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Apraham's Cafe: How Coffee Can Define...
Beirut
By Ahmad Mogharbel
12 Nov 2014

68-year-old Apraham is a Lebanese Armenian who lives in Naba'a a section of Beirut's famous Armenian Ghetto known as Bourj Hammoud.
Apraham has diabetes and has no other choice but to work at his little coffee "shop" under the Bourj Hammoud bridge in order to pay for his medications. He starts work every morning at 5am in order to catch the morning worker crowd and spends the whole day serving his customers.

Coffee making on the streets of Lebanon is a famous profession, not only because it is tradition, but also for the simple fact that it is a relatively easy and accessible source of income.

Apraham's friends are loyal customers, they come and hang everyday to check on him and watch the busy streets of Bourj Hammoud. Apraham has survived all of these years thanks to the people who still enjoy gathering around his freshly pulled cups of coffee.

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Bloodletting in Old Delhi
By Sinha Archit
03 Jun 2014

Despite medical science not believing in bloodletting, lot of people from local and rest of the world come to Mohammad Iqbal for the treatment in Old Delhi .He claims to be the only bloodletting therapist in the world .He charges a very low fee and to few poor patients he performs bloodletting for free.

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Bloodletting Treatment in Delhi
New Delhi
By Rajan Zaveri
26 May 2014

Bloodletting practitioner Mohammad Gyas watched as his son sliced open the tourniquet-bound hands and feet of the sick with single-use razor blades in the garden of Old Delhi's Jama Masjid.

The ‘bad blood’ spilled into gutters that ran along the side of the platform, washed from the patient’s limbs with jugs of water. This ancient medical practice is said to cure everything from heart pain and arthritis, to cancer and diabetes.

"The darker the blood, the longer you have to bleed," Gyas said. A typical treatment regime runs for six weeks.

Gyas’ son was working with half a dozen assistants. They wrapped the tourniquets and washed water over the blade wounds to flush out blood. They then treated the cuts with a mixture of spices and doctor was on hand to give tetanus injections.

Gyas learned the trade from his grandfather and passed on his skills to his son. He has been practicing and overseeing treatments at the same place every day since 1980. During that time he has saved every single razor blade he used, which he proudly displays in 20 plastic drums.

“This many years, this many people, this many blades,” he said, pointing proudly to the plastic drums. “How could you doubt my treatment working?”

Gyas suffers from Parkinson’s disease, which has prevented him from doing any of the work himself since 2008. Interestingly, neither he nor his son sported any nicks or cuts on their own limbs. However, that does not deter the duo's patients who travel from far-flung parts of India and even other countries, including Japan and the United States. Many of them swear by the treatment, which includes following a strict no-booze, no-smoking, legume-rich diet.

One of Gyas' longtime arthritis patients demonstrated his belief in the treatment by leaping spiritedly on and off a brick platform in the garden.

“Look at me now!” he exclaimed in broken English, grinning and bouncing gratefully. “I can move everything, there’s no pain.”

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Food deserts (19 of 29)
Harlem, New York City
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
15 Feb 2013

Although New York City is one of the wealthiest cities in the world, healthy food products are not available to many populations throughout the city. Poor areas and neighborhoods often have small bodegas instead of grocery stores with diversified products. Those bodegas most commonly focus on fast food, junky snacks, cigarettes and alcohol, which help perpetuate an unhealthy lifestyle. To remedy the situation, various initiatives such as The Healthy Bodegas have been created. The Healthy Bodegas has city officials working with small business owners in order to bring healthier options, including fruits, vegetables, healthy juices and whole wheat bread and pastas into Bodegas, in order to increase access to healthier options.

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Food deserts (27 of 29)
Harlem, New York City
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
15 Feb 2013

Although New York City is one of the wealthiest cities in the world, healthy food products are not available to many populations throughout the city. Poor areas and neighborhoods often have small bodegas instead of grocery stores with diversified products. Those bodegas most commonly focus on fast food, junky snacks, cigarettes and alcohol, which help perpetuate an unhealthy lifestyle. To remedy the situation, various initiatives such as The Healthy Bodegas have been created. The Healthy Bodegas has city officials working with small business owners in order to bring healthier options, including fruits, vegetables, healthy juices and whole wheat bread and pastas into Bodegas, in order to increase access to healthier options.

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Food deserts (20 of 29)
Harlem, New York City
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
15 Feb 2013

A bodegas in Harlem, New York City. Bodegas are small, local corner store that sells everything from beer to diapers. Although New York City is one of the wealthiest cities in the world, healthy food products are not available to many populations throughout the city. Poor areas and neighborhoods often have small bodegas instead of grocery stores with diversified products. Those bodegas most commonly focus on fast food, junky snacks, cigarettes and alcohol, which help perpetuate an unhealthy lifestyle. To remedy the situation, various initiatives such as The Healthy Bodegas have been created. The Healthy Bodegas has city officials working with small business owners in order to bring healthier options, including fruits, vegetables, healthy juices and whole wheat bread and pastas into Bodegas, in order to increase access to healthier options.

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Food deserts (23 of 29)
Harlem, New York City
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
15 Feb 2013

A bodegas in Harlem, New York City. Bodegas are small, local corner store that sells everything from beer to diapers. Although New York City is one of the wealthiest cities in the world, healthy food products are not available to many populations throughout the city. Poor areas and neighborhoods often have small bodegas instead of grocery stores with diversified products. Those bodegas most commonly focus on fast food, junky snacks, cigarettes and alcohol, which help perpetuate an unhealthy lifestyle. To remedy the situation, various initiatives such as The Healthy Bodegas have been created. The Healthy Bodegas has city officials working with small business owners in order to bring healthier options, including fruits, vegetables, healthy juices and whole wheat bread and pastas into Bodegas, in order to increase access to healthier options.

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Food deserts (26 of 29)
Harlem, New York City
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
15 Feb 2013

Although New York City is one of the wealthiest cities in the world, healthy food products are not available to many populations throughout the city. Poor areas and neighborhoods often have small bodegas instead of grocery stores with diversified products. Those bodegas most commonly focus on fast food, junky snacks, cigarettes and alcohol, which help perpetuate an unhealthy lifestyle. To remedy the situation, various initiatives such as The Healthy Bodegas have been created. The Healthy Bodegas has city officials working with small business owners in order to bring healthier options, including fruits, vegetables, healthy juices and whole wheat bread and pastas into Bodegas, in order to increase access to healthier options.

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Food deserts (28 of 29)
Harlem, New York City
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
15 Feb 2013

A bodegas in Harlem, New York City. Bodegas are small, local corner store that sells everything from beer to diapers. Although New York City is one of the wealthiest cities in the world, healthy food products are not available to many populations throughout the city. Poor areas and neighborhoods often have small bodegas instead of grocery stores with diversified products. Those bodegas most commonly focus on fast food, junky snacks, cigarettes and alcohol, which help perpetuate an unhealthy lifestyle. To remedy the situation, various initiatives such as The Healthy Bodegas have been created. The Healthy Bodegas has city officials working with small business owners in order to bring healthier options, including fruits, vegetables, healthy juices and whole wheat bread and pastas into Bodegas, in order to increase access to healthier options.

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FOOD DESERT
New York City, United States
By Mais Istanbuli
14 Feb 2013

Food deserts are defined as areas in major cities in which residents must walk 12 blocks or more in order to access fresh produce. Such areas exist in major American cities including New York and Seattle, and have been proven to have a direct relationship with higher obesity and diabetes rates.

With a lack of readily available fruits and vegetables, paired with the allure of cheaper snacks such as chips and soda, lower income American families are increasingly turning to junk food as their main food staples. This problem is heightened when vegetables cannot be accessed throughout entire neighborhoods, especially when families cannot easily access a vehicle or public transport to do their grocery shopping.

A number of initiatives have been taken in major American cities in an attempt to address this wide-reaching problem. A significant one is the New York City Green Cart Initiative – around 500 food trucks park in food deserts around New York city and sell fresh, affordable and healthy produce. Some have been highly successful, while others have failed – all is dependent on personal entrepreneurship, building community relationships and finding prime spots to park and sell.

Another such project is the Healthy Bodegas initiative – referring to the small corner stores that are plentiful in New York City, most famous for selling beer, magazines, cigarettes, and various junky snacks. Again, with healthier options increasing in price, and unemployment rates remaining high, these small corner stores are often families’ only food source in a community – especially if they do not have access to a car. The Healthy Bodegas initiative has city officials working with small business owners in order to bring healthier options, including fruits, vegetables, healthy juices and whole wheat bread and pastas into Bodegas, in order to increase access to healthier options.

We propose you a photo essay that will illustrate New York City's food deserts and how the lack of healthy products in some disadvantaged neighborhoods affect the life of its inhabitants (including short interviews with shop owners, families, etc). Through the photographs, we will also illustrate the work of organizations such as the Healthy Bodegas and New York City Green Cart initiatives.

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Food deserts (3 of 29)
Time Square, New York City
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
14 Feb 2013

Food deserts are defined as areas in major cities in which residents must walk 12 blocks or more in order to access fresh produce. Such areas exist in major American cities including New York and Seattle, and have been proven to have a direct relationship with higher obesity and diabetes rates.

With a lack of readily available fruits and vegetables, paired with the allure of cheaper snacks such as chips and soda, lower income American families are increasingly turning to junk food as their main food staples. This problem is heightened when vegetables cannot be accessed throughout entire neighborhoods, especially when families cannot easily access a vehicle or public transport to do their grocery shopping.

A number of initiatives have been taken in major American cities in an attempt to address this wide-reaching problem. A significant one is the New York City Green Cart Initiative – around 500 food trucks park in food deserts around New York city and sell fresh, affordable and healthy produce. Some have been highly successful, while others have failed – all is dependent on personal entrepreneurship, building community relationships and finding prime spots to park and sell.

Another such project is the Healthy Bodegas initiative – referring to the small corner stores that are plentiful in New York City, most famous for selling beer, magazines, cigarettes, and various junky snacks. Again, with healthier options increasing in price, and unemployment rates remaining high, these small corner stores are often families’ only food source in a community – especially if they do not have access to a car. The Healthy Bodegas initiative has city officials working with small business owners in order to bring healthier options, including fruits, vegetables, healthy juices and whole wheat bread and pastas into Bodegas, in order to increase access to healthier options.

We propose you a photo essay that will illustrate New York City's food deserts and how the lack of healthy products in some disadvantaged neighborhoods affect the life of its inhabitants (including short interviews with shop owners, families, etc). Through the photographs, we will also illustrate the work of organizations such as the Healthy Bodegas and New York City Green Cart initiatives.

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Food deserts (4 of 29)
Time Square, New York City
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
14 Feb 2013

Food deserts are defined as areas in major cities in which residents must walk 12 blocks or more in order to access fresh produce. Such areas exist in major American cities including New York and Seattle, and have been proven to have a direct relationship with higher obesity and diabetes rates.

With a lack of readily available fruits and vegetables, paired with the allure of cheaper snacks such as chips and soda, lower income American families are increasingly turning to junk food as their main food staples. This problem is heightened when vegetables cannot be accessed throughout entire neighborhoods, especially when families cannot easily access a vehicle or public transport to do their grocery shopping.

A number of initiatives have been taken in major American cities in an attempt to address this wide-reaching problem. A significant one is the New York City Green Cart Initiative – around 500 food trucks park in food deserts around New York city and sell fresh, affordable and healthy produce. Some have been highly successful, while others have failed – all is dependent on personal entrepreneurship, building community relationships and finding prime spots to park and sell.

Another such project is the Healthy Bodegas initiative – referring to the small corner stores that are plentiful in New York City, most famous for selling beer, magazines, cigarettes, and various junky snacks. Again, with healthier options increasing in price, and unemployment rates remaining high, these small corner stores are often families’ only food source in a community – especially if they do not have access to a car. The Healthy Bodegas initiative has city officials working with small business owners in order to bring healthier options, including fruits, vegetables, healthy juices and whole wheat bread and pastas into Bodegas, in order to increase access to healthier options.

We propose you a photo essay that will illustrate New York City's food deserts and how the lack of healthy products in some disadvantaged neighborhoods affect the life of its inhabitants (including short interviews with shop owners, families, etc). Through the photographs, we will also illustrate the work of organizations such as the Healthy Bodegas and New York City Green Cart initiatives.

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Food deserts (5 of 29)
Time Square, New York City
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
14 Feb 2013

Food deserts are defined as areas in major cities in which residents must walk 12 blocks or more in order to access fresh produce. Such areas exist in major American cities including New York and Seattle, and have been proven to have a direct relationship with higher obesity and diabetes rates.

With a lack of readily available fruits and vegetables, paired with the allure of cheaper snacks such as chips and soda, lower income American families are increasingly turning to junk food as their main food staples. This problem is heightened when vegetables cannot be accessed throughout entire neighborhoods, especially when families cannot easily access a vehicle or public transport to do their grocery shopping.

A number of initiatives have been taken in major American cities in an attempt to address this wide-reaching problem. A significant one is the New York City Green Cart Initiative – around 500 food trucks park in food deserts around New York city and sell fresh, affordable and healthy produce. Some have been highly successful, while others have failed – all is dependent on personal entrepreneurship, building community relationships and finding prime spots to park and sell.

Another such project is the Healthy Bodegas initiative – referring to the small corner stores that are plentiful in New York City, most famous for selling beer, magazines, cigarettes, and various junky snacks. Again, with healthier options increasing in price, and unemployment rates remaining high, these small corner stores are often families’ only food source in a community – especially if they do not have access to a car. The Healthy Bodegas initiative has city officials working with small business owners in order to bring healthier options, including fruits, vegetables, healthy juices and whole wheat bread and pastas into Bodegas, in order to increase access to healthier options.

We propose you a photo essay that will illustrate New York City's food deserts and how the lack of healthy products in some disadvantaged neighborhoods affect the life of its inhabitants (including short interviews with shop owners, families, etc). Through the photographs, we will also illustrate the work of organizations such as the Healthy Bodegas and New York City Green Cart initiatives.

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Food deserts (6 of 29)
Time Square, New York City
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
14 Feb 2013

Food deserts are defined as areas in major cities in which residents must walk 12 blocks or more in order to access fresh produce. Such areas exist in major American cities including New York and Seattle, and have been proven to have a direct relationship with higher obesity and diabetes rates.

With a lack of readily available fruits and vegetables, paired with the allure of cheaper snacks such as chips and soda, lower income American families are increasingly turning to junk food as their main food staples. This problem is heightened when vegetables cannot be accessed throughout entire neighborhoods, especially when families cannot easily access a vehicle or public transport to do their grocery shopping.

A number of initiatives have been taken in major American cities in an attempt to address this wide-reaching problem. A significant one is the New York City Green Cart Initiative – around 500 food trucks park in food deserts around New York city and sell fresh, affordable and healthy produce. Some have been highly successful, while others have failed – all is dependent on personal entrepreneurship, building community relationships and finding prime spots to park and sell.

Another such project is the Healthy Bodegas initiative – referring to the small corner stores that are plentiful in New York City, most famous for selling beer, magazines, cigarettes, and various junky snacks. Again, with healthier options increasing in price, and unemployment rates remaining high, these small corner stores are often families’ only food source in a community – especially if they do not have access to a car. The Healthy Bodegas initiative has city officials working with small business owners in order to bring healthier options, including fruits, vegetables, healthy juices and whole wheat bread and pastas into Bodegas, in order to increase access to healthier options.

We propose you a photo essay that will illustrate New York City's food deserts and how the lack of healthy products in some disadvantaged neighborhoods affect the life of its inhabitants (including short interviews with shop owners, families, etc). Through the photographs, we will also illustrate the work of organizations such as the Healthy Bodegas and New York City Green Cart initiatives.

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Food deserts (7 of 29)
Time Square, New York City
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
14 Feb 2013

Food deserts are defined as areas in major cities in which residents must walk 12 blocks or more in order to access fresh produce. Such areas exist in major American cities including New York and Seattle, and have been proven to have a direct relationship with higher obesity and diabetes rates.

With a lack of readily available fruits and vegetables, paired with the allure of cheaper snacks such as chips and soda, lower income American families are increasingly turning to junk food as their main food staples. This problem is heightened when vegetables cannot be accessed throughout entire neighborhoods, especially when families cannot easily access a vehicle or public transport to do their grocery shopping.

A number of initiatives have been taken in major American cities in an attempt to address this wide-reaching problem. A significant one is the New York City Green Cart Initiative – around 500 food trucks park in food deserts around New York city and sell fresh, affordable and healthy produce. Some have been highly successful, while others have failed – all is dependent on personal entrepreneurship, building community relationships and finding prime spots to park and sell.

Another such project is the Healthy Bodegas initiative – referring to the small corner stores that are plentiful in New York City, most famous for selling beer, magazines, cigarettes, and various junky snacks. Again, with healthier options increasing in price, and unemployment rates remaining high, these small corner stores are often families’ only food source in a community – especially if they do not have access to a car. The Healthy Bodegas initiative has city officials working with small business owners in order to bring healthier options, including fruits, vegetables, healthy juices and whole wheat bread and pastas into Bodegas, in order to increase access to healthier options.

We propose you a photo essay that will illustrate New York City's food deserts and how the lack of healthy products in some disadvantaged neighborhoods affect the life of its inhabitants (including short interviews with shop owners, families, etc). Through the photographs, we will also illustrate the work of organizations such as the Healthy Bodegas and New York City Green Cart initiatives.

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Food deserts (10 of 29)
Time Square, New York City
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
14 Feb 2013

Food deserts are defined as areas in major cities in which residents must walk 12 blocks or more in order to access fresh produce. Such areas exist in major American cities including New York and Seattle, and have been proven to have a direct relationship with higher obesity and diabetes rates.

With a lack of readily available fruits and vegetables, paired with the allure of cheaper snacks such as chips and soda, lower income American families are increasingly turning to junk food as their main food staples. This problem is heightened when vegetables cannot be accessed throughout entire neighborhoods, especially when families cannot easily access a vehicle or public transport to do their grocery shopping.

A number of initiatives have been taken in major American cities in an attempt to address this wide-reaching problem. A significant one is the New York City Green Cart Initiative – around 500 food trucks park in food deserts around New York city and sell fresh, affordable and healthy produce. Some have been highly successful, while others have failed – all is dependent on personal entrepreneurship, building community relationships and finding prime spots to park and sell.

Another such project is the Healthy Bodegas initiative – referring to the small corner stores that are plentiful in New York City, most famous for selling beer, magazines, cigarettes, and various junky snacks. Again, with healthier options increasing in price, and unemployment rates remaining high, these small corner stores are often families’ only food source in a community – especially if they do not have access to a car. The Healthy Bodegas initiative has city officials working with small business owners in order to bring healthier options, including fruits, vegetables, healthy juices and whole wheat bread and pastas into Bodegas, in order to increase access to healthier options.

We propose you a photo essay that will illustrate New York City's food deserts and how the lack of healthy products in some disadvantaged neighborhoods affect the life of its inhabitants (including short interviews with shop owners, families, etc). Through the photographs, we will also illustrate the work of organizations such as the Healthy Bodegas and New York City Green Cart initiatives.

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Food deserts (13 of 29)
Time Square, New York City
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
14 Feb 2013

Food deserts are defined as areas in major cities in which residents must walk 12 blocks or more in order to access fresh produce. Such areas exist in major American cities including New York and Seattle, and have been proven to have a direct relationship with higher obesity and diabetes rates.

With a lack of readily available fruits and vegetables, paired with the allure of cheaper snacks such as chips and soda, lower income American families are increasingly turning to junk food as their main food staples. This problem is heightened when vegetables cannot be accessed throughout entire neighborhoods, especially when families cannot easily access a vehicle or public transport to do their grocery shopping.

A number of initiatives have been taken in major American cities in an attempt to address this wide-reaching problem. A significant one is the New York City Green Cart Initiative – around 500 food trucks park in food deserts around New York city and sell fresh, affordable and healthy produce. Some have been highly successful, while others have failed – all is dependent on personal entrepreneurship, building community relationships and finding prime spots to park and sell.

Another such project is the Healthy Bodegas initiative – referring to the small corner stores that are plentiful in New York City, most famous for selling beer, magazines, cigarettes, and various junky snacks. Again, with healthier options increasing in price, and unemployment rates remaining high, these small corner stores are often families’ only food source in a community – especially if they do not have access to a car. The Healthy Bodegas initiative has city officials working with small business owners in order to bring healthier options, including fruits, vegetables, healthy juices and whole wheat bread and pastas into Bodegas, in order to increase access to healthier options.

We propose you a photo essay that will illustrate New York City's food deserts and how the lack of healthy products in some disadvantaged neighborhoods affect the life of its inhabitants (including short interviews with shop owners, families, etc). Through the photographs, we will also illustrate the work of organizations such as the Healthy Bodegas and New York City Green Cart initiatives.

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Food deserts (14 of 29)
Time Square, New York City
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
14 Feb 2013

Food deserts are defined as areas in major cities in which residents must walk 12 blocks or more in order to access fresh produce. Such areas exist in major American cities including New York and Seattle, and have been proven to have a direct relationship with higher obesity and diabetes rates.

With a lack of readily available fruits and vegetables, paired with the allure of cheaper snacks such as chips and soda, lower income American families are increasingly turning to junk food as their main food staples. This problem is heightened when vegetables cannot be accessed throughout entire neighborhoods, especially when families cannot easily access a vehicle or public transport to do their grocery shopping.

A number of initiatives have been taken in major American cities in an attempt to address this wide-reaching problem. A significant one is the New York City Green Cart Initiative – around 500 food trucks park in food deserts around New York city and sell fresh, affordable and healthy produce. Some have been highly successful, while others have failed – all is dependent on personal entrepreneurship, building community relationships and finding prime spots to park and sell.

Another such project is the Healthy Bodegas initiative – referring to the small corner stores that are plentiful in New York City, most famous for selling beer, magazines, cigarettes, and various junky snacks. Again, with healthier options increasing in price, and unemployment rates remaining high, these small corner stores are often families’ only food source in a community – especially if they do not have access to a car. The Healthy Bodegas initiative has city officials working with small business owners in order to bring healthier options, including fruits, vegetables, healthy juices and whole wheat bread and pastas into Bodegas, in order to increase access to healthier options.

We propose you a photo essay that will illustrate New York City's food deserts and how the lack of healthy products in some disadvantaged neighborhoods affect the life of its inhabitants (including short interviews with shop owners, families, etc). Through the photographs, we will also illustrate the work of organizations such as the Healthy Bodegas and New York City Green Cart initiatives.

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Food deserts (15 of 29)
Time Square, New York City
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
14 Feb 2013

Food deserts are defined as areas in major cities in which residents must walk 12 blocks or more in order to access fresh produce. Such areas exist in major American cities including New York and Seattle, and have been proven to have a direct relationship with higher obesity and diabetes rates.

With a lack of readily available fruits and vegetables, paired with the allure of cheaper snacks such as chips and soda, lower income American families are increasingly turning to junk food as their main food staples. This problem is heightened when vegetables cannot be accessed throughout entire neighborhoods, especially when families cannot easily access a vehicle or public transport to do their grocery shopping.

A number of initiatives have been taken in major American cities in an attempt to address this wide-reaching problem. A significant one is the New York City Green Cart Initiative – around 500 food trucks park in food deserts around New York city and sell fresh, affordable and healthy produce. Some have been highly successful, while others have failed – all is dependent on personal entrepreneurship, building community relationships and finding prime spots to park and sell.

Another such project is the Healthy Bodegas initiative – referring to the small corner stores that are plentiful in New York City, most famous for selling beer, magazines, cigarettes, and various junky snacks. Again, with healthier options increasing in price, and unemployment rates remaining high, these small corner stores are often families’ only food source in a community – especially if they do not have access to a car. The Healthy Bodegas initiative has city officials working with small business owners in order to bring healthier options, including fruits, vegetables, healthy juices and whole wheat bread and pastas into Bodegas, in order to increase access to healthier options.

We propose you a photo essay that will illustrate New York City's food deserts and how the lack of healthy products in some disadvantaged neighborhoods affect the life of its inhabitants (including short interviews with shop owners, families, etc). Through the photographs, we will also illustrate the work of organizations such as the Healthy Bodegas and New York City Green Cart initiatives.

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Food deserts (16 of 29)
Time Square, New York City
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
14 Feb 2013

Food deserts are defined as areas in major cities in which residents must walk 12 blocks or more in order to access fresh produce. Such areas exist in major American cities including New York and Seattle, and have been proven to have a direct relationship with higher obesity and diabetes rates.

With a lack of readily available fruits and vegetables, paired with the allure of cheaper snacks such as chips and soda, lower income American families are increasingly turning to junk food as their main food staples. This problem is heightened when vegetables cannot be accessed throughout entire neighborhoods, especially when families cannot easily access a vehicle or public transport to do their grocery shopping.

A number of initiatives have been taken in major American cities in an attempt to address this wide-reaching problem. A significant one is the New York City Green Cart Initiative – around 500 food trucks park in food deserts around New York city and sell fresh, affordable and healthy produce. Some have been highly successful, while others have failed – all is dependent on personal entrepreneurship, building community relationships and finding prime spots to park and sell.

Another such project is the Healthy Bodegas initiative – referring to the small corner stores that are plentiful in New York City, most famous for selling beer, magazines, cigarettes, and various junky snacks. Again, with healthier options increasing in price, and unemployment rates remaining high, these small corner stores are often families’ only food source in a community – especially if they do not have access to a car. The Healthy Bodegas initiative has city officials working with small business owners in order to bring healthier options, including fruits, vegetables, healthy juices and whole wheat bread and pastas into Bodegas, in order to increase access to healthier options.

We propose you a photo essay that will illustrate New York City's food deserts and how the lack of healthy products in some disadvantaged neighborhoods affect the life of its inhabitants (including short interviews with shop owners, families, etc). Through the photographs, we will also illustrate the work of organizations such as the Healthy Bodegas and New York City Green Cart initiatives.

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Food deserts (17 of 29)
Time Square, New York City
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
14 Feb 2013

Food deserts are defined as areas in major cities in which residents must walk 12 blocks or more in order to access fresh produce. Such areas exist in major American cities including New York and Seattle, and have been proven to have a direct relationship with higher obesity and diabetes rates.

With a lack of readily available fruits and vegetables, paired with the allure of cheaper snacks such as chips and soda, lower income American families are increasingly turning to junk food as their main food staples. This problem is heightened when vegetables cannot be accessed throughout entire neighborhoods, especially when families cannot easily access a vehicle or public transport to do their grocery shopping.

A number of initiatives have been taken in major American cities in an attempt to address this wide-reaching problem. A significant one is the New York City Green Cart Initiative – around 500 food trucks park in food deserts around New York city and sell fresh, affordable and healthy produce. Some have been highly successful, while others have failed – all is dependent on personal entrepreneurship, building community relationships and finding prime spots to park and sell.

Another such project is the Healthy Bodegas initiative – referring to the small corner stores that are plentiful in New York City, most famous for selling beer, magazines, cigarettes, and various junky snacks. Again, with healthier options increasing in price, and unemployment rates remaining high, these small corner stores are often families’ only food source in a community – especially if they do not have access to a car. The Healthy Bodegas initiative has city officials working with small business owners in order to bring healthier options, including fruits, vegetables, healthy juices and whole wheat bread and pastas into Bodegas, in order to increase access to healthier options.

We propose you a photo essay that will illustrate New York City's food deserts and how the lack of healthy products in some disadvantaged neighborhoods affect the life of its inhabitants (including short interviews with shop owners, families, etc). Through the photographs, we will also illustrate the work of organizations such as the Healthy Bodegas and New York City Green Cart initiatives.

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Food deserts (1 of 29)
Harlem, New York City
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
14 Feb 2013

Food deserts are defined as areas in major cities in which residents must walk 12 blocks or more in order to access fresh produce. Such areas exist in major American cities including New York and Seattle, and have been proven to have a direct relationship with higher obesity and diabetes rates.

With a lack of readily available fruits and vegetables, paired with the allure of cheaper snacks such as chips and soda, lower income American families are increasingly turning to junk food as their main food staples. This problem is heightened when vegetables cannot be accessed throughout entire neighborhoods, especially when families cannot easily access a vehicle or public transport to do their grocery shopping.

A number of initiatives have been taken in major American cities in an attempt to address this wide-reaching problem. A significant one is the New York City Green Cart Initiative – around 500 food trucks park in food deserts around New York city and sell fresh, affordable and healthy produce. Some have been highly successful, while others have failed – all is dependent on personal entrepreneurship, building community relationships and finding prime spots to park and sell.

Another such project is the Healthy Bodegas initiative – referring to the small corner stores that are plentiful in New York City, most famous for selling beer, magazines, cigarettes, and various junky snacks. Again, with healthier options increasing in price, and unemployment rates remaining high, these small corner stores are often families’ only food source in a community – especially if they do not have access to a car. The Healthy Bodegas initiative has city officials working with small business owners in order to bring healthier options, including fruits, vegetables, healthy juices and whole wheat bread and pastas into Bodegas, in order to increase access to healthier options.

We propose you a photo essay that will illustrate New York City's food deserts and how the lack of healthy products in some disadvantaged neighborhoods affect the life of its inhabitants (including short interviews with shop owners, families, etc). Through the photographs, we will also illustrate the work of organizations such as the Healthy Bodegas and New York City Green Cart initiatives.

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Food deserts (2 of 29)
Time Square, New York City
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
14 Feb 2013

Food deserts are defined as areas in major cities in which residents must walk 12 blocks or more in order to access fresh produce. Such areas exist in major American cities including New York and Seattle, and have been proven to have a direct relationship with higher obesity and diabetes rates.

With a lack of readily available fruits and vegetables, paired with the allure of cheaper snacks such as chips and soda, lower income American families are increasingly turning to junk food as their main food staples. This problem is heightened when vegetables cannot be accessed throughout entire neighborhoods, especially when families cannot easily access a vehicle or public transport to do their grocery shopping.

A number of initiatives have been taken in major American cities in an attempt to address this wide-reaching problem. A significant one is the New York City Green Cart Initiative – around 500 food trucks park in food deserts around New York city and sell fresh, affordable and healthy produce. Some have been highly successful, while others have failed – all is dependent on personal entrepreneurship, building community relationships and finding prime spots to park and sell.

Another such project is the Healthy Bodegas initiative – referring to the small corner stores that are plentiful in New York City, most famous for selling beer, magazines, cigarettes, and various junky snacks. Again, with healthier options increasing in price, and unemployment rates remaining high, these small corner stores are often families’ only food source in a community – especially if they do not have access to a car. The Healthy Bodegas initiative has city officials working with small business owners in order to bring healthier options, including fruits, vegetables, healthy juices and whole wheat bread and pastas into Bodegas, in order to increase access to healthier options.

We propose you a photo essay that will illustrate New York City's food deserts and how the lack of healthy products in some disadvantaged neighborhoods affect the life of its inhabitants (including short interviews with shop owners, families, etc). Through the photographs, we will also illustrate the work of organizations such as the Healthy Bodegas and New York City Green Cart initiatives.

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Food deserts (8 of 29)
Harlem, New York City
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
14 Feb 2013

Food deserts are defined as areas in major cities in which residents must walk 12 blocks or more in order to access fresh produce. Such areas exist in major American cities including New York and Seattle, and have been proven to have a direct relationship with higher obesity and diabetes rates.

With a lack of readily available fruits and vegetables, paired with the allure of cheaper snacks such as chips and soda, lower income American families are increasingly turning to junk food as their main food staples. This problem is heightened when vegetables cannot be accessed throughout entire neighborhoods, especially when families cannot easily access a vehicle or public transport to do their grocery shopping.

A number of initiatives have been taken in major American cities in an attempt to address this wide-reaching problem. A significant one is the New York City Green Cart Initiative – around 500 food trucks park in food deserts around New York city and sell fresh, affordable and healthy produce. Some have been highly successful, while others have failed – all is dependent on personal entrepreneurship, building community relationships and finding prime spots to park and sell.

Another such project is the Healthy Bodegas initiative – referring to the small corner stores that are plentiful in New York City, most famous for selling beer, magazines, cigarettes, and various junky snacks. Again, with healthier options increasing in price, and unemployment rates remaining high, these small corner stores are often families’ only food source in a community – especially if they do not have access to a car. The Healthy Bodegas initiative has city officials working with small business owners in order to bring healthier options, including fruits, vegetables, healthy juices and whole wheat bread and pastas into Bodegas, in order to increase access to healthier options.

We propose you a photo essay that will illustrate New York City's food deserts and how the lack of healthy products in some disadvantaged neighborhoods affect the life of its inhabitants (including short interviews with shop owners, families, etc). Through the photographs, we will also illustrate the work of organizations such as the Healthy Bodegas and New York City Green Cart initiatives.

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Food deserts (11 of 29)
Time Square, New York City
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
14 Feb 2013

Food deserts are defined as areas in major cities in which residents must walk 12 blocks or more in order to access fresh produce. Such areas exist in major American cities including New York and Seattle, and have been proven to have a direct relationship with higher obesity and diabetes rates.

With a lack of readily available fruits and vegetables, paired with the allure of cheaper snacks such as chips and soda, lower income American families are increasingly turning to junk food as their main food staples. This problem is heightened when vegetables cannot be accessed throughout entire neighborhoods, especially when families cannot easily access a vehicle or public transport to do their grocery shopping.

A number of initiatives have been taken in major American cities in an attempt to address this wide-reaching problem. A significant one is the New York City Green Cart Initiative – around 500 food trucks park in food deserts around New York city and sell fresh, affordable and healthy produce. Some have been highly successful, while others have failed – all is dependent on personal entrepreneurship, building community relationships and finding prime spots to park and sell.

Another such project is the Healthy Bodegas initiative – referring to the small corner stores that are plentiful in New York City, most famous for selling beer, magazines, cigarettes, and various junky snacks. Again, with healthier options increasing in price, and unemployment rates remaining high, these small corner stores are often families’ only food source in a community – especially if they do not have access to a car. The Healthy Bodegas initiative has city officials working with small business owners in order to bring healthier options, including fruits, vegetables, healthy juices and whole wheat bread and pastas into Bodegas, in order to increase access to healthier options.

We propose you a photo essay that will illustrate New York City's food deserts and how the lack of healthy products in some disadvantaged neighborhoods affect the life of its inhabitants (including short interviews with shop owners, families, etc). Through the photographs, we will also illustrate the work of organizations such as the Healthy Bodegas and New York City Green Cart initiatives.

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Food deserts (12 of 29)
Time Square, New York City
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
14 Feb 2013

Food deserts are defined as areas in major cities in which residents must walk 12 blocks or more in order to access fresh produce. Such areas exist in major American cities including New York and Seattle, and have been proven to have a direct relationship with higher obesity and diabetes rates.

With a lack of readily available fruits and vegetables, paired with the allure of cheaper snacks such as chips and soda, lower income American families are increasingly turning to junk food as their main food staples. This problem is heightened when vegetables cannot be accessed throughout entire neighborhoods, especially when families cannot easily access a vehicle or public transport to do their grocery shopping.

A number of initiatives have been taken in major American cities in an attempt to address this wide-reaching problem. A significant one is the New York City Green Cart Initiative – around 500 food trucks park in food deserts around New York city and sell fresh, affordable and healthy produce. Some have been highly successful, while others have failed – all is dependent on personal entrepreneurship, building community relationships and finding prime spots to park and sell.

Another such project is the Healthy Bodegas initiative – referring to the small corner stores that are plentiful in New York City, most famous for selling beer, magazines, cigarettes, and various junky snacks. Again, with healthier options increasing in price, and unemployment rates remaining high, these small corner stores are often families’ only food source in a community – especially if they do not have access to a car. The Healthy Bodegas initiative has city officials working with small business owners in order to bring healthier options, including fruits, vegetables, healthy juices and whole wheat bread and pastas into Bodegas, in order to increase access to healthier options.

We propose you a photo essay that will illustrate New York City's food deserts and how the lack of healthy products in some disadvantaged neighborhoods affect the life of its inhabitants (including short interviews with shop owners, families, etc). Through the photographs, we will also illustrate the work of organizations such as the Healthy Bodegas and New York City Green Cart initiatives.

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Food deserts (9 of 29)
Time Square, New York City
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
08 Feb 2013

Food deserts are defined as areas in major cities in which residents must walk 12 blocks or more in order to access fresh produce. Such areas exist in major American cities including New York and Seattle, and have been proven to have a direct relationship with higher obesity and diabetes rates.

With a lack of readily available fruits and vegetables, paired with the allure of cheaper snacks such as chips and soda, lower income American families are increasingly turning to junk food as their main food staples. This problem is heightened when vegetables cannot be accessed throughout entire neighborhoods, especially when families cannot easily access a vehicle or public transport to do their grocery shopping.

A number of initiatives have been taken in major American cities in an attempt to address this wide-reaching problem. A significant one is the New York City Green Cart Initiative – around 500 food trucks park in food deserts around New York city and sell fresh, affordable and healthy produce. Some have been highly successful, while others have failed – all is dependent on personal entrepreneurship, building community relationships and finding prime spots to park and sell.

Another such project is the Healthy Bodegas initiative – referring to the small corner stores that are plentiful in New York City, most famous for selling beer, magazines, cigarettes, and various junky snacks. Again, with healthier options increasing in price, and unemployment rates remaining high, these small corner stores are often families’ only food source in a community – especially if they do not have access to a car. The Healthy Bodegas initiative has city officials working with small business owners in order to bring healthier options, including fruits, vegetables, healthy juices and whole wheat bread and pastas into Bodegas, in order to increase access to healthier options.

We propose you a photo essay that will illustrate New York City's food deserts and how the lack of healthy products in some disadvantaged neighborhoods affect the life of its inhabitants (including short interviews with shop owners, families, etc). Through the photographs, we will also illustrate the work of organizations such as the Healthy Bodegas and New York City Green Cart initiatives.

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Health, Death and Poverty in Indigeno...
San Jorge La Laguna , Solola, Guatemala
By hiroko tanaka
27 Jul 2012

A family member mourns after the funeral of Rodrigo, who passed away after 7 years of suffering from diabetes and nutritional deficiencies. In his last months, the 49 year-old father of five, decided not to seek further treatment in order to save his family the financial burden.

In Guatemala, death too often represents a heavy financial burden. On top of their daily struggle to secure money for food and necessities, many families have to deal not only with grief but also with huge debts for the wake and funeral.

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Health, Death and Poverty in Indigeno...
San Jorge La Laguna , Solola, Guatemala
By hiroko tanaka
27 Jul 2012

A family member mourns after the funeral of Rodrigo, who passed away after 7 years of suffering from diabetes and nutritional deficiencies. In his last months, the 49 year-old father of five, decided not to seek further treatment in order to save his family the financial burden.

In Guatemala, death too often represents a heavy financial burden. On top of their daily struggle to secure money for food and necessities, many families have to deal not only with grief but also with huge debts for the wake and funeral.

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Health, Death and Poverty in Indigeno...
San Jorge La Laguna , Solola, Guatemala
By hiroko tanaka
27 Jul 2012

A family member mourns after the funeral of Rodrigo, who passed away after 7 years of suffering from diabetes and nutritional deficiencies. In his last months, the 49 year-old father of five, decided not to seek further treatment in order to save his family the financial burden.

In Guatemala, death too often represents a heavy financial burden. On top of their daily struggle to secure money for food and necessities, many families have to deal not only with grief but also with huge debts for the wake and funeral.

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Health, Death and Poverty in Indigeno...
San Jorge La Laguna , Solola, Guatemala
By hiroko tanaka
27 Jul 2012

A family member mourns after the funeral of Rodrigo, who passed away after 7 years of suffering from diabetes and nutritional deficiencies. In his last months, the 49 year-old father of five, decided not to seek further treatment in order to save his family the financial burden.

In Guatemala, death too often represents a heavy financial burden. On top of their daily struggle to secure money for food and necessities, many families have to deal not only with grief but also with huge debts for the wake and funeral.

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Health, Death and Poverty in Indigeno...
San Jorge La Laguna , Solola, Guatemala
By hiroko tanaka
27 Jul 2012

Mourners carry the coffin to the cemetery during the funeral for Rodrigo, who passed away after 7 years of suffering from diabetes and nutritional deficiencies. In his last months, the 49 year-old father of five, decided not to seek further treatment in order to save his family the financial burden.

In Guatemala, death too often represents a heavy financial burden. On top of their daily struggle to secure money for food and necessities, many families have to deal not only with grief but also with huge debts for the wake and funeral.

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Health, Death and Poverty in Indigeno...
San Jorge La Laguna , Solola, Guatemala
By hiroko tanaka
27 Jul 2012

Mourners walk to the cemetery during the funeral for Rodrigo, who passed away after 7 years of suffering from diabetes and nutritional deficiencies. In his last months, the 49 year-old father of five, decided not to seek further treatment in order to save his family the financial burden.

In Guatemala, death too often represents a heavy financial burden. On top of their daily struggle to secure money for food and necessities, many families have to deal not only with grief but also with huge debts for the wake and funeral.

Thumb sm
Health, Death and Poverty in Indigeno...
San Jorge La Laguna , Solola, Guatemala
By hiroko tanaka
27 Jul 2012

Mourners carry the coffin to the cemetery during the funeral of Rodrigo, who passed away after 7 years of suffering from diabetes and nutritional deficiencies. In his last months, the 49 year-old father of five, decided not to seek further treatment in order to save his family the financial burden.

In Guatemala, death too often represents a heavy financial burden. On top of their daily struggle to secure money for food and necessities, many families have to deal not only with grief but also with huge debts for the wake and funeral.

Thumb sm
Health, Death and Poverty in Indigeno...
San Jorge La Laguna , Solola, Guatemala
By hiroko tanaka
27 Jul 2012

Mourners carry the coffin to the cemetery during the funeral of Rodrigo, who passed away after 7 years of suffering from diabetes and nutritional deficiencies. In his last months, the 49 year-old father of five, decided not to seek further treatment in order to save his family the financial burden.

In Guatemala, death too often represents a heavy financial burden. On top of their daily struggle to secure money for food and necessities, many families have to deal not only with grief but also with huge debts for the wake and funeral.

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Health, Death and Poverty in Indigeno...
San Jorge La Laguna , Solola, Guatemala
By hiroko tanaka
27 Jul 2012

Mourners share the last moments with the deceased during a funeral for Rodrigo, who passed away after 7 years of suffering from diabetes and nutritional deficiencies. In his last months, the 49 year-old father of five, decided not to seek further treatment in order to save his family the financial burden.

In Guatemala, death too often represents a heavy financial burden. On top of their daily struggle to secure money for food and necessities, many families have to deal not only with grief but also with huge debts for the wake and funeral.

Thumb sm
Health, Death and Poverty in Indigeno...
San Jorge La Laguna , Solola, Guatemala
By hiroko tanaka
27 Jul 2012

Family members mourn during the funeral for Rodrigo, who passed away after 7 years of suffering from diabetes and nutritional deficiencies. In his last months, the 49 year-old father of five, decided not to seek further treatment in order to save his family the financial burden.

In Guatemala, death too often represents a heavy financial burden. On top of their daily struggle to secure money for food and necessities, many families have to deal not only with grief but also with huge debts for the wake and funeral.

Thumb sm
Health, Death and Poverty in Indigeno...
San Jorge La Laguna , Solola, Guatemala
By hiroko tanaka
27 Jul 2012

Family members mourn during the funeral for Rodrigo, who passed away after 7 years of suffering from diabetes and nutritional deficiencies. In his last months, the 49 year-old father of five, decided not to seek further treatment in order to save his family the financial burden.

In Guatemala, death too often represents a heavy financial burden. On top of their daily struggle to secure money for food and necessities, many families have to deal not only with grief but also with huge debts for the wake and funeral.

Thumb sm
Health, Death and Poverty in Indigeno...
San Jorge La Laguna , Solola, Guatemala
By hiroko tanaka
27 Jul 2012

Family members mourn during the funeral of Rodrigo, who passed away after 7 years of suffering from diabetes and nutritional deficiencies. In his last months, the 49 year-old father of five, decided not to seek further treatment in order to save his family the financial burden.

In Guatemala, death too often represents a heavy financial burden. On top of their daily struggle to secure money for food and necessities, many families have to deal not only with grief but also with huge debts for the wake and funeral.

Thumb sm
Health, Death and Poverty in Indigeno...
San Jorge La Laguna , Solola, Guatemala
By hiroko tanaka
27 Jul 2012

Family members mourn during the funeral of Rodrigo, who passed away after 7 years of suffering from diabetes and nutritional deficiencies. In his last months, the 49 year-old father of five, decided not to seek further treatment in order to save his family the financial burden.

In Guatemala, death too often represents a heavy financial burden. On top of their daily struggle to secure money for food and necessities, many families have to deal not only with grief but also with huge debts for the wake and funeral.