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Lavori in corso
L'Aquila
By Donlisander
07 Feb 2019

This work show how places are changed in 10 year from the D-Day (april 6th, 2009) when a 6.3 earthquake hit L’Aquila, (Abruzzo, Italy) and 309 people died. We have the 2009 shots and the same shots in 2019. Many places are changed, many other seems look like nothing happened after the quake.

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Porta aperta
L'Aquila
By Donlisander
07 Feb 2019

This work show how places are changed in 10 year from the D-Day (april 6th, 2009) when a 6.3 earthquake hit L’Aquila, (Abruzzo, Italy) and 309 people died. We have the 2009 shots and the same shots in 2019. Many places are changed, many other seems look like nothing happened after the quake.

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Casa e crepe
L'Aquila
By Donlisander
07 Feb 2019

This work show how places are changed in 10 year from the D-Day (april 6th, 2009) when a 6.3 earthquake hit L’Aquila, (Abruzzo, Italy) and 309 people died. We have the 2009 shots and the same shots in 2019. Many places are changed, many other seems look like nothing happened after the quake.

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Attendere prego
L'Aquila
By Donlisander
07 Feb 2019

This work show how places are changed in 10 year from the D-Day (april 6th, 2009) when a 6.3 earthquake hit L’Aquila, (Abruzzo, Italy) and 309 people died. We have the 2009 shots and the same shots in 2019. Many places are changed, many other seems look like nothing happened after the quake.

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Casa e puntelli
L'Aquila
By Donlisander
07 Feb 2019

This work show how places are changed in 10 year from the D-Day (april 6th, 2009) when a 6.3 earthquake hit L’Aquila, (Abruzzo, Italy) and 309 people died. We have the 2009 shots and the same shots in 2019. Many places are changed, many other seems look like nothing happened after the quake.

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Centro storico
L'Aquila
By Donlisander
07 Feb 2019

This work show how places are changed in 10 year from the D-Day (april 6th, 2009) when a 6.3 earthquake hit L’Aquila, (Abruzzo, Italy) and 309 people died. We have the 2009 shots and the same shots in 2019. Many places are changed, many other seems look like nothing happened after the quake.

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Arco senza trionfo
L'Aquila
By Donlisander
07 Feb 2019

This work show how places are changed in 10 year from the D-Day (april 6th, 2009) when a 6.3 earthquake hit L’Aquila, (Abruzzo, Italy) and 309 people died. We have the 2009 shots and the same shots in 2019. Many places are changed, many other seems look like nothing happened after the quake.

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Zona rossa
L'Aquila
By Donlisander
07 Feb 2019

This work show how places are changed in 10 year from the D-Day (april 6th, 2009) when a 6.3 earthquake hit L’Aquila, (Abruzzo, Italy) and 309 people died. We have the 2009 shots and the same shots in 2019. Many places are changed, many other seems look like nothing happened after the quake.

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Manila Traffic
Manila
By Ralf Falbe
13 Jun 2016

Rush Hour on Roxas Boulevard in Ermita, Manila, Philippines.

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Malaybalay Street Scene
Mindanao
By Ralf Falbe
15 Feb 2016

Street scene in the town of Malaybalay, Bukidnon, Mindanao, Philippines.

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Damascus Traffic Scenes in 2007
Damascus
By Martin Jay
27 Nov 2015

Footage of traffic and street scenes in Damascus, Syria, in 2007.

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Damascus Street Scenes (B-roll)
Damascus, Syria
By TTM Contributor 4
21 Sep 2015

Various shots of streets and the old market in the government-controlled part of Damascus, Syria.

Note: Interview with Damascus residents about life in the city (not translated)

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Manila Street Scene
Manila
By Ralf Falbe
09 May 2015

Traffic on Mabini Street in the Ermita District, Manila, Philippines.

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Iraqis Flee Ramadi as ISIS Advance to...
Anbar, Ramadi
By Arshed
15 Apr 2015

Photos shot on a mobile phone show hundreds of Iraqis stuck in traffic as they attempt to flee Ramadi and the surrounding villages. ISIS militants launched a large offensive on Wednesday 15, April, and were able to seize control over the villages of Sjariyah, Albu-Ghanim and Soufiya, which had been under government control. The locals fear that the advance could reach Ramadi giving ISIS control over the capital of Anbar, Iraq’s largest province. ISIS insurgents are now about 100Km from Anbar’s Ain Al-Asad air base, where hundreds of US and coalition forces have been training Iraqi troops.

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Funeral Procession for Commander of N...
Baghdad
By Ahmad Mousa
14 Apr 2015

April 14, 2015
Baghdad, Iraq

A large funeral procession took place in Baghdad for Zaid Jasim, a commander of the Nujaba Movement Shiite militia, who was killed in clashes with ISIS in Tikrit.

Video shows Zaid Jasim's coffin being carried on the back of a car at the front of the procession and crowds of mourners and many vehicles stopping the traffic on a busy road, playing military-style music and flying yellow Nujaba Movement flags.

The Nubaja Movement is one of the Shiite militias who make up al-Hashid al-Shaabi (Popular Mobilization) and are fighting against ISIS in the western and northern Iraqi provinces.

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Nightlife Is Back in Baghdad
Baghdad
By Mazin Munther Jawad
08 Feb 2015

Baghdad, Iraq

February 8, 2014

A night curfew that was imposed on Baghdad for 10 years was lifted on Sunday, February 8, allowing people to take to the street and celebrate.
Iraqi Prime Minister Haidar al-Abbadi ordered the end of the curfew that was usually enforced between midnight and 5 am. Security checkpoints were also removed, which allowed people to circulate more easily.

SHOTLIST AND TRANSCRIPT
Various of cars driving at night
Various of fountain in main square
Wide of traffic policeman
Various of cars driving by
Various of people sitting in street café

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Ali Nashmi, Iraqi Historian
04:45 – 05:21
“Baghdad has witnessed a night curfew for many years. It was important because bombings used to take place during gatherings and rush hours. The lack of heavy traffic during the night did not mean that there would be no bombings. Some military positions were targeted. Lifting the curfew means that a heavy burden is lifted off citizens’ shoulders, especially the ill and those who returned from abroad. I think it was a right decision that gives moral and political support to the people, who have been suffering for more than 10 years.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Ahmad Ali, Resident of Baghdad
05:22 – 05:43
“I think that lifting the curfew is a good decision. I can see that activity in Baghdad is normal. Those who are sick or traveling can go out at any time during the night. Traffic is normal at this time of the night.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Anas Abdel Rahim, Resident of Baghdad
05:44 – 06:06
“This is something positive, especially for employees, who are tired and want to have some recreation at night. The curfew is over. As you can see, we went out on the first day of lifting the curfew. This is something positive. We wish that Baghdad returns to its previous state.”

Various/ Traveling of street from inside a car

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The streets of raqqa 02
Raqqa
By TTM Contributor 20
25 Oct 2014

An IS fighter takes on the role of traffic police. The Islamic State fighters in charge of governing Raqqa come from a variety of backgrounds. Some fighters are from Raqqa and some are Syrians from other cities. There are also fighters from different countries, including Saudi Arabia, Tunisia, and Morocco. The key is that those who interact with the public are Arabs because it is important for citizens to be able to communicate with the authorities in the streets.

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Syrians Vote in Lebanon
By arenevier
27 May 2014

On Wednesday, May 28th, Syrians living abroad voted in the Syrian the presidential election. While some countries banned voting from taking place, Lebanon allowed the election to move forward at the Syrian embassy near Beirut. From early in the morning the road leading to the Syrian embassy was jammed for several kilometers with pedestrians, cars, buses, and Lebanese Army tanks.

The area immediately around the embassy was tense as people tried to push their way into the compound. Soldiers and Guards struggled to control the crowd. Some people fainted in the heat and others were pushed to the ground by the raucous crowd. The army did not allow photos near the embassy.

Despite the chaos, most people were in high spirits and some sang songs of adoration of Bashar Al Assad. There were also some Lebanese citizens along the road voicing their love for the Syrian president. No one spoken to outside the embassy mentioned the two other Syrian presidential candidates, Maher Al Hajjar and Hassan Al Nouri. People appeared to only voiced their desire for Bashar Al Assad to remain in power.

Inside the embassy people were not using the voting booths set up. Instead, they passed around a pen and ticked the picture of Bashar Al Assad in front of each other.

These photos were taken outside the Syrian Embassy in Yarze, Lebanon, on May 28, between 7am and 10am.

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Traffic accidents in Yemen.
yemen
By Mosab Tareq
08 Oct 2013

Video about : One of the victims of traffic accidents in Yemen, where excess speed constitute the most important reason in traffic accident.

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Traffic Of Karachi
Karachi, Pakistan
By Syed Yasir Iqbal Kazmi
15 Jun 2013

Every day thousand of Commuters stuck in traffic jam, when returning their home from offices because of undisciplined driving and always blames system and traffic police.
Main reason of traffic jam in Karachi that from Carts to donkey Carts, bicycle to motorbike, Taxi to Private cars of all sizes, Mini buses, Buses to Goods Trucks of all sizes are running on 100 Ft to 150 ft wide road with out following the rules of traffic, Photo by Yasir Kazmi, Karachi, Pakistan.

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Cairo by TokTok (25 of 26)
Shubra El Khaymah, Egypt
By Teo Butturini
24 Mar 2013

Toktoks are seen at night, speeding down the road in the suburb of Shobra El Kheima (Cairo, Egypt). These vehicles have no licence or plate, probably they don't even comply any safety standard, and sometimes are tuned to reach up to 90 km/h, say some of the drivers.

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Cairo by TokTok (26 of 26)
Shubra El Khaymah, Egypt
By Teo Butturini
24 Mar 2013

The lights and the traffic of Shobra El Kheima (Cairo, Egypt) as seen from the subway bridge.

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Cairo by TokTok
Shubra El Khaymah, Egypt
By Mais Istanbuli
23 Mar 2013

The suburbs of Cairo, also called local areas, are home to millions of people, many of whom survive on scarce wages and in poor living conditions. Life has always been difficult in these impoverished areas, but the revolution has left many residents struggling as the media's eye focuses on Egypt's ongoing democratic transition.

Many hoped for improved living conditions following the historic June 2012 election, but have yet to receive the aid they were promised by the various candidates. In many areas of the suburbs, garbage litters the streets, sometimes in huge piles that are set ablaze overnight. No police or security monitor the streets, leading many to feel unsafe in their own neighbourhoods.

One of the most popular modes of transportation in these areas is the Toktok, a three wheeled moto-rickshaw that is banned in the center of the city, and can carry up to four people plus the driver. The popularity of these vehicles comes mainly from their cheap fares and practicality. Because they are smaller than a normal vehicle, they are efficient in the small alleys and unpaved roads that define the downtrodden suburbs.

The toktoks have no plates, licenses or insurance, and are not subject to safety inspections. Their existence itself is not addressed in traffic laws, despite the fact that in the last 10 years their number has grown exponentially, and that Cairo's streets are now literally invaded by them.

Drivers tend to be teenage and small boys, some of them are young as 6 years old. Most have experienced tragedies forcing them to leave their studies to support themselves and their families. Some of these young drivers are luckier than others, going to school in the morning and working in the afternoon, though most try to be home by 10 PM for their own safety. Cairo's suburbs are notoriously dangerous at night, and several drivers have been attacked, robbed of their toktok, and even killed. Some continue to drive in the streets despite the darkness, but carry with them a knife or a gun, and sometimes a friend, as deterrent.

This essay is a trip inside these suburbs, through one of the most popular ways of transportation that local residents use everyday. It is a glance into the living conditions of millions of people who have been forgotten by their government and have lost any hope of a better future, but whose number may play an important part in the next parliamentary elections.

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Cairo by TokTok (2 of 26)
Shubra El Khaymah, Egypt
By Teo Butturini
23 Mar 2013

A toktok, a three wheeled moto-rickshaw, carries passengers in the suburb of Shobra El Kheima (Cairo, Egypt). These vehicles appeared almost 10 years ago, and have grown massively popular in the overcrowded streets of the local areas.

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Cairo By Tok Tok (8 of 26)
shubra el khaymah, Egypt
By Teo Butturini
22 Mar 2013

A horse-cart carrying gas tanks is seen in the middle of the traffic of Shobra El Kheima (Cairo, Egypt). It is easy to sport them nn the suburbs, as they come from outside the city to sell vegetables or looking for random jobs to earn money.

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New York Blackout Continues (6 of 10)
New York, USA
By Derek Henry Flood
02 Nov 2012

The dark apartment blocks of Manhattan’s Stuyvessant Town neighborhood are faintly lit by passing traffic on the adjacent FDR drive. Pedestrians pass each other on the streets with wariness with often the only sources of light sirens and cell phones.

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Egyptians Address Morsi during Eid - ...
Cairo, Egypt
By U.S. Editor
27 Oct 2012

During the first Sacrifice Feast (Eid al-Adha) under the rule of President Mohamed Morsi, Egyptians send their president messages with various demands and issues that they wished would have been settled by the Eid.

The lack of security was the number one demand of Egyptians and the first wish they wanted Morsi to hear on this holy Muslim occasion.

Egyptians also address their new President to focus on the youth and work on providing them with housing and job opportunities, as unemployment in the country has exceeded 12%.

SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Beesa Talaat, Egyptian woman:
“Our demand from President Morsi is security, safety, stability and to live in a clean country, those are mainly the things that he already promised us. Adding to that, we want him to provide us with proper means of public transportation, and also we want the police to return back to normal.” SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – Ahmed Abdel-Aaty, Egyptian young man:
“One of the main problems we face is traffic, those few days before Eid; the traffic was unbearable, and one of the main problems also is cleanliness, which they still didn’t find solutions for, so hopefully step by step; we will make some achievement if people would cooperate with the government.”

A clean environment is also among the top demands of Egyptians.

President Morsi launched a two-day “Clean Homeland” campaign late July, during which workers, bulldozers, machines and officials could be seen everywhere nationwide. However, piles of garbage gradually returned to fill Egyptian streets.

Some Egyptians also demand retrial of those who killed peaceful protestors during the January 25 Revolution last year, complaining that most of the perpetrators have been acquitted.

SOUNDBITE 3 (Arabic) – Ahmed Mansour, Egyptian man, Engineer at General Motors:
“I was hoping to see more achievements from President Mosri, to feel that he came after a real successful revolution and that he came to achieve the goals that were set by that revolution, for me this is the main issue…I don’t feel that President Mosri achieved anything out of the revolution goals.”

President Morsi promised that his first 100-day plan would put an end to five main problems in Egypt: lack of security, garbage in the streets, traffic jams and shortages of bread and fuel. However, monitoring activists say that Morsi achieved only 9.37% of the promises of his first 100 days.

In a previous speech, Morsi gave greater indication of the progress he made in the five major issues than what a lot of Egyptians actually feel.
Local News Agency: Middle East Bureau / VCS
Shooting Dateline: October 27, 2012 (and archive)
Shooting Location: Cairo, Egypt
Publishing Time: October 27, 2012
Language: Arabic
Column:
Organized by:
Correspondent:
Camera: VCS

SHOTLIST:
1. Wide shot of the main street in Tahrir Square
2. Long shot of some little boys hanging out in Tahrir Sq.
3. Wide, pan right shot of streets around Tahrir Sq.
4. Long shot of some boys walking around in the square
5. Wide shot of the Egyptian Presidency headquarters in Cairo
6. Medium shot of President Morsi during a press conference at the Presidential Palace (archive)
7. Close shot of a reporter taking notes during President Morsi’s speech (archive)
8. Medium shot of President Mosri continuing his speech (archive)
9. SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Beesa Talaat, Egyptian woman:
“Our demand from President Morsi is security, safety, stability and to live in a clean country, those are mainly the things that he already promised us. Adding to that, we want him to provide us with proper means of public transportation, and also we want the police to return back to normal.” 10. SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – Ahmed Abdel-Aaty, Egyptian young man:
“One of the main problems we face is traffic, those few days before Eid; the traffic was unbearable, and one of the main problems also is cleanliness, which they still didn’t find solutions for, so hopefully step by step; we will make some achievement if people would cooperate with the government.” 11. Various, long shots of streets of Cairo
12. Wide shot of President Morsi heading to deliver a speech at the UN during the UN United Nations General Assembly meeting (archive)
13. Medium shot of President Morsi while giving the speech (archive)
14. Medium shot of the attendees during Morsi’s speech (archive)
15. Medium shot of President Mosri continuing his speech (archive)
16. Wide shot of Talaat Harb Square in downtown Cairo
17. SOUNDBITE 3 (Arabic) – Ahmed Mansour, Egyptian man, Engineer at General Motors:
“I was hoping to see more achievements from President Mosri, to feel that he came after a real successful revolution and that he came to achieve the goals that were set by that revolution, for me this is the main issue…I don’t feel that President Mosri achieved anything out of the revolution goals.” 18. Wide shot of a main street in down town Cairo
19. Long shot of little boys hanging out in Tahrir Sq.
20. Various shots of the streets of Cairo
21. Medium shot of President Morsi during a speech to the nation, that was given in Cairo University (archive)
22. Long, pan right shot of President Morsi greeting the attendees of the meeting in Cairo University, after he finished his speech, and leaving the podium (archive)