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Battle of Bakara Market
Mogadishu
By Noe Falk Nielsen
29 Apr 2015

The internationally recognised Somali Government, the Transitional Federal Government, had been under siege since the Ethiopian Army pulled out in January 2009. Protected by a small force of Ugandan and Burundian soldiers deployed as the African Union's Mission to Somalia (AMISOM) the government was functioning in a 25 km2 pocket in the capital, Mogadishu, consisting of the State House Complex, the port and the airport base, where AMISOM had their HQ. In the fall of 2010 Al Shabaab attempted to push the government and the AMISOM forces into the sea in a large offensive referred to as the Ramadan Offensive, but AMISOM held their ground and eventually fought back. One of the main turning points of the conflict appeared at the end of July and beginning of August 2011, where combined AMISOM and government forces managed to push Al Shabaab out of Mogadishu, leaving the group wiht only limited footholds in the north and east of the capital.
The present collection depicts the fighting on the first two days of the offensive, where AMISOM and government forces attacked the Bakara Market in the attempt to dislodge the group from it main stronghold in the city.  

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The Horror of War - Somalia
Lafole, Somalia
By Noe Falk Nielsen
16 Apr 2015

A Medic sees the fireball followed by thick billowing smoke from a helicopter heading south from Mogadishu. As she calls it in the incident has already been reported to HQ and an AMISOM Quick Reaction Force has been mobilized. The convoy moves aggressively through the congested streets of Mogadishu heading out of the capital towards Lafole 20 kilometres away. We reach the site of the incident 50 minutes after an Al Shabaab operative detonated his car bomb. The suicide bomber was targeting an AMISOM Armoured Personnel Carrier, which was scorched and incapacitated, but otherwise fine, and all the passengers could exit the vehicle by own means. This was, however, not the case for the two civilian minibuses located on the other side of the car bomb as it detonated. When we arrive the wrecks of the two busses are still smoldering, while cans of food litter the surrounding area some having exploded spilling their mangy content due to the intense heat. One mini bus has been sent 20 meters off the road by the explosion and is left as a burning wreck, while the charred bodies and interior continue to smolder. Next to the bus lies the remains of a woman, whose white teeth are clearly visible in the charred face, as she lies half covered in car parts with her hands up to protect her face. At her feet lies another body, this one of a man whose skin has been burned clear off lying entangled in the remains of the bus half way out of the passenger cabin. Inside the cabin are the remains of at least six people of which at least four were children. The remains are too small to be adults. In the back of the burned out bus sits the remains of a child, where only the top of the torso is left. The top of the skull has been sawn clean off and lies below the seat. Another body lies on a seat and consists of a very small skull and a small pile of ashes. A third is nothing but a charred skeleton entangled with the remains of the interior of the bus. The smell of burned meat and rubber is heavy and sickening and lingers over the entire area. A bit of charred meat and bloody clothes lie on the ground some 30 meters away. Back on the road the other bus is left a short distance down the road. The bus was mostly hit from behind and was luckily not a passenger bus, but carried provisions. Next to it lies the remains of the suicide bombers vehicle, which by now is nothing more than unrecognizable junk. Spectators move about and inspect the scene of destruction. Death fascinates. The body of the woman outside of the first bus is photographed and inspected. An older Somali man uses his cane to point out the remains of a child to another man. Others stand around and watch. Covering their noses and mouths to avoid the stench. More photos are taken. Some take selfies. I photograph it all. The spectacle is terribly and tragic. At least 12 were killed and 27 injured. All civilians. Statistics in the real world.

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Al-Shabaab Attack Government Building...
Mogadishu
By Hornconnect Broadcast Services
14 Apr 2015

Somali security forces kill seven al-Shabaab militants after they attacked the Ministry of Higher Education in Mogadishu. A car laden with explosives rammed the wall surrounding the compound and exploded, after which gunmen stormed the building, killing eight bystanders and two officials.

The video includes scenes outside the ministry as authorities enter a gun battle with militants inside, as well as images of the aftermath of the explosion that started the attack.

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Somalia: Routing Al-Shabab 08
Mogadishu
By Noe Falk Nielsen
08 Sep 2014

A Somali soldier stands in front of one of two minibuses that were hit by a suicide car bomb (VBIED) 20Km outside of Mogadishu on 9 September 2014.

12 civilians were killed and 27 wounded. Despite being weakened, Al Shabab were still able to carry out ambushes and attacks using improvised explosive devices (IEDs). These would often hit military targets, but would end up killing and maiming scores of civilians. Al Shabab displayed a blatant disregard for civilian casualties in their fight agains AMISOM/the government.

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The horror of War - Somalia 1
Lafole, Somalia
By Noe Falk Nielsen
08 Sep 2014

On 8 September 2014 a car bomb tore through two civilian mini busses in the course of an attack on an AMISOM convoy some 20 Ks outside of Mogadishu. 12 were killed and 27 wounded, all civilians and mostly children.

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The horror of War - Somalia 2
Lafole, Somalia
By Noe Falk Nielsen
08 Sep 2014

On 8 September 2014 a car bomb tore through two civilian mini busses in the course of an attack on an AMISOM convoy some 20 Ks outside of Mogadishu. 12 were killed and 27 wounded, all civilians and mostly children.

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The horror of War - Somalia 3
Lafole, Somalia
By Noe Falk Nielsen
08 Sep 2014

On 8 September 2014 a car bomb tore through two civilian mini busses in the course of an attack on an AMISOM convoy some 20 Ks outside of Mogadishu. 12 were killed and 27 wounded, all civilians and mostly children.

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The horror of War - Somalia 4
Lafole, Somalia
By Noe Falk Nielsen
08 Sep 2014

On 8 September 2014 a car bomb tore through two civilian mini busses in the course of an attack on an AMISOM convoy some 20 Ks outside of Mogadishu. 12 were killed and 27 wounded, all civilians and mostly children.

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The horror of War - Somalia 5
Lafole, Somalia
By Noe Falk Nielsen
08 Sep 2014

On 8 September 2014 a car bomb tore through two civilian mini busses in the course of an attack on an AMISOM convoy some 20 Ks outside of Mogadishu. 12 were killed and 27 wounded, all civilians and mostly children.

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The horror of War - Somalia 6
Lafole, Somalia
By Noe Falk Nielsen
08 Sep 2014

On 8 September 2014 a car bomb tore through two civilian mini busses in the course of an attack on an AMISOM convoy some 20 Ks outside of Mogadishu. 12 were killed and 27 wounded, all civilians and mostly children.

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The horror of War - Somalia 7
Lafole, Somalia
By Noe Falk Nielsen
08 Sep 2014

On 8 September 2014 a car bomb tore through two civilian mini busses in the course of an attack on an AMISOM convoy some 20 Ks outside of Mogadishu. 12 were killed and 27 wounded, all civilians and mostly children.

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The horror of War - Somalia 8
Lafole, Somalia
By Noe Falk Nielsen
08 Sep 2014

On 8 September 2014 a car bomb tore through two civilian mini busses in the course of an attack on an AMISOM convoy some 20 Ks outside of Mogadishu. 12 were killed and 27 wounded, all civilians and mostly children.

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The horror of War - Somalia 9
Lafole, Somalia
By Noe Falk Nielsen
08 Sep 2014

On 8 September 2014 a car bomb tore through two civilian mini busses in the course of an attack on an AMISOM convoy some 20 Ks outside of Mogadishu. 12 were killed and 27 wounded, all civilians and mostly children.

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Somalia: Routing Al-Shabab
Mogadishu
By Noe Falk Nielsen
31 Aug 2014

2011-2014

These photos profile the efforts over the past years of the African Union Mission to Somalia (AMISOM) to route Al-Shabab from its strongholds in Somalia.
Beginning with a large offensive in 2011, aimed at ending Al-Shabab rule in Somalia, Mogadishu was quickly retaken. Since then, AMISOM forces were able to steadily push Al-Shabab militants out of the outlying areas under their control.
In the summer and fall of 2014, AMISOM launched Operation Indian Ocean, which was another offensive aimed at eradicating pockets of Al-Shabab fighters still stationed in the Somali countryside. 

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Somalia: Routing Al-Shabab 07
Mogadishu
By Noe Falk Nielsen
31 Aug 2014

Soldiers from UPDF 62 battalion sit in a Casspir Armoured Personnel Carrier on the way to join in the attack on KurtunWaraay on 31 August 2014. Somalia is big and mobility is key to AMISOM's ability to reclaim Al Shabaab controlled territory. Offensives thus involved a variety of armored personnel carriers to allow for movement of troops.

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Somalia: Routing Al-Shabab 11
Beled Amin
By Noe Falk Nielsen
29 Aug 2014

Ugandan AMISOM soldier guarding the outer perimeter at the forward operating base in Beled Amin during Operation Indian Ocean on 29 August 2014.

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Somalia: Routing Al-Shabab 06
Mogadishu
By Noe Falk Nielsen
29 Aug 2014

As Al Shabaab lost their footholds around Mogadishu, and forces from other countries joined AMISOM, Somalia was carved up in sectors, each under control of an AMISOM contingent. Here a Ugandan Army colonel stands in front of his tank battalion in preparation for Operation Indian Ocean to reclaim the cities of Bulo Marer, Kurtunwaraay and eventually Barawe, in Lower Shabelle. 29 August 2014.

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African Union Forces in Somalia
Mogadishu
By Takeshi KUNO
14 Apr 2013

African Union forces continue to fight Al Shabab in Mogadishu and other parts of central Somalia. Security is a major problem for internally displaced persons, who often abandon their camps to find safer places to live. Formerly popular places such as Bakara market are now empty, except for fighting between African Union forces and Al Shabab.

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Somali women launch all-female radio ...
Hargeisa, Somaliland
By Anna Karatvuo
10 Apr 2013

Somali women have started their own radio station in Mogadishu, Somalia. Aman Radio broadcasts two hours daily and programs are based in basic situations in women's lives. The radio station employs dozens of women age 17-30. They also publish the first women's magazine in Somalia. This is a story of these ladies.

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A Fight for a Voice (15 of 15)
Hargeisa, Somaliland
By Anna Karatvuo
10 Apr 2013

Lul, 21, is taking photos while Ubax, 19, interviews a shepherd.

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A Fight for a Voice (14 of 15)
Hargeisa, Somaliland
By Anna Karatvuo
10 Apr 2013

For Somali women, appearance of the hands are extremely important. Hands are one of the only things women can show in public.

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A Fight for a Voice (13 of 15)
Hargeisa, Somaliland
By Anna Karatvuo
10 Apr 2013

Khadra is head of Somaliland's Sports and Culture organization, SOCSA. This powerful woman is one of the few public Somali female figures.

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A Fight for a Voice (12 of 15)
Hargeisa, Somaliland
By Anna Karatvuo
10 Apr 2013

Ubax is taking photos of camels for her report on farm animal healthcare.

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A Fight for a Voice (11 of 15)
Hargeisa, Somaliland
By Anna Karatvuo
10 Apr 2013

Tasniim, 17, records a conversation at a women's political workshop.

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A Fight for a Voice (10 of 15)
Hargeisa, Somaliland
By Anna Karatvuo
10 Apr 2013

Tasniim, 17, and Farxia, 23, are looking through their photographs.

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A Fight for a Voice (9 of 15)
Hargeisa, Somaliland
By Anna Karatvuo
10 Apr 2013

Fardowsa, 30, is learning image processing on Photoshop. She tries to forget her sorrow with her radio work. Her husband left her a year ago and took their children with him.

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A Fight for a Voice (6 of 15)
Hargeisa, Somaliland
By Anna Karatvuo
10 Apr 2013

Faduma, 19, is looking to know why women cannot play football in Somalia even though it is a popular sport.

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A Fight for a Voice (8 of 15)
Hargeisa, Somaliland
By Anna Karatvuo
10 Apr 2013

Aman Radio girls working beside Somaliland's national TV broadcaster.

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A Fight for a Voice (4 of 15)
Hargeisa, Somaliland
By Anna Karatvuo
10 Apr 2013

Xodan, 18, takes a break outside the courthouse after interview with a judge. As part of a story she was working on, she asked him why there are different rules for divorce for men than women.

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A Fight for a Voice (3 of 15)
Hargeisa, Somaliland
By Anna Karatvuo
10 Apr 2013

The Aman Radio girls take a break at the Somaliland Culture and Sports Association (SOCSA) center after a hard day of work.

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A Fight for a Voice (5 of 15)
Hargeisa, Somaliland
By Anna Karatvuo
10 Apr 2013

Xodan and Faduma are searching for story ideas in the countryside.

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Somalia: Routing Al-Shabab 12
Mogadishu
By Noe Falk Nielsen
29 Jan 2013

The head of a suicide bomber, who blew himself up outside of State House, the seat of the government, in Mogadishu on 29 January 2013.

NOTE: GRAPHIC IMAGE

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Somalia: Mogadishu's artistic rebirth
Somalia
By Abdi Latif Dahir
29 Dec 2012

With hope and transformation in the air as Somalia experiences its first sustained period of peace for two decades, a group of veteran Somalian artists have taken up their brushes again to send out a message for a better future that can be seen large and clear all around the city.

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Letterpress of Mogadishu (1 of 20)
Mogadishu, Somalia
By jonathankalan
01 Oct 2012

Daha Printing Press first opened its doors to Mogadishu in 1967. Despite a brief period of nationalization during the 70's, the shop has remained with its original owners, and printers, for over three generations.

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Letterpress of Mogadishu (3 of 20)
Mogadishu, Somalia
By jonathankalan
01 Oct 2012

Kasim Shiek Ahmed, 60 (left), and Liban Egal, 43 (right), and their families have been linked through the letterpress for nearly half a century. Kasims father was Dahas first printer, and Libans father, Abdi Egal Hassan, founded Daha. The two play a game of Shax, similar to checkers, during down time at the shop.

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Letterpress of Mogadishu (4 of 20)
Mogadishu, Somalia
By jonathankalan
01 Oct 2012

After Somalia's independence in 1960, many young Somali students were offered scholarships from European universities. One such student, Abdi Egal Hassan (left), just 19 at the time, earned a scholarship to studying printing in Germany in 1961. He graduated in 1963, and returned to Somalia to start Daha Printing Press, named after his first daughter.