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Raj Kumar’s fight against social stig...
Kathmandu, Nepal
By Rajneesh Bhandari
23 Mar 2013

Raj Kumar is among many Nepalis who contracted HIV from a dirty needle, and now he is trying to adjust in society and working hard to achieve his long cherished dream, to be a singer. Though Raj Kumar knew that he had HIV in 2004, he didn’t disclose the fact to his wife, out of the fear of ruining his family and being stigmatized by society.
It has been two months since Raj Kumar disclosed the news about his HIV infection to his wife, with much care and counseling.
He took advantage of help of his friends, colleagues and counselors to do the “impossible task,” telling others. Raj Kumar said that he waited for “the right time,” but always “felt heavy with the guilt of hiding it to his wife.” The right moment however, came after nearly a decade. “It was difficult to gather the courage to tell,” he added. “Now I have gathered courage to face it.”
Raj Kumar is now pursuing his childhood dream to be a singer. Raj Kumar’s first song “Mod” was released during a function in Kathmandu on April 29, 2013.

“I was born genius, drugs spoiled me,” Raj Kumar said looking back at his life. When he reached grade eight he got into a habit of using drugs. It was very late that his mother, his primary caretaker, knew about it.

According to government data, an average of 1,437 new infections are reported each year. In 2011, 50,287 people were living with HIV and 3,804 of them are children. Out of the total HIV cases reported in 2011, 87.9 percent were from sexual transmission. The number of new cases of HIV infections has been on decline in the last five years. In 2007, a total of 64,585 people were believed to be living with HIV. Government figures put HIV prevalence in the adult population at 0.3 percent. Only 20,583 HIV cases are reported so far.

Nepal’s first HIV case was reported in 1988. The high-risk group includes intravenous drug users, female sex workers and their clients, men who have sex with other men and male migrant laborers.

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Ritual Exhumation -Ifugao, Philippine...
Ifugao, Philippines
By Sherbien Dacalanio
19 Mar 2013

Bogwa is an ancient ritual in Ifugao, Philippines where natives in Kiangan, Asipulo, Banaue, Lagawe, Hingyon, and Hungduan exhume their death as a form of love and respect to their departed relatives. They feast, celebrate, and offer prayers to the dead for three days.

Although most Ifuagonos have converted to Christianity, they still practice this ritual taboo and incorporate Christian songs and prayers during “Bogwa”.

On the first day of "Bogwa", a Mumbaki (priest) will offer a prayer and a ritual asking the spirits to allow them to open the tomb of the dead.

After opening the tomb, a group of men are now ready to exhume the dead body and clean its 246 bones tediously . The men remove the garments and decaying flesh of the dead with their bare hands.

After cleaning the bones, they bury the decaying flesh near the tomb and sundry the cleaned bones. Next they wrap the skeleton's bones with white cloth and place native Ifugao garments over the white cloth.They will lay the wrapped bones in the favorite area of their beloved where they will pray and sing Christian songs for 3 days.

All people who wish to join the celebration are welcome. The family who is celebrating this unusual day are required to butcher pigs every day to feed all the visitors and on the last day they must also butcher a carabao.

A new coffin is made for the wrapped bones.

Before returning the dead to his tomb, a closing prayer and ritual is done and family members are asked to throw stones inside the tomb and make wishes to the spirits of their departed loved ones.

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Sample media
Exilio
Santiago, Santiago, Región Metropolitana,Chile
By Marisa Candia Cadavid and Carwyn Jones
17 Mar 2013

An intimate portrayal of a journey that turned into a goodbye. In 2013, two 88-year-old grandparents return to Chile, the country they fled forty years earlier to avoid Pinochet’s dictatorship. This is the story and documentary of a final encounter.

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Heroes For The Strays (28 of 30)
Alor Star, Malaysia
By syahrin
14 Mar 2013

stray dogs at the animal shelter is eating the foods

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Heroes for the Strays (2 of 30)
Alor Star, Malaysia
By syahrin
13 Mar 2013

-Pak Mie playing with his dog Rani.

For the past 20 years Pak Mie and his wife Mak Intan have been tending to the needs of stray animals suffering from diseases such as mange or cataracts.

The couple established the Pak Mie shelter on a vacant area near a river in Tanjung Bendshara. Although Pak Mie and Mak Intan have put in a lot of their own money and time into caring for these stray animals they have drawn the attention of malicious gossip.

They have been accused as running the center as a cover to hold donation money and accused of mistreating the animals. Pak Mie and Mak Intan strongly deny all these allegations. The center was only recently running on public donations. Prior to this the family ran the center with their own money.

The married couple volunteers at the shelter and its supporters are not only giving aid to these animals but are attempting to overturn Malaysians perception that animals, such as dogs, should be disregarded. Much of this public view stems from some of the Muslim population of Malaysia being taught that touching or having a dog is forbidden.

Contrary to the couple's efforts,the shelter is currently under investigation from the local authorities and they may have to relocate under the pressure of landowners.

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Heroes for the Strays (5 0f 30)
Alor star, Malaysia
By syahrin
13 Mar 2013

-Pak Mie teasing his dog at the shelter.

For the past 20 years Pak Mie and his wife Mak Intan have been tending to the needs of stray animals suffering from diseases such as mange or cataracts.

The couple established the Pak Mie shelter on a vacant area near a river in Tanjung Bendshara. Although Pak Mie and Mak Intan have put in a lot of their own money and time into caring for these stray animals they have drawn the attention of malicious gossip.

They have been accused as running the center as a cover to hold donation money and accused of mistreating the animals. Pak Mie and Mak Intan strongly deny all these allegations. The center was only recently running on public donations. Prior to this the family ran the center with their own money.

The married couple volunteers at the shelter and its supporters are not only giving aid to these animals but are attempting to overturn Malaysians perception that animals, such as dogs, should be disregarded. Much of this public view stems from some of the Muslim population of Malaysia being taught that touching or having a dog is forbidden.

Contrary to the couple's efforts,the shelter is currently under investigation from the local authorities and they may have to relocate under the pressure of landowners.

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Heroes for the Strays (6 0f 30)
Alor Star, Malaysia
By syahrin
12 Mar 2013

Mak Intan shows the spot where one of the dogs bit while she was tending to them.

For the past 20 years Pak Mie and his wife Mak Intan, have been tending to the needs of stray animals suffering from diseases such as mange or cataracts.

The couple established the Pak Mie shelter on a vacant area near a river in Tanjung Bendshara. Although Pak Mie and Mak Intan have put in a lot of their own money and time into caring for these stray animals they have drawn the attention of malicious gossip.

They have been accused as running the center as a cover to hold donation money and accused of mistreating the animals. Pak Mie and Mak Intan strongly deny all these allegations. The center was only recently running on public donations. Prior to this the family ran the center with their own money.

The married couple volunteers at the shelter and its supporters are not only giving aid to these animals but are attempting to overturn Malaysians perception that animals, such as dogs, should be disregarded. Much of this public view stems from some of the Muslim population of Malaysia being taught that touching or having a dog is forbidden.

Contrary to the couple's efforts,the shelter is currently under investigation from the local authorities and they may have to relocate under the pressure of landowners.

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Heroes for the Strays (11 0f 30)
Alor Star, Malaysia
By syahrin
12 Mar 2013

-Pak Mie prepares food for the stray dogs at the shelter.

For the past 20 years Pak Mie and his wife Mak Intan, have been tending to the needs of stray animals suffering from diseases such as mange or cataracts.

The couple established the Pak Mie shelter on a vacant area near a river in Tanjung Bendshara. Although Pak Mie and Mak Intan have put in a lot of their own money and time into caring for these stray animals they have drawn the attention of malicious gossip.

They have been accused as running the center as a cover to hold donation money and accused of mistreating the animals. Pak Mie and Mak Intan strongly deny all these allegations. The center was only recently running on public donations. Prior to this the family ran the center with their own money.

The married couple volunteers at the shelter and its supporters are not only giving aid to these animals but are attempting to overturn Malaysians perception that animals, such as dogs, should be disregarded. Much of this public view stems from some of the Muslim population of Malaysia being taught that touching or having a dog is forbidden.

Contrary to the couple's efforts,the shelter is currently under investigation from the local authorities and they may have to relocate under the pressure by landowner

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Heroes for the Strays (7 0f 30)
Alor Star,Malaysia
By syahrin
12 Mar 2013

-Mak Intan resting after feeding the stray dogs at the shelter.

For the past 20 years Pak Mie and his wife Mak Intan have been tending to the needs of stray animals suffering from diseases such as mange or cataracts.

The couple established the Pak Mie shelter on a vacant area near a river in Tanjung Bendshara. Although Pak Mie and Mak Intan have put in a lot of their own money and time into caring for these stray animals they have drawn the attention of malicious gossip.

They have been accused as running the center as a cover to hold donation money and accused of mistreating the animals. Pak Mie and Mak Intan strongly deny all these allegations. The center was only recently running on public donations. Prior to this the family ran the center with their own money.

The married couple volunteers at the shelter and its supporters are not only giving aid to these animals but are attempting to overturn Malaysians perception that animals, such as dogs, should be disregarded. Much of this public view stems from some of the Muslim population of Malaysia being taught that touching or having a dog is forbidden.

Contrary to the couple's efforts,the shelter is currently under investigation from the local authorities and they may have to relocate under the pressure of landowners.

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Heroes for the Strays (10 0f 30)
Alor star,Malaysia
By syahrin
12 Mar 2013

-One of the stray dogs in Pak Mie shelter barking as people try to approach him

For the past 20 years Pak Mie and his wife Mak Intan have been tending to the needs of stray animals suffering from diseases such as mange or cataracts.

The couple established the Pak Mie shelter on a vacant area near a river in Tanjung Bendshara. Although Pak Mie and Mak Intan have put in a lot of their own money and time into caring for these stray animals they have drawn the attention of malicious gossip.

They have been accused as running the center as a cover to hold donation money and accused of mistreating the animals. Pak Mie and Mak Intan strongly deny all these allegations. The center was only recently running on public donations. Prior to this the family ran the center with their own money.

The married couple volunteers at the shelter and its supporters are not only giving aid to these animals but are attempting to overturn Malaysians perception that animals, such as dogs, should be disregarded. Much of this public view stems from some of the Muslim population of Malaysia being taught that touching or having a dog is forbidden.

Contrary to the couple's efforts,the shelter is currently under investigation from the local authorities and they may have to relocate under the pressure of landowners.

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Heroes for the Strays (12 of 30)
Alor star, Malaysia
By syahrin
12 Mar 2013

-Mak Intan preparing the food for the strays dogs.

For the past 20 years Pak Mie and his wife Mak Intan have been tending to the needs of stray animals suffering from diseases such as mange or cataracts.

The couple established the Pak Mie shelter on a vacant area near a river in Tanjung Bendshara. Although Pak Mie and Mak Intan have put in a lot of their own money and time into caring for these stray animals they have drawn the attention of malicious gossip.

They have been accused as running the center as a cover to hold donation money and accused of mistreating the animals. Pak Mie and Mak Intan strongly deny all these allegations. The center was only recently running on public donations. Prior to this the family ran the center with their own money.

The married couple volunteers at the shelter and its supporters are not only giving aid to these animals but are attempting to overturn Malaysians perception that animals, such as dogs, should be disregarded. Much of this public view stems from some of the Muslim population of Malaysia being taught that touching or having a dog is forbidden.

Contrary to the couple's efforts,the shelter is currently under investigation from the local authorities and they may have to relocate under the pressure of landowners.

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Heroes for the Strays (8 0f 30)
Alor star, Malaysia
By syahrin
11 Mar 2013

-One of the stray dogs who was saved by Pak Mie from the streets plays with his daughter.

For the past 20 years Pak Mie and his wife Mak Intan have been tending to the needs of stray animals suffering from diseases such as mange or cataracts.

The couple established the Pak Mie shelter on a vacant area near a river in Tanjung Bendshara. Although Pak Mie and Mak Intan have put in a lot of their own money and time into caring for these stray animals they have drawn the attention of malicious gossip.

They have been accused as running the center as a cover to hold donation money and accused of mistreating the animals. Pak Mie and Mak Intan strongly deny all these allegations. The center was only recently running on public donations. Prior to this the family ran the center with their own money.

The married couple volunteers at the shelter and its supporters are not only giving aid to these animals but are attempting to overturn Malaysians perception that animals, such as dogs, should be disregarded. Much of this public view stems from some of the Muslim population of Malaysia being taught that touching or having a dog is forbidden.

Contrary to the couple's efforts,the shelter is currently under investigation from the local authorities and they may have to relocate under the pressure of landowners.

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Heroes for the Strays (1 of 30)
Alor star, Malaysia
By syahrin
11 Mar 2013

-Pak Mie prepares food for his dogs.

For the past 20 years Pak Mie and his wife Mak Intan have been tending to the needs of stray animals suffering from diseases such as mange or cataracts.

The couple established the Pak Mie shelter on a vacant area near a river in Tanjung Bendshara. Although Pak Mie and Mak Intan have put in a lot of their own money and time into caring for these stray animals they have drawn the attention of malicious gossip.

They have been accused as running the center as a cover to hold donation money and accused of mistreating the animals. Pak Mie and Mak Intan strongly deny all these allegations. The center was only recently running on public donations. Prior to this the family ran the center with their own money.

The married couple volunteers at the shelter and its supporters are not only giving aid to these animals but are attempting to overturn Malaysians perception that animals, such as dogs, should be disregarded. Much of this public view stems from some of the Muslim population of Malaysia being taught that touching or having a dog is forbidden.

Contrary to the couple's efforts,the shelter is currently under investigation from the local authorities and they may have to relocate under the pressure by landowners.

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Japan Marks 2nd Anniversary Of Tsunam...
Miyagi, Japan
By satoruniwa
11 Mar 2013

An old women who lost six relatives in the tsunami prays for them in front of a grave on the second anniversary day of 3.11. Minamisoma, Fukushima, Japan. 11 Mar. 2013

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Japan Marks 2nd Anniversary Of Tsunam...
Fukushima, Japan
By satoruniwa
11 Mar 2013

A girl who lost her friend to the tsunami reads a message of condolence in Namie-town's memorial service in Nihonmatsu where Namie's temporary city hall is. People who used to live in Namie have not been able to come back to their hometown because the town is still designated a No-Go Zone.
Nihonmatsu, Fukushima, Japan. 11 Mar. 2013

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The poor living conditions of indigen...
San Antonio Palopo, Guatemala
By U.S. Editor
10 Mar 2013

Poverty plagues the indigenous in Guatemala surviving in poor living conditions. Many live in one-room homes made with cane, mud, and tin sheeting with mud floor and many lack access to clean water, sanitation facilities, kitchens or furniture.

The indigenous village of San Antonio Palopó in Guatemala sits on the steep banks of Lake Atitlan, the nation’s popular tourist destination located 40 miles east of Guatemala City. The United Nations reports that 80% of the indigenous population in Guatemala are living in poverty, compared to 40% of the non-indigenous population in the nation.

San Antonio Palopó was one of the villages hit hardest by tropical storm Agatha in 2010. The village suffered from a huge landslide that swept away 25 homes, killed 15 people and destroyed the water systems. Many who lost their homes returned to the same land, but remain insecure from potential storms and landslides; many families could not afford to relocate to a safer location.

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KENYA DAILY LIFE (27 of 27)
Nairobi, Kenya
By Karel Prinsloo
28 Feb 2013

Shack just next the railway line in Kibera.
Picture/Karel Prinsloo

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KENYA DAILY LIFE (23 of 27)
Nairobi, Kenya
By Karel Prinsloo
28 Feb 2013

A family prepares dinner in the Kibera slum.
Picture/Karel Prinsloo

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KENYA DAILY LIFE (9 of 27)
Nairobi, Kenya
By Karel Prinsloo
28 Feb 2013

A family prepares dinner in the Kibera slum.
Picture/Karel Prinsloo

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Getting Prepared
Dalhamiye, Lebanon
By Docphot
13 Feb 2013

Women and children prepare for a photo at a refugee camp in the Bekaa Valley, Lebanon.

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Island of Twins (13 of 23)
Alabat Island, Philippines
By Sherbien Dacalanio
04 Feb 2013

There are around 60 pairs of twins in a small town on Alabat Island. Eudosia and Antonia are the oldest twins living in the island turning 82 next year,w hile the five month-old babies, Jane and Joy, are the youngest twins on the island.
According to the mayor, the population of the island is composed of .4% of twins of the 12,039 residents of their town. When he and his wife migrated to the island in 1980s they were amazed that the island had so many twins. As a matter of fact, the former mayor of the island had a twin brother. Town folks are shocked when they think they've seen that the dead mayor is alive, but later learn that the former mayor has a twin brother.
No studies have been conducted on the island as to why the prevalence of twins in this small town is growing. According to a study conducted between 1996 to 2006, the Philippine Obstetric and Gynecologic Society found out that there was 182% increase in multiple pregnancies in 35 year-old women due to the use of fertility drugs. Due to the remoteness of the island and the limited access to fertility drugs, other influences could be considered such as inheritance of twinning or the food intake of mothers.
According to Wikipedia, Yoruba in South Africa has the highest rate of twinning in the world, with 45-50 twin sets (or 90-100 twins) per 1,000 live births, possibly because of high consumption of a specific type of yam containing a natural phytoestrogen which may stimulate the ovaries to release an egg from each side.
The main source of sustenance on the island is farming and fishing and according to the oldest midwife in the island, heredity is the major culprit of twinning in the island, and so far, their island has the highest population of twins in the entire Philippines.

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LIVING WITH LEPROSY IN ETHIOPIA - Edi...
Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
By Editor's Picks
04 Feb 2013

In Ethiopia living with leprosy has enormous social implications. Though it is not contagious, contracting the disease forces most people to a solitary life, or at best, into a leper community such as are found throughout the country. Medicinal and educational advances see understanding of the disease growing in Ethiopia, not least apparent at The Alert hospital, a charitable hospital funded primarily through European aid that provides inexpensive or free treatment to many victims of leprosy.

The Alert hospital is situated in a slum, where a small group of women gather to fight their condition; they've created a small business in which they knit, sew and sell traditional garments and bedding, earning a small salary that contributes to the well being of their families. Life continues to be difficult, but several women are able to provide schooling, food, and a home for their children and ease some of the distress of living with leprosy.

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Island of Twins (19 of 23)
Alabat Island, Philippines
By Sherbien Dacalanio
03 Feb 2013

There are around 60 pairs of twins in a small town on Alabat Island. Eudosia and Antonia are the oldest twins living in the island turning 82 next year,w hile the five month-old babies, Jane and Joy, are the youngest twins on the island.
According to the mayor, the population of the island is composed of .4% of twins of the 12,039 residents of their town. When he and his wife migrated to the island in 1980s they were amazed that the island had so many twins. As a matter of fact, the former mayor of the island had a twin brother. Town folks are shocked when they think they've seen that the dead mayor is alive, but later learn that the former mayor has a twin brother.
No studies have been conducted on the island as to why the prevalence of twins in this small town is growing. According to a study conducted between 1996 to 2006, the Philippine Obstetric and Gynecologic Society found out that there was 182% increase in multiple pregnancies in 35 year-old women due to the use of fertility drugs. Due to the remoteness of the island and the limited access to fertility drugs, other influences could be considered such as inheritance of twinning or the food intake of mothers.
According to Wikipedia, Yoruba in South Africa has the highest rate of twinning in the world, with 45-50 twin sets (or 90-100 twins) per 1,000 live births, possibly because of high consumption of a specific type of yam containing a natural phytoestrogen which may stimulate the ovaries to release an egg from each side.
The main source of sustenance on the island is farming and fishing and according to the oldest midwife in the island, heredity is the major culprit of twinning in the island, and so far, their island has the highest population of twins in the entire Philippines.

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Leper Community in Addis Ababa
Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
By U.S. Editor
28 Jan 2013

Leprosy has been identified as a major health problem in Ethiopia since the 1950's, when the effort to control leprosy began by the establishment of a National leprosy office in the Ministry of Health with the support of German Leprosy Relief Association (GLRA). There are three main regions where Leprosy is still endemic, that is Oromiya, Amhara and SNNPRG in the Central and South Eastern highlands.
Following the introduction of MDT and the consequent reduction in the duration of treatment, there resulted a constant and steady decline in the prevalence of leprosy. Due to the reduction in number of patients registered, which has also reduced the workload of leprosy services, they have integrated the leprosy program within the general health services. The integration services covers a wider geographical area and is closer to the community. This integration is believed to reduce the stigma associated with leprosy and they think may have an impact on the epidemiology.
Today however lepers are rarely included in society. In Northern Addis Ababa, the capital of Ethiopia, thousands of lepers lives in poverty with their families, excluded from Ethiopian society. Their plight is nothing new in this poor East African country. Since the 19th century Western travelers or scientists have described the harsh living conditions of these outcast carrying, as thought back then, a very contagious sickness. About three thousand live in this northern slum, trying to survive by begging on the streets of the capital, or near the only church of the area. Such a woman, Kelbe Adamu, 60 years old, left her small village hoping to find better understanding of her countrymen in the capital. She was quickly disappointed, as her life did not improve. However with time she was able to find a small job sewing traditional Ethiopian clothes and bed sheets with other women lepers, making a small living, enough to feed herself and her grandchildren born in the slum.

But not all is bleak. A group of women with leprosy have gotten together to fight their condition. They created a small business where a dozen or so of these women knit and put together traditional garments and bed sheets. Using their bare hands and ancients machinery, these women have managed to organize a small business where they can earn a small salary from their sales. Kelebe, 60 years old, is one of these women. She arrived in the slum from the Northern part of the country to start over and perhaps find a better life after her husband died. She brought with her, her children, cousins, and other relatives, to increase their chances of survival. Once there, she was quickly reminded that her condition would not make things life easy for her and her family. She managed to find a shack made out of mud with metal roofing, and dirt floors. She, however did not give up, and joined these businesswomen. The fruit of her work has helped her to feed herself as well as her family members. In fact it has allowed her to prosper, buy new close and give some schooling to the youngest in her family.
With an ongoing fix price of 50$ for the most expensive bedding, the little company has been able to sustain itself for a few years now, feeding a dozen family. However this small grouping seem to be the exception to the rule. Most lepers in the slum keep starving; their offspring have no more future than their parents did before them, and the government seems uninterested in helping this portion of the population.

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La Rinconada, into the gold's bubble 18
La RInconada, Peru
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
24 Jan 2013

Cerro Lunar: Vanesa Canesa is photographed with her daughter Ana Paula in front of their little house, made with stones and "calamina" (metal layer), in Cerro Lunar, Ananea, Peru. Vanesa is a miner's wife and she used to support her husband working on "Pallaqueo" (collecting stones thrown from the mines looking for gold) and now she quit due to health reasons.

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RUNNING FROM REPRESSION - Editor's Pi...
Tibet
By Editor's Picks
24 Jan 2013

Every year, hundreds of Tibetans make their way to the Tibetan Refugee Reception Centre in Kathmandu, Nepal, seeking to escape religious and cultural repression by the Chinese government.

Crossing the border to reach Nepal can be a very costly endeavor – with guides being paid between 12 000 CNY (€1400) and 50 000 CNY (€8500) per person – if it is to be secure. But with the help of their family members, many Tibetans are at least able to attempt it.

But the challenge is not only found in meeting these expenses – it is also found in reconciling with leaving family members behind and the uncertainty of the future; oftentimes, it is also found in crossing the physical barriers which divide these two nations; yet, for others, the journey simply consists of a single bus or plane ride.

Whatever the reality of the journey is for these Tibetans who have fled their homes – be it dramatic or uneventful - they are all tales of refuge.

(Where indicated (*), names have been changed to protect the subject’s identity and that of any friends and family still living in Tibet).

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La Rinconada, into the gold's bubble 20
La RInconada, Peru
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
23 Jan 2013

Left to right, Lucy Callpacruz and Norma Quispe (with her two children Eduardo Cristian and Chantal Ochoqui), both miner's wives, are pictured in their little house made with "calamina" (metal layer) in La Rinconada, Ananea, Peru. Lucy has nine children and she is from Putina. From time to time, Lucy and Norma support their husbands working as "Pallaqueos" (selecting stones from the mine dumps looking for gold).

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Cooking
Bamako, Mali
By bindra
17 Dec 2012

A displaced woman from Timbuktu cooks food in the room of her host family in Bamako to later sell at the market. Many displaced find it hard to make ends meet as they are not able to resume their normal activities and livelihoods they had in the north.

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Curtains
Bamako, Mali
By bindra
17 Dec 2012

Two displaced children hold the curtains closed in the room of their host family in Bamako where they have found refuge since fleeing Timbuktu.

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Vegetables
Bamako, Mali
By bindra
15 Dec 2012

Many displaced women sell vegetables in order to feed their families in Bamako. More than 265,000 displaced travelled to refugee camps in Mauritania, Niger and Burkina Faso while 185,800 more have been internally displaced.

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Stories in Tents, Qah Refugee Camp (6...
Idlib, Syria
By Jodi Hilton
12 Dec 2012

Newly arrived family with their possessions at Qah Camp for displaced Syrians on December 12, 2012. The same doctor reported high incidence of diarrhea, lung infections and hepatitis A among the population of nearly 3600 displaced Syrians.

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Stories in Tents, Qah Refugee Camp (3...
Idlib, Syria
By Jodi Hilton
12 Dec 2012

Tomato and potato soup being cooked at Qah Camp for displaced Syrians on December 12, 2012. The same doctor reported high incidence of diarrhea, lung infections and hepatitis A among the population of nearly 3600 displaced Syrians.

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Bedouin Settlement near Israeli Housi...
Ma’aleh Adumim
By javiervidela
06 Dec 2012

A Bedouin family living in front the settlement Ma'aleh Adumim arrive at home. as Israeli authorities recently approved plans to build more settlement units in an area known as E1, which links Jerusalem with Ma’aleh Adumim, these families are in danger of expulsion.

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Azaz Camp, Syria (38 of 41)
Azaz, Syria
By Michele Pero
06 Dec 2012

Refugee camp of Azaz, Syrian border.
Refugees from Halep and surrounding areas have lost their houses under the bombings. They left Halep with just the clothes they had at the time. They have no documents, no money, no belongings. The refugees believed the could cross the Turkish border to escape the massacres, but after a limited number of refugees were accepted by the Turkish government who settled in the nearby camp of Kilis, the border was closed. They had to settle in the camp right on the Syrian border, waiting for a move that does not arrive.

Turkey cannot take more refugees and cannot do more than what actually it does. The refugees must stay were they are, with no home in Syria anymore, no passport to leave the country, as if convicted to stay in the camp.
The excess number refugees not accepted into Turkey settled in September 2012 under big hangars once used by Syrian customs police for storing and checking goods before letting them pass the border. For months the refugees had to sleep right on the pavement, under hangars, under trucks or any other shelter available. No heating, no running water, no latrines, no roof above their heads.

Tents arrived just at around the middle of November 2012, donated by the Red Crescent of Qatar. Since that, three hangars were filled with tents, then other tents were placed on open ground. In December 2012, the number of refugees at the Azaz camp reached about 7000.

Life at the camp is hard. Volunteers from various ONG such as IHH provide meals every day. Supplies come from world wide relief organizations and volunteer donations, but they are not enough to meet the needs of so many. Tents are not waterproof. The pavement is constantly wet when the rain falls, especially hard for those ones settled on open ground. No electricity is supplied. Water is scarce and is brought in big containers for those who need it most. Heating becomes a real issue with the oncoming winter. Kids are sent to the surrounding fields to gather any burning material, but they cannot go too far since the mine fields protecting the no-man’s land are right at border line next to the camp. Refugees burn dry grass. At dusk, they must make return to their tents, because all around there is no light to even walk. They rest by candlelight in their tents until they fall asleep.
Recently a protest calling for better conditions at the camp was held at the border (see other reportage “Syria - protest in the camp of Azaz”, © Michele Pero) to get attention from the Turkish Governor of the area, with no results. These people must stay here. No place where to go, no place to return to. Convicted, forgotten. No one knows for how long.

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March for immigrants in Sao Paulo, Br...
Sao Paulo, Brazil
By Juliana Spinola
02 Dec 2012

Immigrants in Brazil out in the streets demanding rights and improvements in immigration laws.

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Shadows
Mopti, Mali
By bindra
27 Nov 2012

A young boy herds sheep in Segou, in front of a house where a family of displaced have come to flee the north. More than 265,000 travelled to refugee camps in Mauritania, Niger and Burkina Faso while 185,800 more have been internally displaced.

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Raj Kumar’s fight against social stig...
Kathmandu, Nepal
By Rajneesh Bhandari
27 Nov 2012

Raj Kumar is among many Nepalis who contracted HIV from a dirty needle, and now he is trying to adjust in society and working hard to achieve his long cherished dream, to be a singer. Though Raj Kumar knew that he had HIV in 2004, he didn’t disclose the fact to his wife, out of the fear of ruining his family and being stigmatized by society.
It has been two months since Raj Kumar disclosed the news about his HIV infection to his wife, with much care and counseling.
He took advantage of help of his friends, colleagues and counselors to do the “impossible task,” telling others. Raj Kumar said that he waited for “the right time,” but always “felt heavy with the guilt of hiding it to his wife.” The right moment however, came after nearly a decade. “It was difficult to gather the courage to tell,” he added. “Now I have gathered courage to face it.”
Raj Kumar is now pursuing his childhood dream to be a singer. Raj Kumar’s first song “Mod” was released during a function in Kathmandu on April 29, 2013.

“I was born genius, drugs spoiled me,” Raj Kumar said looking back at his life. When he reached grade eight he got into a habit of using drugs. It was very late that his mother, his primary caretaker, knew about it.

According to government data, an average of 1,437 new infections are reported each year. In 2011, 50,287 people were living with HIV and 3,804 of them are children. Out of the total HIV cases reported in 2011, 87.9 percent were from sexual transmission. The number of new cases of HIV infections has been on decline in the last five years. In 2007, a total of 64,585 people were believed to be living with HIV. Government figures put HIV prevalence in the adult population at 0.3 percent. Only 20,583 HIV cases are reported so far.

Nepal’s first HIV case was reported in 1988. The high-risk group includes intravenous drug users, female sex workers and their clients, men who have sex with other men and male migrant laborers.