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Ekas: bay of men 14
Ekas, Lombok, Indonesia
By Eleanor Moseman
05 Mar 2016

A man and the female family members harvest green peanuts, one of Lombok's crops, that are grown along the southern tip of Ekas.

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Ekas: bay of men 07
Ekas, Lombok, Indonesia
By Eleanor Moseman
02 Mar 2016

Salman, a fisherman and the best surfer in the village of Ekas, sands his fishing boat that has been freshly pained with Sasak designs. Other men of the village work on a boat and mend nets close to the shore of the bay.

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Ekas: bay of men 09
Ekas, Lombok, Indonesia
By Eleanor Moseman
02 Mar 2016

During the day, women take care of the children while tending to other household chores. This boy will surely grow up to be a fisherman, and perhaps a surfer, in the village of Ekas.

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Ekas: bay of men 17
Ekas, Lombok, Indonesia
By Eleanor Moseman
02 Mar 2016

Teens take some time out during the day to hang out, play music, or watch the sea from the shore. It's time to spend with friends or alone, as much time is spent fishing or surfing in the world famous waters of Indonesia.

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Ekas: bay of men 19
Ekas, Lombok, Indonesia
By Eleanor Moseman
02 Mar 2016

As night falls with Mount Rinjani in the distance, the village leader's son plays with the trash left behind the fisherman along the banks of Ekas bay. The village becomes very lively as everyone enjoys the sunset, the cool air, and the ending of another day of simple hard labor.

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Ekas: bay of men 02
Ekas, Lombok, Indonesia
By Eleanor Moseman
29 Feb 2016

Rumaji, a fisherman of the small village of Ekas, prepares his boat at sunrise to collect the fish from his nets. Mount Rinjani, Lombok's one active volcano, sits off into the distance.

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Ekas: bay of men 18
Ekas, Lombok, Indonesia
By Eleanor Moseman
29 Feb 2016

Rumaji, a local fisherman of Ekas, pulls his nets in after sunrise to find his daily catch that will feed his family for the days to come. This small remote fishing village still remains completely self-sufficient with little need for resources further close to cities.

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Ekas: bay of men 08
Ekas, Lombok, Indonesia
By Eleanor Moseman
28 Feb 2016

After a night of sailing and fishing, men bring their boats to the shore of Lombok's largest fish market, Tanjung Luar. After sunrise, primarily women, and some men, will wade to meet the boats then bring the fish into the market to be sold.

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Ekas: bay of men 01
Ekas, Lombok, Indonesia
By Eleanor Moseman
27 Feb 2016

Men rest on the beach during the early morning of the Bau Nyale festival, a traditional holiday that occurs once a year on Lombok Island. It's a Sasak holiday that occurs for two days, on the 10th month of the Sasak calendar, and people travel to the southern coast for the festivities.

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Ekas: bay of men 16
Ekas, Lombok, Indonesia
By Eleanor Moseman
27 Feb 2016

Left: Marine worms called "Nyale" come to certain beaches of southern Lombok to spawn once a year. The legend says that after Princess Mandalika jumped from the cliffs to save the island from war, her people searched the tidal flats below but only found nyale marine worms, which they believed were the magical infestation of her beautiful hair. Right: Ice is sold at the largest fish market on the island of Lombok to keep the fish fresh and able to transport across the island.

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Ekas: bay of men 20
Ekas, Lombok, Indonesia
By Eleanor Moseman
27 Feb 2016

As the first light of day rises over the village of Ekas, a family collects nyale, a sea worm that comes to the southern coast of Lombok once a year and is part of the activities of the most important holiday of Sasak culture.

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Ekas: bay of men 12
Ekas, Lombok, Indonesia
By Eleanor Moseman
26 Feb 2016

During the annual Sasak festival, Bau Nyale, men will perform peresean which is traditional stick fighting competition. This may represent the story how many kingdoms ago, Princess Mandalika had numerous suitors fighting for her hand in marriage. To prevent war and death on the beautiful and peaceful island of Lombok, she threw herself off the seaside cliffs to her death.

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Ekas: bay of men 04
Ekas, Lombok, Indonesia
By Eleanor Moseman
25 Feb 2016

Sahram uses traditional tools for building fishing boats to carve a "gamboose" on the shore immediately after choosing and cutting the tree to be used for the traditional instrument. It will take an approximate week to make this 7 stringed instrument that will use a varied weight fishing line for strings.

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Ekas: bay of men 05
Ekas, Lombok, Indonesia
By Eleanor Moseman
25 Feb 2016

Sitting on a traditional "bruga", to shade from the sun and allow the ocean breeze to cross, the loser at a game of dominos must wear a stone tied to his ear with fishing line.

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Ekas: bay of men 06
Ekas, Lombok, Indonesia
By Eleanor Moseman
25 Feb 2016

Boys of fisherman living in the small Indonesian village of Ekas, cool off from the intense heat and play with miniature boats that were built with the help of their fathers.

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Ekas: bay of men 11
Ekas, Lombok, Indonesia
By Eleanor Moseman
25 Feb 2016

A fisherman, his wife, and child pass to drop their fishing nets for the evening as Rumaji reuses a plastic bag to funnel petrol into the rudimentary internal combustion engine so the boat can return to the village of Ekas.

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Ekas: bay of men 15
Ekas, Lombok, Indonesia
By Eleanor Moseman
25 Feb 2016

About a kilometer into the bay of Ekas, there is a single fish farm where most of the fish are exported to China and islands settled further north of the Indian Ocean.

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Ekas: bay of men 03
Ekas, Lombok, Indonesia
By Eleanor Moseman
24 Feb 2016

Jamal, a fisherman of Ekas Bay, uses zip ties to attach a new bamboo beam to help the balance of this fishing boat. During the day, most men will be repairing boats or nets. His sandals have been clipped to allow for more stability and control.

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Ekas: bay of men 10
Ekas, Lombok, Indonesia
By Eleanor Moseman
24 Feb 2016

While laboring over parts to repair fishing boats, the men of Ekas find ways to keep spirits high with jokes and laughter among themselves.

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Ekas: bay of men 13
Ekas, Lombok, Indonesia
By Eleanor Moseman
24 Feb 2016

A young shepherd turns his attention away from his flock of sheep to watch a group of local surfers along the horizon of the crystal clear waters of the Indian Ocean.

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Bangladesh's Jamdani Sari
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
08 Jul 2015

In December 2013, the Intellectual Property Association of Bangladesh (IPAB) celebrated a major success as Bangladesh's Jamdani Sari weaving tradition, a labor-intensive and time-consuming form of hand loom weaving is recognized as Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization. Jamdani is the finest Muslin textile produced in Bangladesh's Dhaka District.

A sari is the traditional garment worn by women in the Indian subcontinent, made up of a long strip of unstitched cloth, ranging from five to nine yards in length, which can be draped in various styles. The most common style is for the sari to be wrapped around the waist with one end then draped over the shoulders with the other. The Jamdani Sari is among the oldest styles, at more than 5,000 years old! Some people think that the sari was influenced by Greek or Roman toga, which we see on ancient statues. However, there is no solid historical evidence to this effect.

The sari is essentially designed to suit local conditions in the subcontinent. There are at least six varieties of Bengal handlooms, each deriving its name from the village in which it originated, and each with its own distinctive style. Dhaka was especially renowed for saris of fine muslin, a tradtion that carries on today. Jamdani is basically a transformation of the world famous Dhakai Muslin. According to their variety, fineness and patterns the traditional Dhakai Muslins were divided into specific categories. Among them, Aab-E-Rouhan, Shabnam, Sarband and Jamdani muslin were the most famous. Over the years the first three of these have vanished from history.

The production, marketing and export of Jamdani has somehow maintained its continuity. Dhaka has a history of only four hundred years from 1610 A.D., but the history of the cotton clothes of the region reveals more ancient traditions. Although most of the history of Jamdani weaving os lost in the mists of antiquity, it's known that trade in the fabric was established at least 2,000 years ago.

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Jamdani Sari 01
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
07 Jul 2015

A Bangladeshi weaver designs a Jamdani Sari in the village of Rupganj Thana in the outskirts of Dhaka.

Jamdani is the finest Muslin textile produced in Bangladesh's Dhaka District. This time consuming and labor-intensive form of hand loom weaving has been declared intagible cultural world heritage by UNESCO.

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Jamdani Sari 02
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
07 Jul 2015

A Bangladeshi weaver designs a Jamdani Sari in the village of Rupganj Thana in the outskirts of Dhaka.

Jamdani is the finest Muslin textile produced in Bangladesh's Dhaka District. This time consuming and labor-intensive form of hand loom weaving has been declared intagible cultural world heritage by UNESCO.

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Jamdani Sari 03
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
07 Jul 2015

A Bangladeshi weaver designs a Jamdani Sari in the village of Rupganj Thana in the outskirts of Dhaka.

Jamdani is the finest Muslin textile produced in Bangladesh's Dhaka District. This time consuming and labor-intensive form of hand loom weaving has been declared intagible cultural world heritage by UNESCO.

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Jamdani Sari 04
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
07 Jul 2015

A Bangladeshi weaver designs a Jamdani Sari in the village of Rupganj Thana in the outskirts of Dhaka.

Jamdani is the finest Muslin textile produced in Bangladesh's Dhaka District. This time consuming and labor-intensive form of hand loom weaving has been declared intagible cultural world heritage by UNESCO.

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Jamdani Sari 05
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
07 Jul 2015

Portrait of a Bangladeshi weaver of Jamdani Saris in the village of Rupganj Thana in the outskirts of Dhaka.

Jamdani is the finest Muslin textile produced in Bangladesh's Dhaka District. This time consuming and labor-intensive form of hand loom weaving has been declared intagible cultural world heritage by UNESCO.

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Jamdani Sari 06
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
07 Jul 2015

A Bangladeshi weaver designs a Jamdani Sari in the village of Rupganj Thana in the outskirts of Dhaka.

Jamdani is the finest Muslin textile produced in Bangladesh's Dhaka District. This time consuming and labor-intensive form of hand loom weaving has been declared intagible cultural world heritage by UNESCO.

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Jamdani Sari 07
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
07 Jul 2015

Portrait of a Bangladeshi weaver of Jamdani Saris in the village of Rupganj Thana in the outskirts of Dhaka.

Jamdani is the finest Muslin textile produced in Bangladesh's Dhaka District. This time consuming and labor-intensive form of hand loom weaving has been declared intagible cultural world heritage by UNESCO.

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Jamdani Sari 08
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
07 Jul 2015

A Bangladeshi weaver designs a Jamdani Sari in the village of Rupganj Thana in the outskirts of Dhaka.

Jamdani is the finest Muslin textile produced in Bangladesh's Dhaka District. This time consuming and labor-intensive form of hand loom weaving has been declared intagible cultural world heritage by UNESCO.

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Jamdani Sari 09
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
07 Jul 2015

A whole saller of Jamdani Saris shows a piece from his collection in the village of Rupganj Thana in the outskirts of Dhaka.

Jamdani is the finest Muslin textile produced in Bangladesh's Dhaka District. This time consuming and labor-intensive form of hand loom weaving has been declared intagible cultural world heritage by UNESCO.

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Jamdani Sari 10
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
07 Jul 2015

Jamdani Saris are made from the finest Muslin textile produced in Bangladesh's Dhaka District. This time consuming and labor-intensive form of hand loom weaving has been declared intagible cultural world heritage by UNESCO.

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Jamdani Sari 11
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
07 Jul 2015

A whole saller of Jamdani Saris shows a piece from his collection in the village of Rupganj Thana in the outskirts of Dhaka.

Jamdani is the finest Muslin textile produced in Bangladesh's Dhaka District. This time consuming and labor-intensive form of hand loom weaving has been declared intagible cultural world heritage by UNESCO.

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Jamdani Sari 12
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
07 Jul 2015

A Bangladeshi weaver designs a Jamdani Sari in the village of Rupganj Thana in the outskirts of Dhaka.

Jamdani is the finest Muslin textile produced in Bangladesh's Dhaka District. This time consuming and labor-intensive form of hand loom weaving has been declared intagible cultural world heritage by UNESCO.

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Jamdani Sari 13
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
07 Jul 2015

A Bangladeshi weaver designs a Jamdani Sari in the village of Rupganj Thana in the outskirts of Dhaka.

Jamdani is the finest Muslin textile produced in Bangladesh's Dhaka District. This time consuming and labor-intensive form of hand loom weaving has been declared intagible cultural world heritage by UNESCO.

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Jamdani Sari 17
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
07 Jul 2015

A Bangladeshi weaver designs a Jamdani Sari in the village of Rupganj Thana in the outskirts of Dhaka.

Jamdani is the finest Muslin textile produced in Bangladesh's Dhaka District. This time consuming and labor-intensive form of hand loom weaving has been declared intagible cultural world heritage by UNESCO.

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Jamdani Sari 18
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
07 Jul 2015

A Bangladeshi weaver designs a Jamdani Sari in the village of Rupganj Thana in the outskirts of Dhaka.

Jamdani is the finest Muslin textile produced in Bangladesh's Dhaka District. This time consuming and labor-intensive form of hand loom weaving has been declared intagible cultural world heritage by UNESCO.

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Jamdani Sari 19
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
07 Jul 2015

A Bangladeshi weaver designs a Jamdani Sari in the village of Rupganj Thana in the outskirts of Dhaka.

Jamdani is the finest Muslin textile produced in Bangladesh's Dhaka District. This time consuming and labor-intensive form of hand loom weaving has been declared intagible cultural world heritage by UNESCO.

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Jamdani Sari 20
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
07 Jul 2015

A Bangladeshi weaver designs a Jamdani Sari in the village of Rupganj Thana in the outskirts of Dhaka.

Jamdani is the finest Muslin textile produced in Bangladesh's Dhaka District. This time consuming and labor-intensive form of hand loom weaving has been declared intagible cultural world heritage by UNESCO.

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Jamdani Sari 21
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
07 Jul 2015

A Bangladeshi weaver designs a Jamdani Sari in the village of Rupganj Thana in the outskirts of Dhaka.

Jamdani is the finest Muslin textile produced in Bangladesh's Dhaka District. This time consuming and labor-intensive form of hand loom weaving has been declared intagible cultural world heritage by UNESCO.

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Jamdani Sari 23
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
07 Jul 2015

A Bangladeshi weaver designs a Jamdani Sari in the village of Rupganj Thana in the outskirts of Dhaka.

Jamdani is the finest Muslin textile produced in Bangladesh's Dhaka District. This time consuming and labor-intensive form of hand loom weaving has been declared intagible cultural world heritage by UNESCO.