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The Light In The Cave (Subtitles)
Afghanistan
By sarakeawal
24 Sep 2010

This film features the story of the filmmaker, Suleiman Amanzad, who survived the genocide of the residents of Bamyan province in central Afghanistan by the Taliban in 1999. The filmmaker was four years old when the Taliban captured their village and began massacring people.

His family and other villagers hid themselves in a cave near the village, and this is how they survived the genocide. After that the family of the filmmaker move to Kabul, where Suleiman gets a chance to go to school. He also gets a scholarship from the US Embassy of Kabul and attends one year of high school in the United States.

The film is eight minutes long.

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TTM Documentaries
Beirut, Lebanon
By Beirut Editor's Picks
24 Sep 2010

TRANSTERRA is becoming more than just a marketplace where producers can showcase and sell their documentaries. We are a resource for archive footage, and a community that provides collaboration opportunities.

The documentaries shown here are part of TRANSTERRA's greater catalog of options. Full-length screenings are available for most, and you can access these by sending an e-mail request to [email protected].

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Transition (Part 2 of 2)
Moscow, Russia
By Marina Fonda
03 Jan 2010

Wissam is a Journalism student in Moscow and former Syrian Army officer. After being forbidden by his advisor teacher of writing his final paper on the farce of Russian coverage of the conflicts on Syria, he decides to head back to his homeland to make a film and show Russians what's really going on in his country. But they seem to have already been persuaded by state TVs' official propaganda pro Bashar Al Assad.
This teaser refers to a full HD 50 min. documentary film.

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Dadaab
Dadaab
By carloscastro
30 Nov 2009

Can a shelter become a prison? "We cannot leave the camp neither go back to our country nor prosper". At the same time, can a shelter become homeland? "In this place I grow myself, I studied, worked and became father. I feel home". This is a contradiction faced by refugees of the largest camp worldwide, Dadaab, in north-eastern Kenya.
This is the case of Omar, Hassan and Mohamed, three Somalian young men who arrived to Dadaab in 1991, when the war started in Somalia and the camp was created. Their memories of their previous lives are reduced to some blurry images. In these two decades, they have become part of an incipient middle class, but despite that, their aim is to get one of the prized visas to start a new life in another country.
While they think on leaving, 6.000 people arrive every month from Somalia. N-0 is one of the areas where new arrivals are settled and Mohamed Alí is its leader. For them, the camp means safety, but restarting life there is difficult either.
A few of them leave; a lot arrive; all of them "hoping the best but prepared for the worst".

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The People of Pingelap (26 of 27)
Pingelap, Federated States of Micronesia
By Hannes von der Fecht
24 Mar 2008

The only paved road on Pingelap. The houses were build by the Japanese occupiers during the 2nd world war. After the Japanese were defeated by the Americans, the inhabitants of Pingelap moved into these houses.

Pingelap is a small island in the Pacific Ocean, a part of the Federate States of Micronesia. About 240 people live on this atoll. Ten per cent of them have a genetic form of colour blindness, achromatopsia, meaning their sight is extremely diffused and their eyes very sensitive to light. This disease is locally known as "Maskun", which in Pingelapese language means "to not see".
In his book, The Island of the Colorblind, Oliver Sacks, author and neurologist, describes the life of the inhabitants of Pingelap. His interest is based on the question, if, because of the multitude of people with Maskun in Pingelap, there is an independent culture of colour blind people. This book inspired me to travel to Pingelap and create a photographic series as a study in the perception of people with Maskun. I discovered that in everyday life people with Maskun are hardly distinguishable from those without – only the constant blinking of the eyes in the bright sunshine reveals any difference. With my camera I wanted to somehow visualise how the island was percieved by its inhabitants and come to terms with those who are living with Maskun.

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The People of Pingelap
Pingelap, Federated States of Micronesia
By Hannes von der Fecht
17 Mar 2008

Pingelap is a small island in the Pacific Ocean, a part of the Federate States of Micronesia. About 240 people live on this atoll. Ten per cent of them have a genetic form of colour blindness, achromatopsia, meaning their sight is extremely diffused and their eyes very sensitive to light. This disease is locally known as "Maskun", which in Pingelapese language means "to not see".
In his book, The Island of the Colorblind, Oliver Sacks, author and neurologist, describes the life of the inhabitants of Pingelap. His interest is based on the question, if, because of the multitude of people with Maskun in Pingelap, there is an independent culture of colour blind people. This book inspired me to travel to Pingelap and create a photographic series as a study in the perception of people with Maskun. I discovered that in everyday life people with Maskun are hardly distinguishable from those without – only the constant blinking of the eyes in the bright sunshine reveals any difference. With my camera I wanted to somehow visualise how the island was percieved by its inhabitants and come to terms with those who are living with Maskun.

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Javier
El Calafate, Patagonia
By Gabriele Orlini
01 Jan 1970

Javier comes from faraway Andalusia.
He crossed the ocean carrying a passion of his homeland: the dance.
In Argentina, he has arrived till the southern hemisphere - in Patagonia - drifting the dances and folk dances of the place, made of tango, bolero, cumbia, by continuous contamination of Andean Peoples on the border between Chile and Argentina.
Javier loves life, loves the simple things that only an existence in contact with the nature is capable of feeling. Javier is 35 years old, speaks three languages, and at Fin del Mundo he chose to get lost, for keeping looking for the pace of his dancing.

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Ricardo
El Calafate, Patagonia
By Gabriele Orlini
01 Jan 1970

Ricardo: born in a family of gaucho Tehuelche, since he was a child his eyes remained fascinated by the endless expanses of Patagonia.
With his hard face, common to the locals native made by windy and hard winters and short summers, embodies the profound meaning of the term huacho, which in quechua means “landless".
Go up on the back of a horse even before learning to walk, Ricardo - and his father and his grandfather before him - is a wild white man who lives away from modern life.
Ricardo has 46 years old, lives on the slopes of the Andes, and never saw a big city.

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El Calafate, Patagonia
By Gabriele Orlini
01 Jan 1970

Patagonia is also known for its immense prairies that enhance a natural breeding of cattle and sheep.
Strong is the presence of horses in the wild, especially in the lands at the base of the Andes, along the Chilean border. In many farms (estancia) throughout the region, they still use to slaughter according to ancient native methods.
This practice involves cutting the throat of the animal that is then hoisted to the hind legs in order to drain the blood and finally remove the skin.

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El Calafate, Patagonia
By Gabriele Orlini
01 Jan 1970

The immense grasslands of Patagonia are a fertile ground for many types of livestock, including sheep.
For their valuable fleece that is particularly warm and resistant, many multinationals in the textile sector have decided to acquire these lands (especially following the 2001 Argentine economic default even to the detriment of native peoples) for its production of raw material.
Herds in small farms do not provide large multinational companies but feed local and tourist trade.

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Thomas
El Calafate, Patagonia
By Gabriele Orlini
01 Jan 1970

He raised horses in Cornwall.
Saw them born, with them he grew.
Inheriting this knowledge from his father, he knows everything about them: their ancient names - not those given by men- their sense of freedom, the wild streak that pulsates in every Thoroughbred.
Thomas is 24 years old and he loves drawing too.
He arrived from Europe with an unique huge desire: to hear the sound of the silence of a boundless land that has nourished the imagination of many generations before him and, after having absorbed every silent note, draw in his notebook just one line. The line that his eyes recognise in the horizon every day. .

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El Calafate, Patagonia
By Gabriele Orlini
01 Jan 1970

There are many animal species that inhabit the boundless prairies of Patagonia, considering its size and the lack of human presence.
Among these there is the guanaco (like a lama), a skilled runner, much sought after for its meat and for its warm coat. For a very long time the main source of livelihood of the native populations.
Moving in flocks, the guanaco trapped in enclosures that have appeared in recent years more and more frequently especially in areas with higher population density, therefore becoming food for other predators such as foxes, Pumas, condors, etc.

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Bernardo
El Calafate, Patagonia
By Gabriele Orlini
01 Jan 1970

Bernardo is a city boy.
He comes from the North, from an area of Argentina where the seasons still feature the rhythm of the days. Where the humid summers require to rest along the beaches of Rio de la Plata.
Bernardo is 24 years old, and from 4 years he spends his summer at an estancia in the Glacial Park, at the foot of the Andes.
Bernardo is not a huacho - his grandfather was - and maybe for the challenge of research and travel, he decided to retrace the history of his family coming to live and work where it all began. Because there is no future for who ignores its past and to move closer to the world's end allows you to scroll down to themselves.

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El Calafate, Patagonia
By Gabriele Orlini
01 Jan 1970

Patagonian sheep are valuable for their fleece, particularly warm and durable.
In small estancia the herds are not serving the production of the multinationals textile company but the benefit of local and tourist trade.
The shearing, in these cases, is done by hand using scissors, denying shavers because tended to scare the sheep who not accustomed to loud noise.
The hand shears, task of the gaucho, becomes an art handed down over time.

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El Calafate, Patagonia
By Gabriele Orlini
01 Jan 1970

The breeding of cattle, in Patagonia, is the second to that of sheep that actually represents the main source of income after tourism.
Low humidity, the climate and the abundance of pasture vegetation makes the cattle farming (pigs and horses) very high quality for the slaughter.
Also for this reason the Argentine beef is among the most sought and demanded around the world.

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Santiago
El Calafate, Patagonia
By Gabriele Orlini
01 Jan 1970

Santiago is 18 years old and in his country, Colombia, is studying to become a doctor.he
He chose to take a year off to travel to Latin America to discover the root of its origins.
And as a story that repeats, itself in his journey he is discovering a world, simple gestures, earning the respect and trust from the bottom, getting your hands with those that trample on the ground for a living it.
Santiago will return to his country (and maybe today is a brilliant doctor). To the Fin del Mundo, Santiago came with a promise made to his mother: "never lower our gaze".

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Patagonia Landscape
El Calafate, Patagonia
By Gabriele Orlini
01 Jan 1970

Patagonia, the Land of the Giants, spreads out between Chile and Argentina for more than 900,000 km2. It’s a region of wide plains and plateaus, light vegetation and it is almost uninhabited (2 habitants per km2) also because of the constant cold winds and hard terrain.
Patagonia has always fueled the imagination and passion of travelers and writers from all around the world.
One of the first European explorers, Magellano, gave the name of Patagão to its residents probably because of their height and primitive costumes (they wore leather and ate raw meat).
In the world there is no region like Patagonia, who is able to charm with its endless horizons, to misplace or recover even the more sharp-eyed traveler.

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Ricardo
El Calafate, Patagonia
By Gabriele Orlini
01 Jan 1970

Ricardo is 40 years old, Argentine blood.
His story starts long before his own conscience.
Ricardo is responsible for preserving one of the greatest traditions of the Argentinian cuisine: the Asado.
And the asador, which embodies the life transforming death, is like a priest called to accompany the transition.
He has the responsibility of the tradition, her privilege of making men the evening banquet.
The asador Ricardo takes care causing death, cooking the meat according to native rules and according to the rhythms of the Earth. And under his expert hands and the ancient gestures, the livestock raised in the isolated Plains of Patagonia is transformed and becomes force, becomes familiar rite.
The asador is a craftsman and becomes an artist in the person of Ricardo.