish residents of Lifta new homes in Jerusalem. The residents happily accepted the offer and blew up the roofs of Lifta's houses before they left to ensure that no one would return to the village.

The Palestinian villages inside present day Israel which were deserted in 1948 have been largely erased from the map. While Israel still retains around 1 million Palestinian residents, many fear that the destruction of Lifta would erase, once and for all, the memory of those Palestinians who once inhabited much of present day Israel, but lost their homes when the state was created.

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Palestinians in Iraq Displaced Repeat...
Erbil
By Jawdat Ahmed
28 Aug 2014

Palestinians, who fled their home country in 1948 and settled in Iraq, have been displaced again in their adopted country. The families left Palestine after the creation of the state of Israel and set up residency in Mosul. They were persecuted under the regime of Saddam Hussein and denied rights of ownership given to regular Iraqi citizens. Despite this they stayed in Mosul for years until ISIS fighters took over the city and encouraged them to fight with them under the pretense of giving the Palestinians a state (Islamic State).

After they refused, the Palestinians fled Mosul to the Khazer refugee camp in the Kalak region, 50km east of Erbil, on the Iraqi-Syrian border, along with other refugees from northern Iraq. However ISIS forces kept advancing, taking over more towns in the region, which lead to the Kurdish Peshmerga evacuating the refugees from the area. They moved the Palestinians to the Baharka camp near Erbil, where they are sheltering for now.

Ibrahim, Palestinian father (man, Arabic):

“At first let me tell you that we are Palestinians, and we have been suffering continuously from 1948 until now. We have been persecuted and treated unjustly since then. Even during the rule of Saddam Hussein, Palestinians used to suffer as well. We weren't allowed to have Iraqi nationality, we couldn't own a house, and we couldn't own anything under our names. Even when Hussein was overthrown and the new regime took control we still suffered. To Arabs in general, Palestinians are terrorists. Anywhere we go, we are always treated in a negative way, once we show our IDs that say that we are Palestinian, the way they treat us changes.

The day the fighters came into Mosul, you can call them whatever you want “ISIS” or “IS” or anything, they already had information that we are Palestinian. They came to us asking us to fight with them, under the pretext that we are oppressed, and that they will help us have our own state. Of course we couldn't allow our children to join the fighting, or else they will be considered terrorists and will probably end up dead, but we had no other choice, no one can argue with them. If we had we would be treated as apostates. They told us we have two days to make our children join the fighting. Even if they can't fight, they will train them and give them salaries. We, the decision makers in the community, held a meeting and decided to flee the area the next day to the Khazer camp.

Our situation is not safe, if the next day Mosul is freed [from ISIS], the government will tell us to go back, but when we are in Mosul, our lives are in danger. Since we are Palestinian, the Iraqi government will treat us as terrorists. If we go to Mosul today, ISIS will punish us because we didn't fight on their side. Either way, our situation in Iraq is dangerous, we thank God we're in Kurdistan now, but our future is unknown. We demand the UNHCR to settle us in another country, because our future here is unstable.”

Ali, Palestinian father (man, Arabic):

“We ask the UN and the Human rights associations to look after us, and take us out of the country. We suffered a lot since we came here. Ever since I was born in this country, I didn't know peace or stability; we have no rights at all. We demand the UN to take us out of Iraq.

We came to this refugee camp without a thing, not even a dollar. We decided to look for a job in order to survive. We are living all together, 8 families supporting and helping each other.

The state of Palestine has provided nothing for us since 1948. We always wished the Palestinian president and the government would look out for us. The only thing we got from any Palestinian official was the official form to get into Erbil easily and that was given by the Palestinian ambassador, here in Iraq.”

Shot list:

00:00 - 01:26 Various shots of Khazer refugee camp and Peshmerga forces
01:27 - 02:16 Various shots of Baharka refugee camp and cutaways of the Palestinian families
08:52 - 10:15 (End) Various shots of Baharka refugee camp and refugees

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Gaza's Orphans Begin New Lives
Gaza
By Andrea DiCenzo
25 Aug 2014

August 28, 2014
Gaza, Palestine

Palestinian children orphaned in the 2014 Gaza war begin new lives in the care of extended family and orphanages. While the physical wounds many of them sustained during the 50 day war are healing, their psychological wounds are just beginning to show. Gaza's dismal, blockaded, and underfunded mental health system cannot cope with massive amount of children in need of psychosocial care. Most children will receive no specialized treatment for their deep psychological wounds.

Many children orphaned in the war are now beginning new lives in the care of extended family members. However, as Islam forbids adoption, those who do not have extended family to go to are now under the care of orphanages and will remain so until they are adults.

These photos profile three young girls who lost their parents in the 2014 Gaza conflict and are now looking for a new start as their caretakers help rebuild their shattered lives.

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Gaza: Assessing the Damage
Gaza
By Andrea DiCenzo
25 Aug 2014

After what was possibly the most destructive war in Gaza in recent history, residents of the besieged coastal enclave finally have a chance to assess the damage done to their homes and properties. For the thousands left homeless by the hostilities, life is now a painstaking process of rebuilding the little that remains of their possessions.

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Protest Demonstration - Hebron
Hebron, Palestine
By Ibrahim Hamouz
16 Aug 2014

Hebron, Palestinian Territories

August 15, 2014

Protestors demonstrating against the conflict in Gaza clash with Israeli soldiers in the Bab el Zawya district of Hebron.

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Gaza Fisherman
Gaza, Palestinian Territories
By ashgallagher
14 Aug 2014

Gaza, Palestinian Territories
August 14, 2014

SCRIPT:

OPEN NATS, SUNRISE OVER GAZA CITY/WATER MOVING, THEN WATER UNDER BOAT AND FISHERMEN.
DIP BLACK-

ON CAMERA/OPEN SOT: FARES EL-HESSI, GAZA FISHERMAN, then to PUTTING WATER COVER ON:
I am fares Murad Rahab El-Hessi. I work as a fisherman and learned from my ancestors. I have worked this profession for 20 years.

VOICE OVER/FARES, BROLL OF FISHING, ARRANGING BOAT, CREW AS WELL FISHING OUT ON WATER, OTHERS PASSING
SOT: We are catching fish to sell it to a trader. The trader will sell it in the market.

SOT: We don’t know what the average daily income will be catching fish. Sometimes we collect 800 or 900 dollars. And sometimes the situation is very bad and we cannot even get 100 dollars.

ON CAM/SOT: (start) We sail the boat from 6 a.m. until 6 a.m. the next day, we work on two shifts, my brother and me.

NATSOUND, FARES AND NEPHEWS LOOKING OUT, BENDING OVER, SHOUTING LOOKING FOR FISH, PROGRESSION TO PUTTING OUT THE LINE AND SARDINE PILE...
SOT: Now we have see the fish, we observe the fish in the sea, and when we see it we throw the nets, all the time we observe the fish...to let us can catch.
(butt to) SOT: In the areas we sail, we can only catch small sardines, we throw the nets into the sea, the small sardines are so small we cannot see them,

/QT DIP TO BLACK/ EM-ABED SOT ONCAM: -- THEN BROLL FARES WALKING IN TO EAT AFTER FISHING
Palestinian women depend on their husbands , and because of the bad economic situation we [the family] cannot depend on anyone other than my husband, and even kids feel sad if there is nothing to eat or money in the house.

DIP UP - START ON CAM/BUTT TO SOT FARES /THEN/
COVER W/ VO OF HIM, FISHING DOCK, (THEN BACK TO ONCAM):
I have been detained in a prison in Ashdod, we stayed for 9 days don't know what caused our detention. (butt to) We were sentenced for 1 month and fined 500 dollars per person, and then they transferred us to the Negev prison. After we finished our sentence, then we had to pay the fine and go back to our homes.

ON CAM/EM-ABED SOT:
I felt sad because my husband was arrested by the Israeli army, and I am afraid of them because they use bad methods with prisoners.

VO OF BOATS IN THE MARINA, SHOWING BIGGER ONES WHICH DONT GO OUT -
FARES SOT: I own two boats, one of them is 20meters long, and works in waters after 12miles, we are fishing in Saltan Ibrahim [finding] shrimp and loucos and all kinds of fish, but because of the [Israeli] siege, it does not work.

ON CAM/END ON EM-ABED SOT - THEN LAST COVER OF WATER W/ GAZA IN BACK TO END:
i am glad that [there are negotiations in cairo - i hope they get results, God willing, and let them [the fisherman] go out further than before,

DIP TO BLACK OUT

FONTS:
Fares al-Hessi: Palestinian Fisherman, Gaza
Em-Abed al-Hessi: Fares’ Wife
TRT: 00.02.52;16

Produced by: Ashley Gallagher
Shot by: Mohammed Alnajar & Ashley Gallagher
Edited by: Ashley Gallagher

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Funeral of Udai Nafez
Rafat, Palestinian Territories
By Eyad Jadallah
02 Aug 2014

Palestinian women mourn during the funeral of 19-year-old Udai Nafez, killed during clashes with Israeli forces in Saffa a village west of Ramallah, in the West Bank village of Rafat on August 2, 2014. Israeli forces shot dead two Palestinians during separate clashes in the northern and central West Bank on Friday . Photo By: Eyad Jadallah

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Funeral of Udai Nafez
Rafat, Palestinian Territories
By Eyad Jadallah
02 Aug 2014

Mourners and relatives carry the body of 19-year-old Palestinian Udai Nafez, killed during clashes with Israeli forces in Saffa a village west of Ramallah, during his funeral in the West Bank village of Rafat on August 2, 2014. Israeli forces shot dead two Palestinians during separate clashes in the northern and central West Bank on Friday

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Protest and Funeral in the West Bank
Qalandia
By Eyad Jadallah
25 Jul 2014

July 24-25, 2014
Qalandia, West Bank

17-year-old Palestinian Mohammed al-Araj is laid to rest after being shot and killed during clashes with Israeli troops the previous night at the Qalandia checkpoint separating the West Bank from Jerusalem. Israeli security forces shot dead Mohammad and wounded 150 other people during the massive, 10 000 person protest in support of fellow Palestinians in the Gaza Strip. The confrontation, and several smaller skirmishes throughout Israeli-annexed east Jerusalem, came on Laylat al-Qadr, or Night of Destiny, when Muslims pray through the night as the holy month of Ramadan nears its end.

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Inside Gaza's Central Morgue
Gaza City
By Daniel Van Moll
18 Jul 2014

July 17, 2014
Gaza City

Gaza City's central morgue fills up with bodies of those killed in Israel's ongoing military offensive in Gaza. Relatives of the dead come to collect the bodies for funerals.

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Gazans Rush to Buy Food During Ceasefire
Gaza City
By Daniel Van Moll
18 Jul 2014

July 17, 2014
Gaza City

Residents of Gaza rush to local markets to buy food during a five hour, UN imposed ceasefire on July 17, 2014. Due to the ongoing conflict with Israel, residents have been trapped in their homes by fighting and food supplies have been running out.

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Gaza: Baker Family Mourns Children Ki...
Gaza City
By Daniel Van Moll
18 Jul 2014

The Baker family of Gaza City mourns the loss of four of the children who were killed by an Israeli missile while playing football on a beach in Gaza City. The death of the four boys precipitated a temporary, UN backed humanitarian ceasefire between Israel and Hamas in order to allow Gaza residents to restock basic supplies.

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Finding Sanctuary in Gaza
Gaza
By Alison Baskerville
15 Jul 2014

Following a warning from the Israeli Defence Forces (IDF), over 600 people evacuated their homes in the north of Gaza and have taken refuge in a UN School. Many fled few possessions and the school is now concerned that they will run out of water and supplies. "I don't know how much longer we will be able to go on in this situation," commented Abdil Sawan, the UN representative within the school.

The UN now estimates that 17,000 people have now left their homes.

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Workshop between Lebanese and Palesti...
Beirut
By wissam fanash
10 Jul 2014

Workshop encourages dialogue, cooperation between Lebanese and Palestinian youth

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Palestinians commemorate the Annivers...
Syria
By TTM Contributor 4
07 Aug 2013

On the anniversary of the Palestinian Nakba, hundreds of Palestinians returned to the Yarmook Refugee Camp to commemorate the day.

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Mohammed Assaf visits Bethlehem (1 of...
Bethlehem, West Bank, Palestine
By Elo B
04 Aug 2013

Palestinian children wait for FC Barcelona and "Arab Idol" winner Mohammed Assaf visiting the Nativity church during their Peace Tour - Bethlehem, West Bank, Palestine

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Portrait of Bedouin child
Assir, Israel
By Elo B
24 Jul 2013

Bedouin family threatened of displacement by the Prawer plan stand in their village of Assir in the Negev desert in Israel.The Israeli government is expecting the Knesset to pass a law confiscating over 850,000 dunums in the Negev, uprooting approximately 40 villages which will lead to the displacement of between 30,000 to 40,000 Palestinian Bedouins.

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Bedouin family threatened of displace...
Al Araqib, Israel
By Elo B
24 Jul 2013

Bedouin village of Assir in the Negev desert in Israel is threatened of displacement by the Prawer plan.The Israeli government is expecting the Knesset to pass a law confiscating over 850,000 dunums in the Negev, uprooting approximately 40 villages which will lead to the displacement of between 30,000 to 40,000 Palestinian Bedouins.

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Bedouin village threatened of displac...
Al Araqib, Israel
By Elo B
24 Jul 2013

Bedouin village of Assir in the Negev desert in Israel is threatened of displacement by the Prawer plan.The Israeli government is expecting the Knesset to pass a law confiscating over 850,000 dunums in the Negev, uprooting approximately 40 villages which will lead to the displacement of between 30,000 to 40,000 Palestinian Bedouins.