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Dawn of Libya Bring 'Security' Back t...
Tripoli
By TTM albattat
29 Sep 2014

September 29, 2014
Tripoli, Libya

A few months ago militants from the Dawn of Libya Brigade stormed Tripoli airport and began destroying the area, which resulted in great damage to the oil port. As their offensive spread to the areas surrounding the Libyan capital, many civilians were killed as the militants attempted to eliminate the remnants of the former regime. Once the group had a tight hold over the capital they began to impose their control, receiving support from other Libyan revolutionaries. They declared that the situation is now safer than it previously was. Their opposition, as well as the civilian population affected by the situation, maintained their silence to avoid any more losses.

Transcript:

Mohammed Saeed (00:22): "Dawn of Libya's operations are corrections of the revolution of February 17. As for the other rebels who joined the revolution after February 20, they are the real nationals and real revolutionaries, they of course support Libya Dawn that is considered the last pulse of the Revolution of February 17." (01:00)

Mohammad Imran (01:01): "I surely support Dawn of Libya. They were able to make a change that others couldn't." (01:10)

Mustafa Ahmed (01:52): "The first goal of Dawn of Libya is to eliminate corruption in all its shapes, and correct the path of the Revolution of February 17." (02:09)

Rabieh Riad (02:10): For me, the actions of Libya Dawn truly show a new dawn in the Libyan history. They brought back security in Tripoli after 4 years of instability." (02:39)

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Libyans Discuss Precarious Security S...
Tripoli
By Ahmad Mogharbel
19 Sep 2014

Tripoli, Libya
September 19, 2014

Despite the recent suffering faced by the people of Tripoli, life seems to go on. The army and police are constantly trying to keep things under control, especially in areas close to the airport and oil fields, which have seen an increase in militia presence.

Though some people believe that the situation is relatively stable, others describe life as total misery, with the proliferation of armed militias creating a sense of fear and insecurity among the city’s citizens.

SOUNDBITES

1-Ali Ahmad: "The situation in Libya is not very good. You have some areas where there is peace, others where the situation is very bad, and in other cities army men and police wander there all the time. But in general, the situation is not good" (00:40).

2-Abed Al-Baset Zalaytni: "The situation in Libya is not good, but since I live in Tripoli, where I live is somehow stable; police and army men are all around" (01:23).

3-Talal Saad: "The situation in Tripoli is perfect at the moment; stealing and killing was common in the past, now the situation is more stable" (01:58).

4-Naser Mohamad: "Tripoli is good, Alhamdulillah. Although some problems occurred next to the airport and the oil fields in the past months, now the situation is better. All the militias are out of Tripoli. As you can see I am next to the beach now, so all is good" (02:35).

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Unidentified Bodies Found After Deadl...
Benghazi
By Mohammad Salama
04 Aug 2014

August 4, 2014
Benghazi, Libya

Parents at the Benghazi Medical Center, BMC, try to identify the bodies of their relatives, after Benghazi residents volunteered to transfer the bodies of civilians, militants and special forces soldiers, out of al-Saeeka compound in the eastern town of Abu Atni.
The deadly clashes that erupted in al-Saeeka compound, between Islamic militants from Ansar al-Shariaa fighting with Libya Shield Forces against government special forces belonging to General Khalifa Haftar, ended today with the withdrawal of government forces.

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Tripoli Protest
By Ibrahim El Mayet
02 Aug 2014

Under one flag these protestors sing chants against the militias involved in the current conflict, primarily those from ZIntan who have controled Tripoli's airport since 2011, and those from Misurata who re-entered the city three weeks ago. The recent battles have destroyed Tripoli airport, set fire to fuel tanks containing millions of litres of petrol (at the main Tripoli storage depot) and destroyed residential areas. Hundreds of civilians have been killed and injured in the fighting. Many Tripoli residents question the motives of the warring sides and the claims by the Misurata militias that the purpose of their operation was to 'liberate' and 'protect' the captial.

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Tripoli Protest
By Ibrahim El Mayet
02 Aug 2014

As the protest rounds the square the demonstrators face the walls of Tripoli's iconic 'Suraya Al Hamra' (Red Castle) the external walls of Tripoli's old city. In the foreground a man holds up a banner saying 'No Brigades, we need one army under one flag'.

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Tripoli Protest
By Ibrahim El Mayet
02 Aug 2014

Tripolitanian protestors carried a large Libyan flag, a symbol of unity. Their faces all told of the pain and anger they feel as many are forced to watch helplessly while parts of the city are destroyed. Some of their chants mentioned Libya's second city Benghazi in the East, where fierce fighting between Islamist militias and forces led by a retired army genral is ongoing.

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Tripoli Protest
By Ibrahim El Mayet
01 Aug 2014

United in their anger, Tripoli residents call for an end to the senseless violence and the presence of militias in the city.

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Tripoli Protest
By Ibrahim El Mayet
01 Aug 2014

The protestors continue their chanting as they move around the square calling for an end to the militia occupation in Libya's capital city.

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Tripoli Protest
By Ibrahim El Mayet
01 Aug 2014

Joining the protest with their father these young Libyan's hold a banner saying 'We want Libya, we are staying, and we will secure it'

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Tripoli Protest
By Ibrahim El Mayet
01 Aug 2014

As the protestors made their way around Martyrs Square they called out slogans against the militias, the most common 'la Misurata, la Zintan, Tarabules Tibi Alaman' (No Misurata, No Zintan Tripoli wants peace) refering to the main rivals in the current battle, militias from the city of Misurata and the mountain town of Zintan.

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Tripoli Protest
By Ibrahim El Mayet
01 Aug 2014

Joining the protest carrying his two sons this father holds his family book (a registration document) which shows that he lives in Qasr Ben Ghashir a neighborhood close to Tripoli airport which has become a battleground as rival militias fight for control of the airport. Many civilians have been killed and injured and houses destroyed as militias continue indiscriminate shelling in residential areas. The boys sign simply asks, when can we go home?

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Tripoli Protest
By Ibrahim El Mayet
01 Aug 2014

The protestors marched taking many laps of the square. In the foreground in a show of solidarity with Libya's East the banner reads, 'Benghazi you are not alone, we are the bandage for your wounds'. Next to him another protestor carries a banner saying 'No for Shield, Yes for Police & Army'. A reference to the Libya Shield a coalition of revolutionary militia brigades (mostly from Misurata) who rather than being forced to disband were given official status under Libya's Ministry of Defence while maintaining their revolutionary command structures.

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Tripoli Protest
By Ibrahim El Mayet
01 Aug 2014

Protesters gathered in Tripoli's Central Marytrs Square on Friday afternoon to demonstrate against the rival militias battling for control of Tripoli's airport. Petrol stations in Tripoli have been empty for weeks meaning many people had to walk or cycle long distances to join the demonstration.

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"Free Syrian Football Team
Tripoli
By ashgallagher
22 Jul 2014

June, 2014
Tripoli, Lebanon

As the war in Syria drags on, some Syrian defectors and refugees are choosing to fight with a football. Training in northern Lebanon, team members passionately follow international football teams- and now, they are determined to become the new representatives for a free Syrian national team. They are fervent in their Ramadan prayers by day and train with passion at night. We gain rare access to their world, how they live, and just how they hope to rise above the turmoil in their country through sport.

By Ashley Gallagher

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"Free" Syrian National Football Team
By ashgallagher
16 Jul 2014

June, 2014
Tripoli, Lebanon

As the war in Syria drags on, some Syrian defectors and refugees are choosing to fight with a football. Training in northern Lebanon, team members watched the 2014 World Cup games and were inspired - and now, they are determined to become the new representatives for a free Syrian national team. They are fervent in their Ramadan prayers by day and train with passion at night. We gain rare access to their world, how they live, and just how they hope to rise above the turmoil in their country through sport.

OPENING SHOT: GUYS SPREADING FSA FLAG 3-4 SECONDS/NATSOUND
SECOND SHOT: PLAYING W/ SOCCER BALL / WALK UP
---(CON'T VO)--- 01.15 My name is Nehad Saad al Dine from Homs. I came from Homs to Lebanon 2 years ago. I play with the national Free Syrian team
BUTT TO (OnCam) My house and my family, my brother were caught in shelling .

VO NOUR- SHOW NOUR WALKING THROUG SMALL CORRIDOR OUTSIDE.
1252 My name is Nour al din Khatan, I came from Homs Syria, I play with the Free Syrian team.

(VO --NOUR WALKING) ONCAM THEN TO VO - NEHAD PLAYING WITH FOOTBALL. ADJUSTING SHIRT ON THE HANGER
-SOT NEHAD:----1015 the regime doesn't distinguish people with the random shelling, we decided to continue with sports despite everything, we have martyrs. we lost our houses and we continue

ONCAM SOT NOUR THEN TO VO OF NEHAD/NOUR BEHIND THE WALL to VO OF THE BOYS BY THE FLAG
NOUR -- , i was visiting a relatives in Tripoli they told me about Nehad, they told me about the team and Nehad the coach , there's Nehad Said al Dieah who's running the Free Syrian team, so they told me "your are a player why don't you join them!"

VO OF NEHAD SHOWING TEAM PIX ON PHONE /ON CAM/ VO OF SHOES
NEHAD: // 1225 The team members work different jobs, so we can collect money from each other to rent stadiums and pay for uniforms, our players are professionals, they used to pay for professional teams in Syria

VO: OPEN STREET SHOTS AND W/ CALLS TO PRAYERS 3-4 SECONDS/ FADE TO NOUR GETTING READY to ON CAM TO IFTAR GATHERING
NOUR: // 1227 [[During Ramadan]] we spend our day: we wake up early, we bring things for the house, we bring things to break the fast and then we after we train for an hour, and then go back, we train again then we spend time with our friends, we pray. this is normal lifE

ON CAM/NEHAD 02.16.00 -- Thanks to God, we're managing our work, we are able to rent a stadium and buy uniformsNOUR: with our work, we are trying to rent a stadium,

VO OF BOYS W/ THE FLAG/ON CAM/EQUPTMT SHOTS
SOT NOUR: 0774 When the crises ends I want this team to represent all Syria, free Syria the independent Syria. To represent all Syria, not to JUST Damascus or Homs, but all Syria, God willing in the coming few years there will be national team no bribing and with no sectarianism and our team will move forward 2.59.23

VO OF IFTAR
ON CAM/NEHAD: we are facing many things here in lebanon, the regime still threatens us, the regime has a lot of allies and the players are in danger

FADE OUT/LAST SHOTS OF NIGHT FOOD/ BOMBING IN THE BACKGROUND OVER NIGHHT CITY SHOTS

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Preparations for Parliamentary Electi...
Tripoli, Libya
By Ibrahim El Mayet
23 Jun 2014

Article about the run up to the Parliamentary elections in Libya with related pictures taken in Tripoli.

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Torture of prisoner in Bosleem Prison...
tripoli, Libya
By mchreyteh
17 May 2014

A selected portion of video clip that appears to show an unidentified prisoner being shocked by a taser device by Libyan interrogators in Bosleem Prison in May 2011.

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Torture of prisoner in Bosleem Prison...
tripoli
By mchreyteh
17 May 2014

A selected portion of video clip that appears to show an unidentified prisoner being wiped by Libyan interrogators in Bosleem Prison in May 2011.

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Torture of prisoner in Bosleem Prison...
tripoli
By mchreyteh
17 May 2014

A selected portion of video clip that appears to show an unidentified prisoner being kicked and shocked with a taser device by Libyan interrogators in Bosleem Prison in May 2011.

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Jordanian Ambassador Kidnapped in Tri...
Tripoli
By Mohammad Salama
24 Apr 2014

15/04/2014

Tripoli, Libya

The Jordanian Foreign Ministry has confirmed that Jordan's ambassador in Libya was kidnapped on Tuesday morning in Tripoli.
Embassy sources said masked men wearing civilian clothes, driving a BMW and a pick up truck surrounded the ambassador's car and opened fire. They forced him into the car and drove off quickly. The ambassador's driver was shot in the leg and one of the guards was shot in the arm.
Royal Jordanian Airlines has canceled its Tuesday flight to Tripoli.

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Tawerghans Face Challenges in IDP Cam...
Tawergha, Libya
By Transterra Editor
09 Apr 2014

In August 11th, 2011, habitants of Tawergha were forced to leave their town by Misrata rebel groups. They were accused of supporting Libyan forces of killed President Muammar Gaddafi during the two months long siege of Misrata.

Tawergha lies south of Misrata between this town and Gaddafi's stronghold town of Sirte. Gaddafi's forces used Tawergha as a base to besiege Misrata during the war, back in 2011.

Many of the around 30,000 inhabitants of Tawergha had to leave the town walking miles and miles through the desert and are now spread across the country. To this day, Tawergha remains a ghost town and it is reportedly being destroyed by militias of Misrata in order to prevent any future return of its inhabitants. The Libyan government is not able to guarantee safe return for the refugees, nor to protect the city.

In Libyan capital, Tripoli, there are up to four IDP camps for Tawerghans. The camp we visited, Tariq al Matar (Airport road) lies on the highway connecting the city and the airport in an old fabric. Access to the camp is through a dirt road of about 200 meters.

Tariq al Matar hosts around 300 families and a total of 1500 people. Most families use to live in a single room of about 3 x 3 meters. Residents say that water is not healthy, they do not have access to hot water and face attacks from militias for the simple fact of being from Tawergha. They say they are abused by Libyans outside the camp and have no protection from authorities.

A majority of city inhabitants are black-skinned, a rare fact in coastal Libya. This is due to the slavery origins of the habitants, which were once working on the palm trees.

TRANSCRIPT/LISTING OF SCENES:

1- Dirt road, only way to access the camp.

2-General view

3-Entrance to the camp. (Revolutioners of Tawergha can be read)

4- Mabrouk Mohammed, one of the coordinators of the camp

5- Mabrouk in the camp's office

6- He shows videos of the day Tawerghans were expelled from their town.

7- Another video

8- Mabrouk - "Misrata does not want us to return until there is a law that compensates them. They say that there are women who were raped by Tawergha. They want to investigate us and apply justice. They are asking the Libyan government not to allow us back until those guilty go to tribunals and are sentenced."

9- We are sure that some people (from Tawergha) did bad things. We are not all guilty for that. People from Tawergha have met with people from Misrata to solve the problem. We apologized to the families of Misrata. The meetings were good, but there is no answer from their side. They are waiting for the government to decide, but the government is not strong.

10- Street of the camp

11- Street

12-Street at the edge of the camp

13- Mabrouk explains the problems with the water

14- Housing unit for several families. Tawergha can be read.

15- Showers inside the unit. No Machines, no hot water

16- Toilets and water tank

17- Corridor. Each door, one family

18- One of the rooms. Up to 9 people in some of them

19- They received aid when they moved, but now, no.

20- Old man with an ill wife in their room

21- This family built a second room with a kitchen.

22- "The camp is not protected. Militias make problems for us. They killed people here. They arrested people here who did nothing. Militias come and say Tawergha, Tawergha! and take three or four people."

23- Clothes hanging to dry

24- Libyan flag

25- A family builds a new room

26- Kid carries concrete to his father

27- Mahmud: "We are building a room because the one we have is not enough for the whole family. We are seven and as you know we have young and old children, and we can't stay in a single room"

28- Mahmud working.

29- Inside the camp

30- Entrance to the mosque

31, 32, 33- Inside the mosque

34- Call for prayer

35- Man walks home after prayer.

36- Khamis Salem Ibrahim: "On October 12th, my sons were at home and a militia from Misrata came. They stormed the house and took three people. I don't know what happened with one of them, Salem is at home and Ibrahim is at the Wahda Institute."

37- Khamis in the camp.

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Living in Bab al Tabbaneh
Tripoli, Lebanon
By Marion Normand
24 Mar 2014

Bab el Tabbeneh, a Sunni neighborhood where most people support the Syrian rebels, is one of the poorest areas in Lebanon. It faces Jabal Mohsen, a majority Alawite neighborhood that is devoted to Syrian President Bashar el Assad and his government.
Since the beginning of the Syrian war in 2011, both areas have engaged in violent rounds of clashes. The fighters in Bab el Tabbeneh are all young unemployed men - as the area is plagued with unemployment and poverty. Public services are scarce, and the inhabitants feel abandoned by the authorities.

Women and children try to live normally despite the constant gunshots and sounds of RPGs and mortars nearby. This intimate photo essay shows how ordinary people are trying to cope with the stress and fighting in their neighborhood. When fighting flares up, people hide in rooms that face away from the street, sometimes for days. Schools in the neighborhood are forced to close, frequently interrupting the children’s education. Families have to live with long power cuts and in apartments riddled with bullets.

Our photographer went several times to Bab el Tabbeneh and shared the daily life of different families. One of them is the Abu Bashir family. Unlike many families from Bab el Tabbeneh, none of the six Abu Bashir children dropped out of school: Bashir, 26, is now enrolled in the Special Forces of the Lebanese army. Rim, 24, just finished her studies and is now a doctor. Mohammed, 22, is studying economics and dreams of entering politics. The youngest ones, Nour, 16, Racha, 15 and Ahmed, 12, are all going to school. Nour would like to become a journalist.

The photographer also met Saloua, the young wife of a local militia leader, Abu Omar. At the time, Saloua was 8 months pregnant with her third child. She was hoping it would be a girl, as boys are more likely to become fighters and get killed.

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Libya's underground hip hop and parco...
By Claudia Wiens
05 Mar 2014

Break Dance and Parcour Underground Scene in Libya
The b-boying scene in Libya started around 1999-2000 and is now since Qaddafi's death gaining new momentum. B-boy Ayashi was was one of the very first Libyans to introduce break dancing to Libya back then. Even though he is 40 years old now he is still active and gives workshops to the youth about hip hop culture. More and more young guys are starting to break dance and doing parcour. It is a way of expressing their feelings, rebelling against conservative powers and also staying sane in times of constant political turmoil and violence. The guys meet to practice in an old basket ball hall or a public park several times a week. The parcour guys find unused sandy spaces and create their own obstacle parcour where they practice crazy somersaults and dangerous jumps.
On 7th March a big break dance festival took place in a central public space in Tripoli with dozens of participants and hundreds of spectators. For almost a whole day dancers were battling against each other, showing off new moves and simply enjoying dancing to loud music open air. Even though there is the constant threat of some Islamic fundamentalist might turn up and violently object to young guys dancing in public to loud western hip hop music nobody let that stop them.
The one thing missing is female dancers. The guys explained that is already very difficult for them to break dance let alone having girls participating. They might dance secretely at home but it seems it is not the time yet to make a public appearance.

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Escaping Syria
Tripoli, Bekaa Valley
By Christina Malkoun
04 Dec 2013

March 6th 2013, one Million refugee officially registered at the centre in Tripoli, Lebanon. A number expected in June 2013. Today it is estimated that double this number have crossed into Lebanon, that's how much the situation is getting worse.
Since the Syrian revolution started in January 2011, families have escaped their home, leaving all their belongings behind, their houses destroyed, terrorised, looking for a safer place to live. In August 2011, the UNHCR launched the Tripoli registration centre, ensuring extension of services to persons under its mandate. 600 to 800 refugees register there every day. 2000 register daily in all of Lebanon. And today there are 7000 daily registrations throughout the region, in the countries of asylum, including Lebanon, Jordan, turkey, Egypt and Iraq.
This project is about portraying the lives of Syrian refugees across Lebanon; their struggles, their strength, their weaknesses, their hope of returning home... one day.
Are their rights as refugees being acknowledged? Being outside of their home country, are Syrian children having access to education? Are Syrian men and women being able to work independently to earn a living? Are Syrian elderly having access to health care?
"Please! Take a picture of me and my children. Let the world see!" said to me a syrian woman during a visit to Halba in Northern Lebanon. Disseminating those life abstracts can only generate and enhance awareness. More people are becoming conscious about the situation and are now more involved in helping the ones in need. Some photos are taken at the UNHCR centre in Tripoli, where men, women, children and elderly refugees gather and wait for their turn to register. They stand in front of the gates sometimes under heavy rains, with no shelter. After registering, they will eventually get the help they need. Other photos were taken in Halba, in tiny apartments where 20 people live under one roof. Some women found each other at the Women Association Centre of Northern Lebanon, and started learning and making accessories to earn a living, while others live off charity contributions. Some more photos were shot at the Beqaa Valley, where Syrian families wander around the streets to find a shelter, holding their babies in their arms, and hiding from the rain. But the generosity of the locals had been tremendous, taking them voluntarily under their roof. They are now refugees. A fate they did not choose.

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Liban : le conflit syrien contamine T...
Tripoli, Lebanon
By Margaux Bergey
04 Dec 2013

Tripoli est régulièrement frappée par des affrontements armés entre deux quartiers. D'un côté Bab el Tabbeneh à majorité sunnite et pro-opposition syrienne. De l'autre, Jabal Mohsen, à majorité alaouite et pro-régime.
Mais les racines du problème remontent à la guerre civile libanaise

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Fighters of Bab Al Tebbaneh, Tripoli
Tripoli, Lebanon
By Transterra Editor
26 Oct 2013

In Lebanon’s second largest city, Tripoli, Alawites loyal to Syrian President Bashar Assad's regime battle with Sunni's that support the Free Syrian opposition that live within blocks of each-other. The proxy conflict in Tripoli began over 30 years ago during the Lebanese civil war under the Syrian military occupation. Many of the Sunni fighters have crossed into Syria to fight alongside the Free Syrian Army against the regime and its allies. Tripoli, is a city that directly reflects the sectarian divisions in neighboring Syria. WIth the bombings in both Tripoli and Beirut's Dahiyeh the sectarian arms race in Tripoli continues for weaponry for what they fear is going to be the worst fighting seen in the region. Alawites populate a hillside called Jabal Mohsen and the Sunnis live in Bab al Tebbaneh that rests in the valley at the base of the hill. Events in Syria easily trigger an exchange of sniper fire and sporadic mortar shelling. All militias engaged in the conflict are heavily armed with RPGs, mortars, and heavy machine guns. In one night, over 1,000 mortars were exchanged in Tripoli. The Lebanese army has returned repeatedly to try and stabilize the area resulting in many casualties without making headway. The army has created a buffer zone on the infamous Syria Street, which has served as a front line between the battling sects since the conflict began. The Sunni fighters are always in preparation for a final fight against their pro Assad regime Alawite neighbors.

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Twin Explosions in Tripoli, Lebanon
Tripoli, Lebanon
By Serene Yordi
25 Aug 2013

Volunteers in Tripoli organized a cleaning effort after the two explosions rocked the city on August 22, 2013.

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Twin explosions in Tripoli, Lebanon (...
Tripoli, Lebanon
By Collette Hogg
24 Aug 2013

A man stands at the scene of the explosion outside al-Taqwa mosque, Tripoli, Lebanon

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Twin explosions in Tripoli, Lebanon (...
Tripoli, Lebanon
By Collette Hogg
24 Aug 2013

A Police officer walks towards a cluster of car carcasses outside al Taqwa mosque in Tripoli, Lebanon

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Twin explosions in Tripoli, Lebanon (...
Tripoli, Lebanon
By Collette Hogg
24 Aug 2013

The shell of a bombed-out car lies on its belly at the entrance of Salaam mosque in Tripoli,

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Twin explosions in Tripoli, Lebanon (...
Tripoli, lebanon
By Collette Hogg
24 Aug 2013

A black sandal camouflaged by the charcoal-stained ground reminds us of the victims of Fridays explosions in Tripoli, Lebanon

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Twin explosions in Tripoli, Lebanon (...
Tripoli, Lebanon
By Collette Hogg
24 Aug 2013

Volunteers, who met via Facebook, make haste to clean the rubble outside Salaam mosque in Tripoli, Lebanon.

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Twin explosions in Tripoli, Lebanon (...
Tripoli, Lebanon
By Collette Hogg
24 Aug 2013

A rescue worker for the Red Cross walks away from a row of blown-out shops. Al-Taqwa mosque, Tripoli, Lebanon.

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Twin explosions in Tripoli, Lebanon (...
Tripoli, lebanon
By Collette Hogg
24 Aug 2013

People's t-shirts stand-out amongst the grey charcoal shops and the scattered skeletons of cars. Al-Taqwa mosque, Tripoli, Lebanon.

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Twin explosions in Tripoli, Lebanon (...
Tripoli, Lebanon
By Collette Hogg
24 Aug 2013

Shoes removed by those praying in Salaam mosque on Friday, lie abandoned.

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Twin explosions in Tripoli, Lebanon (...
Triopli, Lebanon
By Collette Hogg
24 Aug 2013

A volunteer helps to clean the debris left from Fridays explosion outside Salaam mosque, Tripoli.

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Twin explosions in Tripoli, Lebanon (...
Tripoli, Lebanon
By Collette Hogg
24 Aug 2013

'We all met and organised a cleaning effort on Facebook' says Aly, a volunteer helping to clean the rubble from Friday's explosion in Tripoli.

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Twin explosions in Tripoli, Lebanon (...
Tripoli, Lebanon
By Collette Hogg
24 Aug 2013

Tripoli residents come together to clean up Fridays explosion. Lebanon

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Twin explosions in Tripoli, Lebanon (...
tripoli, Lebanon
By Collette Hogg
24 Aug 2013

Hasan Abdul Ali, 39 years old, works in construction around the corner from Salaam mosque in Tripoli. He purchases coffee daily from Zakaria, a vendor outside the mosque.