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Kenya's Turkana Nomads
Lokichoggio, Kenya
By Kamuz Raphael
02 Jul 2015

A few shots taken during filming in Lokichoggio, Turkana in Kenya. Gives a glimpse at life amongst the Turkana nomads.

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Tribal Forces in Hadramawt Defy Houthis
Thamoud
By Amged Sabeeh
10 Apr 2015

April 10, 2014
Hadramawt, Yemen

Dozens of armed men from the Awamer clans paraded against the Houthis in Hawarem, a desert area in the southern Yemeni province of Hadramawt near the border with Saudi Arabia.
This video shows the tribesmen driving a convoy of pickup trucks and SUVs that carry the Awamer tribal flag in a desert area while brandishing rifles, machineguns and rocket-propelled grenade launchers. The men are then seen forming a circle and chanting, as well as shooting their weapons in the air.
The footage also includes an interview with Saleh al-Ameri, a leader of the Awamer clans, in which he declares his tribe’s solidarity with Gulf countries “against any aggression.”

TRANSCRIPT

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Saleh al-Ameri, A leader of the Awamer clans
07:48 – 08:47

“The Awamer tribes have gathered today. We met here in Hawarem in order to discuss what is going on in the country in general. We have expressed our willingness to adopt the position of the area’s tribes – the tribes in Hadramawt province – in order to defend the country against any aggression. In fact, the security of our country is related to the security of entire Yemen as well as neighboring countries. We, the people of Gulf countries, are prepared to fulfil our duty in defending our homeland. You have doubtless seen these gatherings that have come from everywhere to declare that they are united against any aggression or sabotage that could target our country. We are prepared to defend our homeland. Peace be upon you.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Unnamed Tribal Fighter
08:47 – 08:57

The Awamer tribes have convened in the desert. God willing, we shall safeguard the security of the desert against any aggression. We shall push any aggression back, God willing.”

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Southern Tribal Fighters Unite to Fig...
Shabwah
By Amged Sabeeh
01 Apr 2015

Fighters of the Belobeid tribe proudly tout their guns and artillery in the southern Yemeni desert of Shabwah, an Al-Qaeda haven. Just as the Saudi-led coalition began bombing Houthis and loyalists to ousted president Ali Abdullah Saleh, hundreds of fighters from the Belobeid tribe began joining forces in the desert of the southern province to begin organizing a coordinated resistance against the Houthis.

In the past few months, the ongoing expansion of northern Yemen's Houthi rebels has prompted many tribes in the restive south to pull together. One man interviewed says they are fighting against both the Houthis and "terrorism" as such.

TRANSCRIPT

SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Unnamed Tribal fighter 1
01:01 – 01:04

“We are against Houthis and terrorism alike.” "We are against [UNINTELLIGIBLE] country"

SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Hassan Bahloul, Spokesperson of the Southern Revolutionary Movement in Hadramout
01:53 – 02:50

“Peace be upon the Prophet Mohamad and his honourable descendants. Today is the day of reunion in this historic area. Return to history, roots and authenticity.
We are gathered to unify the voice of all Belobeid clans. We confirm that that Belobeid are a solid bloc that shall not be broken.
Throughout history, we have preserved the security of our area [UNINTELLIGIBLE] al-Soda. We have preserved our security and safety against any kind of aggression. What is happening in Sanaa is their own conflict, we are not concerned with it in any manner here in the south. We have proved our presence. The security of Belobaid is equivalent to the security of the whole land of the south, from Mahra to Bab al-Mandab [UNINTELLIGIBLE]."

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President of Kurdistan Meets Arab Tribes
Dohuk
By Jawdat Ahmed
16 Mar 2015

March 15, 2015
Duhuk, Iraq


(IraqiNews.com) President of Kurdistan Massoud Barzani said on Sunday, that the doors are open for Arabs to fight in the ranks of the Kurdish Peshmerga forces, calling the federal government to do its duty in the liberated areas. Barzani said during a meeting with Arab tribal elders attended by IraqiNews.com, “The doors are open for Arabs to join the Peshmerga ranks in their fight against terrorism, and without discrimination,” urging the federal government to do its duty and provide services in the liberated areas. Barzani added, “We should not feed grudges and hatred. Those who refused loyalty to ISIS must live freely and with dignity, while those who chose to be with ISIS, their fate will be like ISIS’ fate.” “All Kurdish areas have been liberated and are now ready to contribute in the operations to liberate the rest of Iraq,” calling on everyone to cooperate in order to build a spirit of cooperation and brotherhood.

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Kurdish, Arab Forces Retake Strategic...
Tal Hamis
By Bedir
28 Feb 2015

Tal Hamis, Syria
February 28, 2015

On 27 February Kurdish and Arab militias recaptured Tal Hamis from ISIS, a town located in the Hasaka province of Syria and some 35km south of Qamishli, a major regional city on the Turkish border that has been hotly contested by ISIS and Kurdish forces in recent months.

Fighters involved belong to various Kurdish militias: the People’s Protection Units (YPG); the Women’s Protection Units (YPJ); and the Shengal Resistance Units, in addition to Arab forces known as Jaish al-Sanadid (The Army of the Brave) which are affiliated with the influential Shummar tribal confederation.

Shummar tribes, for their part, inhabit areas that stretch across Syria, Iraq, Jordan and Saudi Arabia. An influential ISIS commander in Raqqa originally from Saudi Arabia, known as Abu Abdullah Daigham, is from one of the Shummar clans.

According to field commanders interviewed in Tal Hamis, ISIS fighters fled strikes on the ground and airstrikes carried out by the international coalition on Tal Hamis before heading to desert areas in the south of Hasaka province. Commanders also said their forces were preparing to take control of the road between Raqqa province in Syria and Mosul province in Mosul, both of which are major ISIS strongholds. Military commanders said that ISIS fighters had been using Tal Hamis to launch artillery and car bomb attacks against neighboring areas.

Tal Hamis had been under ISIS control for a year and a half and most of its civilians, ethnic Arabs, Kurds, Syriacs and Assyrians, have fled to Qamishli.

SHOTLIST

Wide of road; road sign reads “Tal Hamis”
Wide of male and female fighters entering Tal Hamis
Various of lettering on walls in Kurdish and Arabic apparently left by Kurdish ISIS fighters
Wide of lettering on the wall “There is no God but Allah. The Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant”  
Various of lettering on walls in Kurdish and Arabic apparently left by Kurdish ISIS fighters
Moving shot of room interior – ISIS flag on the wall
Moving shot of combat fatigues scattered on the floor
Close-up of what appears to be a logbook left by Kurdish ISIS fighters
Lettering on the wall in Kurdish; lettering in English reads “Be careful of our sniper Abu Dujana Al-Kindy 143/4/2014”
Interview with Assi Dahham, commander of Jaish al-Sanadid commander (SOUNDBITE)
Various of two fighters inspecting destroyed tank
Wide of YPG convoy
Interview with Idris Qamishlo (nom de guerre), YPG Commander (SOUNDBITE)
Interview with Sarhad Hemo (now de guerre), YPG fighter (SOUNDBITE)
Traveling of grain silos
Wide of Kurdish fighters inspecting ammunition(SOUNDBITE)
Various of fighters near destroyed buildings
Wide/ R-L traveling of buildings and YPG flags
R-L traveling of town

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Sunni Tribesmen Guard Their Borders A...
Shabwa
By Dhaifallah Homran
19 Feb 2015

February 19, 2015
Shabwa, Yemen

Sunni tribesmen, belonging to the Markha al-Alya tribe of the southern Yemeni province of Shabwa, announced today that they are closing their border with the neighboring al-Baydaa province. Situated to the west of Shabwa, al-Baydaa has been the scene of fierce battles between the Houthis and local tribesmen, who are trying to prevent the Houthis from advancing south.

In their announcement the Markha al-Alya tribe emphatically rejected the constitutional declaration of the Houthis and banned any military group from entering Shabwa. They have positioned their fighters along the border and installed sentries on the Farsha passage, the road which connects the neighboring provinces.

The tribesmen assured that they will defend their land to the death and not allow it to become a thoroughfare for Houthis and other armed groups to transport their soldiers and weapons. They are working in conjunction with the local authorities who support their mission to defend Shabwa.

Transcript

Soundbite Sheikh Monser Salem al-Kabali, Tribal Leader (Man, Arabic)

"Based on the agreement among the tribe leaders, dignitaries and local authorities, we announce that we refuse the constitutional declaration made by the Houthis. We support the constitutionally legitimate authorities and will not accept any agreement outside the consensus among political powers in Yemen. Our stance regarding the Shabwa province follows that of the governor. It is guided by the governor of Shabwa as well as the security committee and the tribes in Shabwa and the regions of Hadramoot and Muhar al-Shabwa. We will stand against anyone who wants to use our province as a gate for chaos, whether they are armed militias, tribes or [any other] groups. We declare our support of the local authorities in the province in their bid to protect Shabwa borders from all directions."

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Sudan: Surviving Despite the Conflict
Nuba Mountains, South Kordofan
By Giovanni Diffidenti
06 Feb 2015

The Nuba Mountains rise from the semi-arid savannah of South Kordofan, one of the largest states of Sudan bordering what is now the Republic of South Sudan. The population is dominated by over 50 distinct ethnic groups of black African origin collectively known as the Nuba.  Settled small holder farmers, the Nuba have lived alongside a number of Arab pastoralist tribes relatively peacefully for generations. In addition to its remarkably rich and engaging culture, Nuba society is characterised by religious tolerance (there being about equal numbers of Muslims and Christians with many still respecting traditional ancestral beliefs), ethnic diversity and expectations of local accountability and good governance not commonly found elsewhere in the country. It is estimated that as many as three million Sudanese are Nuba, many living in the slums of cities in the north.
 
As with other Sudanese living on the peripheries (including the people of Darfur, Blue Nile, Abyei, Red Sea Hills, and the far north), the people of South Kordofan have been marginalised for generations by the policies of successive Khartoum-based Governments. As a result,  they face restricted educational and employment opportunities, lack of land tenure and huge loss of land to outsider mechanised schemes, social discrimination,  lack of political rights,  banning of local languages from school curricula and ever increasing poverty and frustration.  Failure to bring about any changes through political process and alarm at the undemocratic imposition of Sha’ria law (in 1983) eventually resulted in armed resistance, initially alongside the southern Sudanese insurrection led by Dr John Garang.  In 2005, an internationally brokered “peace agreement” led eventually  to the secession of South Sudan but failed to address the marginalisation of Nuba and other peripheral ethnic groups in (northern) Sudan. 
 
In 2011 the region returned to civil-war  and currently the Nuba opposition are fighting as part of an alliance of northern Sudanese opposition groups resisting the continued oppressive policies of Omar al Bashir’s National Congress Party.  As in Darfur and Blue Nile, the efforts of the Khartoum government to stamp out any opposition have been particularly brutal. An area of some 40,000 square kilometres, home to over a million people, has been effectively surrounded by the Sudan Armed Forces (SAF) and Government paid militias deprived of any public services (including markets,  transport, power and telecommunications) or access to international or national humanitarian aid. Civilian villages are bombed and shelled daily, hospitals and schools are targeted, hunger is used as a weapon of war, villages are burnt to the ground and captured civilians are routinely tortured, raped and executed. Several thousands of Nuba have died since the war restarted in 2011, over 400,000 have lost their homes and possessions and remain internally displaced with little or no assistance. More than 80,000 are refugees in camps in increasingly insecure border area of South Sudan and this figure is expected to rise significantly.
 
However, despite all these atrocities, the local population continues to demonstrate enormous resilience and a determination to resist the brutal oppression of Bashir’s regime and to help bring about the democratic transformation of Sudan of which they dream. They dig foxholes to reduce the number of deaths from bombs and shells, share food and shelter, and seek refuge in the mountains.  They continue to celebrate their ethnic and cultural diversity and religious tolerance.  And perhaps most remarkably, they continue to show a real readiness for forgiveness. They talk not of revenge but of reconstruction in a united and peaceful Sudan that promotes pluralism, justice, mutual respect and codependence.
 
In a region riddled with conflict, extremism and instability, the people of the Nuba Mountains provide an all too rare alternative narrative. If they can survive this war, perhaps they will also contribute to a longer-term transformation in Sudan that allows genuine African democracy, peaceful coexistence and pluralism to replace conflict and dictatorship.

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People of Nuba Mountains in Sudan 05
South Kordofan, Sudan
By Giovanni Diffidenti
06 Feb 2015

A man lies on the ground as a government Antonov aircraft bomb Kauda Town. Communities have learnt that lying down increases their chances of surviving the devastating shrapnel-filled barrel bombs that remain as the most frequently dropped ordinance to date. In the past three and a half years (up to April 2015), the Sudan Air Force has dropped over 3,700 bombs on civilian sites in the Nuba Mountains. (South Kordofan, Sudan)

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People of Nuba Mountains in Sudan 07
South Kordofan, Sudan
By Giovanni Diffidenti
06 Feb 2015

A displaced woman cries at the news of the death of her son Najamadin, 22 years old, killed by government soldiers while he was taking care of the community’s cattle in Dalami County. His brother Abdulbaghi, who was with him, managed to escape and run back to their makeshift home to tell his mother about the sad news. (South Kordofan, Sudan)

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People of Nuba Mountains in Sudan 12
South Kordofan, Sudan
By Giovanni Diffidenti
06 Feb 2015

Friday prayers are underway at one of the many mosques found throughout the Nuba Mountains, where some 40% of the population are Muslims. During the prayer time, people collected money to help a family who needed a surgical operation. Ahmed Kuwa, a devote local Muslim, says: “They (the regime) are bombing our mosques, killing our Imams, using religion to make war between peaceful neighbors; but this is not God’s Islam.” (South Kordofan, Sudan)

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People of Nuba Mountains in Sudan 16
South Kordofan, Sudan
By Giovanni Diffidenti
06 Feb 2015

People run for cover during a bombardment in Kauda Town. On this particular raid, 12 bombs were dropped in less than 5 minutes, destroying three houses and leaving one man injured. Confirmed reports indicate that between 2012 and 2014, 198 civilians were killed and over 440 seriously injured by bombing and shelling. However actual fatalities have been much higher as many more have died from disease and malnutrition. (South Kordofan, Sudan)

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People of Nuba Mountains in Sudan 17
South Kordofan, Sudan
By Giovanni Diffidenti
06 Feb 2015

A family comes out from a fox hole after protecting themselves from 12 bombs that were dropped in Kauda town center in just five minutes. Local civil society organizations are seeking help to deal with the increasing cases of psycho-social trauma resulting from the constant terror of attack from bombs, shells and rockets. (South Kordofan, Sudan)

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People of Nuba Mountains in Sudan 22
South Kordofan, Sudan
By Giovanni Diffidenti
06 Feb 2015

Yida refugee camp across the international border in Unity State of South Sudan, remains a last resort for many Nuba families. Currently some 66,000 Nuba people are living here as refugees. The camp which itself was bombed by the Sudan Air Force, now faces insecurity challenges from the South Sudan civil war. Due to disagreements over positioning of the camp, neither the UNHCR nor any other international assistance agencies provide any schools to children. Since the camp opened 4 years ago€“, the local Nuba civil society plays an important role in providing education services. (South Kordofan, Sudan)

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People of Nuba Mountains in Sudan 21
South Kordofan, Sudan
By Giovanni Diffidenti
03 Feb 2015

During the early morning of February 3, 2015, an artillery shell blasted through the roof of a house in Um Serdiba village. Nine children were sleeping in a foxhole inside the house, three died immediately. Six children, aged between 2 and 11, survived and lay in Mother of Mercy Hospital with more than 50% of their bodies burned. The next day, another girl died at the hospital, and three other children facing serious burns. The head surgeon of the hospital is not sure if they are going to survive. (South Kordofan, Sudan)

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People of Nuba Mountains in Sudan 19
South Kordofan, Sudan
By Giovanni Diffidenti
02 Feb 2015

Jackson Teamtrust, 7 years old, was wounded by a bomb dropped by the Sudanese government forces in Ragafi village, Umdorein County on the 1st of February, 2015. Between 2012 and 2014, 36 children have been reported killed and 83 seriously injured by the government bombing of civilian targets in the Nuba Mountains. Sadly, the actual casualties since the start of the war (including 2015) is much higher. (South Kordofan, Sudan)

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People of Nuba Mountains in Sudan 20
South Kordofan, Sudan
By Giovanni Diffidenti
02 Feb 2015

An unexploded bomb dropped by the Sudanese government lies in the middle of the field next to a primary health center in South Kordofan. With the Sudanese government also having started to drop cluster bombs on civilian targets, the risks of continuing deaths and injuries from unexploded ordinances will increase. (South Kordofan, Sudan)

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People of Nuba Mountains in Sudan 18
South Kordofan, Sudan
By Giovanni Diffidenti
01 Feb 2015

A Sunday service is held at the Sudanese Church of Christ, one of many Christian denominations found in South Kordofan. More than 300 people attended the service, using biscuits and hibiscus flower juice for the communion. The peaceful co-existence between Muslims and Christians is an important feature of Nuba (and traditionally, Sudanese) society which celebrates ethnic, religious, linguistic and cultural diversity. (South Kordofan, Sudan)

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People of Nuba Mountains in Sudan 09
South Kordofan, Sudan
By Giovanni Diffidenti
30 Jan 2015

Stir Ahmed, 26, is seen inside the cave where she keeps some of her belongings and use as shelter if she can during frequent bombing raids on Tunguli Village, in Dalami County. "€œThe bombing is terrible. It can come anytime. We feel very alone and€“ the world does not care, the Sudanese people do not care." (South Kordofan, Sudan)

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People of Nuba Mountains in Sudan 10
South Kordofan, Sudan
By Giovanni Diffidenti
30 Jan 2015

Displaced Sana Mahjub, 26, cleans the beans for lunch with the help of her children outside the small cave where they now have to live since their village was destroyed. It is estimated that more than 400,000 people living in similar conditions have been  displaced since the war started nearly 4 years ago as a result of targeted bombing, shelling and land attacks by government forces. Dalami County, South Kordofan, Sudan.

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People of Nuba Mountains in Sudan 11
South Kordofan, Sudan
By Giovanni Diffidenti
30 Jan 2015

Alnjama Alzahabia cultural group, meaning Gold Stars, poses for a photo in Dalami County with a typical local backdrop. Music, dance and cultural events are integral to Nuba society and continue to play an important role in countering the psycho-social trauma caused by the war. (South Kordofan, Sudan)

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People of Nuba Mountains in Sudan 08
South Kordofan, Sudan
By Giovanni Diffidenti
29 Jan 2015

Displaced Mary Musa (left), 26, and Khadmalla Abuzet, 18, cook the evening meal of Baliila (maize, sorghum and beans) next to a rocky mountain near Tunguli village. Families move to such shelters in the evenings as night time bombings and shelling become increasingly frequent. (South Kordofan, Sudan)

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People of Nuba Mountains in Sudan 04
South Kordofan, Sudan
By Giovanni Diffidenti
27 Jan 2015

People collect water in Ragafi river bed during the dry season. In many villages, hand water pumps have been destroyed by government forces during land attacks or targeted bombing and shelling on villages. "They (the regime of Omar Bashir) say they are our government, but we want true democracy, not murderers" Awatif Musa, a 48 year old grandmother, says as she waits in line. (South Kordofan, Sudan)

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People of Nuba Mountains in Sudan 06
South Kordofan, Sudan
By Giovanni Diffidenti
27 Jan 2015

A group of women seeks shelter inside a foxhole after a bombing raid. Given the frequency of bombing and shelling of civilian targets, communities depend on fox holes and caves in the mountains to reduce casualties. Women have played a key role in promoting the spread of effective self-protection measures. As bombing and shelling intensity increases, they are having to construct ever larger shelters. (South Kordofan, Sudan)

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People of Nuba Mountains in Sudan 15
South Kordofan, Sudan
By Giovanni Diffidenti
27 Jan 2015

Pastoralist Korie Hassan, 18, and part of his family are moving to seek better grazing and security ahead of the rest of the family and cattle. Traditionally settled Nuba farmers coexist peacefully with livestock pastoralists (many of whom are Arabs) and they are attempting to counteract the government's tactics of arming local militias and promoting ethnic division and conflict. "€œWe do not want war with Nuba people"€ he says, "€œIt is those of Bashir who are making people to fight." (South Kordofan, Sudan)

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People of Nuba Mountains in Sudan 03
South Kordofan, Sudan
By Giovanni Diffidenti
26 Jan 2015

Students at Tangal Model Primary School in Umdorein County look up in the sky concerned that an Antonov airplane is flying over their heads, but cannot see it yet. The original school in Tangal Village was bombed 3 years ago. Since then they have changed location twice. Now they have moved close to a river where the children feel safer. The classrooms are built with grass that the students and their family provided. There are 150 students in total, from kindergarten to the 8th grade class. The teachers are paid with food given by the families of the students. They have been in this location for the last six months. (South Kordofan, Sudan)

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People of Nuba Mountains in Sudan 13
South Kordofan, Sudan
By Giovanni Diffidenti
26 Jan 2015

The Council of a village in Umdorein County prepare for a wider community meeting being convened to discuss further collective measures needed to respond to the many problems provoked by the war. Topics will include the digging of more fox holes, the sharing of homes and food stocks with newly arrived displaced, maintaining support for the volunteer teachers, getting the most vulnerable families to refugee camps in South Sudan. Over a hundred men, women and youth may typically attend the meeting. (South Kordofan, Sudan)

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People of Nuba Mountains in Sudan 14
South Kordofan, Sudan
By Giovanni Diffidenti
26 Jan 2015

Neighbours help to clear the debris from a house hit by bombs in Tangal Village, Umdorein County. "They know there is nothing here except civilians" says El Hadi Kodi, 43 years old, as he helps look for anything to salvage. "This regime in Khartoum does not want peaceful coexistence, it wants to kill anyone who resists their terror and greed". (South Kordofan, Sudan)

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People of Nuba Mountains in Sudan 02
South Kordofan, Sudan
By Giovanni Diffidenti
24 Jan 2015

A busy day at a local market in the heart of the Nuba Mountains. Despite the frequent bombing of such civilian targets by the Sudan Air Force, communities brave the risks of congregating for economic and social reasons as they strive to maintain some semblance of normality amidst the horrors of war. (South Kordofan, Sudan)

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People of Nuba Mountains in Sudan 01
South Kordofan, Sudan
By Giovanni Diffidenti
23 Jan 2015

Keni Hawa Abdalah, 17, has had to become a street vendor in the central market in Kauda Town. "œWhy is Omar Bashir bombing our schools?" she asks. "Why does no one want to help us with school books so we can still study?"€. (South Kordofan, Sudan)

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Leaked Footage from ISIS Defector
Deir Ez Zour
By Transterra Editor
06 Jan 2015

This video collection offers a unique and unauthorized glimpse into the activities of ISIS in Syria. It features meetings led by a high-ranking official of ISIS who attempts to convince clan leaders in a Syrian village to pledge allegiance to the Islamic State. The video also includes scenes of ISIS fighters in military situations and relaxing.

NOTE: The video clips in this collection were obtained by Transterra Media from a source who received it from a member of ISIS who defected from the group. According to the source the videos were recorded in the town of Zir and other locations in Syria between January and June, 2014. Transterra Media cannot independently verify the accuracy of this content. The appearance of this video on the Transterra Media (TTM) website does not in any way constitute endorsement by TTM of any claims or statements made in the video.

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The Abu Ghanem Tribe Fights ISIS in R...
Ramadi, Iraq
By mushtaq mohammed
04 Dec 2014

December 4, 2014
Ramadi, Anbar, Iraq

Tribes in Anbar continue their fight against ISIS in the suburbs of Al Sajariya and Al Soufiya in the city of Ramadi, without assistance from the Iraqi army. The Abu Ghanem tribe's only demand is for the Iraq government to supply them with weapons as soon as possible, since they have almost run out of ammunition. As their demand has not yet been met, the fighters bought weapons of their own accord, to protect themselves and their lands.

Transcription:

(00:22) Fighter 1: "We [the tribes] have been here Al Soufiya for 9 months and a week. We don't have equipment or heavy artillery yet and we will keep fighting with the equipment we have until the government supplies us with more. We will keep fighting until the last person of the tribe dies. Inshallah we will keep standing and we will protect Al Soufiya. They can only capture Al Soufiya in their dreams, we are ready to die defending this town." (00:58)

(00:59) Fighter 2: "We are members of Abu Ghanem Tribe, and they won't take our land while we are still alive. We have strong men to oppose them and they cannot take 1 meter of Al Soufiya. We were able to drive them out of Al Sajariya and if God wills it, we can do more. If anyone tries to take our town, whether it is ISIS or not, we will crush their heads ourselves, since the government has not given us any weapons or vehicles. We fight using our own weapons and cars. We ask the government to support us; we were waiting for the engineers to defuse the bombs but they did not come so we had some men who decided to volunteer to defuse them." (02:05)

(02:06) Fighter 3: "We ask the government to support us by sending us heavy weapons. We [the Abu Ghanem Tribe] are fighting using our light weapons. We demand the weapons to be delivered at the soonest possible date." (02:26)

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Iraqi Forces Retake Ramadi from ISIS
Anbar
By mushtaq mohammed
29 Nov 2014

November 29, 2014
Ramadi, Anbar, Iraq

Heavy artillery was used on both sides in fierce clashes as Iraqi government forces and local tribal fighters formed an alliance and drove ISIS fighters out of the Sijariyya suburb of Ramadi, capital of the Anbar province. Iraqi officials said that the country's military launched a major operation to retake this part of the city, that ISIS claimed to have seized on November 21st. Before they retreated, ISIS fighters planted a large number of explosive devices in buildings on several streets which the army have been trying to defuse.

Policeman, (man, Arabic):
(03:32-04:23) "We defused the bombs we found in these houses and helped families get out of them. They [ISIS] planted bombs in these houses and streets. Four people have died as a result of these explosions. We are ready to defuse all the bombs they have planted. Inshallah we will defeat them and liberate all these towns."

Tents and tombstones- israeli bedouin...
Araqib
By Vinciane Jacquet
11 Nov 2014

November 12, 2014. Al Araqib, Israel.

Aziz, chief of the village (center):

"When the Israeli government started, in 1997, the new ministry 'Department of Negev and Galilee', headed by Shimon Peres, we thought that maybe the situation would change because Peres was a Nobel prize man. However instead, every year, from 1999 and until 2003, they sprayed us with Round Up weed killer. [They killed] the grass and over 200 sheep, 16 Arab horses and 2 camels. They want to kill the relationship between the Bedouins and the land".

Tents and tombstones- israeli bedouin...
Araqib
By Vinciane Jacquet
11 Nov 2014

November 12, 2014. Al Araqib, Israel.

Sally is the wife of the mayor. Gathered in the plastic tarp are all of their belongings, included cooking utensils and a little bit of food, like canned tuna.

Tents and tombstones- israeli bedouin...
Araqib
By Vinciane Jacquet
11 Nov 2014

November 12, 2014. Al Araqib, Israel.

The cemetery area of Al Turi is empty of animals. The Bedouins there only own 3 horses and a few ducks and chickens. They used to have sheep and camels. The sheep have been killed and the camels confiscated. Once, a camel caused a car accident. Since then, as soon as the soldiers see a camel in the desert, they take it and bring it to a "camel farm" that they have opened. They keep the camel there one month and send us the bill for the food and care. If we cannot pay after this month, the camel is lost forever. And they then sell us the camel milk that we love so much.

Tents and tombstones- israeli bedouin...
Araqib
By Vinciane Jacquet
11 Nov 2014

November 12, 2014. Al Araqib, Israel.

The entrance of Al Turi cemetary in Al Araqib. 22 families used to live here. Since July 27th, 2010, the " Black Day" as the Bedouins call it, only 12 people are still living in Al Araqib, confined in the graveyard. The "Black Day" is the day where the village was totally demolished by the Israeli army. They came at 4am, destroyed 65 houses, uprooted 4.500 olive trees and 700 fruit trees and killed dozens of chickens.

Tents and tombstones- israeli bedouin...
Araqib
By Vinciane Jacquet
11 Nov 2014

November 12, 2014. Al Araqib, Israel.

Saba plays with her daughter Araqib before she begins cooking dinner. Saba says: "I do nothing during the day except watching to see if the police or soldiers are coming so I can hide everything that wouldn't be already hidden among the graves".

Tents and tombstones- israeli bedouin...
Araqib
By Vinciane Jacquet
11 Nov 2014

November 12, 2014. Al Araqib, Israel.

The last time the army came to Al Araqib's cemetery was October 14, 2014. They took fridges and cars. Now the men live under the trees and sleep in the 2 cars that are left.

Tents and tombstones- israeli bedouin...
Araqib
By Vinciane Jacquet
11 Nov 2014

November 12, 2014. Al Araqib, Israel.

Araqib is 2 years old and a half. She is the youngest inhabitant of the graveyard of Al Araqib. She has been named after the village.

Tents and tombstones- israeli bedouin...
Araqib
By Vinciane Jacquet
11 Nov 2014

November 12, 2014. Al Araqib, Israel.

On July 12th, 2014, after the Israeli army came and destroyed everything around the graveyard, they set up a military zone in the Negev, not far from Al Araqib. Police and army were present 24/7.

In September, the police left. Aziz, the chief of the village describes the current situation:

"They still come from time to time, look at what's happening and leave. Sometimes, they destroy something, took our clothes, blankets, carpets and any personal belonging."