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Transgender of Pakistan 07
Lahore, Pakistan
By vincenzo floramo
25 Dec 2014

Saima Butt, 32, from Lahore is a field worker at Khawaja Sira Society. She is very close to the elder transgender of the local community and her aim is to help all those old transgender who fall into poverty.

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Transgender of Pakistan 01
Lahore, Pakistan
By vincenzo floramo
24 Dec 2014

Transgender organizers of the Khawaja Sira Society (KSS) talk about their activities and transgender human rights related issues at the morning show "Doodh Patti," broadcasted by the Pakistani news channel GEO Tez.

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Transgender of Pakistan 11
Lahore, Pakistan
By vincenzo floramo
24 Dec 2014

Anjeli, 24, from Lahore is a very popular wedding dance. Good dancers earn between 10 to 50 dollars per ceremony, depending on the economic status of the family hosting.

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Transgender of Pakistan 13
Lahore, Pakistan
By vincenzo floramo
22 Dec 2014

Two transgender dancers walk away from a wedding ceremony where they had been invited. Even if legally recognized on their ID card, Pakistani society is still largely discriminating towards transgender people.

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Transgender of Pakistan 09
Lahore, Pakistan
By vincenzo floramo
21 Dec 2014

Jannat, 26, poses at a transgender fashion show celebrating the end of an HIV/AIDS workshop organized by a local government-run family planning clinic. She has a master's degree in business and administration at the University of Central Punjab, and she dances as a professional Khatak dancer in the theatre and on TV.

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Transgender of Pakistan 10
Lahore, Pakistan
By vincenzo floramo
21 Dec 2014

A transgender parade is held at a fashion show during December's month-long activities around the HIV/AIDS day. Even if Pakistan's Supreme Court recognized a third gender on state ID cards, many members of the community are reticent to apply for it due to the impossibility to visit the holy city of Mecca as a transgender.

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Transgender of Pakistan 02
Lahore, Pakistan
By vincenzo floramo
19 Dec 2014

A government HIV/AIDS prevention campaign poster is pasted to the wall of Dostana Dropping Center, a community organization for men who engage in same-sex practices (MSM). The organization works under the umbrella of NAZ Male Health Alliance.

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Transgender of Pakistan 12
Lahore, Pakistan
By vincenzo floramo
16 Dec 2014

Darshan, a transgender from Lahore performs the "Toli," a blessing dance where transgender are thrown money on auspicious occasions such as baby showers or weddings.

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Transgender of Pakistan 06
Lahore, Pakistan
By vincenzo floramo
11 Dec 2014

At the KSS facilities, the local transgender community takes part in different activities where they can express their interests freely, including dancing. Make-up and beauty sessions are organized in between activities.

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Raj Kumar’s fight against social stig...
Kathmandu, Nepal
By Rajneesh Bhandari
29 Apr 2013

Raj Kumar is among many Nepalis who contracted HIV from a dirty needle, and now he is trying to adjust in society and working hard to achieve his long cherished dream, to be a singer. Though Raj Kumar knew that he had HIV in 2004, he didn’t disclose the fact to his wife, out of the fear of ruining his family and being stigmatized by society.
It has been two months since Raj Kumar disclosed the news about his HIV infection to his wife, with much care and counseling.
He took advantage of help of his friends, colleagues and counselors to do the “impossible task,” telling others. Raj Kumar said that he waited for “the right time,” but always “felt heavy with the guilt of hiding it to his wife.” The right moment however, came after nearly a decade. “It was difficult to gather the courage to tell,” he added. “Now I have gathered courage to face it.”
Raj Kumar is now pursuing his childhood dream to be a singer. Raj Kumar’s first song “Mod” was released during a function in Kathmandu on April 29, 2013.

“I was born genius, drugs spoiled me,” Raj Kumar said looking back at his life. When he reached grade eight he got into a habit of using drugs. It was very late that his mother, his primary caretaker, knew about it.

According to government data, an average of 1,437 new infections are reported each year. In 2011, 50,287 people were living with HIV and 3,804 of them are children. Out of the total HIV cases reported in 2011, 87.9 percent were from sexual transmission. The number of new cases of HIV infections has been on decline in the last five years. In 2007, a total of 64,585 people were believed to be living with HIV. Government figures put HIV prevalence in the adult population at 0.3 percent. Only 20,583 HIV cases are reported so far.

Nepal’s first HIV case was reported in 1988. The high-risk group includes intravenous drug users, female sex workers and their clients, men who have sex with other men and male migrant laborers.

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Raj Kumar’s fight against social stig...
kathmandu, Nepal
By Rajneesh Bhandari
29 Apr 2013

Raj Kumar is among many Nepalis who contracted HIV from a dirty needle, and now he is trying to adjust in society and working hard to achieve his long cherished dream, to be a singer. Though Raj Kumar knew that he had HIV in 2004, he didn’t disclose the fact to his wife, out of the fear of ruining his family and being stigmatized by society.
It has been two months since Raj Kumar disclosed the news about his HIV infection to his wife, with much care and counseling.
He took advantage of help of his friends, colleagues and counselors to do the “impossible task,” telling others. Raj Kumar said that he waited for “the right time,” but always “felt heavy with the guilt of hiding it to his wife.” The right moment however, came after nearly a decade. “It was difficult to gather the courage to tell,” he added. “Now I have gathered courage to face it.”
Raj Kumar is now pursuing his childhood dream to be a singer. Raj Kumar’s first song “Mod” was released during a function in Kathmandu on April 29, 2013.

“I was born genius, drugs spoiled me,” Raj Kumar said looking back at his life. When he reached grade eight he got into a habit of using drugs. It was very late that his mother, his primary caretaker, knew about it.

According to government data, an average of 1,437 new infections are reported each year. In 2011, 50,287 people were living with HIV and 3,804 of them are children. Out of the total HIV cases reported in 2011, 87.9 percent were from sexual transmission. The number of new cases of HIV infections has been on decline in the last five years. In 2007, a total of 64,585 people were believed to be living with HIV. Government figures put HIV prevalence in the adult population at 0.3 percent. Only 20,583 HIV cases are reported so far.

Nepal’s first HIV case was reported in 1988. The high-risk group includes intravenous drug users, female sex workers and their clients, men who have sex with other men and male migrant laborers.

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Raj Kumar’s fight against social stig...
Kathmandu, Nepal
By Rajneesh Bhandari
04 Apr 2013

Raj Kumar is among many Nepalis who contracted HIV from a dirty needle, and now he is trying to adjust in society and working hard to achieve his long cherished dream, to be a singer. Though Raj Kumar knew that he had HIV in 2004, he didn’t disclose the fact to his wife, out of the fear of ruining his family and being stigmatized by society.
It has been two months since Raj Kumar disclosed the news about his HIV infection to his wife, with much care and counseling.
He took advantage of help of his friends, colleagues and counselors to do the “impossible task,” telling others. Raj Kumar said that he waited for “the right time,” but always “felt heavy with the guilt of hiding it to his wife.” The right moment however, came after nearly a decade. “It was difficult to gather the courage to tell,” he added. “Now I have gathered courage to face it.”
Raj Kumar is now pursuing his childhood dream to be a singer. Raj Kumar’s first song “Mod” was released during a function in Kathmandu on April 29, 2013.

“I was born genius, drugs spoiled me,” Raj Kumar said looking back at his life. When he reached grade eight he got into a habit of using drugs. It was very late that his mother, his primary caretaker, knew about it.

According to government data, an average of 1,437 new infections are reported each year. In 2011, 50,287 people were living with HIV and 3,804 of them are children. Out of the total HIV cases reported in 2011, 87.9 percent were from sexual transmission. The number of new cases of HIV infections has been on decline in the last five years. In 2007, a total of 64,585 people were believed to be living with HIV. Government figures put HIV prevalence in the adult population at 0.3 percent. Only 20,583 HIV cases are reported so far.

Nepal’s first HIV case was reported in 1988. The high-risk group includes intravenous drug users, female sex workers and their clients, men who have sex with other men and male migrant laborers.

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Raj Kumar’s fight against social stig...
Kathmandu, Nepal
By Rajneesh Bhandari
04 Apr 2013

Raj Kumar is among many Nepalis who contracted HIV from a dirty needle, and now he is trying to adjust in society and working hard to achieve his long cherished dream, to be a singer. Though Raj Kumar knew that he had HIV in 2004, he didn’t disclose the fact to his wife, out of the fear of ruining his family and being stigmatized by society.
It has been two months since Raj Kumar disclosed the news about his HIV infection to his wife, with much care and counseling.
He took advantage of help of his friends, colleagues and counselors to do the “impossible task,” telling others. Raj Kumar said that he waited for “the right time,” but always “felt heavy with the guilt of hiding it to his wife.” The right moment however, came after nearly a decade. “It was difficult to gather the courage to tell,” he added. “Now I have gathered courage to face it.”
Raj Kumar is now pursuing his childhood dream to be a singer. Raj Kumar’s first song “Mod” was released during a function in Kathmandu on April 29, 2013.

“I was born genius, drugs spoiled me,” Raj Kumar said looking back at his life. When he reached grade eight he got into a habit of using drugs. It was very late that his mother, his primary caretaker, knew about it.

According to government data, an average of 1,437 new infections are reported each year. In 2011, 50,287 people were living with HIV and 3,804 of them are children. Out of the total HIV cases reported in 2011, 87.9 percent were from sexual transmission. The number of new cases of HIV infections has been on decline in the last five years. In 2007, a total of 64,585 people were believed to be living with HIV. Government figures put HIV prevalence in the adult population at 0.3 percent. Only 20,583 HIV cases are reported so far.

Nepal’s first HIV case was reported in 1988. The high-risk group includes intravenous drug users, female sex workers and their clients, men who have sex with other men and male migrant laborers.

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Raj Kumar’s fight against social stig...
Kathmandu, Nepal
By Rajneesh Bhandari
04 Apr 2013

Raj Kumar is among many Nepalis who contracted HIV from a dirty needle, and now he is trying to adjust in society and working hard to achieve his long cherished dream, to be a singer. Though Raj Kumar knew that he had HIV in 2004, he didn’t disclose the fact to his wife, out of the fear of ruining his family and being stigmatized by society.
It has been two months since Raj Kumar disclosed the news about his HIV infection to his wife, with much care and counseling.
He took advantage of help of his friends, colleagues and counselors to do the “impossible task,” telling others. Raj Kumar said that he waited for “the right time,” but always “felt heavy with the guilt of hiding it to his wife.” The right moment however, came after nearly a decade. “It was difficult to gather the courage to tell,” he added. “Now I have gathered courage to face it.”
Raj Kumar is now pursuing his childhood dream to be a singer. Raj Kumar’s first song “Mod” was released during a function in Kathmandu on April 29, 2013.

“I was born genius, drugs spoiled me,” Raj Kumar said looking back at his life. When he reached grade eight he got into a habit of using drugs. It was very late that his mother, his primary caretaker, knew about it.

According to government data, an average of 1,437 new infections are reported each year. In 2011, 50,287 people were living with HIV and 3,804 of them are children. Out of the total HIV cases reported in 2011, 87.9 percent were from sexual transmission. The number of new cases of HIV infections has been on decline in the last five years. In 2007, a total of 64,585 people were believed to be living with HIV. Government figures put HIV prevalence in the adult population at 0.3 percent. Only 20,583 HIV cases are reported so far.

Nepal’s first HIV case was reported in 1988. The high-risk group includes intravenous drug users, female sex workers and their clients, men who have sex with other men and male migrant laborers.

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Raj Kumar's Fight Against Social Stigma
Kathmandu, Nepal
By U.S. Editor
03 Apr 2013

Raj Kumar is one of many Nepalis who contracted HIV from a dirty needle. He is now trying to reintegrate into society despite his condition, and is working hard to achieve his lifelong dream of becoming a singer.

Though Raj Kumar knew that he had HIV in 2004, he didn’t disclose the fact to his wife out of the fear of ruining his family and being stigmatized by society. It has now been two months since Raj Kumar disclosed the news about his HIV infection to his wife, with much care and counseling.

He took advantage of the help of his friends, colleagues and counselors to do the “impossible task,” of telling others. Raj Kumar said that he waited for “the right time,” but always “felt heavy with the guilt of hiding it from his wife.” The right moment, however, eventually arrived, after nearly a decade of secrecy.

“It was difficult to gather the courage to tell,” he added. “Now I have gathered courage to face it.”

Raj Kumar is now pursuing his childhood dream to become a singer. HIs first song, “Mod,” was released during a function in Kathmandu on April 29, 2013.

“I was born genius, drugs spoiled me,” said Raj Kumar, looking back at his life. When he reached grade eight he began using drugs, eventually becoming addicted. It was very late that his mother, his primary caretaker, finally found out about his substance abuse problem.

According to government data, an average of 1,437 new infections are reported each year. In 2011, 50,287 people were living with HIV and 3,804 among them were children. Out of the total HIV cases reported in 2011, 87.9 percent were transmitted sexually. The number of new cases of HIV infections has been on decline in the last five years, and government figures now estimate HIV prevalence in the adult population to be at 0.3 percent.

Nepal’s first HIV case was reported in 1988. High-risk groups in the country include intravenous drug users, female sex workers and their clients, and migrant laborers.

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Positive is negative: HIV/AIDS in the...
Wamena, Indonesia
By Carolincik
26 Mar 2013

Among majestic mountains in the highlands of Papua, a generalised HIV epidemic is underway.

The island of New Guinea has been largely isolated from the influence of the rest of the world for thousands of years. In the western half (now part of Indonesia), in the Baliem valley one of the first agricultural centers developed over 9,000 years ago. It was only in the 1950s that the valley began to open up to the outside world with the arrival of the first European missionaries, following the 'discovery' of the valley in 1938.

Home to the world’s second largest rain forest, and some of the greatest natural reserves in gold, timber gas and fisheries, the two Papua provinces remain Indonesia’s poorest region. Ever since Indonesia controversially ‘integrated’ Papua in 1969 under the auspices of the UN, it has implemented an aggressive modernization campaign that maximizes resource exploitation. Apart from a small elite who could be said to have both participated in and reaped the benefits of this development, the majority of indigenous Papuans have remained at its margins.

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Raj Kumar’s fight against social stig...
Kathmandu, Nepal
By Rajneesh Bhandari
23 Mar 2013

Raj Kumar is among many Nepalis who contracted HIV from a dirty needle, and now he is trying to adjust in society and working hard to achieve his long cherished dream, to be a singer. Though Raj Kumar knew that he had HIV in 2004, he didn’t disclose the fact to his wife, out of the fear of ruining his family and being stigmatized by society.
It has been two months since Raj Kumar disclosed the news about his HIV infection to his wife, with much care and counseling.
He took advantage of help of his friends, colleagues and counselors to do the “impossible task,” telling others. Raj Kumar said that he waited for “the right time,” but always “felt heavy with the guilt of hiding it to his wife.” The right moment however, came after nearly a decade. “It was difficult to gather the courage to tell,” he added. “Now I have gathered courage to face it.”
Raj Kumar is now pursuing his childhood dream to be a singer. Raj Kumar’s first song “Mod” was released during a function in Kathmandu on April 29, 2013.

“I was born genius, drugs spoiled me,” Raj Kumar said looking back at his life. When he reached grade eight he got into a habit of using drugs. It was very late that his mother, his primary caretaker, knew about it.

According to government data, an average of 1,437 new infections are reported each year. In 2011, 50,287 people were living with HIV and 3,804 of them are children. Out of the total HIV cases reported in 2011, 87.9 percent were from sexual transmission. The number of new cases of HIV infections has been on decline in the last five years. In 2007, a total of 64,585 people were believed to be living with HIV. Government figures put HIV prevalence in the adult population at 0.3 percent. Only 20,583 HIV cases are reported so far.

Nepal’s first HIV case was reported in 1988. The high-risk group includes intravenous drug users, female sex workers and their clients, men who have sex with other men and male migrant laborers.

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Raj Kumar’s fight against social stig...
Kathmandu, Nepal
By Rajneesh Bhandari
23 Mar 2013

Raj Kumar is among many Nepalis who contracted HIV from a dirty needle, and now he is trying to adjust in society and working hard to achieve his long cherished dream, to be a singer. Though Raj Kumar knew that he had HIV in 2004, he didn’t disclose the fact to his wife, out of the fear of ruining his family and being stigmatized by society.
It has been two months since Raj Kumar disclosed the news about his HIV infection to his wife, with much care and counseling.
He took advantage of help of his friends, colleagues and counselors to do the “impossible task,” telling others. Raj Kumar said that he waited for “the right time,” but always “felt heavy with the guilt of hiding it to his wife.” The right moment however, came after nearly a decade. “It was difficult to gather the courage to tell,” he added. “Now I have gathered courage to face it.”
Raj Kumar is now pursuing his childhood dream to be a singer. Raj Kumar’s first song “Mod” was released during a function in Kathmandu on April 29, 2013.

“I was born genius, drugs spoiled me,” Raj Kumar said looking back at his life. When he reached grade eight he got into a habit of using drugs. It was very late that his mother, his primary caretaker, knew about it.

According to government data, an average of 1,437 new infections are reported each year. In 2011, 50,287 people were living with HIV and 3,804 of them are children. Out of the total HIV cases reported in 2011, 87.9 percent were from sexual transmission. The number of new cases of HIV infections has been on decline in the last five years. In 2007, a total of 64,585 people were believed to be living with HIV. Government figures put HIV prevalence in the adult population at 0.3 percent. Only 20,583 HIV cases are reported so far.

Nepal’s first HIV case was reported in 1988. The high-risk group includes intravenous drug users, female sex workers and their clients, men who have sex with other men and male migrant laborers.

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Raj Kumar’s fight against social stig...
Kathmandu, Nepal
By Rajneesh Bhandari
23 Mar 2013

Raj Kumar is among many Nepalis who contracted HIV from a dirty needle, and now he is trying to adjust in society and working hard to achieve his long cherished dream, to be a singer. Though Raj Kumar knew that he had HIV in 2004, he didn’t disclose the fact to his wife, out of the fear of ruining his family and being stigmatized by society.
It has been two months since Raj Kumar disclosed the news about his HIV infection to his wife, with much care and counseling.
He took advantage of help of his friends, colleagues and counselors to do the “impossible task,” telling others. Raj Kumar said that he waited for “the right time,” but always “felt heavy with the guilt of hiding it to his wife.” The right moment however, came after nearly a decade. “It was difficult to gather the courage to tell,” he added. “Now I have gathered courage to face it.”
Raj Kumar is now pursuing his childhood dream to be a singer. Raj Kumar’s first song “Mod” was released during a function in Kathmandu on April 29, 2013.

“I was born genius, drugs spoiled me,” Raj Kumar said looking back at his life. When he reached grade eight he got into a habit of using drugs. It was very late that his mother, his primary caretaker, knew about it.

According to government data, an average of 1,437 new infections are reported each year. In 2011, 50,287 people were living with HIV and 3,804 of them are children. Out of the total HIV cases reported in 2011, 87.9 percent were from sexual transmission. The number of new cases of HIV infections has been on decline in the last five years. In 2007, a total of 64,585 people were believed to be living with HIV. Government figures put HIV prevalence in the adult population at 0.3 percent. Only 20,583 HIV cases are reported so far.

Nepal’s first HIV case was reported in 1988. The high-risk group includes intravenous drug users, female sex workers and their clients, men who have sex with other men and male migrant laborers.

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Raj Kumar’s fight against social stig...
Kathmandu, Nepal
By Rajneesh Bhandari
23 Mar 2013

Raj Kumar is among many Nepalis who contracted HIV from a dirty needle, and now he is trying to adjust in society and working hard to achieve his long cherished dream, to be a singer. Though Raj Kumar knew that he had HIV in 2004, he didn’t disclose the fact to his wife, out of the fear of ruining his family and being stigmatized by society.
It has been two months since Raj Kumar disclosed the news about his HIV infection to his wife, with much care and counseling.
He took advantage of help of his friends, colleagues and counselors to do the “impossible task,” telling others. Raj Kumar said that he waited for “the right time,” but always “felt heavy with the guilt of hiding it to his wife.” The right moment however, came after nearly a decade. “It was difficult to gather the courage to tell,” he added. “Now I have gathered courage to face it.”
Raj Kumar is now pursuing his childhood dream to be a singer. Raj Kumar’s first song “Mod” was released during a function in Kathmandu on April 29, 2013.

“I was born genius, drugs spoiled me,” Raj Kumar said looking back at his life. When he reached grade eight he got into a habit of using drugs. It was very late that his mother, his primary caretaker, knew about it.

According to government data, an average of 1,437 new infections are reported each year. In 2011, 50,287 people were living with HIV and 3,804 of them are children. Out of the total HIV cases reported in 2011, 87.9 percent were from sexual transmission. The number of new cases of HIV infections has been on decline in the last five years. In 2007, a total of 64,585 people were believed to be living with HIV. Government figures put HIV prevalence in the adult population at 0.3 percent. Only 20,583 HIV cases are reported so far.

Nepal’s first HIV case was reported in 1988. The high-risk group includes intravenous drug users, female sex workers and their clients, men who have sex with other men and male migrant laborers.

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Health in Uganda (40 of 49)
Luweero, Uganda
By Papillon
10 Mar 2013

Luweero, Uganda - March 10, 2013
Involvement in the promotion of better health is central in the development of Uganda as a better nation. This includes clean hospitals and health centers, schools, wells and effective community outreach programs in which people receive free medication, health services and mosquito nets. But even with the strong government efforts in reducing mortality rates, the situation is still serious and dangerous in some areas of Uganda. Children are at especially high risk of vector borne diseases including malaria, as well as water-borne diseases including bacterial diarrhea. Maternal mortality is high in Uganda, and pregnancy is still the leading cause of death for young women ages 15 through 19.The picture shows Perpetua, 14 years old, positive to HIV/AIDS. She lives with her mother family as she lost both her parents for the HIV/AIDS.

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Positive Is Negative
Wamena, Indonesia
By U.S. Editor
15 Feb 2013

HIV/AIDS in the highlands of Indonesia Papua

The fact that HIV infection is higher among ethnic Papuans is representative of greater socio-economic inequalities. Much remains to be done to reach the United Nations Political Declaration on HIV/AIDS and the Millennium Development goals. In Papua, the severity of the situation has been completely underestimated by the authorities and so far, their response to the epidemic has been severely inadequate. In order to decrease dissatisfaction with their rule, a general attitude of the Indonesian government has been to provide local governments in Papua with large amounts of money. It is then assigned to various programs without proper preliminary research and subsequent monitoring. The actual causes of the problem however, are rarely tackled. The poor standards or complete lack of health services and education throughout the region not only facilitate the spread of the disease, they also severely impede any efficient response to the epidemic. Indeed, although the provincial governments have made HIV testing and treatment free, many Papuans do not have access to health care or education and are unlikely to be reached by awareness raising campaigns any time soon. In the meantime, the virus continues its deadly advance into the highlands.

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Health in Uganda (20 of 49)
Luweero, Uganda
By Papillon
10 Feb 2013

Luweero, Uganda - March 10, 2013
Involvement in the promotion of better health is central in the development of Uganda as a better nation. This includes clean hospitals and health centers, schools, wells and effective community outreach programs in which people receive free medication, health services and mosquito nets. But even with the strong government efforts in reducing mortality rates, the situation is still serious and dangerous in some areas of Uganda. Children are at especially high risk of vector borne diseases including malaria, as well as water-borne diseases including bacterial diarrhea. Maternal mortality is high in Uganda, and pregnancy is still the leading cause of death for young women ages 15 through 19. The picture shows a one month baby girl with evident signs of malnutrition.

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Health in Uganda (21 ...
Luweero, Uganda
By Papillon
10 Feb 2013

Luweero, Uganda - March 10, 2013
Involvement in the promotion of better health is central in the development of Uganda as a better nation. This includes clean hospitals and health centers, schools, wells and effective community outreach programs in which people receive free medication, health services and mosquito nets. But even with the strong government efforts in reducing mortality rates, the situation is still serious and dangerous in some areas of Uganda. Children are at especially high risk of vector borne diseases including malaria, as well as water-borne diseases including bacterial diarrhea. Maternal mortality is high in Uganda, and pregnancy is still the leading cause of death for young women ages 15 through 19.The picture shows a one month baby girls with evident signs of malnutrition.

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Health in Uganda (22 of 49)
Luweero, Uganda
By Papillon
10 Feb 2013

Luweero, Uganda - March 10, 2013
Involvement in the promotion of better health is central in the development of Uganda as a better nation. This includes clean hospitals and health centers, schools, wells and effective community outreach programs in which people receive free medication, health services and mosquito nets. But even with the strong government efforts in reducing mortality rates, the situation is still serious and dangerous in some areas of Uganda. Children are at especially high risk of vector borne diseases including malaria, as well as water-borne diseases including bacterial diarrhea. Maternal mortality is high in Uganda, and pregnancy is still the leading cause of death for young women ages 15 through 19. The picture shows twin baby girls recently born, under a malnutrition state.

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Health in Uganda (23 of 49)
Luweero,Uganda
By Papillon
10 Feb 2013

Luweero, Uganda - March 10, 2013
Involvement in the promotion of better health is central in the development of Uganda as a better nation. This includes clean hospitals and health centers, schools, wells and effective community outreach programs in which people receive free medication, health services and mosquito nets. But even with the strong government efforts in reducing mortality rates, the situation is still serious and dangerous in some areas of Uganda. Children are at especially high risk of vector borne diseases including malaria, as well as water-borne diseases including bacterial diarrhea. Maternal mortality is high in Uganda, and pregnancy is still the leading cause of death for young women ages 15 through 19. The picture shows two girls walking on the way to Luweero hospital, bringing food for patients of the general hospital in Luweero.

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Health in Uganda (24 of 49)
Luweero,Uganda
By Papillon
10 Feb 2013

Luweero, Uganda - March 10, 2013
Involvement in the promotion of better health is central in the development of Uganda as a better nation. This includes clean hospitals and health centers, schools, wells and effective community outreach programs in which people receive free medication, health services and mosquito nets. But even with the strong government efforts in reducing mortality rates, the situation is still serious and dangerous in some areas of Uganda. Children are at especially high risk of vector borne diseases including malaria, as well as water-borne diseases including bacterial diarrhea. Maternal mortality is high in Uganda, and pregnancy is still the leading cause of death for young women ages 15 through 19. The picture shows Elisabeth, an eleven years old girl, affected by bacterial diarrhea, after she has been dismiss from Luweero general hospital. Many children are affected by bacterial diarrhea, for drinking infected water.

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Health in Uganda (25 of 49)
Luweero, Uganda
By Papillon
10 Feb 2013

Luweero, Uganda - March 10, 2013
Involvement in the promotion of better health is central in the development of Uganda as a better nation. This includes clean hospitals and health centers, schools, wells and effective community outreach programs in which people receive free medication, health services and mosquito nets. But even with the strong government efforts in reducing mortality rates, the situation is still serious and dangerous in some areas of Uganda. Children are at especially high risk of vector borne diseases including malaria, as well as water-borne diseases including bacterial diarrhea. Maternal mortality is high in Uganda, and pregnancy is still the leading cause of death for young women ages 15 through 19. The picture shows Kizito, a five year old child, affected by bacterial diarrhea, after he has been dismissed from Luweero general hospital. Many children are affected by bacterial diarrhea, for drinking infected water.

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Health in Uganda (26 of 49)
Luweero, Uganda
By Papillon
10 Feb 2013

Luweero, Uganda - March 10, 2013
Involvement in the promotion of better health is central in the development of Uganda as a better nation. This includes clean hospitals and health centers, schools, wells and effective community outreach programs in which people receive free medication, health services and mosquito nets. But even with the strong government efforts in reducing mortality rates, the situation is still serious and dangerous in some areas of Uganda. Children are at especially high risk of vector borne diseases including malaria, as well as water-borne diseases including bacterial diarrhea. Maternal mortality is high in Uganda, and pregnancy is still the leading cause of death for young women ages 15 through 19. The picture shows Clarice, a twelve year old girl, affected by bacterial diarrhea, after she has been dismissed from Luweero general hospital. Many children are affected by bacterial diarrhea, for drinking infected water.

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Health in Uganda (27 of 49)
Luweero, Uganda
By Papillon
10 Feb 2013

Luweero, Uganda - March 10, 2013
Involvement in the promotion of better health is central in the development of Uganda as a better nation. This includes clean hospitals and health centers, schools, wells and effective community outreach programs in which people receive free medication, health services and mosquito nets. But even with the strong government efforts in reducing mortality rates, the situation is still serious and dangerous in some areas of Uganda. Children are at especially high risk of vector borne diseases including malaria, as well as water-borne diseases including bacterial diarrhea. Maternal mortality is high in Uganda, and pregnancy is still the leading cause of death for young women ages 15 through 19.The picture shows Emmanuel, a two year old child, affected by cerebral malaria, in sever conditions, in Luweero general hospital. Malaria, is devastating many areas of Uganda, like the Luweero region and government is trying to provide every family with several mosquito nets, to avoid serious situations.

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Health in Uganda (28 of 49)
Luweero, Uganda
By Papillon
10 Feb 2013

Luweero, Uganda - March 10, 2013
Involvement in the promotion of better health is central in the development of Uganda as a better nation. This includes clean hospitals and health centers, schools, wells and effective community outreach programs in which people receive free medication, health services and mosquito nets. But even with the strong government efforts in reducing mortality rates, the situation is still serious and dangerous in some areas of Uganda. Children are at especially high risk of vector borne diseases including malaria, as well as water-borne diseases including bacterial diarrhea. Maternal mortality is high in Uganda, and pregnancy is still the leading cause of death for young women ages 15 through 19.The picture shows Emmanuel, a two years old child, affected by cerebral malaria, in sever conditions, in Luweero general hospital. Malaria, is devastating many areas of Uganda, like the Luweero region and government is trying to provide every family with several mosquito nets, to avoid serious situations.

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Health in Uganda (29 of 49)
Luweero, Uganda
By Papillon
10 Feb 2013

Luweero, Uganda - March 10, 2013
Involvement in the promotion of better health is central in the development of Uganda as a better nation. This includes clean hospitals and health centers, schools, wells and effective community outreach programs in which people receive free medication, health services and mosquito nets. But even with the strong government efforts in reducing mortality rates, the situation is still serious and dangerous in some areas of Uganda. Children are at especially high risk of vector borne diseases including malaria, as well as water-borne diseases including bacterial diarrhea. Maternal mortality is high in Uganda, and pregnancy is still the leading cause of death for young women ages 15 through 19.The picture shows Emmanuel, a two year-old child, affected by a severe case of cerebral malaria, in Luweero general hospital. Malaria is devastating many areas of Uganda, like the Luweero region and the government is trying to provide every family with several mosquito nets, to avoid serious situations.

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Health in Uganda (30 of 49)
Luweero, Uganda
By Papillon
10 Feb 2013

Luweero, Uganda - March 10, 2013
Involvement in the promotion of better health is central in the development of Uganda as a better nation. This includes clean hospitals and health centers, schools, wells and effective community outreach programs in which people receive free medication, health services and mosquito nets. But even with the strong government efforts in reducing mortality rates, the situation is still serious and dangerous in some areas of Uganda. Children are at especially high risk of vector borne diseases including malaria, as well as water-borne diseases including bacterial diarrhea. Maternal mortality is high in Uganda, and pregnancy is still the leading cause of death for young women ages 15 through 19.The picture shows Emmanuel, a two years old child, affected by cerebral malaria, in sever conditions, in Luweero general hospital. Malaria, is devastating many areas of Uganda, like the Luweero region and government is trying to provide every family with several mosquito nets, to avoid serious situations.

Thumb sm
Health in Uganda (31 of 49)
Luweero, Uganda
By Papillon
10 Feb 2013

Luweero, Uganda - March 10, 2013
Involvement in the promotion of better health is central in the development of Uganda as a better nation. This includes clean hospitals and health centers, schools, wells and effective community outreach programs in which people receive free medication, health services and mosquito nets. But even with the strong government efforts in reducing mortality rates, the situation is still serious and dangerous in some areas of Uganda. Children are at especially high risk of vector borne diseases including malaria, as well as water-borne diseases including bacterial diarrhea. Maternal mortality is high in Uganda, and pregnancy is still the leading cause of death for young women ages 15 through 19.The picture shows Samir, a two years old child, affected by cerebral malaria, in sever conditions, in Luweero general hospital. Malaria, is devastating many areas of Uganda, like the Luweero region and government is trying to provide every family with several mosquito nets, to avoid serious situations.

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Health in Uganda (32 of 49)
Luweero, Uganda
By Papillon
10 Feb 2013

Luweero, Uganda - March 10, 2013
Involvement in the promotion of better health is central in the development of Uganda as a better nation. This includes clean hospitals and health centers, schools, wells and effective community outreach programs in which people receive free medication, health services and mosquito nets. But even with the strong government efforts in reducing mortality rates, the situation is still serious and dangerous in some areas of Uganda. Children are at especially high risk of vector borne diseases including malaria, as well as water-borne diseases including bacterial diarrhea. Maternal mortality is high in Uganda, and pregnancy is still the leading cause of death for young women ages 15 through 19.The picture shows Samir, a two years old child, affected by cerebral malaria, in sever conditions, in Luweero general hospital. Malaria, is devastating many areas of Uganda, like the Luweero region and government is trying to provide every family with several mosquito nets, to avoid serious situations.

Thumb sm
Health in Uganda (33 of 49)
Luweero, Uganda
By Papillon
10 Feb 2013

Luweero, Uganda - March 10, 2013
Involvement in the promotion of better health is central in the development of Uganda as a better nation. This includes clean hospitals and health centers, schools, wells and effective community outreach programs in which people receive free medication, health services and mosquito nets. But even with the strong government efforts in reducing mortality rates, the situation is still serious and dangerous in some areas of Uganda. Children are at especially high risk of vector borne diseases including malaria, as well as water-borne diseases including bacterial diarrhea. Maternal mortality is high in Uganda, and pregnancy is still the leading cause of death for young women ages 15 through 19.The picture shows Samir, a two years old child, affected by cerebral malaria, in severe conditions, in Luweero general hospital. Malaria, is devastating many areas of Uganda, like the Luweero region and government is trying to provide every family with several mosquito nets, to avoid serious situations.

Thumb sm
Health in Uganda (34 of 49)
Luweero, Uganda
By Papillon
10 Feb 2013

Luweero, Uganda - March 10, 2013
Involvement in the promotion of better health is central in the development of Uganda as a better nation. This includes clean hospitals and health centers, schools, wells and effective community outreach programs in which people receive free medication, health services and mosquito nets. But even with the strong government efforts in reducing mortality rates, the situation is still serious and dangerous in some areas of Uganda. Children are at especially high risk of vector borne diseases including malaria, as well as water-borne diseases including bacterial diarrhea. Maternal mortality is high in Uganda, and pregnancy is still the leading cause of death for young women ages 15 through 19.The picture shows Grace, a one and half years old child, affected by cerebral malaria, in severe conditions, in Luweero general hospital and her mother taking care of her. Malaria, is devastating many areas of Uganda, like the Luweero region and government is trying to provide every family with several mosquito nets, to avoid serious situations.

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Health in Uganda (35 of 49)
Luweero, Uganda
By Papillon
10 Feb 2013

Luweero, Uganda - March 10, 2013
Involvement in the promotion of better health is central in the development of Uganda as a better nation. This includes clean hospitals and health centers, schools, wells and effective community outreach programs in which people receive free medication, health services and mosquito nets. But even with the strong government efforts in reducing mortality rates, the situation is still serious and dangerous in some areas of Uganda. Children are at especially high risk of vector borne diseases including malaria, as well as water-borne diseases including bacterial diarrhea. Maternal mortality is high in Uganda, and pregnancy is still the leading cause of death for young women ages 15 through 19.The picture shows , a baby girl, affected by the guinea worm, in severe conditions, in Luweero general hospital. Guinea worm, is another serious pathology, in remote areas of Uganda.

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Health in Uganda (36 of 49)
Luweero, Uganda
By Papillon
10 Feb 2013

Luweero, Uganda - March 10, 2013
Involvement in the promotion of better health is central in the development of Uganda as a better nation. This includes clean hospitals and health centers, schools, wells and effective community outreach programs in which people receive free medication, health services and mosquito nets. But even with the strong government efforts in reducing mortality rates, the situation is still serious and dangerous in some areas of Uganda. Children are at especially high risk of vector borne diseases including malaria, as well as water-borne diseases including bacterial diarrhea. Maternal mortality is high in Uganda, and pregnancy is still the leading cause of death for young women ages 15 through 19.The picture shows Samir, a two years old child, affected by cerebral malaria, in severe conditions, in Luweero general hospital. Malaria, is devastating many areas of Uganda, like the Luweero region and government is trying to provide every family with several mosquito nets, to avoid serious situations.