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Sao Paulo, Brazil
By Cristiano Burmester
02 Sep 2016

This is a documentary regarding job displacement due to technology advancement, real estate development and socio-cultural transformations.

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_R5A8491
Sao Paulo, Brazil
By Cristiano Burmester
01 Sep 2016

This is a documentary regarding job displacement due to technology advancement, real estate development and socio-cultural transformations.

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Sao Paulo, Brazil
By Cristiano Burmester
01 Sep 2016

This is a documentary regarding job displacement due to technology advancement, real estate development and socio-cultural transformations.

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Factories Are Out of Service in Besie...
Gaza
By ramzi
30 May 2016

May 30, 2016
Gaza, Palestine

80% of factories in Gaza are out of service because of the ongoing siege imposed on the city by the Israelis.

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TALPAPRIL2017-22
London
By Tom Price
04 May 2016

Still photography selection from various assignments and projects.

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Sao Paulo, Brazil
By Cristiano Burmester
10 Mar 2016

This is a documentary regarding job displacement due to technology advancement, real estate development and socio-cultural transformations.

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Sao Paulo, Brazil
By Cristiano Burmester
10 Mar 2016

This is a documentary regarding job displacement due to technology advancement, real estate development and socio-cultural transformations.

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_R5A87711-brou
Sao Paulo, Brazil
By Cristiano Burmester
02 Mar 2016

This is a documentary regarding job displacement due to technology advancement, real estate development and socio-cultural transformations.

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Sao Paulo, Brazil
By Cristiano Burmester
02 Mar 2016

This is a documentary regarding job displacement due to technology advancement, real estate development and socio-cultural transformations.

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_R5A87391
Sao Paulo, Brazil
By Cristiano Burmester
02 Mar 2016

This is a documentary regarding job displacement due to technology advancement, real estate development and socio-cultural transformations.

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chief of workers
hormuz
By Pantea Naghavi Anaraki
12 Jul 2015

Iranian worker of mineral of red earth at Hormoz island. here they waiting for new part of earth and they have rest some. here because of shadows the color of earth is looks purple .they had hard life and because always they breathing this red earth in air they cant have safety life and maybe they lose their normal life and dead sooner than others.

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restless room
hormuz
By Pantea Naghavi Anaraki
12 Jul 2015

Iranian worker of mineral of red earth at Hormoz island. here they waiting for new part of earth and they have rest some. here because of shadows the color of earth is looks purple .they had hard life and because always they breathing this red earth in air they cant have safety life and maybe they lose their normal life and dead sooner than others.

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guardian room
hormuz
By Pantea Naghavi Anaraki
12 Jul 2015

Iranian worker of mineral of red earth at Hormoz island. here they waiting for new part of earth and they have rest some. here because of shadows the color of earth is looks purple .they had hard life and because always they breathing this red earth in air they cant have safety life and maybe they lose their normal life and dead sooner than others.

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Red Persian Gulf
hormuz
By Pantea Naghavi Anaraki
12 Jul 2015

Iranian worker of mineral of red earth at Hormoz island. here they waiting for new part of earth and they have rest some. here because of shadows the color of earth is looks purple .they had hard life and because always they breathing this red earth in air they cant have safety life and maybe they lose their normal life and dead sooner than others.

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guardian room all together
hormuz
By Pantea Naghavi Anaraki
12 Jul 2015

Iranian worker of mineral of red earth at Hormoz island. here they waiting for new part of earth and they have rest some. here because of shadows the color of earth is looks purple .they had hard life and because always they breathing this red earth in air they cant have safety life and maybe they lose their normal life and dead sooner than others.

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smiling
hormuz
By Pantea Naghavi Anaraki
12 Jul 2015

Iranian worker of mineral of red earth at Hormoz island. here they waiting for new part of earth and they have rest some. here because of shadows the color of earth is looks purple .they had hard life and because always they breathing this red earth in air they cant have safety life and maybe they lose their normal life and dead sooner than others.

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restless room
hormuz
By Pantea Naghavi Anaraki
03 Jul 2015

Iranian worker of mineral of red earth at Hormoz island. here they waiting for new part of earth and they have rest some. here because of shadows the color of earth is looks purple .they had hard life and because always they breathing this red earth in air they cant have safety life and maybe they lose their normal life and dead sooner than others.

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resting in red soil mine
hormuz
By Pantea Naghavi Anaraki
03 Jul 2015

Iranian worker of mineral of red earth at Hormoz island. here they waiting for new part of earth and they have rest some. here because of shadows the color of earth is looks purple .they had hard life and because always they breathing this red earth in air they cant have safety life and maybe they lose their normal life and dead sooner than others.

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sitting in warehouse
hormuz
By Pantea Naghavi Anaraki
03 Jul 2015

Iranian worker of mineral of red earth at Hormoz island. here they waiting for new part of earth and they have rest some. here because of shadows the color of earth is looks purple .they had hard life and because always they breathing this red earth in air they cant have safety life and maybe they lose their normal life and dead sooner than others.

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Hidden smile with pain
hormuz
By Pantea Naghavi Anaraki
03 Jul 2015

Iranian worker of mineral of red earth at Hormoz island. here they waiting for new part of earth and they have rest some. here because of shadows the color of earth is looks purple .they had hard life and because always they breathing this red earth in air they cant have safety life and maybe they lose their normal life and dead sooner than others.

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Out side of warehouse
hormuz
By Pantea Naghavi Anaraki
03 Jul 2015

Iranian worker of mineral of red earth at Hormoz island. here they waiting for new part of earth and they have rest some. here because of shadows the color of earth is looks purple .they had hard life and because always they breathing this red earth in air they cant have safety life and maybe they lose their normal life and dead sooner than others.

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A gay in shy
hormuz
By Pantea Naghavi Anaraki
03 Jul 2015

Iranian worker of mineral of red earth at Hormoz island. here they waiting for new part of earth and they have rest some. here because of shadows the color of earth is looks purple .they had hard life and because always they breathing this red earth in air they cant have safety life and maybe they lose their normal life and dead sooner than others.

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driving to mineral location
hormuz
By Pantea Naghavi Anaraki
03 Jul 2015

Iranian worker of mineral of red earth at Hormoz island. here they waiting for new part of earth and they have rest some. here because of shadows the color of earth is looks purple .they had hard life and because always they breathing this red earth in air they cant have safety life and maybe they lose their normal life and dead sooner than others.

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storage of red soil
hormuz
By Pantea Naghavi Anaraki
03 Jul 2015

Iranian worker of mineral of red earth at Hormoz island. here they waiting for new part of earth and they have rest some. here because of shadows the color of earth is looks purple .they had hard life and because always they breathing this red earth in air they cant have safety life and maybe they lose their normal life and dead sooner than others.

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A gay in shy
hormuz
By Pantea Naghavi Anaraki
03 Jul 2015

Iranian worker of mineral of red earth at Hormoz island. here they waiting for new part of earth and they have rest some. here because of shadows the color of earth is looks purple .they had hard life and because always they breathing this red earth in air they cant have safety life and maybe they lose their normal life and dead sooner than others.

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Time Off
hormuz
By Pantea Naghavi Anaraki
03 Jul 2015

Iranian worker of mineral of red earth at Hormoz island. here they waiting for new part of earth and they have rest some. here because of shadows the color of earth is looks purple .they had hard life and because always they breathing this red earth in air they cant have safety life and maybe they lose their normal life and dead sooner than others.

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Jharia Coal Fire 08
Jharia
By Sanjay Pandey
18 Mar 2015

A coal seam fire rages in a state-run mine in Jharia.

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Domestic Workers Face 'Modern Slavery...
Hong Kong
By Miguel Candela
01 Mar 2015

320,000 migrant women are exposed to all kinds of physical and psychological abuse in the domestic service sector of Hong Kong. This story is a testimony of their experiences and struggles.

After being repeatedly abused and realizing that her situation would not improve, in a desperate attempt, Kamsiah ran away from her employer's house without money or documentation. Subsequently she was accused of stealing her employer's wallet which was said to contain around 900 US Dollars. Unfortunately, false accusations are a common practice to pressure migrant workers and avoid paying the wages owed to them. Barefooted, without money nor documentation, she sought refuge in a 24-hour fast food restaurant and waited until another compatriot helped her and took her to a shelter.

Esther C. Bangkawayan is the director of Bethune House shelter, where foreign domestic helpers who suffer abuse find shelter, food, and legal advice. They now house about a dozen women in trouble, but at times they even have to squeeze around 20 people in the small house nestled beside a church in Kowloon. A domestic helper herself, Esther is campaigning the government to scrap two rules she deems unfair: one which forbids employees from changing their employers more than three times a year, and another one which doesn’t allow them from changing to work at another sector of the economy.

42 year old filipino domestic helper Grace signed a misleading labour contract to work in Hong Kong but she instead ended up in Dalian, a northeast Chinese city 1,979 km far from Hong Kong. After confronting her employer about the situation, Grace was put into a return flight to Hong Kong without her pending salary and with only 200 RMB in her wallet. Grace has made now a formal complaint against the recruitment agency which made her labour contract. However, she is not very optimistic regarding her chances of recovering the debt of 40,000 pesos she currently has in the Philippines.

Eni Lestari, Indonesian, is the spokesperson for the Justice for Erwiana Committee. A domestic helper herself, she hopes to get justice for one of her compatriots, Erwiana Sulistyaningsih, who came to Hong Kong seeking for a better life and future but instead found a form of modern slavery. Erwiana’€™s employers hit her so severely that her brain has sustained irreversible injuries. As a result, she is unable to walk properly and has blurred vision. Her employer punched Erwiana so violently that her teeth cracked. She was sent to Indonesia with her body full of bruises and 8 US dollars in her pocket. Outraged immigrants like Lestari demand now justice and prison for her attackers. The Court has already declared them guilty and sentence is pending.

On Sundays thousands of Indonesian women gather in the streets and public spaces around Hong Kong to take advantage of their only day off. Most take their own food and an umbrella and talk to their friends all day long.

“€œWe barely have any money, so we have to take our lunch from our employer's house and sit in any public space that we can so we can enjoy our leisure time with our friends,”€ said Kamsiah.

To enjoy their free time and to get to know other immigrant workers in Hong Kong, immigrant groups organize activities for the women, such as beauty contests and self-defense classes in Victoria Park.  Persaudaraan Setia Hati Terate Fight Club teaches women to protect themselves from abusive employers.

Not only helping the women get away from the world of domestic work for the little time they have off or boosting their ability to defend themselves, such activities are the only social contact many have; and friends made during Sundays can be of great importance when difficulties arise.

FULL ARTICLE AVAILABLE ON REQUEST

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Living along Nicaragua’s Grand Canal
Rivas, Nicaragua
By Charlotte Bruneau
22 Jan 2015

A Chinese firm started construction on the Nicaragua Canal in late 2014 in the city of Rivas.  It is considered the world’s latest mega project and one of the largest engineering projects in history, expected to take five years to complete and to cost around 50 billion dollars, raising controversy and environmental concerns.

To win the Nicaraguan people’s support for the planned canal, the government of President Daniel Ortega launched an impressive propaganda campaign claiming that the canal would bring wealth and power to the nation. However, to make way for the canal, as many as 30,000 people will have to be displaced and dozens of villages erased from the map. Environmentalists worry about the ecological costs as well.

Kenny has finished his design degree a couple of months ago. During his studies, he built a model of the canal because he did not really know what it would look like: the most widespread criticism of the canal project is the lack of information provided by the government.

“The model’s design comes out of my imagination,"  explains Kenny while proudly opening and closing his model canal’s locks. "I tried to make sense of the scarce official information we receive. I invited the village’s children to participate in building the model to help them better understand the canal.”

While he is trying to find a job, he works in a car repair workshop. The workers there explain that, although they would like the canal to create employment opportunities for them, the Chinese are importing machines they don’t have the skills to handle. The government’s promise of employment is empty, they say.

“We have to learn how to better organize and protect ourselves," says one of Kenny's co-workers. "Some of us are already being followed by the government and I am sometimes scared to sleep at home. The government tries to scare families into keeping quiet while a number of foreign journalists were already expelled.”

The idea of having a trans-oceanic canal cutting through Nicaragua is hardly revolutionary. More than 150 years ago, the American businessman Cornelius Vanderbilt had already started digging but later stopped the project for lack of enough investors. Others, like the New Spain colonial administration or France’s Napoleon III considered, and later on abandoned, the idea of a Nicaraguan canal.

Now it is the Chinese’s turn to take on the Grand Canal’s challenge: 278 km long and at times 520 meters wide, the canal will allow for bulk carriers to navigate from the Pacific coast to the Caribbean. President Ortega, the former Marxist guerrilla revolutionary, granted the Chinese businessman Wang Jing’s HK Nicaragua Canal Development Investment Co. Ltd (HKND Group) a 50-year concession.  HKND says that the canal would create an estimated 50,000 jobs, but thousands of them would go to Chinese workers.

At the same time, the local population fears that Rivas might become a Chinese town when the Chinese workers arrive, bringing prostitution and high prices as Chinese goods flood the local markets. Indeed, the canal’s project is accompanied by a number of other projects. For instance, the HKND Group will be allowed to establish a number of so-called zonas francas, or tax free zones.

Such agreements between HKND and the Ortega government led a number of critics to assume that Wang Jing secretly acts on behalf of the Chinese government. While Nicaragua and Taiwan have good diplomatic relations, Beijing and Managua do not. Having private investors coming from the Chinese mainland to Nicaragua seems to be an alternative to diplomatic ties as far as business is concerned.

Worried about their future, people from Rivas have started to voice their discontent. Kenny takes us to his cousin’s uncle, Octavio Ortega, who says that the canal’s project has already been triggering opposition among the region’s campesinos (peasants) for two years.

After the opening ceremony for the construction was held on December 22, 2014, Ortega saw his fears materialize. He has since begun organizing a network of protest leaders throughout the country. For having participated in demonstrations, however, Octavio was violently beaten and jailed for over a week. A growing number of peasants who fought for the Sandinistas during the war have distanced themselves from Daniel Ortega’s government, saying he has betrayed them and accusing him of not being a “real Sandinista” anymore.

“We have to learn how to better organize and protect ourselves," says Octavio. "Some of us are already being followed by the government and I am sometimes scared to sleep at home. The government tries to scare families into keeping quiet while a number of foreign journalists were already expelled.”

Octavio explains how land property functions in Nicaragua, how many properties were redistributed during the Sandinista’s era in the 80’s. But now, the government passed a law that legalizes expropriation without compensating the occupants of a piece of land.

People living in the countryside around Rivas have no other choice than self-sustainability. On his patch of land, Ronal has pigs, cows, chicken, sugar cane and a number of vegetables. Although the canal does not pass through his land directly, he will be expropriated to make room for another “side project.” The vicinity of Lake Nicaragua and its pristine shores will be turned into tourist complexes.

Ronal’s family lives in Tolesmaida, close to Lake Nicaragua. Their village will be erased from the map as well. Villagers there show us the scars of the beatings they suffered in jail. On every house’s wall, they have painted Chinese characters reading “Chinese, get out!” The villagers do not only worry about the impact of mass tourism, but about the lake’s ecosystem as well. More pollution, traffic, noise and salinity will gravely endanger the largest freshwater resource in Latin America. Ronal thinks a lot about the social impact of the Chineses’ arrival. For many villagers, the pending arrival of the Chinese often feels like a modern conquistadora.

“I have heard that they worship dragons and animals,” he says. “The Chinese have a religion and customs so different from our that I wonder  whtether a coexistence will be possible Will they remain among themselves without talking to locals? Will they be violent? Will they try to influence our youths?”

“We are like a battalion,” shouts Ronal’s mother. “The whole family has been in jail and we are not scared to go again.”

We met Don Alejandro’s family in El Palmar, where a four-lane highway will replace the main local road. He has been the region’s guitar manufacturer for decades, and his grandchildren are now taking on the trade. We learned more about the family’s rhythm of life, their farming techniques and the way they see life as campesinos. The family is considering resettling in neighboring Costa Rica in order to remain farmers, should the construction of the road lead to their eviction.

“We barely have the necessary tools and ressources to survive as farmers here," says Don Alejandro. "As you see, everything is done with the machete and we have no tractors and machines to help us. On the other hand, we get to live a quiet life. What will happen to our lifestyle should the road nearby become a highway for trucks?"

The eastern city of Nueva Guinea is located in the eastern side on the Caribbean coast, seven hours by bus from the capital. The canal will be forty kilometers away from their city, and people do not feel directly concerned. Rodriguez is a journalist at Radio Luz, the local Christian radio. He is eager to see the beginning for the construction of the canal. He and his colleagues are tired of their country’s stagnation and they do want to see things change, especially economically.  

“Since the end of the war in Nicaragua, the whole region has stagnated," he says. "People did move back from larger cities to the more isolated regions because it was safe again. But the government didn’t extend regional opportunities as promised. Maybe the canal will change all this."

It takes a three hours hazardous bus ride to reach Puerto Principe from Nueva Guinea. And another six hours on a lancha, a small motorised boat, to arrive at Pollo de Desarollo, a village close to the Caribbean. The village lies on the banks of the Punta Gorda river, that will eventually be enlarged to become the canal. Dina lives with her two sons and daughter in the village’s center, which consists of a baseball field and a few dozen houses. She holds the local “comedor,” a canteen that offers hot meals.

”We didn’t know yet that our village was endangered by the canals construction, this is why I welcomed the Chinese," she says. "They were very polite and paid really well. To be honest, if they come back tomorrow and pay the same amount again, I would still cook for them, despite the canal.”

She always talks with caution, as dozens of policemen currently stay in the village to “protect” a group of doctors carrying out medical surveys in the region. The main Nicaraguan opposition paper, Confidencial, claims that those doctors work hand in hand with the government to find out how much land families own along the canal’s route.

We met one of the doctors at Dina’s place. She tells us that many households refuse the medical visit. Asked about whether the government will have access to their survey, she refused to reply.

Dina also tells us about the visit Chinese engineers paid them some time ago. Around 20 Chinese stayed in her house for two months. They were carrying out ecological and scientific surveys to see whether the canal could pass through the Punta Gorda river. Back then, the Chinese were received quite well.

Aidak, Dina’s oldest son, explains that he doesn’t want to be a campesino in the future: with the canal, tourism will increase and he wishes to become a tourist guide. Dina hopes for good compensation. She is tired of living in an isolated village, and would love to start her life again elsewhere.

Travelling along the canal’s road has definitely raised an important question: Will the canal be built at all? Chamorro, of the Confidencial newspaper, believes that the whole project is a scam. The canal will never be built, but land will be seized at low prices from farmers who will barely benefit from business opportunities reserved for the Nicaraguan economic elite.

This Chinese mega project represents the 74th attempt to built a canal in Nicaragua. It may also be the 74th failure to do so.

Bangladesh: Shipyard Workers Face Har...
Dhaka
By zakir hossain chowdhury
29 Dec 2014

Shipyard workers near the Buriganga River in Dhaka face difficult work conditions. According to witnesses, many workers died in accidents related to explosions. The death toll from 2012 to 2014 at ship recycling yards stands at 44, leaving dozens of ship-breaking workers wounded.

Workers break down the rusty, old supertankers, cargo ships and cruisers that are no longer in use to reuse their steel and parts in new ships. There are more than 35 shipyards in Old Dhakas Keraniganj area in the bank of the river Burigonga, where small ships, launches and steamers are built and repaired around the clock.

Ashraful, a 17 year-old worker, has seen several of his colleagues fall victim to explosions, caused by ruptures in gas cylinders. “Our conditions are very bad. Most of us live by eating rice and vegetables. I cannot remember the last time I ate meat.”

About 15,000 people work in extremely dangerous conditions and earn between $4 and $5 as they don't get safety gear from the dock owners and accidents are common. Shipyard workers say make very meager earnings, without proper safety, and surrounded by the smell of asbestos.

Jamal Uddin, 32, has worked in the shipyard since 2012. He is a father of two and lives in his home-district Ranngpur. "I work in this place on a daily basis. There are no days off or holidays, so I can't go visit my family regularly. If I want, I can visit my house once a year for one week but without payment."

Most of the private shipyards use plate-steel, engines, components and machinery from old merchant ships, collected from many ship recycling industries located in Bangladesh. However, frequent accidents and heavy human causalities on inland vessels often raise questions about the quality of ships produced in local shipyards.

A primary school is situated near this yard, and children make their way to their classes using a dangerous path inside the shipyard, some of them using it as a playground, though a dangerous one. Other children, mostly climate refugees from flooded areas of the country, work there collecting scrap metal and used oil to sell in local markets.

Bangladesh is now exporting small and medium-sized ships for the highly competitive European market, building vessels for countries including Denmark, Germany and Finland. Bengali shipbuilding is being compared with giants such as China, Japan and South Korea.

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Thailand: A Solar-Powered Path to Dev...
Mae Sot, Thailand
By Ana Salvá
09 Dec 2014

FULL ARTICLE AVAILABLE ON REQUEST

Access to electricity is a key element in development. However, in Thailand there is an important gap in access to energy between rich and poor that has persisted over the years, especially in rural areas. The situation is critical in some marginal areas, such as the Thai-Burma border.

The lack of electricity makes these communities more vulnerable. In these areas, some villagers depend on candles or kerosene lamps that are very expensive and have a negative impact on their health. They also pose serious risks to their livelihoods since their homes are usually constructed with bamboo and dried leaves that can easily catch fire. On the other hand, these communities must gather wood in order to satisfy their most basic needs, tasks that are normally carried out by women, cutting into the time and energy they could devote to other economic activities. Moreover, some schools and hospitals do not have access to power for needs as basic as keeping vaccines refrigerated.

The Thai government implemented solar energy systems in more than 200.000 households in 2004. However, most of the systems died because of the lack of maintenance. In this context, a Thai woman founded an organization to refurbish the old equipment and to train local people on how to maintain it. Her project aims to be self-sustainable. If successful, it could bring some much needed relief to families who currently struggle to meet their energy needs.

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Slovakia: Bratislava's White-Gloved H...
Bratislava
By danubestory
09 Dec 2014

Donning dapper navy blue uniforms and traditional caps, complete with pristine white gloves, a few of Bratislava’s homeless have revived the role of the traditional baggage porter.

Bratislava Railway Station is a dowdy, yet charming old building with scarce facilities and no modern equipment, making it less accessible to elderly people, families traveling with children, and people carrying heavy luggage. Getting to the train with heavy bags and baby strollers is a real challenge. Meanwhile, outside the train station approximately four to five thousand homeless people face harsh conditions with little chance of find work. A local NGO called Proti Prudu (Against the Stream) works with the homeless, providing them with a street paper called Nota Bene, that they offer to passers by in exchange for spare change. Now, they have launched an ingenious project offering part-time jobs to seven of the homeless they work with to attack both issues. They pay the porters for part-time work helping people with their bags, free of charge. These men who once depended completely on the help of others are finding a bit of much needed economic stability and a new sense of social pride by offering a much appreciated hand to others.

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Slovakia: Bratislava's White-Gloved H...
Bratislava
By danubestory
08 Dec 2014

Donning dapper navy blue uniforms and traditional caps, complete with pristine white gloves, a few of Bratislava’s homeless have revived the role of the traditional baggage porter.

Bratislava Railway Station is a dowdy, yet charming old building with scarce facilities and no modern equipment, making it less accessible to elderly people, families traveling with children, and people carrying heavy luggage. Getting to the train with heavy bags and baby strollers is a real challenge. Meanwhile, outside the train station approximately four to five thousand homeless people face harsh conditions with little chance of find work. A local NGO called Proti Prudu (Against the Stream) works with the homeless, providing them with a street paper called Nota Bene, that they offer to passers by in exchange for spare change. Now, they have launched an ingenious project offering part-time jobs to seven of the homeless they work with to attack both issues. They pay the porters for part-time work helping people with their bags, free of charge. These men who once depended completely on the help of others are finding a bit of much needed economic stability and a new sense of social pride by offering a much appreciated hand to others.

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Jharia Coal Fire 03
Jharia
By Sanjay Pandey
24 Nov 2014

Smoke comes out of a drain along the main road in Jharia, hinting at the alarming levels of underground fires in area. A few years ago, fires damaged the Jharia railway station, leading to its eventual closure.

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Jharia Coal Fire 16
Jharia
By Sanjay Pandey
24 Nov 2014

People pilfer coal from state-run mines in Jharia.

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Jharia Coal Fire 14
Jharia
By Sanjay Pandey
23 Nov 2014

A boy carrying a heavy load of coal over his head in Jharia. Many local children are forced to work pilfering coal from state-owned mines in the area.

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Jharia Coal Fire 21
Jharia
By Sanjay Pandey
23 Nov 2014

Children play in the streets of Belgharia, a township that has been set to up accommodate residents of Jharia displaced by the fire.

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Cane land Iran
Haft Tape
By Javid Tafazoli
09 Nov 2014

Little is known about sugar cane harvesting in southwestern Iran. Here the workers come with hopes of a better life but arrive to find extremely harsh working conditions. The work is hazardous and injuries are frequent, but there is no support system for the workers. They are in a system which abuses their need to earn a living and there is no thought on the safety of workers. They are under constant surveillance as they work 12 hour days, six days per week for which they get paid $10 per day. Most of them are from the western regions of Ilam and Lorestan and are contracted by organizations hired by plantation owners in their home towns. The season starts before spring arrives and does not finish until autumn. First they burn the fields, to make harvesting easier, before using sharp scythes to cut the canes.

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Child Labor in Venezuela's Andes
Pueblo Llano, Venezuela
By Manaure Quintero
07 Nov 2014

Pueblo Llano is at 800 km from Caracas, Venezuela's capital. This little town inside Los Andes is the main potatoes and carrot producer in the country. However, and despite the successful market with multinational companies like Frito-Lay as one the biggest clients, Pueblo Llano have deep social issues interconnected between them, child labor and high suicide rates.
Their main job is to plant and care for the crops of potatoes and carrots, using several toxic pesticides most of them prohibited by international laws. The landlord provides them with a precarious home, food and a US$ 1 daily salary. At harvest time, they make money depending on how many bags (of 70 Kg each) can be filled and carried down from the steep mountains.
The isolation of the town and the hard market between farmers make this town a place for avarice, most of the children from 9 to 13 years old leave the school and begin to work on the fields dreaming about making tons of money, however, the harvest not always become as they expected and, in some cases, they took their own lives away as the easiest exit.

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child labor in venezuela 04
Pueblo Llano, Venezuela
By Manaure Quintero
07 Nov 2014

A 14 year old boy carry a 70 Kg bag of carrots in the field in Pueblo Llano, Venezuela. Pueblo Llano is the main potatoes and carrot producer of Venezuela, most of the children leave the school to start working with the crops at the age of 9.