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Asylum Seekers in Spain 18
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
20 May 2015

Yaya Ouahara (center) attends a workshop at the office of the Catalan Commission for Refugee Aid (CCAR) in Barcelona, with two other migrants and two CCAR staff members.
Yaya, 36 years old from Ivory Coast, arrived to Spain in 2009 by a small boat and after three years traveling through Africa. Yaya fled the civil war in his country and he recently got residence permit to stay in Spain permanently.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 19
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
20 May 2015

Yaya Ouahara (left) attends a workshop at the office of the Catalan Commission for Refugee Aid (CCAR) in Barcelona, with two other migrants and two CCAR staff members.
Yaya, 36, from Ivory Coast, arrived in Spain in 2009 by a small boat and after three years traveling through Africa. Yaya fled the civil war in his country and he recently got residence permit to stay in Spain permanently.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 12
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
22 Apr 2015

'Fodoy', from Gambia, attends practicals lessons of sewing by the owner (left) of a workshop in Barcelona, Spain. He has experience as a tailor back in his country and he wants to develop his skills. 'Fodoy' is a nickname for this migrant from Gambia, who arrived to Barcelona in 2007 without residence permit. He fled the country due to political prosecution and departed in a boat to Canary Islands. Then, the Spanish authorities reallocated him to Valencia and then to Barcelona. His asylum request has been blocked until 2017 due to having been condemned for drugs dealing. Until then, he is struggling to find accommodation and to have income to survive, although organizations such as CCAR assist him from time to time.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 13
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
22 Apr 2015

'Fodoy', from Gambia, attends practicals lessons of sewing in a workshop in Barcelona, Spain. He has experience as a tailor back in his country and he wants to develop his skills. 'Fodoy' is a nickname for this migrant from Gambia, who arrived to Barcelona in 2007 without residence permit. He fled the country due to political prosecution and departed in a boat to Canary Islands. Then, the Spanish authorities reallocated him to Valencia and then to Barcelona. His asylum request has been blocked until 2017 due to having been condemned for drugs dealing. Until then, he is struggling to find accommodation and to have income to survive, although organizations such as CCAR assist him from time to time.

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This Is How ISIS Refines Oil in Mosul
Mosul, Iraq
By omariq
27 Mar 2015

March 2015
Mosul, Iraq

On the roads around Mosul, Iraq's second largest city and taken by ISIS in June 2014, it is not uncommon to see roadside oil transactions.

In between ISIS billboards, civilians pull up to oil tankers parked on the side of the road to buy gas, petrol, and diesel to meet their daily needs.

Secret footage filmed in a town south of Mosul city shows a makeshift oil refinery, one of more than 2,000 similar installations, according to local sources. A Transterra Media contributor describes the refining process that takes place at the site, which was vacant at the time of filming.

Crude oil is brought to such refineries from wells in the provinces of Salahuddine and Mosul. Refined oil products are then sold in neighboring villages through distributors licensed by ISIS.

ISIS has divided Mosul province into three administrative districts: Wilayat (or province of) Mosul, which includes Mosul city and the Nineveh plain; Wilayat Dijla, south of Mosul city; and Wilayat al-Jazeera, west of Mosul city. The militant group considers Mosul the capital of its self-proclaimed state.

According to locals, ISIS controls the entire oil trade in the area. No one can sell oil without its permission.

The contributor's identity and the name of the town have been withheld at the contributor's request.

Shot List:

Traveling of road sign that reads: "The Islamic State. Wilayat [province] of Dijla." NOTE: The name of the town was blurred for security reasons.
Traveling of road sign that reads: "The Islamic State. Wilayat Dijla
Traveling of mobile oil tanker parked on roadside selling fuel to passersby
Various of makeshift oil refinery with voice over

Voice Over (Arabic)
00:38 – 02:17

“This is an oil refinery in Mosul. Crude oil is poured into these barrels. The barrels are then emptied into this tank, under which fire is started. When temperature rises, crude oil evaporates. Steam comes out of these tubes, which pass through water in order for steam to condense and become liquid.
Liquid comes out here. First, gasoline is collected. Afterwards, white oil [kerosene] comes out of the pipes, followed by gas oil [fuel oil].
Lighter substances come out first, followed by denser ones. These substances are then sold on the market.”

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Workshop between Lebanese and Palesti...
Beirut
By wissam fanash
10 Jul 2014

Workshop encourages dialogue, cooperation between Lebanese and Palestinian youth

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Eyes Wide Shut Masks
Venice, Italy
By Filippo Biagianti
23 May 2014

Rialto, Venice. In a short but remarkable workshop, in 1985 Franco Cecamore has created two original masks for the Venice Carnival. Twelve years later, a man with white coloured men's clothing, came to that shop: the man was Jan Harlan, executive producer of one of the last movies directed by Stanley Kubrick. He visited "Il Canovaccio" in order to buy several masks. One of them would be used by Kubrick in his last masterpiece "Eyes Wide Shut" for the character of Dr. Bill Harford, played by Tom Cruise. This documentary is the incredible and unknown story behind the creation of the most important masks of "Eyes Wide Shut." The artisans of this typical Italian product say that the origin of the art makes it a unique product. Original documents, photographs and the description of the meeting with the Kubrick's production make this the story we tell in our film.

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Pottery Workshop In Gaza (4 of 35)
Gaza
By AhmedDeeb
13 Jun 2013

Four-year old Qosi Attalla is the youngest child in the factory who knows how to make traditional pottery. This pottery factory in Gaza has been a source of income and pride for the Attallah family for generations. Gaza Strip, June, 2013.

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Pottery Workshop In Gaza (6 of 35)
Gaza
By AhmedDeeb
13 Jun 2013

Mustafa, 35, and his son Mahmud, 10, work together to repair the broken pottery. This pottery factory in Gaza has been a source of income and pride for the Attallah family for generations. Gaza Strip, June, 2013.

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Pottery Workshop In Gaza (16 of 35)
Gaza
By AhmedDeeb
13 Jun 2013

The pottery factory resides right under the Attallah home, a part of their daily life. It has been a source of income and pride for the Attallah family for generations. Gaza Strip, June, 2013.

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Pottery Workshop In Gaza (7 of 12)
Gaza
By AhmedDeeb
13 Jun 2013

Omar Atallah, 51, produces pottery, vases, bottles and receptacles from mud in this factory. It has been a source of income and pride for the Attallah family for generations. Gaza Strip, June, 2013.

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Pottery Workshop In Gaza (12 of 12)
Gaza
By AhmedDeeb
13 Jun 2013

Ahmed Attallah, 14, carrying crockery that was produced by his grandfather at their workshop in Gaza city. This factory has been a source of income and pride for the Attallah family for generations. Gaza Strip, June, 2013.

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Pottery Workshop In Gaza (13 of 35)
Gaza
By AhmedDeeb
13 Jun 2013

Ahmed Attallah, 14, left school when he was 13 to work in the factory alongside his father and grandfather. This pottery factory in Gaza has been a source of income and pride for the Attallah family for generations. Gaza Strip, June, 2013.

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Pottery Workshop In Gaza (11 of 35)
Gaza
By AhmedDeeb
13 Jun 2013

Mustafa Atallah, 35, doesn't study at school because he has a job in the family's humble factory performing numerous tasks. He repairs broken pottery and also makes new ones. Gaza Strip, June, 2013.

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Pottery Workshop In Gaza (11 of 12)
Gaza
By AhmedDeeb
13 Jun 2013

Hassan Atallah, 32, puts wood shavings into the mud kiln to use it to produce the pottery. Gaza Strip, June, 2013.

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Pottery Workshop In Gaza (9 of 35)
Gaza
By AhmedDeeb
13 Jun 2013

Hassan works beside the kiln while fresh pots are being created. Gaza Strip, June, 2013.

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Pottery Workshop In Gaza (6 of 12)
Gaza
By AhmedDeeb
13 Jun 2013

Hassan Atallah, 32,works beside the kiln while fresh pots are being created. Gaza Strip, June, 2013.

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Pottery Workshop In Gaza (7 of 35)
Gaza
By AhmedDeeb
13 Jun 2013

Hassan Atallah, 32, works beside the kiln while fresh pots are being created. Gaza Strip, June, 2013.

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Pottery Workshop In Gaza (2 of 35)
Gaza
By AhmedDeeb
13 Jun 2013

Four-year old Qosi Attalla is the youngest child in the factory who knows how to make traditional pottery. This pottery factory in Gaza has been a source of income and pride for the Attallah family for generations. Gaza Strip, June, 2013.

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Pottery Workshop In Gaza (1 of 35)
Gaza
By AhmedDeeb
11 Jun 2013

Hassan Atallah, 32 years old, puts wood shavings into mud kiln to melt the mud by the fire. This pottery factory in Gaza has been a source of income and pride for the Attallah family for generations. Gaza Strip, June, 2013.

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The Oldest Pottery Workshop In Gaza o...
Gaza
By U.S. Editor
11 Jun 2013

This pottery factory in Gaza has been a source of income and pride for the Attallah family for generations. The tradition of pottery making in Gaza dates back centuries and has been a source of income and family pride. This ceramic factory rest underneath the Attallah family's home. The Attallahs consider the pottery industry a part of their identity and heritage. They are one of the oldest families producing pottery in Gaza. Their factory was established over 60 years ago and are now struggling to maintain not only their business but an ancestral tradition. The security situation in Gaza and the Israeli blockade has made their business unprofitable and on the brink of vanishing.

To Read Full Article Go To : http://transterramedia.com/media/19049

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Pottery Workshop In Gaza City (28 of 35)
Gaza City
By AhmedDeeb
06 Jun 2013

A boy carries crockery at a pottery workshop in Gaza city which has been a source of income and pride for the Attallah family for generations. Gaza Strip, June, 2013.

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Pottery Workshop In Gaza City (32 of 35)
Gaza City
By AhmedDeeb
06 Jun 2013

A young boy carries crockery at a pottery workshop in Gaza city which has been a source of income and pride for the Attallah family for generations. Gaza Strip, June, 2013.

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Pottery Workshop In Gaza City (30 of 35)
Gaza City
By AhmedDeeb
06 Jun 2013

A boy carries crockery at a pottery workshop in Gaza city which has been a source of income and pride for the Attallah family for generations. Gaza Strip, June, 2013.

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Pottery Workshop In Gaza City (5 of 12)
Gaza City
By AhmedDeeb
06 Jun 2013

A boy carries crockery at a pottery workshop in Gaza which has been a source of income and pride for the Attallah family for generations. Gaza Strip, June, 2013.

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Pottery Workshop In Gaza City (10 of 12)
Gaza City
By AhmedDeeb
06 Jun 2013

A Palestinian man shaping a simple clay pot in a pottery factory which has been a source of income and pride for the Attallah family for generations. Gaza Strip, June, 2013.

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Pottery Workshop In Gaza City (3 of 12)
Gaza City
By AhmedDeeb
06 Jun 2013

A boy loads clay pots into storage rooms in a pottery factory, which has been a source of income and pride for the Attallah family for generations. Gaza Strip, June, 2013.

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Pottery Workshop In Gaza City (8 of 12)
Gaza City
By AhmedDeeb
06 Jun 2013

A Palestinian boy assembles rows of clay pots in a pottery factory, which has been a source of income and pride for the Attallah family for generations. Gaza Strip, June, 2013.

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Pottery Workshop In Gaza City (2 of 12)
Gaza City
By AhmedDeeb
06 Jun 2013

A young boy carries a heavy vase in a pottery factory in Gaza, which has been a source of income and pride for the Attallah family for generations. Gaza Strip, June, 2013.

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Pottery Workshop In Gaza City (20 of 35)
Gaza City
By AhmedDeeb
06 Jun 2013

A boy carries crockery at this pottery factory in Gaza, which has been a source of income and pride for the Attallah family for generations. Gaza Strip, June, 2013.

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Pottery Workshop In Gaza City (35 of 35)
Gaza City
By AhmedDeeb
06 Jun 2013

A Palestinian worker makes a pot made out of kneaded mud in one of the largest pottery workshops in Gaza. It has been a source of income and pride for the Attallah family for generations. Gaza Strip, June, 2013.

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The Ancient Craft of Pottery in the G...
Gaza City
By Transterra Editor
06 Jun 2013

Jun 2013 12:00 This pottery factory in Gaza has been a source of income and pride for the Attallah family for generations. The tradition of pottery making in Gaza dates back centuries and has been a source of income and family pride. This ceramic factory rest underneath the Attallah family's home. The Attallahs consider the pottery industry a part of their identity and heritage. They are one of the oldest families producing pottery in Gaza. Their factory was established over 60 years ago and are now struggling to maintain not only their business but an ancestral tradition. The security situation in Gaza and the Israeli blockade has made their business unprofitable and on the brink of vanishing.

To Read Full Article Go To : http://transterramedia.com/media/19049
View More Photos Here: http://transterramedia.com/collections/1175

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Leper Community in Addis Ababa
Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
By U.S. Editor
28 Jan 2013

Leprosy has been identified as a major health problem in Ethiopia since the 1950's, when the effort to control leprosy began by the establishment of a National leprosy office in the Ministry of Health with the support of German Leprosy Relief Association (GLRA). There are three main regions where Leprosy is still endemic, that is Oromiya, Amhara and SNNPRG in the Central and South Eastern highlands.
Following the introduction of MDT and the consequent reduction in the duration of treatment, there resulted a constant and steady decline in the prevalence of leprosy. Due to the reduction in number of patients registered, which has also reduced the workload of leprosy services, they have integrated the leprosy program within the general health services. The integration services covers a wider geographical area and is closer to the community. This integration is believed to reduce the stigma associated with leprosy and they think may have an impact on the epidemiology.
Today however lepers are rarely included in society. In Northern Addis Ababa, the capital of Ethiopia, thousands of lepers lives in poverty with their families, excluded from Ethiopian society. Their plight is nothing new in this poor East African country. Since the 19th century Western travelers or scientists have described the harsh living conditions of these outcast carrying, as thought back then, a very contagious sickness. About three thousand live in this northern slum, trying to survive by begging on the streets of the capital, or near the only church of the area. Such a woman, Kelbe Adamu, 60 years old, left her small village hoping to find better understanding of her countrymen in the capital. She was quickly disappointed, as her life did not improve. However with time she was able to find a small job sewing traditional Ethiopian clothes and bed sheets with other women lepers, making a small living, enough to feed herself and her grandchildren born in the slum.

But not all is bleak. A group of women with leprosy have gotten together to fight their condition. They created a small business where a dozen or so of these women knit and put together traditional garments and bed sheets. Using their bare hands and ancients machinery, these women have managed to organize a small business where they can earn a small salary from their sales. Kelebe, 60 years old, is one of these women. She arrived in the slum from the Northern part of the country to start over and perhaps find a better life after her husband died. She brought with her, her children, cousins, and other relatives, to increase their chances of survival. Once there, she was quickly reminded that her condition would not make things life easy for her and her family. She managed to find a shack made out of mud with metal roofing, and dirt floors. She, however did not give up, and joined these businesswomen. The fruit of her work has helped her to feed herself as well as her family members. In fact it has allowed her to prosper, buy new close and give some schooling to the youngest in her family.
With an ongoing fix price of 50$ for the most expensive bedding, the little company has been able to sustain itself for a few years now, feeding a dozen family. However this small grouping seem to be the exception to the rule. Most lepers in the slum keep starving; their offspring have no more future than their parents did before them, and the government seems uninterested in helping this portion of the population.

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Leper Community In Addis Ababa (13 of...
Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
12 Jul 2007

Kelebe Adamu (R) is helping to feed a young daughter (C) of one of the women working at the workshop in the lepers slum of Northern Addis Ababa, July 11 2007 in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Young kids, too young to watch after themselves stay with their parents inside the workshop.

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Leper Community In Addis Ababa (11 of...
Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
11 Jul 2007

Kelebe Adamu is preparing herself before knitting at the women's workshop inside the Lepers slum in Northern Addis Ababa on July 11 2007 in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. About 25 women work at this workshop, knitting, accounting, feeding clients, trying to make a living as a small community.

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Leper Community In Addis Ababa (12 of...
Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
11 Jul 2007

A leper woman, working at the workshop, is using a roller to help her knit cotton for the making of traditional Ethiopian covers in the Northern Lepers slum of Addis Ababa July 11 2007 in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. This is the second step of the process, which makes ready the cotton for use.

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Leper Community In Addis Ababa (14 of...
Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
09 Jul 2007

The president of the workshop organization is keeping track of his sales from his office inside the lepers slum of Addis Ababa July 9 2007 in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Like all the workers at the workshop, he is a leper, with major disabilities in his hands and legs.

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Leper Community In Addis Ababa (15 of...
Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
08 Jul 2007

The second in charge (C), a woman with leprosy is watching for any inperfection in her worker's labor inside the workshop building inside the lepers slum of Northern Addis Ababa July 8 2007 in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Each piece made is reviewed by her and some help before it can be sold on the markets or to foreigners.