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Raj Kumar’s fight against social stig...
Kathmandu, Nepal
By Rajneesh Bhandari
27 Nov 2012

Raj Kumar is among many Nepalis who contracted HIV from a dirty needle, and now he is trying to adjust in society and working hard to achieve his long cherished dream, to be a singer. Though Raj Kumar knew that he had HIV in 2004, he didn’t disclose the fact to his wife, out of the fear of ruining his family and being stigmatized by society.
It has been two months since Raj Kumar disclosed the news about his HIV infection to his wife, with much care and counseling.
He took advantage of help of his friends, colleagues and counselors to do the “impossible task,” telling others. Raj Kumar said that he waited for “the right time,” but always “felt heavy with the guilt of hiding it to his wife.” The right moment however, came after nearly a decade. “It was difficult to gather the courage to tell,” he added. “Now I have gathered courage to face it.”
Raj Kumar is now pursuing his childhood dream to be a singer. Raj Kumar’s first song “Mod” was released during a function in Kathmandu on April 29, 2013.

“I was born genius, drugs spoiled me,” Raj Kumar said looking back at his life. When he reached grade eight he got into a habit of using drugs. It was very late that his mother, his primary caretaker, knew about it.

According to government data, an average of 1,437 new infections are reported each year. In 2011, 50,287 people were living with HIV and 3,804 of them are children. Out of the total HIV cases reported in 2011, 87.9 percent were from sexual transmission. The number of new cases of HIV infections has been on decline in the last five years. In 2007, a total of 64,585 people were believed to be living with HIV. Government figures put HIV prevalence in the adult population at 0.3 percent. Only 20,583 HIV cases are reported so far.

Nepal’s first HIV case was reported in 1988. The high-risk group includes intravenous drug users, female sex workers and their clients, men who have sex with other men and male migrant laborers.

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Raj Kumar’s fight against social stig...
Kathmandu, Nepal
By Rajneesh Bhandari
27 Nov 2012

Raj Kumar is among many Nepalis who contracted HIV from a dirty needle, and now he is trying to adjust in society and working hard to achieve his long cherished dream, to be a singer. Though Raj Kumar knew that he had HIV in 2004, he didn’t disclose the fact to his wife, out of the fear of ruining his family and being stigmatized by society.
It has been two months since Raj Kumar disclosed the news about his HIV infection to his wife, with much care and counseling.
He took advantage of help of his friends, colleagues and counselors to do the “impossible task,” telling others. Raj Kumar said that he waited for “the right time,” but always “felt heavy with the guilt of hiding it to his wife.” The right moment however, came after nearly a decade. “It was difficult to gather the courage to tell,” he added. “Now I have gathered courage to face it.”
Raj Kumar is now pursuing his childhood dream to be a singer. Raj Kumar’s first song “Mod” was released during a function in Kathmandu on April 29, 2013.

“I was born genius, drugs spoiled me,” Raj Kumar said looking back at his life. When he reached grade eight he got into a habit of using drugs. It was very late that his mother, his primary caretaker, knew about it.

According to government data, an average of 1,437 new infections are reported each year. In 2011, 50,287 people were living with HIV and 3,804 of them are children. Out of the total HIV cases reported in 2011, 87.9 percent were from sexual transmission. The number of new cases of HIV infections has been on decline in the last five years. In 2007, a total of 64,585 people were believed to be living with HIV. Government figures put HIV prevalence in the adult population at 0.3 percent. Only 20,583 HIV cases are reported so far.

Nepal’s first HIV case was reported in 1988. The high-risk group includes intravenous drug users, female sex workers and their clients, men who have sex with other men and male migrant laborers.

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Emergency services try to direct digg...
Gaza CIty
By Ms_R
19 Nov 2012

An Israeli airstrike killed 11 members of the same family on 18.11.12 in an attack aimed at Hamas official Jamal Al Dalou. The casualties included four children.

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Israeli Airstrike Destroys Hamas Offi...
Gaza City
By Ms_R
19 Nov 2012

An Israeli airstrike killed 11 members of the same family on 18.11.12 in an attack aimed at Hamas official Jamal Al Dalou. The casualties included four children. Here, the local community and emergency services try to remove the rubble of what was previously a four-story building to find the bodies.

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An Excavator Removes Rubble Searching...
Gaza City
By Ms_R
19 Nov 2012

Local residents look on as emergency services frantically try to remove the rubble from the scene of what was once the Al Dalou family home, following an attack on the home of a Hamas official.

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GAZA UNDER ATTACK
Gaza City
By Mais Istanbuli
19 Nov 2012

An Israeli airstrike killed 11 members of the same family on 18.11.12 in an attack aimed at Hamas official Jamal Al Dalou. The casualties included four children.

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SEARCHING THROUGH RUBBLE - Editor's P...
Gaza, Palestine
By Editor's Picks
19 Nov 2012

An Israeli airstrike killed 11 members of the same family on 18.11.12 in an attack aimed at Hamas official Jamal Al Dalou. The casualties included four children.

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Emergency workers and local residents...
Gaza CIty
By Ms_R
18 Nov 2012

An Israeli airstrike killed 11 members of the same family on 18.11.12 in an attack aimed at Hamas official Jamal Al Dalou. The casualties included four children, two of whom were still trapped beneath the rubble when this shot was taken. Emergency services struggled to find the bodies before nightfall, when life in Gaza becomes considerably more dangerous in the wake of Israeli airstrikes.

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A digger claws at the rubble of the A...
Gaza City
By Ms_R
18 Nov 2012

Local residents look on as emergency services frantically try to remove the rubble from the scene of what was once the Al Dalou family home, following an attack on the home of a Hamas official.

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Emergency workers and local residents...
Gaza City
By Ms_R
18 Nov 2012

An Israeli airstrike killed 11 members of the same family on 18.11.12 in an attack aimed at Hamas official Jamal Al Dalou. The casualties included four children, two of whom were still trapped beneath the rubble when this shot was taken. Emergency services struggled to find the bodies before nightfall, when life in Gaza becomes considerably more dangerous in the wake of Israeli airstrikes.

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In Memory Of
Achrafieh, Beirut, Lebanon
By Roï
17 Nov 2012

Women at the cemetery gates holding flowers and their beloved's picture.

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Cemetery Mothers
Mar Metri, Achrafieh, Lebanon
By Roï
17 Nov 2012

It gets emotional every time they hold their pictures. They visited 3 cemeteries where the state recognized the presence of mass graves, a gesture of hope, a reminder of their past and an act of determination.

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We Have The Right To Know
Adlieh, Beirut, Lebanon
By Roï
17 Nov 2012

30 years have gone by and she still has hope of finding her, dead or alive. She demands her right to know what happened.

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Hold Him Tight
Horsh Beirut, Lebanon
By Roï
17 Nov 2012

A woman holding a picture with tears in her eyes.

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Roni Keidar's house
Erez, israel
By javiervidela
16 Nov 2012

The house of Roni is completely empty. Her family of two daughters and her gradsons was sent far away from rockets, for their own safety.

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Protesters demand accountability for ...
Nogales, Sonora
By ST McNeil
02 Nov 2012

Protesters marched to the port of entry to demand justice for the slaying of a 16-year-old by US Border Patrol (Nov. 2, 2012, Nogales, Sonora).

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Demanding Justicia
Nogales, Sonora
By ST McNeil
02 Nov 2012

Protesters marched to the port of entry to the US from Mexico to demand justice for the slaying of a teenager, the 17th such killing since 2007 (Nov. 2, 2012, Nogales, Sonora).

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Women in Syria: Women's Organizer
Kilis, Turkey
By AnnaThereseDay
01 Nov 2012

Women's organizer discusses her political organizing, humanitarian work, and documenting of sexual assault.

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Women in Syria: Organizer with her fa...
Kilis, Turkey
By AnnaThereseDay
01 Nov 2012

Women's rights organizer with her family

An activist from Deraya, this determined woman organized women's protests in her hometown
until she had to flee, first to Aleppo, then Azaz and Kilis. Now She works
to deliver humanitarian aid, collect and report information on survivors of sexual
assault by Assad's army, and coordinate workshops with the Syrian Center for Civil Society
to train women in political leadership. A working mother, she and her
husband support each other's activities to forward social and political
justice in Syria.

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Women in Syria: Organizer with her fa...
Kilis, Turkey
By AnnaThereseDay
01 Nov 2012

Women's organizer and her family watch from a hotel in Turkey in horror as Al Jazeera plays a feature on their hometown Deraya.

An activist from Deraya, this determined woman organized women's protests in her hometown
until she had to flee, first to Aleppo, then Azaz and Kilis. Now She works
to deliver humanitarian aid, collect and report information on survivors of sexual
assault by Assad's army, and coordinate workshops with the Syrian Center for Civil Society
to train women in political leadership. A working mother, she and her
husband support each other's activities to forward social and political
justice in Syria.

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Women in Syria: Organizer with her fa...
Kilis, Turkey
By AnnaThereseDay
01 Nov 2012

Women's organizer brings her son on her daily duties, as refugee children in Turkey don't yet have school.

An activist from Deraya, this determined woman organized women's protests in her hometown
until she had to flee, first to Aleppo, then Azaz and Kilis. Now She works
to deliver humanitarian aid, collect and report information on survivors of sexual
assault by Assad's army, and coordinate workshops with the Syrian Center for Civil Society
to train women in political leadership. A working mother, she and her
husband support each other's activities to forward social and political
justice in Syria.

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Low-Income Families Face Evictions in...
Milan, Italy
By Transterra Editor
27 Oct 2012

Vulnerable families in Milan, Italy, have become victims of extensive eviction in the city. A cut in government housing subsidies in 2012, combined with widespread unemployment and a high cost of living have contributed to the more than 67,790 evictions last year and estimated 300,000 more families at risk in 2013. A photojournalist followed several families through their unique eviction journeys, from their homes to the streets, foster homes or hotels. Often, illegal immigrants are particularly suseptible to evictions, as landlords raise their rents because they know that they are unable to report them to authorities.

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Daily Life - Poverty & Homelessness (...
Yenagoa, Bayelsa, Nigeria
By Tife Owolabi
24 Oct 2012

A woman with her four kids returning home to her farm in a wooden canoe in the waterway of oil rich Bayelsa state, Nigeria.

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Daily Life - Poverty & Homelessness (...
Yenagoa, Bayelsa, Nigeria
By Tife Owolabi
23 Oct 2012

A family in a wooden canoe along the Nun river in the oil rich Bayelsa state, Nigeria

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A Nigerian in Tbilisi
Tbilisi, Georgia
By TemoBardzimashvili
19 Oct 2012

Erunz Nelson, a 54-year-old immigrant from Nigeria, is watching Lia Lemonjava, a hairdresser sharing the same store, perforate a local girl's ears for her first earrings. Lemonjava, who has been working with Nelson for the last six years, says that his a very honest and reliable person. But best of all, she says, is that "he loves Georgians."

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Families of Maspero's Victims March
Cairo, Egypt
By wailgzoly.911
10 Oct 2012

On the first anniversary of the Maspero massacre, the relatives of the victims who were either shot or crushed to death by Armored Personnel Carriers, are still waiting for justice after a year of legal proceedings stemming from two cases, one of which witnessed the victims’ lawyers withdraw from the case and the other which saw protesters being put on trial.

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TV
Mopti, Mali
By bindra
04 Oct 2012

A family relaxes in Mopti after spending the day traveling on a bus from Timbuktu. They are on their way to Bamako to seek a better life and escape Islamist rule. More than 265,000 travelled to refugee camps in Mauritania, Niger and Burkina Faso while 185,800 more have been internally displaced.

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Leo's House: Breaking the Poverty Cyc...
Philippines, Manilla
By Luc Forsyth
25 Sep 2012

Leo Castellero is a 49-year-old carpenter from Mindanao Island in the Philippines. When his wife left him for another man, he moved to Manila with his five children looking to start a new life.

Initially he found work on one of the city's large construction sites, but when the project ended, he was unable to find a new job. The savings he had were quickly used up to feed his family, and within a few weeks he was broke. Several months later, his criminal and medical clearance certificates expired. These have to be renewed on a yearly basis in order to be legally employed in the Philippines, but he could not afford the $30 fee.

Two years later, Leo is living in a 6 square meter shack along the train tracks near the Osmena highway in Manila. He has been unemployed since 2010 and is only able to feed his children through the charity of the community.

Made possible with the support of a few private donors, this story documents Leo’s life as he tries to break out of the poverty cycle – a hopeless feat for someone without financial backing.

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Aïcha
Bamako, Mali
By bindra
22 Sep 2012

Aïcha Maiga, 12, sprawls out in the living room where she sleeps with 28 other family members that have fled from Gao.

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School In Baalbek For The Syrian Refu...
Lebanon,Baalbek
By Marta Bogdanska
18 Sep 2012

This family came from Homs in Syria.
The woman has three children. One of her daughters is married and has a child. There is also her son’s wife with them.
They arrived to Lebanon three weeks ago although the married daughter came here a month and a half ago.
They were in Al “Qaseer” in Homs but because of the worsening situation there they moved to Damascus, to “Alset Zainab” neighborhood. From there they moved to another neighborhood called Al “Abaseyeen”. Finally they went back to Homs. The heavy bombing started again and there were no taxis to take them out of there so they had to wait. After that they managed to go to “Al Tal” because they were informed that it was safe there. After two days the clashes started, they moved again to “Adra”. After being on the road for ten days they arrived to Lebanon. They couldn’t take anything with them, not even clothes. They crossed the border illegally, walking through the mountains.
Life in Lebanon is much better for them than in Syria. At least children are not scared and can sleep at night. They also received medical treatment because they were sick in Syria and couldn’t get any help there. Children can go to school although her daughter’s child won’t be able to register now because they don’t have the needed documents.

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SYRIAN REFUGEES IN LEBANON - Beirut E...
Lebanon,Baalbek
By Beirut Editor's Picks
18 Sep 2012

This photo collection shows a few Syrian families who are waiting to register their children with the UNHCR and the organization, Save the Children, so they can attend school in Lebanon after crossing over from Syria.
The latest report from the UNHCR states that over 67,960 Syrian refugees are in Lebanon, with 49,653 registered and over 18,307 in contact with UNHCR. While most children will be able to attend school in Lebanon, there have been many issues with refugees being denied because they lack proper paperwork. Another issue that is increasingly become more of a problem is that of child trauma, as reports say almost every child has seen someone killed and there are no resources available to provide counseling for the children, many of which are suffering from PTSD.

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School In Baalbek For The Syrian Refu...
Lebanon,Baalbek
By Marta Bogdanska
18 Sep 2012

This family came from Homs in Syria.
The woman has three children. One of her daughters is married and has a child. There is also her son’s wife with them.
They arrived to Lebanon three weeks ago although the married daughter came here a month and a half ago.
They were in Al “Qaseer” in Homs but because of the worsening situation there they moved to Damascus, to “Alset Zainab” neighborhood. From there they moved to another neighborhood called Al “Abaseyeen”. Finally they went back to Homs. The heavy bombing started again and there were no taxis to take them out of there so they had to wait. After that they managed to go to “Al Tal” because they were informed that it was safe there. After two days the clashes started, they moved again to “Adra”. After being on the road for ten days they arrived to Lebanon. They couldn’t take anything with them, not even clothes. They crossed the border illegally, walking through the mountains.
Life in Lebanon is much better for them than in Syria. At least children are not scared and can sleep at night. They also received medical treatment because they were sick in Syria and couldn’t get any help there. Children can go to school although her daughter’s child won’t be able to register now because they don’t have the needed documents.

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School In Baalbek For The Syrian Refu...
Lebanon,Baalbek
By Marta Bogdanska
18 Sep 2012

This family came from Homs in Syria.
The woman has three children. One of her daughters is married and has a child. There is also her son’s wife with them.
They arrived to Lebanon three weeks ago although the married daughter came here a month and a half ago.
They were in Al “Qaseer” in Homs but because of the worsening situation there they moved to Damascus, to “Alset Zainab” neighborhood. From there they moved to another neighborhood called Al “Abaseyeen”. Finally they went back to Homs. The heavy bombing started again and there were no taxis to take them out of there so they had to wait. After that they managed to go to “Al Tal” because they were informed that it was safe there. After two days the clashes started, they moved again to “Adra”. After being on the road for ten days they arrived to Lebanon. They couldn’t take anything with them, not even clothes. They crossed the border illegally, walking through the mountains.
Life in Lebanon is much better for them than in Syria. At least children are not scared and can sleep at night. They also received medical treatment because they were sick in Syria and couldn’t get any help there. Children can go to school although her daughter’s child won’t be able to register now because they don’t have the needed documents.

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School In Baalbek For The Syrian Refu...
Lebanon,Baalbek
By Marta Bogdanska
18 Sep 2012

This family came from Homs in Syria.
The woman has three children. One of her daughters is married and has a child. There is also her son’s wife with them.
They arrived to Lebanon three weeks ago although the married daughter came here a month and a half ago.
They were in Al “Qaseer” in Homs but because of the worsening situation there they moved to Damascus, to “Alset Zainab” neighborhood. From there they moved to another neighborhood called Al “Abaseyeen”. Finally they went back to Homs. The heavy bombing started again and there were no taxis to take them out of there so they had to wait. After that they managed to go to “Al Tal” because they were informed that it was safe there. After two days the clashes started, they moved again to “Adra”. After being on the road for ten days they arrived to Lebanon. They couldn’t take anything with them, not even clothes. They crossed the border illegally, walking through the mountains.
Life in Lebanon is much better for them than in Syria. At least children are not scared and can sleep at night. They also received medical treatment because they were sick in Syria and couldn’t get any help there. Children can go to school although her daughter’s child won’t be able to register now because they don’t have the needed documents.

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Family
Bamako, Mali
By bindra
16 Sep 2012

Families from Gao and Kidal prepare food together in the compound they share together in Bamako. Many displaced say they are in need of adequate shelter, food and clean water.

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A woman and her son walk towards the ...
Azaz, Syria,
By Ms_R
14 Sep 2012

It's estimated that around 10,000 (some estimates touch as high as 17,000) refugees are currently trapped on the Syrian border, waiting to get into Turkey. Many refugees have been waiting there for up to three weeks, in squalid conditions.

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Editor's Picks 16 Aug 2012
Beirut, Lebanon
By Editor's Picks
15 Aug 2012

Some family members of the 11 abducted Lebanese protested in Riad al Soloh square in Beirut, Lebanon on 9 August 2012.

The large Lebanese Maqdad family then kidnapped 26 Syrians, demanding the return of Hassan Al Maqdad.

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The Will Of Maickel
Caracas, Venezuela
By @LatAmSight
15 Aug 2012

Maickel Melamed was born in 1975 with a physical motor deficiency. In 2011 he ran the New York marathon. This year he will run in Berlin. Maickel has run five marathons in four years, when just one was supposedly impossible.

Maickel training indoors, B Roll:

“En ese momento cuando crees que no, es donde sigues. En ese momento donde todo te dice oscuridad, es donde tú crees en la luz así no la veas. Todo lo contrario: cuando no ves la luz, es cuando más la atraes."

“In that exactly moment when you think you can’t make it, you just have to keep going. That moment where everything says dark, is where you believe in light, even if you cannot see it. When you can’t see the light, is when you most attract it.”

Maickel training outdoors:

“Si a mí me dijeron que yo no iba a vivir, me dijeron que yo no iba a caminar, me dijeron que yo no iba a subir montañas, me dijeron que yo no iba a hablar bien y soy conferencista desde hace más de diez años.”

“I was told that I would die, that I would never walk, that I would never climb a mountain that I would never talk properly, and I have been speaking in lectures for more than 10 years.”

Maickel Melamed:

“A cada no le fuimos poniendo un sí, y ese es el sí que le queremos regalar a cada ser humano.”

“Instead of NO we say YES, and that YES is our gift to every single human being.”

Maritza de Melamed, Maickel's mother:

“Él, como dice su papá, como que se prueba y a la vez es algo como una función que él tiene una cosa que él tiene como un deber, cómo te puedo decir yo, como algo así que él mismo se lo ha propuesto.”

“He, as his father says, he (Maickel) tests himself, and at the same time it is like a duty he must accomplish, as I can tell you, he meets what he proposes.”

Maickel Melamed:

“Sentía que cada vez que yo hacía algo, que me llevaba más allá de mis propios límites, los límites de mi entorno también se expandían, entonces entendí que eso era quizá la diferencia que yo tengo para aportar.”

“I was feeling that every time that I’ve achieved something that took me beyond my limits, my limits were expanded as well, then I think that maybe that is the difference with what I have to give.”

Maickel training outdoors, B Roll:

“Y vivimos buscando nuestra diferencia y yo creo que esa es nuestra búsqueda primaria cuál es nuestra diferencia."

“We live looking for that which makes us different, I believe that this is our main basic quest, what sets us apart.”

Mr. and Mrs. Melamed, B Roll:

“Yo le diría a todos esos padres que tienen una situación como la que se me presentó a mí, de que..."

“I would to like say all those fathers who have a situation as I've been presented with Maickel, that...”

Alberto Melamed, Maickel's father:

“esos muchachos vinieron a esta vida por algo, y nosotros estamos en la obligación de darles todo el cariño y todo el apoyo que podemos darles para poderlos sacar adelante.”

“...this guy came into this life for something, and we are under the obligation to give them all the love and care, and all the support that we can, to keep them moving forward by themselves.”

Crossing the finish line, NY Marathon, B Roll: Natural Sounds

Maickel training, B Roll:

“El entrenamiento es muy intenso, son seis días a la semana, aproximadamente tres horas y media diarias a veces más, hay largos de ocho horas y media de entrenamiento.”

“Training is quite intense, six days per week, almost four hours per day, but sometimes we reach almost nine hours.”

Maickel Melamed:

“Es un entrenamiento muy intenso diseñado específicamente para mi persona, cada ser humano es diferente.”

“Is a very tough training, specially designed for me, every human is different.”

Photos:
“Esto es dedicado a todos esos seres humanos que tienen esos sueños adentro y que están esperando una chispita para despertarlos e ir en búsqueda de ellos.”

“This is dedicated to those human beings that have dreams, for those who are waiting for something to spark their life, wake up and go for it.”

End of NY Marathon, B Roll: Natural Sounds

Short Documentary
Country: Venezuela
Director: Placido Garrido
Editorial Producer: Alvaro Mendoza Saad
@LAtAmSight 2012

Restrictions: Featured and licensed by TELEMUNDO to all American continent (from Patagonia, Argentina to Alaska, USA)

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The poor living conditions of indigen...
San Antonio Palopo, Guatemala
By hiroko tanaka
09 Aug 2012

The family of 3-year-old Santos, second from right, live in a two-room house. The oldest child sleeps in a bed in his room and the four others share two wooden beds with no mattress.

Poverty plagues the indigenous in Guatemala surviving in poor living conditions. Many live in one-room homes made with cane, mud, and tin sheeting with mud floor and many lack access to clean water, sanitation facilities, kitchens or furniture.

The indigenous village of San Antonio Palopó in Guatemala sits on the steep banks of Lake Atitlan, the nation’s popular tourist destination located 40 miles east of Guatemala City. The United Nations reports that 80% of the indigenous population in Guatemala are living in poverty, compared to 40% of the non-indigenous population in the nation.

San Antonio Palopó was one of the villages hit hardest by tropical storm Agatha in 2010. The village suffered from a huge landslide that swept away 25 homes, killed 15 people and destroyed the water systems. Many who lost their homes returned to the same land, but remain insecure from potential storms and landslides; many families could not afford to relocate to a safer location.