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Military Funeral of the Rafah Border ...
Cairo, Egypt
By wailgzoly.911
07 Aug 2012

Families of the victims farewell the coffins of their sons at the funeral of the 16 Egyptian security officers who were killed by unknown gunmen Sunday afternoon.
The military funeral began Tuesday after noon prayers. A large number of people raised their shoes in Prime Minister Hesham Kandil's face, his car was vandalized, and they chanted against him. The car was damaged, and the minister’s guards were forced to take a different street to avoid further assaults.
President Mohamed Morsi was scheduled to attend the funeral but did not appear.

Several other figures attended, including Field Marshal Hussein Tantawi, members of the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces, and Grand Sheikh of Al-Azhar Ahmed al-Tayyeb, as well as former presidential candidates Hamdeen Sabbahi, Abdel Moneim Abouel Fotouh, and Amr Moussa. The Salafi Nour Party and the Salafi Dawah were also represented at the funeral.

The funeral prayers were performed at Aal Rashdan Mosque in Nasr City.

Morsi was also scheduled to visit the seven guards who were injured in the attack afterward.

Ambulances transported coffins of soldiers to the Unknown Soldier Memorial for the military funeral.

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Health, Death and Poverty in Indigeno...
San Jorge La Laguna , Solola, Guatemala
By hiroko tanaka
27 Jul 2012

A family member mourns after the funeral of Rodrigo, who passed away after 7 years of suffering from diabetes and nutritional deficiencies. In his last months, the 49 year-old father of five, decided not to seek further treatment in order to save his family the financial burden.

In Guatemala, death too often represents a heavy financial burden. On top of their daily struggle to secure money for food and necessities, many families have to deal not only with grief but also with huge debts for the wake and funeral.

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Health, Death and Poverty in Indigeno...
San Jorge La Laguna , Solola, Guatemala
By hiroko tanaka
27 Jul 2012

A family member mourns after the funeral of Rodrigo, who passed away after 7 years of suffering from diabetes and nutritional deficiencies. In his last months, the 49 year-old father of five, decided not to seek further treatment in order to save his family the financial burden.

In Guatemala, death too often represents a heavy financial burden. On top of their daily struggle to secure money for food and necessities, many families have to deal not only with grief but also with huge debts for the wake and funeral.

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Health, Death and Poverty in Indigeno...
San Jorge La Laguna , Solola, Guatemala
By hiroko tanaka
27 Jul 2012

Mourners walk to the cemetery during the funeral for Rodrigo, who passed away after 7 years of suffering from diabetes and nutritional deficiencies. In his last months, the 49 year-old father of five, decided not to seek further treatment in order to save his family the financial burden.

In Guatemala, death too often represents a heavy financial burden. On top of their daily struggle to secure money for food and necessities, many families have to deal not only with grief but also with huge debts for the wake and funeral.

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Health, Death and Poverty in Indigeno...
San Jorge La Laguna , Solola, Guatemala
By hiroko tanaka
27 Jul 2012

Family members mourn during the funeral for Rodrigo, who passed away after 7 years of suffering from diabetes and nutritional deficiencies. In his last months, the 49 year-old father of five, decided not to seek further treatment in order to save his family the financial burden.

In Guatemala, death too often represents a heavy financial burden. On top of their daily struggle to secure money for food and necessities, many families have to deal not only with grief but also with huge debts for the wake and funeral.

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Health, Death and Poverty in Indigeno...
San Jorge La Laguna , Solola, Guatemala
By hiroko tanaka
27 Jul 2012

Family members mourn during the funeral of Rodrigo, who passed away after 7 years of suffering from diabetes and nutritional deficiencies. In his last months, the 49 year-old father of five, decided not to seek further treatment in order to save his family the financial burden.

In Guatemala, death too often represents a heavy financial burden. On top of their daily struggle to secure money for food and necessities, many families have to deal not only with grief but also with huge debts for the wake and funeral.

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Health, Death and Poverty in Indigeno...
San Jorge La Laguna , Solola, Guatemala
By hiroko tanaka
27 Jul 2012

Family members mourn during the funeral of Rodrigo, who passed away after 7 years of suffering from diabetes and nutritional deficiencies. In his last months, the 49 year-old father of five, decided not to seek further treatment in order to save his family the financial burden.

In Guatemala, death too often represents a heavy financial burden. On top of their daily struggle to secure money for food and necessities, many families have to deal not only with grief but also with huge debts for the wake and funeral.

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Check point incident between security...
Ma'ameer, south of Manama, Bahrain
By Media Made by Bahraini People
08 Jul 2012

Ma'ameer, south of Manama, Bahrain | July 8, 2012

A child trying to tell what happend during the incident that involved her family and the security forces at a checkpoint and that led to the death of to children.

The security operations carried out many atrocities with the support of soldiers in Bahrain against many regions, towns and villages. A camera spotted the heinous crime carried out by the security forces in the Ma'ameer area in Bahrain south of the capital Manama on the evening of Sunday, July 8 July 2012 for the murder of two girls, two children that lost their lives due to a barrage of gases and bullets dense that targeted the car led by their mother.
The children were rescued with great difficulty by parents. Although security forces attempted to prevent the rescue, and were harassing the mother.

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The poor living conditions of indigen...
San Antonio Palopo, Guatemala
By hiroko tanaka
27 Jun 2012

Josue, 13, sleeps in the corner of the kitchen with his young brother, Oswald, 12. Josue appears to be slow in mental development, however his parents have not been able to seek medical attention for him.

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Wildlife Crimes (5 of 47)
Mekobe, Gabon
By James Morgan
23 Jun 2012

A baka pygmy family in Mekobe village, Gabon.

James Morgan / WWF-CANON

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The poor living conditions of indigen...
San Antonio Palopo, Guatemala
By hiroko tanaka
06 Jun 2012

Three year-old Wendy Lucrecia, left, and two year-old Roxana, sleep on a straw mat on the dirt floor with their parents in one-room home made of cane and mud. Although their father, Fernando, 21, works as a day labor and earn $20 a week, and Juana, 20, works at home weaving goods to sell, their income is not enough to cover all their costs. After paying for the necessities, including $10 rent per month and electricity, the family often does not have enough food to eat.

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The poor living conditions of indigen...
San Antonio Palopo
By hiroko tanaka
06 Jun 2012

Carla Marivel, left, plays with her sister in their one-room house. The family of five with three children share two beds.

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The poor living conditions of indigen...
San Antonio Palopo
By hiroko tanaka
06 Jun 2012

Gustavo Angel lives in a one-room house with his mother. As the father of Gustavo has another family, he does not provide any help to Gustavo and his mother Manuela. Twenty eight years old, Manuela works with handicrafts and earns $6 per week but her income is not enough to cover their expenses. The house the two live in is a part of Manuela’s brother’s property. There is no electricity and the two sleep on the plastic sheet on the dirt floor.

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Growing Up In Jordan
Amman, Jordan
By Melissa Tabeek
29 May 2012

Tanym, 4 months old, lives in a small, 2-room apartment with 10 other family members in Amman, Jordan.

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Between Two Mothers
Madaba, Jordan
By Melissa Tabeek
29 May 2012

Sameer Ahmed Darraj's two daughters stand between their grandmother Salma and mother Sammer in their second-floor flat in Madaba, Jordan. The two girls fled with their family of six under the cover of the night with the help of the Syrian Free Army.

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They lost everything
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Khandaker Azizur Rahman
17 May 2012

On May 16, 2012 in Dhaka, Bangladesh, a slum caught fire and destroyed 200 homes mainly belonging to poor people.

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Shamoly slum on fire
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Khandaker Azizur Rahman
17 May 2012

On May 16, 2012 in Dhaka, Bangladesh, a slum caught fire and destroyed 200 homes mainly belonging to poor people.

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Mourning Death of Brothers
Taftanaz, Syria
By Rachel Beth Anderson
29 Apr 2012

Taftanaz, Syria

Family members mourn the death of their two brothers who were members of the FSA.

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Mourning Death of Brothers
Taftanaz, Syria
By Rachel Beth Anderson
29 Apr 2012

Taftanaz, Syria

Family members mourn the death of their two brothers who were members of the FSA.

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Fears of Economic Depression Loom in ...
Afghanistan
By sarakeawal
24 Apr 2012

The international community is going to hand over full responsibility of the security and defense of Afghanistan to Afghan forces by 2014. It has been declared by the international community that the military pullout of the international forces will be accompanied with a reduction in aid money.

This happens at a time when 90 percent of GDP of Afghanistan is dependent on the foreign aid, and within the past ten years, solid measures to help Afghanistan become self sustainable financially have not been taken by the Afghan government and its international benefactors.

Many in Afghanistan believe that the reduction of aid without solid measures will lead to a financial crisis in Afghanistan, which will pave the ground for political instability and pervasive insecurity.

According to the World Bank's recent report TRANSITION IN AFGHANISTAN LOOKING BEYOND 2014, which came out in November 2011, the reduction in aid money will reduce civilian service delivery and will thus lead to economic depression.

The report says, "Aid for Afghanistan in 2010-11 was about $15.7 billion and World Bank's estimation suggests that a $0.5 billion decline in the external budget, which is going to happen, could affect 11,000-18,000 job opportunities in Afghanistan (on a six-month basis.)

Amar Rezayee, who is 23-year-old Afghan and an employee of one of the projects of USAID, which is the biggest donor in Afghanistan, says,

Translation sound bite #1, Amar Rezayee (USAID employee) (00:57- 1:52): "After 2014 the situation in Afghanistan will get worse because America says that they will take their troops out of Afghanistan, so it will effect security and will also have a bad affect on the economic situation in Afghanistan. Now there are a lot of salaries from USAID that are very high and can help me pay for my tuition at the American University of Afghanistan. But when Americans leave this country there will be high salaries for a limited number of people. Personally for me, it will have a very bad effect and I will not be able to attend this university because I won't be able to pay."

The World Bank report also states that In 2010/11, total public spending, including the “core budget” and “external budget,” was $17.1 billion.

Of this total spending, $15.7 billion was financed by international aid and only $1.9 billion of it was Afghanistan's budget.

Some people in Kabul are already scared of Afghanistan's future after 2014.

Vox Populi:

Translation Sound bite #2 Shafiq saighani (Kabul resident) (2:00-2:27) " If the US leaves Afghanistan, the financial support will be cut from Afghanistan, educational scholarships will be cut from Afghanistan, the unemployment will raise up and not only Taliban but also Iran and Pakistan will interfere in Afghanistan's affairs."

Analysts are also pessimistic about Afghanistan's future because of the foreseeable economic crisis after 2014.

Translation Sound bite #3, Candace Rondeaux (Crisis Group’s senior analyst in Kabul)(2:47-4:33) "The impact of the economical transition and the lack of planning will be tremendous. Politically it increases competition between Afghan elites. but more importantly what it does is it creates an environment of instability and insecurity and that I think will create incentives around the accedes of many, many Afghans for major capital flight, and also it will raise competition and rivalry between communities that could become very, very violent.

The impact of the internationals being present here has increased income tenfold for the average Afghan man. It has created opportunities for Afghan women, which weren't there before. Once all of that collapses, first there is the impact on the family life which is going to be tremendous. Where women once had the ability to go out and work and find some sort of independence, I think that will go away quickly, in fact I think that will be the first thing that will go away. For young men, who have been earning a thousand dollars a month or in some case five thousand dollars if they were working on an international organization, for them, they have been in a certain standard of living in the past ten years and have become completely dependent on this type of money. They have cars now, they have got houses to maintain and suddenly that goes away. Imagine the impact on the family; already there is a lot of intentions around money issues in every family, doesn't matter if its Afghan or American but when income starts to shrink that always has an impact."

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New Edict Threatens Progress for Afgh...
Afghanistan
By sarakeawal
19 Apr 2012

Storyline: One of the most significant achievements of the new era in Afghanistan, after the fall of the Taliban, is in new freedoms for Afghan women. They are allowed to work in public, go to school, and participate in the political sphere-- something they were not allowed to do under the Taliban. However, the Afghan Religious Council, composed of hard-line religious leaders, has recently issued a new edict that calls women second-class citizens and prohibits them from traveling without the escort of a Mahram [male family member]. The edict was endorsed by the president, and has the potential of becoming law. Many people believe the Afghan government aims to woo the Taliban into peace talks by crafting and endorsing such a controversial mandate. The law has faced widespread resentment by Afghan women activists and Afghanistan’s civil society, putting pressure on the religious council and Ulema to revoke their edict.

Yalda Samih is young girl, her family lives in Kandahar province but Yalda lives in Kabul because she studies at the American University of Afghanistan.
Soundbite-1 Translation: Yalda Samih Student living in dorm: "it's very difficult for a girl to refrain from traveling unless she has a male chaperon, because not everyone has many brothers, or a father to accompany her everywhere. if it happens (the edict becomes a law), then we will face a lot of difficulties."
According to women activists in Kabul this is an unrealistic and unenforceable law for the citizens of Afghanistan.

Arezo Omid is a young woman activist who works with Young Women for Change, an organization of young women activists who advocate for women's rights. She says the law is unrealistic, and cannot be imposed on women in Afghanistan.
Soundbite-2 Translation: Arezo Omid (1:00-1:17): "I was very disappointed about this edict of Ulema council, because we are not rich people to have a male company accompany us during our trips outside the country. it's very difficult for those people who don't have a Mahram."

Soundbite-3 Translation: Yalda Samih (1:17-1:32): "if this edict becomes a law, I have to leave university. because I don't have anyone to come with me and live in the dorm. my father is responsible for the rest of the family, and I have a younger brother, who is studying school in Kandahar. So I would have to leave university.

Enayatullah Baligh a member of Islamic Ulema Council rejects Yalda's claim about the edict.
Soundbite-4 Translation: Enayatullah Baligh Member of Islamic Ulema councils: "Find a husband. find yourself a Mahram (male chaperon), these are all childish words."

Sounbite-5 Translation: Yalda samih (1:42-1:55): "I think it is impossible, because around 1.5 million widows live in Afghanistan. this edict also questions women's freedom. those who want to study can't get married and study. it is impossible."

Sounbite-6 Translation: Arezo Omid (1:56-2:05): "I personally think the government wants to get Taliban closer. If the Taliban come back to power, we will do the same thing we did last time and leave the country for the Taliban and immigrate to other countries"

Soundbite-7 Translation: Enayatullah Baligh (2:07-2:14): "When they say, 'we got closer to the Taliban because we are scared of the Taliban,' it's totally wrong. We are not scared of the Taliban, it is the issue of religion."

Sounbite-8 Translation: Arezo Omid (2:15-2:21): "the problem is that high ranking government officials support these edicts."

Sounbite-9 Translation: Enayatullah Baligh (2:23-2:44): "This edict does not need to be passed, it's a matter of religion. It is higher than the Constitution of Afghanistan, because the Afghanistan constitution states that no law is above the Islamic law. They must not ignore our edict, if they do, the Ulema Council will take action".

Soundbite-10 Translation: Soraya Kabul resident: "As an Afghan girl, I do not accept this edict, because Afghan men and women had, and must have, equal rights. And women make half of the society."

Soundbite-11 Translation: Sana Kabul resident: "I do not accept this edict, because it states that every woman should be accompanied by a man, and I would like to say that President Karzai's wife is a doctor and Mr. president can't be with his wife everywhere. So I don't accept this edict and will not obey it."

Soundbite-12 Translation: Enayatullah Baligh (3:43-4:23): Afghan women are Muslims, so they can never oppose this edict. If they oppose this edict that means they have rejected the religion. If a minister is traveling he takes a body guard with him, so why can't our sisters take someone like their brother, uncle or nephew with them? These women do not understand. It's for their good. If there are widows, the government is responsible to pay for their food, and the government is responsible to pay for the person to travel with her as well. It's all for the good of the women. I don't understand how it is NOT observing women's rights.

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Syrian refugees in Bekaa Valley
Bekaa Valley, Lebanon
By Marta Bogdanska
15 Apr 2012

Syrian refugees in Bekaa Valley in Lebanon. Thousands of Syrians have been crossing into the Bekaa Valley situated along the border with Syria. We managed to reach some families in hiding in villages of Saad Neyil and Arsel.

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Syrian refugees in Bekaa Valley
Bekaa Valley, Lebanon
By Marta Bogdanska
15 Apr 2012

Syrian refugees in Bekaa Valley in Lebanon. Thousands of Syrians have been crossing into the Bekaa Valley situated along the border with Syria. We managed to reach some families in hiding in villages of Saad Neyil and Arsel.

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Syrian refugees in Bekaa Valley
Bekaa Valley, Lebanon
By Marta Bogdanska
15 Apr 2012

Syrian refugees in Bekaa Valley in Lebanon. Thousands of Syrians have been crossing into the Bekaa Valley situated along the border with Syria. We managed to reach some families in hiding in villages of Saad Neyil and Arsel.

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Syrian refugees in Bekaa Valley
Bekaa Valley, Lebanon
By Marta Bogdanska
15 Apr 2012

Syrian refugees in Bekaa Valley in Lebanon. Thousands of Syrians have been crossing into the Bekaa Valley situated along the border with Syria. We managed to reach some families in hiding in villages of Saad Neyil and Arsel.

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Syrian refugees in Bekaa Valley
Bekaa Valley, Lebanon
By Marta Bogdanska
15 Apr 2012

Syrian refugees in Bekaa Valley in Lebanon. Thousands of Syrians have been crossing into the Bekaa Valley situated along the border with Syria. We managed to reach some families in hiding in villages of Saad Neyil and Arsel.

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Syrian refugees in Bekaa Valley
Bekaa Valley, Lebanon
By Marta Bogdanska
15 Apr 2012

Syrian refugees in Bekaa Valley in Lebanon. Thousands of Syrians have been crossing into the Bekaa Valley situated along the border with Syria. We managed to reach some families in hiding in villages of Saad Neyil and Arsel.

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Syrian refugees in Bekaa Valley
Bekaa Valley, Lebanon
By Marta Bogdanska
15 Apr 2012

Syrian refugees in Bekaa Valley in Lebanon. Thousands of Syrians have been crossing into the Bekaa Valley situated along the border with Syria. We managed to reach some families in hiding in villages of Saad Neyil and Arsel.

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Syrian refugees in Bekaa Valley
Bekaa Valley, Lebanon
By Marta Bogdanska
15 Apr 2012

Syrian refugees in Bekaa Valley in Lebanon. Thousands of Syrians have been crossing into the Bekaa Valley situated along the border with Syria. We managed to reach some families in hiding in villages of Saad Neyil and Arsel.

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Syrian refugees in Bekaa Valley
Bekaa Valley, Lebanon
By Marta Bogdanska
14 Apr 2012

Syrian refugees in Bekaa Valley in Lebanon. Thousands of Syrians have been crossing into the Bekaa Valley situated along the border with Syria. We managed to reach some families in hiding in villages of Saad Neyil and Arsel.

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Bus station
Bamako, Mali
By bindra
11 Apr 2012

A family from northern Mali arrives in the Bamako bus station with all their possessions after a long journey from rebel-occupied Gao. More than 265,000 travelled to refugee camps in Mauritania, Niger and Burkina Faso while 185,800 more have been internally displaced.

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Three's a Crowd
Kabul, Afghanistan
By MediaMikeDC
18 Mar 2012

Father riding a bike with two young boys on the streets of Kabul, Afghanistan.

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Al-Rihaniyya refugee camp in Turkey 6
Antakya, Turkey
By ili21
01 Feb 2012

Antakya, Turkey: January 23, 2012
Al-Rihaniyya, a Syrian refugee camp located in the Turkish town of Antakya near the Syrian border. The camp suffers from constant power cuts due to the snow, which also damaged many tents. About 1500 Syrian refugees live in the camp. An estimated total of 15 000 Syrian refugees has been absorbed by Turkey since the beginning of the Syrian uprising in 2011.
PICTURED: Syrian children doing a peace sign
Photo taken on January 23, 2012

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Families in Tahrir SQ: Revolution Con...
Cairo, Egypt
By randoshka2000
29 Jan 2012

Cairo, January 27, 2012
A protester with his daughter in Tahrir SQ celebrating January 25 revolution.
The daughter sign says : "Blood of martyrs is integrity. The revolution continues, continues."
The father signs says: "They are saying it's revolution feast so I'm here to celebrate."

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Man Speaks Out To Mubarak Supporters ...
Cairo, Egypt
By Beirut Editor's Picks
10 Jan 2012

January 10, 2012 - Cairo

Outside Mubarak's trial, a family member of a martyr protests against Mubarak's supporters, calling them "thugs," and corrupt for taking money.

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Pointing at the Officer
Cairo, Egypt
By Beirut Editor's Picks
10 Jan 2012

Cairo, January 10, 2012
Mubarak's trial, outside the court.
Martyr's uncle shouting at a mounted officer while several policemen restrain him.

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Burning Mubarak's Photo
Cairo, Egypt
By Beirut Editor's Picks
10 Jan 2012

January 10, 2012 - Cairo

Outside Mubarak's trial, a family member of a martyr protests against the killings by burning his photo in the newspaper. The man also voices against recent words by the Interior Minister who said, "the police officers will shoot the thugs."

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Protesters At The Trial, Chanting: Re...
Cairo, Egypt
By Beirut Editor's Picks
10 Jan 2012

Cairo, January 10, 2012

Outside Mubarak's trial, protesters chant alongside a mother whose son was shot and killed in Alexandria on January 25, 2011. They chant for retribution, saying,

"I hear the martyr's mother say: Tantawi, who is responsible," "I hear the martyr's mother say: the Interior [Minister] killed my son, the army killed my son."

"I swear on your blood..new revolution again. Martyr rest in peace and wait for us at the paradise's gate,
Martyr rest in peace we'll continue struggle."

"Just go tell the Killers: Revenge between us and you for ever. Blood for blood, bullet for bullet, we ask for retribution."
"Retribution, retribution, they killed our brothers by bullet, they gave martyrs as a gift to the sniper."

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Martyr's Mother: They Are Acting, The...
Cairo, Egypt
By Beirut Editor's Picks
10 Jan 2012

January 10, 2012 - Cairo

The mother of 26-year-old Hamdy Abd-Ela'aty Abd-Elmagied, who was shot on January 25, 2011, in Alexandria, protests Mubarak's trial for being a facade. This is her third time attending the trial.
She said, "I feel every thing is dark in front of me, I can't see anything because there is no justice. When Mubarak and his men are tried for what they did I will see the light, and I can say my son went to his God and it's OK."
She added, "There is no trial, they are acting."