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Refugees Cross Greek-Macedonian Borde...
Idomeni, Greece
By Kostis Ntantamis
24 Aug 2015

Portrait of an old man among the refugees as he waits to cross the border from Greece to Macedonia. Idomeni, August 24, 2015.

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Refugees Cross Greek-Macedonian Borde...
Idomeni, Greece
By Kostis Ntantamis
24 Aug 2015

Refugees walk among the fields towards the Greek-Macedonian border. Idomeni, August 24, 2015.

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Refugees Cross Greek-Macedonian Borde...
Idomeni, Greece
By Kostis Ntantamis
24 Aug 2015

A small child cries because of the tension as refugees wait to cross the Greek-Macedonian border. Idomeni, August 24, 2015.

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Refugees Cross Greek-Macedonian Borde...
Idomeni, Greece
By Kostis Ntantamis
24 Aug 2015

Refugees wait to cross the Greek-Macedonian border. Idomeni, August 24, 2015.

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Refugees Cross Greek-Macedonian Borde...
Idomeni, Greece
By Kostis Ntantamis
24 Aug 2015

Refugees among the fields walk towards the Greek-Macedonian border. Idomeni, August 24, 2015.

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Refugees Cross Greek-Macedonian Borde...
Idomeni, Greece
By Kostis Ntantamis
24 Aug 2015

A small child on her mother's arms among a group of refugees waiting for the permission from the Macedonian border police to cross the Greek-Macedonian border. Idomeni, August 24, 2015.

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Refugees Cross Greek-Macedonian Borde...
Idomeni, Greece
By Kostis Ntantamis
24 Aug 2015

A small child on his father's arms and the Macedonian border police on the Greek-Macedonian border. Idomeni, August 24, 2015.

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Refugees Cross Greek-Macedonian Borde...
Idomeni, Greece
By Kostis Ntantamis
24 Aug 2015

A small tension between refugees waiting to cross the Greek-Macedonian border and the Macedonian border police. Idomeni, August 24, 2015.

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Refugees Cross Greek-Macedonian Borde...
Idomeni, Greece
By Kostis Ntantamis
24 Aug 2015

Refugees sit down on the train tracks as they wait to cross the Greek-Macedonian border. Idomeni, August 24, 2015.

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Refugees Cross the Greek-Macedonian B...
Idomeni, Greece
By Kostis Ntantamis
23 Aug 2015

Refugees cross the border from Greece to Macedonia to board on trains that will take them to the Macedonian-Serbian border.

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Refugees Cross Greek-Macedonian Borde...
Idomeni, Greece
By Kostis Ntantamis
23 Aug 2015

Refugees wait to be transported by train to the Macedonian-Serbian border while the Macedonian border police is guarding them. Gevgelija, August 23, 2015.

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Refugees Cross Greek-Macedonian Borde...
Idomeni, Greece
By Kostis Ntantamis
23 Aug 2015

Refugees, among the children, are waiting in the line to board on the train that will take them to the Macedonian-Serbian border. Gevgelija, August 23, 2015.

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Refugees Cross Greek-Macedonian Borde...
Idomeni, Greece
By Kostis Ntantamis
23 Aug 2015

Refugees are crossing the Greek-Macedonian. Gevgelija, August 23, 2015.

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Refugees Cross Greek-Macedonian Borde...
Idomeni, Greece
By Kostis Ntantamis
23 Aug 2015

Refugees, among the children, are waiting in the line to board on the train that will take them to the Macedonian-Serbian border. Gevgelija, August 23, 2015.

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Refugees Cross Greek-Macedonian Borde...
Idomeni, Greece
By Kostis Ntantamis
23 Aug 2015

Refugees, among the children, are waiting in the line to board on the train that will take them to the Macedonian-Serbian border. Gevgelija, August 23, 2015.

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Refugees Cross Greek-Macedonian Borde...
Idomeni, Greece
By Kostis Ntantamis
23 Aug 2015

Refugees, among the children, in the train that will take them to the Macedonian-Serbian border. Gevgelija, August 23, 2015.

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Refugees Cross Greek-Macedonian Borde...
Idomeni, Greece
By Kostis Ntantamis
23 Aug 2015

A refugee child carries his luggage as he walks on the train tracks to the Gevgelija bus station. Gevgelija, August 23, 2015.

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Refugees Cross Greek-Macedonian Borde...
Idomeni, Greece
By Kostis Ntantamis
23 Aug 2015

Refugees are crossing the Greek-Macedonian. Gevgelija, August 23, 2015.

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Refugees Cross Greek-Macedonian Borde...
Idomeni, Greece
By Kostis Ntantamis
23 Aug 2015

Refugees wait in the line to cross from the Greek side of the border to the Macedonian. Idomeni, August 23, 2015.

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Refugees Cross Greek-Macedonian Borde...
Idomeni, Greece
By Kostis Ntantamis
23 Aug 2015

A refugee crosses the Greek-Macedonian border. Idomeni, August 23, 2015.

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Refugees Cross Greek-Macedonian Borde...
Idomeni, Greece
By Kostis Ntantamis
23 Aug 2015

Refugees cross the Greek-Macedonian border from Idomeni to Gevgelija on August 23, 2015.

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Refugees Cross Greek-Macedonian Borde...
Idomeni, Greece
By Kostis Ntantamis
23 Aug 2015

Refugees cross the Greek-Macedonian border from Idomeni to Gevgelija on August 23, 2015

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Refugees Cross Greek-Macedonian Borde...
Idomeni, Greece
By Kostis Ntantamis
23 Aug 2015

Refugees after crossing the Greek-Macedonian border walk towards the train that will take them to the Macedonian-Serbian border. Gevgelija, August 23, 2015.

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Refugees Cross Greek-Macedonian Borde...
Idomeni, Greece
By Kostis Ntantamis
23 Aug 2015

Portrait of a refugee child waiting for the train that will take him to the Macedonian-Serbian border. Gevgelija, August 23, 2015.

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Refugees Cross Greek-Macedonian Borde...
Idomeni, Greece
By Kostis Ntantamis
23 Aug 2015

A refugee child waiting for the train that will take him to the Macedonian-Serbian border. Gevgelija, August 23, 2015.

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Yezidis Demand Return of Loved Ones H...
Dohuk
By rsoufi
15 Apr 2015

Kurdish Yezidi refugees in the Sharya camp near Dohuk in Iraqi Kurdistan took part in protest against the continued detention of their community members by ISIS. The protest was part of a campaign launched by the Yezidi Lalesh Cultural Center and other organizations. These protests coincided with the Yezidi New Year, also known as "Holy Wednesday", which is celebrated on the first Wednesday of April. Thousands of colored balloons carrying written heart-felt messages were released during the sit-in. The refugees wrote “My wish is to celebrate the holiday with my mother,” and “Our holiday is your return” among other slogans.

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Norwegian Father and Son Fight ISIS w...
Unnamed Road, Karbala 56001, Iraq
By mushtaq mohammed
02 Feb 2015

Norwegian father and sons fight ISIS together in Shiite militia in Iraq

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Norwegian Father and Son Fight ISIS T...
Karbala
By mushtaq mohammed
29 Jan 2015

January 29, 2015
Karbala, Iraq

Former Iraqi army Commander Abass al-Assadi fled to Norway and became a citizen in 1991 following the popular revolution against Saddam Hussein. In 2013 he returned to Syria with his daughter and two sons, to fight with the Assad regime and “protect Shiite shrines.”His daughter was killed in an artillery strike.
After the call to jihad by the Shiite spiritual leader Ali al-Sistani in 2014, Abass returned with his family to Iraq to fight ISIS. His sons began training with the Shiite militia. The video shows one of them, 14 year-old Hussein, with his father in a training camp in western Karbala. Abass and other Iranian and Iraqi Shiite officers are teaching Iraqi volunteers urban warfare and combat drills. Hussein calls all young European Shiite Muslims to join the fight against the "Islamic State".

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Abbas al-Assadi
01:58 – 03:45
I was part of the opposition against Saddam Hussein. I participated in the 1991 uprising. After that, I moved to Saudi Arabia and from there to Norway. I obtained the Norwegian citizenship, and I came here after I heard the call of the marjaeia [Ayatollah Ali Sistani] to participate in jihad and obtain material benefit… no, sorry I meant gains in the afterword. This will grant us honor in life and after death and strengthen our sense of jihad. God willing, we shall all be soldiers who serve the marjaeia and the Iraqi people.
Q: As you know, the European Union has imposed sanctions on Europeans of foreign origins who conspire with ISIS. Do you not fear that this measure will also affect the members of the Popular Crowd [Shiite militia loyal to Ayatollah Ali Sistani]?

No, the Popular Crowd has nothing to do with Europe. I am fulfilling the call of the marjaeia, which represents me. European countries would be happy that I am fighting against ISIS. If they have an agreement with ISIS, that would be something else. We came to fulfil the call of the marjaeia and exterminate ISIS members wherever they were in Iraq. I am not concerned with any sanctions.
My children and I have Iraqi citizenship and I am not ashamed of being Iraqi. I am originally Iraqi and I shall remain Iraqi.
Q: What is your name?
Abbas al-Assad; Abu Ali.
Q: Abbas, you have brought your son from Norway.
He would gain experience and learn in the future… Q: Are you not scared for his safety?
I am not scared for his, mine or my family’s safety… All of Iraq is in the same situation. I am not worried about individuals. Everybody, including my family, would be sacrificed for the sake of the Marjaia [spiritual leader] and the honorable Iraqi people.

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Boy) Hussein Abbas al-Assadi, Child soldier
03:47
Q: What is your name, dear?
Hussein Abbas.
Q: Why are you here?
I am practicing jihad.
Q: what do you think about Norway and Iraq?
They are nice, but Iraq is better.
Q: Are you not afraid of ISIS?
No.
Father: We have just come here after finishing a battle. It was fulfilment of the marjaeia’s call. I have two other children. My daughter was martyred in Syria, when ISIS bombarded the town of Nubbul.
Q (addressed to boy): Are you willing to take part in a battle?
Boy: Yes.
Q: Why?
Boy: I want to fulfill the call of the Marjaia [spiritual leader].
[Unseen man]: …and to protect the Iraqi people. Boy: and to protect the Iraqi people.
Q: Are you not scared of death?
Boy: No.
Q: You are Norwegian and had a comfortable life [in Norway], where there is a good economy and safety. You came to Iraq, where there are plenty of ISIS members. Are you not scared of this?
Boy: No. Q: Why?
Boy: I am fulfilling the call of the Marjaia [spiritual leader].
[Unseen man]: … and you have resolution. Boy: … I have courage.
Q: What would you say to your friends in Europe? How did you find the situation? Is there safety? Terrorism? Were you afraid? How did people welcome you?
(Boy smiles and remains quiet) Q: Talk to me…
Father: Tell him, my son, that we are here among our family and people, and the Iraqi people are all our family.
Q: Do not pay attention to the camera. Talk to me.
Boy: It was better that we came here to be our people. The Iraqi people are our family.
Q:Do you advise others in Europe to come and fight against ISIS?
Boy: They should fight against ISIS and defend the holy shrines and protect their people.
Q: Did you quit school?
Boy: Yes.
Q: What is your name?
Boy: Hussein Abbas Assadi.

06:08 – 06:39
Boy: I want to fulfill the call of the Marjaia [spiritual leader] and protect the holy shrines.
Q: You seem so young. Why did you come here?
Boy: I came with my father.
Q: Are you not afraid of ISIS?
Boy: No, I am not.
Q: Have you taken part in battles?
Boy: Yes, in Jaruf al-Sakhr and Fadlia and Buhairat.
Q: You went there?
Boy: Yes, I did.
Q: What do you think about the fighting?
(Boy smiles) Q: What do you say to young men of your age in Europe?
Boy: They should come to fight against ISIS.

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man), Abu Khaled, officer in Popular Crowd
06:58 – 07:14
Today, he will head to the firing practice field to train using live ammunition. This is in preparation for a future duty, the liberation of the remaining occupied areas of Salahuddine.

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Abu Jaafar, Shiite cleric
07:26 – 08:02
These young mujahidin they came to fulfill the call of the Marjaia [spiritual leader] led by ayatollah Sayyed Ali Sistani. God willing, the students of the hawza (institute for cleric formation) shall be with them on the battle fronts. We will be at the barricades before them. We will support their religious morale. We also give them religious lessons.

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My Son's Birth, Through my Lens
Phnom Penh, Cambodia
By George Nickels
27 Dec 2014

If you’re a man in Cambodia, being present at the birth of your child is widely frowned upon. As both the prospective father and a camera-wielding photo-journalist, attending and documenting the birth of my son was a challenge, to say the least.

At 8pm on 26 December 2014, my partner of nearly nine years alerted me that her water had broken. She started to have her first contractions, but we were advised to stay home, get some food and rest, and wait it out until the morning.

By 7am and after a sleepless night, the intensity of Madeline’s contractions reached a peak every ten minutes; it was time to leave. Descending seven flights of stairs from our apartment in Phnom Penh, we hailed a remork (tuk tuk) to take us across the city on a journey that would change our lives forever. As is common in the capital city, the driver said he knew where to go, (which meant no, I don’t, please tell me), so with the limited Khmer that I knew, and ten minutes trying to explain where the clinic was, we came to an agreement and departed.

For twenty minutes, in a rickety wooden carriage towed by a 125cc motorcycle, on substandard roads, we careered through early morning city traffic on with Madeline panting heavily all the way to the clinic. On arrival, Doctors and midwives monitored the baby’s heartbeat, and then lead us to the room that we had pre booked, ready for Madeline to start the first stages of labour.

For the next four hours, the intensity in the room increased tenfold; I watched as the midwives coached Madeline with every technique in the book to ease her pain and mental state. Encouraging deep breathing and keeping her calm was part of my support role .When the staff decided she was ready, my partner told me to grab my camera. She was screaming as they wheeled her upstairs to the delivery room, and I realized I was about to begin documenting the birth of my son.

From a photographer’s point of view, taking photographs of my woman giving birth was not easy. She was in a lot of discomfort and pain, so trying document this, whilst retaining her dignity, was both mentally and physically draining.

There were other factors I had to take into consideration. Room to move was at a premium; I was in a small delivery room with six medical staff and a pregnant woman, so gaining the trust of the midwives and doctors was essential. Lighting conditions were very harsh, and Madeline was constantly moving from one chair to another, from standing to sitting, and from crouching and crawling positions.

The majority of the time I was supporting my partner and wishing for a safe and problem free delivery, and she says she can only recall one moment of me taking photographs from the entire labour. Madeline was having very heavy contractions whilst kneeling on the floor on her hands and knees. My natural instinct as a photographer kicked in, and as I lay on my back in front of her, pointing the camera at her pain stricken face, I composed the frame and took the photograph. This was the only point in the delivery when my partner told me to stop taking photos and to hold her hands!

The images shown were taken in the last three hours of a fairly short seven-hour natural labour, and at 1.50 p.m. on the 27th of December, we were blessed with our first son, Frank Nickels.

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Gaza's Orphans Begin New Lives
Gaza
By Andrea DiCenzo
25 Aug 2014

August 28, 2014
Gaza, Palestine

Palestinian children orphaned in the 2014 Gaza war begin new lives in the care of extended family and orphanages. While the physical wounds many of them sustained during the 50 day war are healing, their psychological wounds are just beginning to show. Gaza's dismal, blockaded, and underfunded mental health system cannot cope with massive amount of children in need of psychosocial care. Most children will receive no specialized treatment for their deep psychological wounds.

Many children orphaned in the war are now beginning new lives in the care of extended family members. However, as Islam forbids adoption, those who do not have extended family to go to are now under the care of orphanages and will remain so until they are adults.

These photos profile three young girls who lost their parents in the 2014 Gaza conflict and are now looking for a new start as their caretakers help rebuild their shattered lives.

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Gaza- Baker Family 07
By Daniel Van Moll
17 Jul 2014

Montesr Baker (12) and his father in the Shifa Hospital after Montesr was heavily injured while he was playing playing with his cousins at the beach of Gaza City when Israeli missiles killed four of them on July 16th, 2014.

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Andrea's family
By Ulrik Pedersen
12 Mar 2014

Andrea is eating lunch with her mother and her father. She says she doesn't know if she will stay in Pungesti when she grows older. She thinks there is no future in Pungesti if Chevron continues its fracking activities because it will destroy the area's natural resources. The majority of villagers in Pungesti are farmers who depend on agriculture to survive.

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International Children's Day (3 of 18)
Ankara, Turkey
By Amy Hume
23 Apr 2013

Fathers of the Next Generation

Turkey's International Children's Day, April 23, was created in 1927. In addition to local school celebrations, many people pay their respects to the Turkish Republic's founding father, Mustafa Kemal Atatürk on this day. Atatürk, who adopted 13 children, stressed the importance of education for future success of the Republic.

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The Last Church in Benghazi (12 of 14)
Tripoli, Libya
By Tripcarbons
23 Apr 2013

Father Alan leaves the congregation to conclude the service.

As Father Alan takes mass in Benghazi’s Immaculate Conception Catholic Church a young Libyan sits in the doorway wearing Adidas tracksuit bottoms and a football shirt and holding an elderly looking sawn-off shotgun.

Immaculate Conception is the city’s last functioning church after gunmen attacked the Greek Orthodox Church in March assaulting the priests and setting it on fire.

Since the revolution the church has been broken into twice and it’s only five minutes away from an open-air gun market but its priests say the only thing that will make them close the church is if the government asks them to leave.

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The Last Church in Benghazi (13 of 14)
Benghazi, Libya
By Tripcarbons
14 Apr 2013

Philip Chukiaiuma
'As you can see there are children running around. Everyone feels safe here. We just try to keep to our prayer and take care of our people.'

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Antigua, Guatemala Celebrates Semana ...
Antigua, Sacatepequez, Guatemala
By hiroko tanaka
31 Mar 2013

Father of San Pedro Church looks on as Anda leaves the church for procession during Semana Santa in Antigua Guatemala.

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Azaz Refugee Camp
Azaz, Syria
By LeeHarper
01 Mar 2013

Mohammed has four sons and four daughters. He used to work in Aleppo in a crisp factory, but the factory and his house have been destroyed by the regime. He now lives in a tent with his family of ten. The refugee camp holds approximately 10,000 refugees, with a remaining 2000 waiting to get in. The camp currently cannot cope with the massive influx of people, where disease is rife due to a shortage of international aid.

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Father of Palestinian Man Killed by L...
Beirut, Lebanon
By U.S. Editor
23 Oct 2012

Hundreds of mourners attended on Tuesday, October 23, the funeral procession a young Palestinian man who was killed on Monday by Lebanese army troops in Beirut’s Qasqas area.

Mourners chanted slogans and fired in the air during the funeral procession.

The young man, Ahmad Qouwayder, was buried in the Sabra refugee camp near Qasqas neighborhood.

The father of the late young man demands retaliation for his son, calling on the Lebanese President to get him the right of his son from those who killed him.

SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Father of the young Palestinian man killed by the Lebanese Army:
“I want retaliation for the blood of my son from the army, and I am a follower of the law not above the law. I say to the President and the whole world that I want to avenge the blood of my son. I want retaliation no matter how; whether through the law or without the law, I want it.”

According to a statement released by the military, an army soldier killed a young Palestinian man after the man and his brother opened fire on an army patrol near Beirut’s Qasqas area.

The incident comes amid heightened tension in Lebanon following the assassination of Lebanese intelligence chief Wissam al-Hassan who was killed on Friday in a massive car explosion that rocked the Beirut area of Ashrafyeh, leaving seven others dead and over a hundred wounded.

Local News Agency: Middle East Bureau / VCS
Shooting Dateline: October 23, 2012
Shooting Location: Beirut, Lebanon
Publishing Time: October 23, 2012
Length: 0:0:57
Video Size: 47.0 MB
Language: Arabic
Column:
Organized by:
Correspondent:
Camera: VCS

SHOTLIST:

1- Various shots of the dead body during the process of washing and shrouding
2- Tilt up shot of the father of the young man killed by the Lebanese Army troops
3- Various shots of mourners waiting for the funeral
4- SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Father of the young Palestinian man killed by the Lebanese Army:
“I want retaliation for the blood of my son from the army, and I am a follower of the law not above the law. I say to the President and the whole world that I want to avenge the blood of my son. I want retaliation no matter how; whether through the law or without the law, I want it.” 5- Various shots of mourners carrying the coffin of the man during the funeral, shouting “There is no God but Allah”
6- Various shots of mourners during the funeral, shouting “Allah is the greatest” while gunfire is heard in the background
7- Wide shot of men shooing fire during the funeral