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Juba
By alexiawebster
12 May 2016

South Sudan's millennials are a generation of displaced. They grew up stateless, in uncertainty, mostly spending their childhoods and teenage years in refugee camps in neighboring countries. When South Sudan got independence 5 years ago this homeless generation returned full of hope, finally having a country to call their own. But the worlds youngest nation has been plagued by violence, with a civil war breaking out in 2013 and most recently fighting erupting in the capital of Juba once again. When I visited in May I spent time with some of the musicians, artists, fashion designers and entrepreneurs who are trying to be part of the world of global youth culture and yet surrounded by uncertainty and anxiety. Everyday life in the capital was precarious, dangerous and often unstable and yet this younger generation who grew up as refugees were determined to stay and make a home, to continue to make music, dance, go a bit wild and be free. Since the fighting broke I have been chatting to many of the people I spent time with a few months ago. Over whatsapp they told me of listening to gun shots outside their front doors, dead bodies on the streets, of whatsapp group messages telling them that different ethnic groups were being hunted in the city and of friends being killed. Most fled the capital and returned to the cities are camps they were raised in.

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Juba
By alexiawebster
11 May 2016

South Sudan's millennials are a generation of displaced. They grew up stateless, in uncertainty, mostly spending their childhoods and teenage years in refugee camps in neighboring countries. When South Sudan got independence 5 years ago this homeless generation returned full of hope, finally having a country to call their own. But the worlds youngest nation has been plagued by violence, with a civil war breaking out in 2013 and most recently fighting erupting in the capital of Juba once again. When I visited in May I spent time with some of the musicians, artists, fashion designers and entrepreneurs who are trying to be part of the world of global youth culture and yet surrounded by uncertainty and anxiety. Everyday life in the capital was precarious, dangerous and often unstable and yet this younger generation who grew up as refugees were determined to stay and make a home, to continue to make music, dance, go a bit wild and be free. Since the fighting broke I have been chatting to many of the people I spent time with a few months ago. Over whatsapp they told me of listening to gun shots outside their front doors, dead bodies on the streets, of whatsapp group messages telling them that different ethnic groups were being hunted in the city and of friends being killed. Most fled the capital and returned to the cities are camps they were raised in.

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Juba
By alexiawebster
11 May 2016

Singer Okuta Ceasar Malis, known as 'Silver X' in his imported Japanese convertible outside his home in Juba, South Sudan.

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Juba
By alexiawebster
10 May 2016

South Sudan's millennials are a generation of displaced. They grew up stateless, in uncertainty, mostly spending their childhoods and teenage years in refugee camps in neighboring countries. When South Sudan got independence 5 years ago this homeless generation returned full of hope, finally having a country to call their own. But the worlds youngest nation has been plagued by violence, with a civil war breaking out in 2013 and most recently fighting erupting in the capital of Juba once again. When I visited in May I spent time with some of the musicians, artists, fashion designers and entrepreneurs who are trying to be part of the world of global youth culture and yet surrounded by uncertainty and anxiety. Everyday life in the capital was precarious, dangerous and often unstable and yet this younger generation who grew up as refugees were determined to stay and make a home, to continue to make music, dance, go a bit wild and be free. Since the fighting broke I have been chatting to many of the people I spent time with a few months ago. Over whatsapp they told me of listening to gun shots outside their front doors, dead bodies on the streets, of whatsapp group messages telling them that different ethnic groups were being hunted in the city and of friends being killed. Most fled the capital and returned to the cities are camps they were raised in.

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Juba
By alexiawebster
09 May 2016

South Sudan's millennials are a generation of displaced. They grew up stateless, in uncertainty, mostly spending their childhoods and teenage years in refugee camps in neighboring countries. When South Sudan got independence 5 years ago this homeless generation returned full of hope, finally having a country to call their own. But the worlds youngest nation has been plagued by violence, with a civil war breaking out in 2013 and most recently fighting erupting in the capital of Juba once again. When I visited in May I spent time with some of the musicians, artists, fashion designers and entrepreneurs who are trying to be part of the world of global youth culture and yet surrounded by uncertainty and anxiety. Everyday life in the capital was precarious, dangerous and often unstable and yet this younger generation who grew up as refugees were determined to stay and make a home, to continue to make music, dance, go a bit wild and be free. Since the fighting broke I have been chatting to many of the people I spent time with a few months ago. Over whatsapp they told me of listening to gun shots outside their front doors, dead bodies on the streets, of whatsapp group messages telling them that different ethnic groups were being hunted in the city and of friends being killed. Most fled the capital and returned to the cities are camps they were raised in.

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Juba
By alexiawebster
08 May 2016

South Sudan's millennials are a generation of displaced. They grew up stateless, in uncertainty, mostly spending their childhoods and teenage years in refugee camps in neighboring countries. When South Sudan got independence 5 years ago this homeless generation returned full of hope, finally having a country to call their own. But the worlds youngest nation has been plagued by violence, with a civil war breaking out in 2013 and most recently fighting erupting in the capital of Juba once again. When I visited in May I spent time with some of the musicians, artists, fashion designers and entrepreneurs who are trying to be part of the world of global youth culture and yet surrounded by uncertainty and anxiety. Everyday life in the capital was precarious, dangerous and often unstable and yet this younger generation who grew up as refugees were determined to stay and make a home, to continue to make music, dance, go a bit wild and be free. Since the fighting broke I have been chatting to many of the people I spent time with a few months ago. Over whatsapp they told me of listening to gun shots outside their front doors, dead bodies on the streets, of whatsapp group messages telling them that different ethnic groups were being hunted in the city and of friends being killed. Most fled the capital and returned to the cities are camps they were raised in.

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Juba
By alexiawebster
08 May 2016

South Sudan's millennials are a generation of displaced. They grew up stateless, in uncertainty, mostly spending their childhoods and teenage years in refugee camps in neighboring countries. When South Sudan got independence 5 years ago this homeless generation returned full of hope, finally having a country to call their own. But the worlds youngest nation has been plagued by violence, with a civil war breaking out in 2013 and most recently fighting erupting in the capital of Juba once again. When I visited in May I spent time with some of the musicians, artists, fashion designers and entrepreneurs who are trying to be part of the world of global youth culture and yet surrounded by uncertainty and anxiety. Everyday life in the capital was precarious, dangerous and often unstable and yet this younger generation who grew up as refugees were determined to stay and make a home, to continue to make music, dance, go a bit wild and be free. Since the fighting broke I have been chatting to many of the people I spent time with a few months ago. Over whatsapp they told me of listening to gun shots outside their front doors, dead bodies on the streets, of whatsapp group messages telling them that different ethnic groups were being hunted in the city and of friends being killed. Most fled the capital and returned to the cities are camps they were raised in.

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Juba
By alexiawebster
08 May 2016

South Sudan's millennials are a generation of displaced. They grew up stateless, in uncertainty, mostly spending their childhoods and teenage years in refugee camps in neighboring countries. When South Sudan got independence 5 years ago this homeless generation returned full of hope, finally having a country to call their own. But the worlds youngest nation has been plagued by violence, with a civil war breaking out in 2013 and most recently fighting erupting in the capital of Juba once again. When I visited in May I spent time with some of the musicians, artists, fashion designers and entrepreneurs who are trying to be part of the world of global youth culture and yet surrounded by uncertainty and anxiety. Everyday life in the capital was precarious, dangerous and often unstable and yet this younger generation who grew up as refugees were determined to stay and make a home, to continue to make music, dance, go a bit wild and be free. Since the fighting broke I have been chatting to many of the people I spent time with a few months ago. Over whatsapp they told me of listening to gun shots outside their front doors, dead bodies on the streets, of whatsapp group messages telling them that different ethnic groups were being hunted in the city and of friends being killed. Most fled the capital and returned to the cities are camps they were raised in.

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Juba
By alexiawebster
08 May 2016

South Sudan's millennials are a generation of displaced. They grew up stateless, in uncertainty, mostly spending their childhoods and teenage years in refugee camps in neighboring countries. When South Sudan got independence 5 years ago this homeless generation returned full of hope, finally having a country to call their own. But the worlds youngest nation has been plagued by violence, with a civil war breaking out in 2013 and most recently fighting erupting in the capital of Juba once again. When I visited in May I spent time with some of the musicians, artists, fashion designers and entrepreneurs who are trying to be part of the world of global youth culture and yet surrounded by uncertainty and anxiety. Everyday life in the capital was precarious, dangerous and often unstable and yet this younger generation who grew up as refugees were determined to stay and make a home, to continue to make music, dance, go a bit wild and be free. Since the fighting broke I have been chatting to many of the people I spent time with a few months ago. Over whatsapp they told me of listening to gun shots outside their front doors, dead bodies on the streets, of whatsapp group messages telling them that different ethnic groups were being hunted in the city and of friends being killed. Most fled the capital and returned to the cities are camps they were raised in.

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Juba
By alexiawebster
07 May 2016

South Sudan's millennials are a generation of displaced. They grew up stateless, in uncertainty, mostly spending their childhoods and teenage years in refugee camps in neighboring countries. When South Sudan got independence 5 years ago this homeless generation returned full of hope, finally having a country to call their own. But the worlds youngest nation has been plagued by violence, with a civil war breaking out in 2013 and most recently fighting erupting in the capital of Juba once again. When I visited in May I spent time with some of the musicians, artists, fashion designers and entrepreneurs who are trying to be part of the world of global youth culture and yet surrounded by uncertainty and anxiety. Everyday life in the capital was precarious, dangerous and often unstable and yet this younger generation who grew up as refugees were determined to stay and make a home, to continue to make music, dance, go a bit wild and be free. Since the fighting broke I have been chatting to many of the people I spent time with a few months ago. Over whatsapp they told me of listening to gun shots outside their front doors, dead bodies on the streets, of whatsapp group messages telling them that different ethnic groups were being hunted in the city and of friends being killed. Most fled the capital and returned to the cities are camps they were raised in.

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Juba
By alexiawebster
07 May 2016

Singer Annet Angaika 'Neetha Baby' on a boat traveling on the White Nile River during the 'Nile Cruise', a party held for young South Sudanese entertainers, artists and entrepreneurs.

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Juba
By alexiawebster
07 May 2016

Singer Okuta Ceasar Malis, known as 'Silver X' (arms raised) stands on a boat traveling on the White Nile River during the 'Nile Cruise', a party held for young South Sudanese entertainers, artists and entrepreneurs.

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Myanmar's Rohingya crisis
Sittwe, Myanmar
By vincenzo floramo
31 Mar 2014

DESCRIPTION UPDATED ON MARCH 2015

Almost two years after a wave of sectarian violence against the Muslim community broke out in Rakhine state in Western Burma, about 70,000 displaced people from the Rohingya ethnic group are caged in appallingly precarious shelters in the camps for internally displaced people (IDP) in the capital Sittwe, and could face potential disaster as rainy season approaches. The Rohingya population has to withstand the poor conditions during their stay at the camps - including the lack of food, medical assistance and the abysmal hygiene conditions - that are likely to worsen markedly during the rains at the low-lying areas next to the sea near Sittwe.

Human Rights Watch had already accused the government, which considers Rohingyas as illegal immigrants from Bangladesh and does not recognize them as Burmese citizens, of carrying out a campaign of ethnic cleansing against the Muslim minority group. This follows Burma's refusal to allow people to class themselves as Rohingya in the first national census in three decades and officials' insistence that members of the ethnic group call themselves Bengali if they want to be registered. Meanwhile, international aid agencies working in Rakhine were attacked last week in what is the latest in a long series of sporadic assaults that erupted into full-scale violence in Rakhine scale back in 2012, causing thousands of Rohingyas to flee their homes. The UN has described the Rohingya as one of the most persecuted minorities in the world.