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Life Along The Railway (4 of 34)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
20 Jun 2013

Children work together to gather tap water for their families who face a lack of running water in the slums of Dakha, Bangladesh’s vibrant capital. It is home to more than 10 million people, making it one of the world’s most populated cities. Hundreds of people live beside the railroad in the Kawran Bazar slum, where residents face dire conditions in the unsanitary environment. Dakha, Bangladesh, June, 2013.

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Life Along The Railway (12 of 34)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
20 Jun 2013

A family is cooking right in front of their house, a makeshift tent right next to the railroad tracks.

Space is scarce in Dhaka, Bangladesh’s vibrant capital. So is money. An estimated number of more than 10 million people live in Dhaka, making it one of the world’s most populated cities. Poor neighborhoods, by western definitions called slums, are continuously growing. The space next to railway tracks has long been occupied by numerous makeshift homes.

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Life Along The Railway (4 of 11)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
20 Jun 2013

A family is cooking between railway tracks outside their makeshift home where they are living in a slum in Dhaka.

Space is scarce in Dhaka, Bangladesh’s vibrant capital. So is money. An estimated number of more than 10 million people live in Dhaka, making it one of the world’s most populated cities. Poor neighborhoods, by western definitions called slums, are continuously growing. The space next to railway tracks has long been occupied by numerous makeshift homes.

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Daily Life - Poverty & Homelessness (...
Yenagoa, Bayelsa, Nigeria
By Tife Owolabi
17 Jun 2013

A woman digs into the moulding sand by the road side of Yenagoa to get small rocks for building contruction in the oil rich Bayelsa state owing to husband jobless to provide for the family.

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Spills & Curses
Yenagoa, Bayelsa, Nigeria
By U.S. Editor
15 Jun 2013

The Ikarama community of the oil-rich state of Bayelsa, Nigeria struggles to survive with crude oil spills from Royal Dutch Shell, ruining their crops and natural spaces.

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Daily Life - Poverty & Homelessness (...
Yenagoa, Bayelsa, Nigeria
By Tife Owolabi
15 Jun 2013

10 year old Emmanuel searches for small rocks by the roadside of Yenagoa, capital of oil rich, Bayelsa state, Nigeria to support his family.

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Daily Life - Poverty & Homelessness (...
Yenagoa, Bayelsa, Nigeria
By Tife Owolabi
15 Jun 2013

10 year old Emmanuel drags his two sacks in search for small rocks by the road side of Yenagoa, capital of oil rich, Bayelsa state, Nigeria to supports his family.

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Daily Life - Poverty & Homelessness (...
Yenagoa, Bayelsa, Nigeria
By Tife Owolabi
15 Jun 2013

10 year old Emmanuel stands before small rocks by the road side of Yenagoa, capital of oil rich Bayelsa state, Nigeria, collected to support his family.

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Spills & Curses (10 of 20)
Yenagoa, Bayelsa, Nigeria
By Tife Owolabi
14 Jun 2013

Freeborn's family stands in front of their home near Royal Dutch Shell Facility in Ikarama community in the oil rich Bayelsa State, Nigeria.

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Spills & Curses (16 of 20)
Yenagoa, Bayelsa, Nigeria
By Tife Owolabi
14 Jun 2013

Freeborn Roland viewing spilled crude oil from Royal Dutch Shell facility behind his home in the Ikarama community of oil rich Bayelsa state Nigeria

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Spills & Curses (14 of 20)
Yenagoa, Bayelsa, Nigeria
By Tife Owolabi
14 Jun 2013

36 year-old, Freeborn Roland, a father of four children sits in his home near Royal Dutch Shell Facility in Ikarama community in the oil rich Bayelsa state, Nigeria.

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Pottery Workshop In Gaza (12 of 12)
Gaza
By AhmedDeeb
13 Jun 2013

Ahmed Attallah, 14, carrying crockery that was produced by his grandfather at their workshop in Gaza city. This factory has been a source of income and pride for the Attallah family for generations. Gaza Strip, June, 2013.

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Pottery Workshop In Gaza (13 of 35)
Gaza
By AhmedDeeb
13 Jun 2013

Ahmed Attallah, 14, left school when he was 13 to work in the factory alongside his father and grandfather. This pottery factory in Gaza has been a source of income and pride for the Attallah family for generations. Gaza Strip, June, 2013.

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The Oldest Pottery Workshop In Gaza o...
Gaza
By U.S. Editor
11 Jun 2013

This pottery factory in Gaza has been a source of income and pride for the Attallah family for generations. The tradition of pottery making in Gaza dates back centuries and has been a source of income and family pride. This ceramic factory rest underneath the Attallah family's home. The Attallahs consider the pottery industry a part of their identity and heritage. They are one of the oldest families producing pottery in Gaza. Their factory was established over 60 years ago and are now struggling to maintain not only their business but an ancestral tradition. The security situation in Gaza and the Israeli blockade has made their business unprofitable and on the brink of vanishing.

To Read Full Article Go To : http://transterramedia.com/media/19049

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Kenyan Grandmothers' Survival (18 of 34)
Nairobi, Kenya
By Karel Prinsloo
28 May 2013

Seventy year old Wairimu Gachenga shows lettuce that she gets from a local church to feed her family on 30 May 2013 in the Nairobi slum of Korogocho, Kenya. Once a week a group of grandmothers from the area get together to practice self defence techniques after one of them was raped in 2007. Rape of elderly woman has increased in Kenya as people believe that grandmothers have a lower risk of HIV compared to younger women. KAREL PRINSLOO.

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Kenyan Grandmothers' Survival -Editor...
Nairobi, Kenya
By Mais Istanbuli
28 May 2013

Wairimu Gachenga, 70, lives in the notorious Nairobi slum of Korogocho, Kenya. She looks after her grandchildren, 19 year old Wahome Njeriand and 17 year old Wairimu Njeriafter, after their mother died from HIV. In order to make ends meet, she travels to the Dandora dumpsite to collect plastic and other recyclable material which she then sells. On a weekly basis, she receives some cabbage and other plant material from a church in the area that she uses to feed her family.

Gachenga regularly joins a group of grandmothers from the area who get together to practice self-defense techniques, after one of the natives was raped in 2007. Elderly women in Kenya are increasingly suffering from sexual assault, since many believe that they have a lower risk of catching HIV compared to younger women. In response to this problem, the group is also part of a support group for the women, where they swap stories and ensure each other's safety. When one of the women doesn't attend a meeting, the rest of the group suspects that she is in danger. Gachenga, like many other women in her condition, has resorted to communal means to secure her livelihood, where the weekly meetings act as a safe haven for those in need of help.

View More Photos Here: http://transterramedia.com/collections/1220

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Kenya Grandmother's Survival
Nairobi, Kenya
By Mais Istanbuli
28 May 2013

Wairimu Gachenga, 70, lives in the notorious Nairobi slum of Korogocho, Kenya. She looks after her grandchildren, 19 year old Wahome Njeriand and 17 year old Wairimu Njeriafter, after their mother died from HIV. In order to make ends meet, she travels to the Dandora dumpsite to collect plastic and other recyclable material which she then sells. On a weekly basis, she receives some cabbage and other plant material from a church in the area that she uses to feed her family.
Gachenga regularly joins a group of grandmothers from the area who get together to practice self-defense techniques, after one of the natives was raped in 2007. Elderly women in Kenya are increasingly suffering from sexual assault, since many believe that they have a lower risk of catching HIV compared to younger women. In response to this problem, the group is also part of a support group for the women, where they swap stories and ensure each other's safety. When one of the women doesn't attend a meeting, the rest of the group suspects that she is in danger. Gachenga, like many other women in her condition, has resorted to communal means to secure her livelihood, where the weekly meetings act as a safe haven for those in need of help.

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Anti-Gay Marriage Demonstration
Paris, France
By tipilakota
26 May 2013

Tens of thousands of people protested against France's new gay marriage law in central Paris on Sunday.
The law came into force over a week ago, but organizers decided to go ahead with the long-planned demonstration to show their continued opposition as well as their frustration with President Francois Hollande, who had made legalizing gay marriage one of his keynote campaign pledges in last year's election.
Marchers set off from three separate points across Paris, and by early evening they filled the Invalides esplanade just across the Seine River from the Champs Elysees.

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Four Floors In Bielany
Warsaw, Poland
By Kirk Ellingham
21 May 2013

Chechen Refugees in Warsaw

Kirk Ellingham

http://kellingham.viewbook.com/portfolio/four_floors_in_bielany

Every day dozens of Chechens try to escape the Putin-proclaimed happy paradise in Chechnya by entering the European Union illegally via the border with Ukraine or Belarus. Despite the news of general peace and prosperity widely circulated by the news media in the Chechen Republic, more and more people dream of leaving the allegedly problem-free Chechnya.

Each time I returned to the rundown refugee centre on the edge of Warsaw that house nearly 300 mainly Chechen refugees to Poland, I found it harder and harder to get a grip both ethically and photographically on their situation.
Some of the residents had moved out into Warsaw apartments, some had been repatriated home; others had just disappeared into the E.U, especially if their asylum claims had been rejected. Some may have even returned to Chechnya voluntary, even perhaps to fight in the insurgence. Often if they had been refused status to stay in Poland or elsewhere the militant young felt they were left with little choice, but to return back to Chechnya to face violent reprisals or join the Islamic insurgence in the Caucasus Mountains.
It became a confusing place but with so many kind and courageous people letting me into their lives to photograph them I felt I needed to continue document the transient and desperate nature of their existence on the four floors of Bielany, the reasons they fled their homeland, in an original way at least.
So how could I transpose these notes and photographs into a viable project? The stories they told me ranged from horrific tales of torture to ones of simply trying to rejoin family members who had left Chechnya years before, during the two wars.
So I began to present the images with my written notes, thoughts and also the pictures the children made for me whilst wandering the cold corridors waiting to interview and photograph their parents.
I often felt like a useless recorder of tragedy and after one visit I felt despair at being only able being able to record these courageous peoples images and voices with a view to just using the work for my MA and not to implement any real change for their situation in Poland. I destroyed my first notebook in a Warsaw youth hostel in anger one night but later I fished its torn remains back from the kitchen bin.
A Bielany resident who I had spoken to about my frustrations had told me the next day even though it may sound clichéd that “It didn’t matter, at least you are listening to us, at least you are here trying to understand us, to document us” this helped waive my doubts about continuing the project, but I still feel that a photojournalist without empathy or ethics is only taking, often not helping; I hope I can give something back even if its only a testament to the fact that the Chechen people were here, in a small part of Warsaw waiting in a bureaucratic limbo as to whether they could continue there journey or travel back to a bleeding homeland.

I plan to make this project into a multimedia piece including all the notebooks, text and audio as well as a finished book and exhibition

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Transgender election candidate from P...
Jhelum City, Pakistan
By Muhammed Furqan
01 May 2013

Rejected because she is transgendered, Lubna lives away from her family.

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A Story of a Fighter and his Gun
Homs, Syria
By Smart Media
01 May 2013

Wa’el Abu Rayan, known to his peers as Abu-Adou was a common construction worker from Al Rastan. A married father of two, Abus has been noted for his obsession with his gun - it never leaves his side.

Emerging from the debris of his bombed out hometown, Abu retreats to the countryside to aid in the training of local would-be fighters. After a day of training he returns home to his family though the gun doesn't leave from his person.

The family man bought his gun by borrowing money from various people and holds it to protect his home town and loved ones. It has become a piece of him, an extra limb, and gives Abu reassurance that it will preserve his “dignity and honour”.

With his gun in one hand and embracing his son with the other he states that he fights to defend the children of Syria.

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Observance of International Labor Day...
Lahore, Pakistan
By Murtaza Syed
30 Apr 2013

A laborer recovers metal pieces from the soil, working hard to ensure that his children will have a good day’s meal.

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Raj Kumar’s fight against social stig...
Kathmandu, Nepal
By Rajneesh Bhandari
29 Apr 2013

Raj Kumar is among many Nepalis who contracted HIV from a dirty needle, and now he is trying to adjust in society and working hard to achieve his long cherished dream, to be a singer. Though Raj Kumar knew that he had HIV in 2004, he didn’t disclose the fact to his wife, out of the fear of ruining his family and being stigmatized by society.
It has been two months since Raj Kumar disclosed the news about his HIV infection to his wife, with much care and counseling.
He took advantage of help of his friends, colleagues and counselors to do the “impossible task,” telling others. Raj Kumar said that he waited for “the right time,” but always “felt heavy with the guilt of hiding it to his wife.” The right moment however, came after nearly a decade. “It was difficult to gather the courage to tell,” he added. “Now I have gathered courage to face it.”
Raj Kumar is now pursuing his childhood dream to be a singer. Raj Kumar’s first song “Mod” was released during a function in Kathmandu on April 29, 2013.

“I was born genius, drugs spoiled me,” Raj Kumar said looking back at his life. When he reached grade eight he got into a habit of using drugs. It was very late that his mother, his primary caretaker, knew about it.

According to government data, an average of 1,437 new infections are reported each year. In 2011, 50,287 people were living with HIV and 3,804 of them are children. Out of the total HIV cases reported in 2011, 87.9 percent were from sexual transmission. The number of new cases of HIV infections has been on decline in the last five years. In 2007, a total of 64,585 people were believed to be living with HIV. Government figures put HIV prevalence in the adult population at 0.3 percent. Only 20,583 HIV cases are reported so far.

Nepal’s first HIV case was reported in 1988. The high-risk group includes intravenous drug users, female sex workers and their clients, men who have sex with other men and male migrant laborers.

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Raj Kumar’s fight against social stig...
kathmandu, Nepal
By Rajneesh Bhandari
29 Apr 2013

Raj Kumar is among many Nepalis who contracted HIV from a dirty needle, and now he is trying to adjust in society and working hard to achieve his long cherished dream, to be a singer. Though Raj Kumar knew that he had HIV in 2004, he didn’t disclose the fact to his wife, out of the fear of ruining his family and being stigmatized by society.
It has been two months since Raj Kumar disclosed the news about his HIV infection to his wife, with much care and counseling.
He took advantage of help of his friends, colleagues and counselors to do the “impossible task,” telling others. Raj Kumar said that he waited for “the right time,” but always “felt heavy with the guilt of hiding it to his wife.” The right moment however, came after nearly a decade. “It was difficult to gather the courage to tell,” he added. “Now I have gathered courage to face it.”
Raj Kumar is now pursuing his childhood dream to be a singer. Raj Kumar’s first song “Mod” was released during a function in Kathmandu on April 29, 2013.

“I was born genius, drugs spoiled me,” Raj Kumar said looking back at his life. When he reached grade eight he got into a habit of using drugs. It was very late that his mother, his primary caretaker, knew about it.

According to government data, an average of 1,437 new infections are reported each year. In 2011, 50,287 people were living with HIV and 3,804 of them are children. Out of the total HIV cases reported in 2011, 87.9 percent were from sexual transmission. The number of new cases of HIV infections has been on decline in the last five years. In 2007, a total of 64,585 people were believed to be living with HIV. Government figures put HIV prevalence in the adult population at 0.3 percent. Only 20,583 HIV cases are reported so far.

Nepal’s first HIV case was reported in 1988. The high-risk group includes intravenous drug users, female sex workers and their clients, men who have sex with other men and male migrant laborers.

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Heroes for the Strays (4 0f 30)
Alor Star, Malaysia
By syahrin
13 Apr 2013

-Villagers donate food to Pakmie. A close friend gives fish heads to feed the stray animals.

For the past 20 years Pak Mie and his wife have been tending to the needs of stray animals suffering from diseases such as mange or cataracts.

The couple established the Pak Mie shelter on a vacant area near a river in Tanjung Bendshara. Although Pak Mie and Mak Intan have put in a lot of their own money and time into caring for these stray animals they have drawn the attention of malicious gossip.

They have been accused as running the center as a cover to hold donation money and accused of mistreating the animals. Pak Mie and Mak Intan strongly deny all these allegations. The center was only recently running on public donations. Prior to this the family ran the center with their own money.

The married couple volunteers at the shelter and its supporters are not only giving aid to these animals but are attempting to overturn Malaysians perception that animals, such as dogs, should be disregarded. Much of this public view stems from some of the Muslim population of Malaysia being taught that touching or having a dog is forbidden.

Contrary to the couple's efforts,the shelter is currently under investigation from the local authorities and they may have to relocate under the pressure of landowners.

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Heroes for the Strays (9 0f 30)
Alor star, Malaysia
By syahrin
12 Apr 2013

-One of Pak Mie dogs in the shelter who previously suffered from mange.

For the past 20 years Pak Mie and his wife Mak Intan, have been tending to the needs of stray animals suffering from diseases such as mange or cataracts.

The couple established the Pak Mie shelter on a vacant area near a river in Tanjung Bendshara. Although Pak Mie and Mak Intan have put in a lot of their own money and time into caring for these stray animals they have drawn the attention of malicious gossip.

They have been accused as running the center as a cover to hold donation money and accused of mistreating the animals. Pak Mie and Mak Intan strongly deny all these allegations. The center was only recently running on public donations. Prior to this the family ran the center with their own money.

The married couple volunteers at the shelter and its supporters are not only giving aid to these animals but are attempting to overturn Malaysians perception that animals, such as dogs, should be disregarded. Much of this public view stems from some of the Muslim population of Malaysia being taught that touching or having a dog is forbidden.

Contrary to the couple's efforts,the shelter is currently under investigation from the local authorities and they may have to relocate under the pressure of landowners.

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Living in the Ruins of Gaddafi's Comp...
Tripoli, Libya
By Tripcarbons
11 Apr 2013

Abdullah's Mother

'My family is not in a good situation. I'm holding onto God, but you can't expect anything from the government right now. We're not proud of living here, but at least someone is putting this land to use.'

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Libyan Rebel's Brother Calls for Mili...
Tripoli, Libya
By U.S. Editor
09 Apr 2013

Two months after the death of Ali Abdelhamid Ben Oun, his brother is still waiting to see justice. Ali Abdelhamid Ben Oun survived fighting as a rebel in Libya’s bloody revolution only to be killed in an RPG attack at a checkpoint in February this year.

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Libyan Rebel's Brother Calls For Mili...
Tripoli, Libya
By Tripcarbons
09 Apr 2013

Two months after the death of Ali Abdelhamid Ben Oun and his brother is still waiting to see justice. Ali Abdelhamid Ben Oun survived fighting as a rebel in Libya’s bloody revolution only to be killed in an RPG attack at a checkpoint in February this year.

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Libyan Rebel's Brother Calls for Mili...
Triploi, Libya
By Tripcarbons
09 Apr 2013

Two months after the death of Ali Abdelhamid Ben Oun and his brother is still waiting to see justice. Ali Abdelhamid Ben Oun survived fighting as a rebel in Libya’s bloody revolution only to be killed in an RPG attack at a checkpoint in February this year.

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Raj Kumar’s fight against social stig...
Kathmandu, Nepal
By Rajneesh Bhandari
04 Apr 2013

Raj Kumar is among many Nepalis who contracted HIV from a dirty needle, and now he is trying to adjust in society and working hard to achieve his long cherished dream, to be a singer. Though Raj Kumar knew that he had HIV in 2004, he didn’t disclose the fact to his wife, out of the fear of ruining his family and being stigmatized by society.
It has been two months since Raj Kumar disclosed the news about his HIV infection to his wife, with much care and counseling.
He took advantage of help of his friends, colleagues and counselors to do the “impossible task,” telling others. Raj Kumar said that he waited for “the right time,” but always “felt heavy with the guilt of hiding it to his wife.” The right moment however, came after nearly a decade. “It was difficult to gather the courage to tell,” he added. “Now I have gathered courage to face it.”
Raj Kumar is now pursuing his childhood dream to be a singer. Raj Kumar’s first song “Mod” was released during a function in Kathmandu on April 29, 2013.

“I was born genius, drugs spoiled me,” Raj Kumar said looking back at his life. When he reached grade eight he got into a habit of using drugs. It was very late that his mother, his primary caretaker, knew about it.

According to government data, an average of 1,437 new infections are reported each year. In 2011, 50,287 people were living with HIV and 3,804 of them are children. Out of the total HIV cases reported in 2011, 87.9 percent were from sexual transmission. The number of new cases of HIV infections has been on decline in the last five years. In 2007, a total of 64,585 people were believed to be living with HIV. Government figures put HIV prevalence in the adult population at 0.3 percent. Only 20,583 HIV cases are reported so far.

Nepal’s first HIV case was reported in 1988. The high-risk group includes intravenous drug users, female sex workers and their clients, men who have sex with other men and male migrant laborers.

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Raj Kumar’s fight against social stig...
Kathmandu, Nepal
By Rajneesh Bhandari
04 Apr 2013

Raj Kumar is among many Nepalis who contracted HIV from a dirty needle, and now he is trying to adjust in society and working hard to achieve his long cherished dream, to be a singer. Though Raj Kumar knew that he had HIV in 2004, he didn’t disclose the fact to his wife, out of the fear of ruining his family and being stigmatized by society.
It has been two months since Raj Kumar disclosed the news about his HIV infection to his wife, with much care and counseling.
He took advantage of help of his friends, colleagues and counselors to do the “impossible task,” telling others. Raj Kumar said that he waited for “the right time,” but always “felt heavy with the guilt of hiding it to his wife.” The right moment however, came after nearly a decade. “It was difficult to gather the courage to tell,” he added. “Now I have gathered courage to face it.”
Raj Kumar is now pursuing his childhood dream to be a singer. Raj Kumar’s first song “Mod” was released during a function in Kathmandu on April 29, 2013.

“I was born genius, drugs spoiled me,” Raj Kumar said looking back at his life. When he reached grade eight he got into a habit of using drugs. It was very late that his mother, his primary caretaker, knew about it.

According to government data, an average of 1,437 new infections are reported each year. In 2011, 50,287 people were living with HIV and 3,804 of them are children. Out of the total HIV cases reported in 2011, 87.9 percent were from sexual transmission. The number of new cases of HIV infections has been on decline in the last five years. In 2007, a total of 64,585 people were believed to be living with HIV. Government figures put HIV prevalence in the adult population at 0.3 percent. Only 20,583 HIV cases are reported so far.

Nepal’s first HIV case was reported in 1988. The high-risk group includes intravenous drug users, female sex workers and their clients, men who have sex with other men and male migrant laborers.

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Raj Kumar’s fight against social stig...
Kathmandu, Nepal
By Rajneesh Bhandari
04 Apr 2013

Raj Kumar is among many Nepalis who contracted HIV from a dirty needle, and now he is trying to adjust in society and working hard to achieve his long cherished dream, to be a singer. Though Raj Kumar knew that he had HIV in 2004, he didn’t disclose the fact to his wife, out of the fear of ruining his family and being stigmatized by society.
It has been two months since Raj Kumar disclosed the news about his HIV infection to his wife, with much care and counseling.
He took advantage of help of his friends, colleagues and counselors to do the “impossible task,” telling others. Raj Kumar said that he waited for “the right time,” but always “felt heavy with the guilt of hiding it to his wife.” The right moment however, came after nearly a decade. “It was difficult to gather the courage to tell,” he added. “Now I have gathered courage to face it.”
Raj Kumar is now pursuing his childhood dream to be a singer. Raj Kumar’s first song “Mod” was released during a function in Kathmandu on April 29, 2013.

“I was born genius, drugs spoiled me,” Raj Kumar said looking back at his life. When he reached grade eight he got into a habit of using drugs. It was very late that his mother, his primary caretaker, knew about it.

According to government data, an average of 1,437 new infections are reported each year. In 2011, 50,287 people were living with HIV and 3,804 of them are children. Out of the total HIV cases reported in 2011, 87.9 percent were from sexual transmission. The number of new cases of HIV infections has been on decline in the last five years. In 2007, a total of 64,585 people were believed to be living with HIV. Government figures put HIV prevalence in the adult population at 0.3 percent. Only 20,583 HIV cases are reported so far.

Nepal’s first HIV case was reported in 1988. The high-risk group includes intravenous drug users, female sex workers and their clients, men who have sex with other men and male migrant laborers.

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Raj Kumar's Fight Against Social Stigma
Kathmandu, Nepal
By U.S. Editor
03 Apr 2013

Raj Kumar is one of many Nepalis who contracted HIV from a dirty needle. He is now trying to reintegrate into society despite his condition, and is working hard to achieve his lifelong dream of becoming a singer.

Though Raj Kumar knew that he had HIV in 2004, he didn’t disclose the fact to his wife out of the fear of ruining his family and being stigmatized by society. It has now been two months since Raj Kumar disclosed the news about his HIV infection to his wife, with much care and counseling.

He took advantage of the help of his friends, colleagues and counselors to do the “impossible task,” of telling others. Raj Kumar said that he waited for “the right time,” but always “felt heavy with the guilt of hiding it from his wife.” The right moment, however, eventually arrived, after nearly a decade of secrecy.

“It was difficult to gather the courage to tell,” he added. “Now I have gathered courage to face it.”

Raj Kumar is now pursuing his childhood dream to become a singer. HIs first song, “Mod,” was released during a function in Kathmandu on April 29, 2013.

“I was born genius, drugs spoiled me,” said Raj Kumar, looking back at his life. When he reached grade eight he began using drugs, eventually becoming addicted. It was very late that his mother, his primary caretaker, finally found out about his substance abuse problem.

According to government data, an average of 1,437 new infections are reported each year. In 2011, 50,287 people were living with HIV and 3,804 among them were children. Out of the total HIV cases reported in 2011, 87.9 percent were transmitted sexually. The number of new cases of HIV infections has been on decline in the last five years, and government figures now estimate HIV prevalence in the adult population to be at 0.3 percent.

Nepal’s first HIV case was reported in 1988. High-risk groups in the country include intravenous drug users, female sex workers and their clients, and migrant laborers.

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Raj Kumar’s fight against social stig...
Kathmandu, Nepal
By Rajneesh Bhandari
23 Mar 2013

Raj Kumar is among many Nepalis who contracted HIV from a dirty needle, and now he is trying to adjust in society and working hard to achieve his long cherished dream, to be a singer. Though Raj Kumar knew that he had HIV in 2004, he didn’t disclose the fact to his wife, out of the fear of ruining his family and being stigmatized by society.
It has been two months since Raj Kumar disclosed the news about his HIV infection to his wife, with much care and counseling.
He took advantage of help of his friends, colleagues and counselors to do the “impossible task,” telling others. Raj Kumar said that he waited for “the right time,” but always “felt heavy with the guilt of hiding it to his wife.” The right moment however, came after nearly a decade. “It was difficult to gather the courage to tell,” he added. “Now I have gathered courage to face it.”
Raj Kumar is now pursuing his childhood dream to be a singer. Raj Kumar’s first song “Mod” was released during a function in Kathmandu on April 29, 2013.

“I was born genius, drugs spoiled me,” Raj Kumar said looking back at his life. When he reached grade eight he got into a habit of using drugs. It was very late that his mother, his primary caretaker, knew about it.

According to government data, an average of 1,437 new infections are reported each year. In 2011, 50,287 people were living with HIV and 3,804 of them are children. Out of the total HIV cases reported in 2011, 87.9 percent were from sexual transmission. The number of new cases of HIV infections has been on decline in the last five years. In 2007, a total of 64,585 people were believed to be living with HIV. Government figures put HIV prevalence in the adult population at 0.3 percent. Only 20,583 HIV cases are reported so far.

Nepal’s first HIV case was reported in 1988. The high-risk group includes intravenous drug users, female sex workers and their clients, men who have sex with other men and male migrant laborers.

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Raj Kumar’s fight against social stig...
Kathmandu, Nepal
By Rajneesh Bhandari
23 Mar 2013

Raj Kumar is among many Nepalis who contracted HIV from a dirty needle, and now he is trying to adjust in society and working hard to achieve his long cherished dream, to be a singer. Though Raj Kumar knew that he had HIV in 2004, he didn’t disclose the fact to his wife, out of the fear of ruining his family and being stigmatized by society.
It has been two months since Raj Kumar disclosed the news about his HIV infection to his wife, with much care and counseling.
He took advantage of help of his friends, colleagues and counselors to do the “impossible task,” telling others. Raj Kumar said that he waited for “the right time,” but always “felt heavy with the guilt of hiding it to his wife.” The right moment however, came after nearly a decade. “It was difficult to gather the courage to tell,” he added. “Now I have gathered courage to face it.”
Raj Kumar is now pursuing his childhood dream to be a singer. Raj Kumar’s first song “Mod” was released during a function in Kathmandu on April 29, 2013.

“I was born genius, drugs spoiled me,” Raj Kumar said looking back at his life. When he reached grade eight he got into a habit of using drugs. It was very late that his mother, his primary caretaker, knew about it.

According to government data, an average of 1,437 new infections are reported each year. In 2011, 50,287 people were living with HIV and 3,804 of them are children. Out of the total HIV cases reported in 2011, 87.9 percent were from sexual transmission. The number of new cases of HIV infections has been on decline in the last five years. In 2007, a total of 64,585 people were believed to be living with HIV. Government figures put HIV prevalence in the adult population at 0.3 percent. Only 20,583 HIV cases are reported so far.

Nepal’s first HIV case was reported in 1988. The high-risk group includes intravenous drug users, female sex workers and their clients, men who have sex with other men and male migrant laborers.

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Raj Kumar’s fight against social stig...
Kathmandu, Nepal
By Rajneesh Bhandari
23 Mar 2013

Raj Kumar is among many Nepalis who contracted HIV from a dirty needle, and now he is trying to adjust in society and working hard to achieve his long cherished dream, to be a singer. Though Raj Kumar knew that he had HIV in 2004, he didn’t disclose the fact to his wife, out of the fear of ruining his family and being stigmatized by society.
It has been two months since Raj Kumar disclosed the news about his HIV infection to his wife, with much care and counseling.
He took advantage of help of his friends, colleagues and counselors to do the “impossible task,” telling others. Raj Kumar said that he waited for “the right time,” but always “felt heavy with the guilt of hiding it to his wife.” The right moment however, came after nearly a decade. “It was difficult to gather the courage to tell,” he added. “Now I have gathered courage to face it.”
Raj Kumar is now pursuing his childhood dream to be a singer. Raj Kumar’s first song “Mod” was released during a function in Kathmandu on April 29, 2013.

“I was born genius, drugs spoiled me,” Raj Kumar said looking back at his life. When he reached grade eight he got into a habit of using drugs. It was very late that his mother, his primary caretaker, knew about it.

According to government data, an average of 1,437 new infections are reported each year. In 2011, 50,287 people were living with HIV and 3,804 of them are children. Out of the total HIV cases reported in 2011, 87.9 percent were from sexual transmission. The number of new cases of HIV infections has been on decline in the last five years. In 2007, a total of 64,585 people were believed to be living with HIV. Government figures put HIV prevalence in the adult population at 0.3 percent. Only 20,583 HIV cases are reported so far.

Nepal’s first HIV case was reported in 1988. The high-risk group includes intravenous drug users, female sex workers and their clients, men who have sex with other men and male migrant laborers.