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Asylum Seekers in Spain 03
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
08 Jun 2015

Alejandro Antonio González, 22, from Guatemala, attends a session with his psychologist, provided by the local NGO Exil in Barcelona, Spain.
Alejandro arrived in Barcelona in September 2013, after being bullied for his homosexual condition for many years back home: his father repudiated him, police used to harass him and his friends in public areas and he was even once kidnapped and raped by two unknown men. He is happy to be now in Barcelona where he attends a psychologist who helps him feel free to express his sexuality. He actively participates in sexual education campaigns for the gay community and he would like to become a nurse in the future.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 48
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
08 Jun 2015

Alejandro Antonio González (right), 22, from Guatemala, has a drink with one of his best friends in Barcelona, Spain.
Alejandro arrived in Barcelona in September 2013, after being bullied for his homosexual condition for many years back home: his father repudiated him, police used to harass him and his friends in public areas and he was even once kidnapped and raped by two unknown men. He is happy to be now in Barcelona where he attends a psychologist who helps him to feel free to express his sexuality, he actively participates in sexual education campaigns for the gay community and he would like to become a nurse in the future.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 02
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
08 Jun 2015

Alejandro Antonio González (center), 22, from Guatemala, walks in Barcelona city center, Spain, with two of his best friends.
Alejandro arrived in Barcelona in September 2013, after being bullied for his homosexual condition for many years back home: his father repudiated him, police used to harass him and his friends in public areas and he was even once kidnapped and raped by two unknown men. He is happy to be now in Barcelona where he attends a psychologist who helps him feel free to express his sexuality, he actively participates in sexual education campaigns for the gay community and he would like to become a nurse in the future.

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Guatemala's Kite Runners Celebrate Da...
Santiago Sacatepéquez, Guatemala
By zackbaddorf
22 Dec 2014

For the past 115 years, the indigenous town of Santiago Sacatapequez in Guatemala has held the annual Gigantic Kite Festival on Dia de Los Muertos ("Day of the Dead"). Prepping for five months for the occasion, Guatemalans come together in a local cemetery on this momentous day to hoist up kites that are 50-60 feet tall and that use bamboo as their structure.

While these kites don't fly, hundreds of people do bring kites that are 5-10 feet wide to fly throughout the day. The beautiful kites are a way to scare off evil spirits who used to, according to legend, harass the people and destroy their crops. The noise of the paper kites frightens the bad spirits away and allows Guatemalans to honor their ancestors.

In this short documentary, Santos Con, who has been building these kites for 15 years, guides us through the process of preparing the kites and explains their significance in the local traditions. He and his friends say it's in their blood and that they will continue this beautiful ceremony year after year.

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Deported from US: Facing the Journey ...
Guatemala and Honduras
By Karim + Jenny
11 Sep 2014

Text by Jenny Gustafsson and Photos by Karim Mostafa

A crowd has gathered on the grass outside Guatemala City’s airport. They wait patiently, wander back and forth outside the gates. Suddenly a plane appears in the sky, sinks down behind the wall. This is what everyone has been waiting for – one of several daily flights arriving with men and women deported from the United States. “I’m here to meet my brother. He called us yesterday saying that he was coming back today,” says Azucely, a young woman with one child resting on her hip and another playing at her feet. Her brother had been in the US for five years, she says, when he got caught without papers. Azucely herself went through the same thing only a year before. “I had been in the US for nine years when I was deported, all the time without papers. I have three kids born over there. I left Guatemala when I was young, only 14. My mum took a bank loan to send me. She did the same with my brothers too.” Azucely relates a common narrative among young people from the region, who are migrating in ever-growing numbers. The Central American immigrant population in the U.S. has nearly tripled since the 1990s, and now makes up the fastest-growing segment of its Latino population. But the story for many ends suddenly. Over 2 million people have been deported during Obama’s years in power – more than any other period in the past. “Each week, between nine and 14 flights land here, full with people. Most come with nothing at all,” says Mario Hernández at Guatemala City’s airport.

FULL ARTICLE AVAILABLE ON REQUEST 

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Central America Immigrants 13
Guatemala City, Guatemala
By Karim + Jenny
11 Sep 2014

Four men just arrived to Guatemala City on a flight from the U.S. are reflected in the airport window. They are given juice and tortillas, and the NGO Asociación de Apoyo Integral al Migrante help them with one phone call and advice – but once they step outside the airport gates they are on their own.

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Central America Immigrants 14
Guatemala City, Guatemala
By Karim + Jenny
11 Sep 2014

A man walks out from Guatemala City's airport, carrying only a small bag in his hand. The number of Central American migrants arriving in the U.S. informally is on the rise, including that of unaccompanied children. The reasons for leaving the region are many – not least the high levels of violence and lack of social and economical security.

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Central America Immigrants 02
Guatemala City, Guatemala
By Karim + Jenny
12 Aug 2014

The young daughter of Azucely, who was deported in 2013, looks underneath the gate to the airport in Guatemala City. They are waiting outside for Azucely's brother, who was also deported and is arriving with the next flight.

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Central America Immigrants 03
Guatemala City, Guatemala
By Karim + Jenny
12 Aug 2014

Azucely and her youngest daughter waiting for Azucely's brother to arrive at the airport in Guatemala City. Their mother had taken bank loans to pay for the siblings' trip with coyotes, organised smugglers, to cross the border to the United States. But eventually, both of them were deported back to Guatemala.

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Central America Immigrants 04
Guatemala City, Guatemala
By Karim + Jenny
12 Aug 2014

Azucely from San Marcos, nearby Guatemala's border with Mexico, waiting for a flight with deported migrants arriving at the airport in Guatemala City. Every day, families gather outside to pick up returning relatives, as do taxis and buses bringing people back to rural parts of Guatemala where most migrants come from.

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Central America Immigrants 05
Guatemala City, Guatemala
By Karim + Jenny
12 Aug 2014

The mother of Azucely, who sees her son for the first time in five years. Many people in Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador, called the 'Northern Triangle', are separated from family members who have left in search of better opportunities and safety in the United States.

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Central America Immigrants 12
Guatemala City, Guatemala
By Karim + Jenny
12 Aug 2014

Three friends who just arrived at the airport in Guatemala City. Most people arrive with nothing or very little – they carry plastic bags with whatever belongings they brought with them.

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child labor in guatemala 06
Chiquimula, Guatemala
By Daniel Van Moll
27 Jan 2014

A young boy on his work to a coffee plantation (Chiquimula, Guatemala in January 2014).

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child labor in guatemala 07
Chiquimula, Guatemala
By Daniel Van Moll
27 Jan 2014

The majority of child labor in Guatemala occurs in agriculture in rural areas (Chiquimula, Guatemala).

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child labor in guatemala 08
Chiquimula, Guatemala
By Daniel Van Moll
27 Jan 2014

Children are also reportedly subjected to forced labor in agriculture, though public information is not available on the goods these children produce (Chiquimula, Guatemala).

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child labor in guatemala 09
Chiquimula, Guatemala
By Daniel Van Moll
27 Jan 2014

The majority of child labor in Guatemala occurs in agriculture in rural areas (Chiquimula, Guatemala).

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child labor in guatemala 10
Chiquimula, Guatemala
By Daniel Van Moll
27 Jan 2014

A boy working illegally on a coffee plantation near Chiquimula, Guatemala.

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child labor in guatemala 11
Chiquimula, Guatemala
By Daniel Van Moll
27 Jan 2014

A young child on the load area of a pick-up truck which brings workers to remote coffee plantations near Chiquimula, Guatemala.

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child labor in guatemala 12
Chiquimula, Guatemala
By Daniel Van Moll
27 Jan 2014

A young child on the load area of a pick-up truck which brings workers to remote coffee plantations near Chiquimula, Guatemala.

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child labor in guatemala 13
Chiquimula, Guatemala
By Daniel Van Moll
27 Jan 2014

A young boy helping to harvest beans on a coffee plantation (Chiquimula, Guatemala).

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child labor in guatemala 14
Chiquimula, Guatemala
By Daniel Van Moll
27 Jan 2014

A young boy helping to harvest beans on a coffee plantation (Chiquimula, Guatemala).

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child labor in guatemala 15
Chiquimula, Guatemala
By Daniel Van Moll
27 Jan 2014

A young boy working illegally on a coffee plantation near Chiquimul, Guatemala.

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child labor in guatemala 16
Chiquimula, Guatemala
By Daniel Van Moll
27 Jan 2014

A young boy working illegally on a coffee plantation near Chiquimul, Guatemala.

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child labor in guatemala 17
Chiquimula, Guatemala
By Daniel Van Moll
27 Jan 2014

A man overseees workers on a coffee plantation near Chiquimula, Guatemala.

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child labor in guatemala 05
Chiquimula, Guatemala
By Daniel Van Moll
27 Jan 2014

The majority of child labor in Guatemala occurs in agriculture in rural areas (Chiquimula, Guatemala).

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child labor in guatemala 01
Chiquimula, Guatemala
By Daniel Van Moll
26 Jan 2014

Children in Guatemala are engaged in the worst forms of child labor, primarily in hazardous activities in agriculture and manufacturing (Chiquimula, Guatemala).

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child labor in guatemala 02
Chiquimula, Guatemala
By Daniel Van Moll
26 Jan 2014

Children in Guatemala are engaged in the worst forms of child labor, primarily in hazardous activities in agriculture and manufacturing (Chiquimula, Guatemala).

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child labor in guatemala 03
Chiquimula, Guatemala
By Daniel Van Moll
26 Jan 2014

Children are also reportedly subjected to forced labor in agriculture, though public information is not available on the goods these children produce (Chiquimula, Guatemala).

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child labor in guatemala 04
Chiquimula, Guatemala
By Daniel Van Moll
26 Jan 2014

The majority of child labor in Guatemala occurs in agriculture in rural areas (Chiquimula, Guatemala).

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The "After Peace" Project
Worldwide
By Mais Istanbuli
08 Jul 2013

The long way towards peace starts just after the signature of the peace agreements. This is when the complex and difficult process of building peace, memory, truth, resolution and justice for all the victims begins.

The documentaries of the ‘After Peace' project seek to analyze and explain different paths taken by various countries who suffered an armed conflict in the last quarter of the 20th century. Researchers, activists for peace and reconciliation, victims, lawyers and educators expose what has been done and ignored in their countries since the conflict ended, and talk about the long road to reconciliation.

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Health, Death and Poverty in Indigeno...
San Jorge La Laguna , Solola, Guatemala
By hiroko tanaka
03 Jul 2013

After seven years of suffering from diabetes and no access to adequate treatment and nutrition, 49-years old Rodrigo lays in bed, waiting for his last moment in his small home in San Jorge La Laguna, Guatemala. This father of five children has been in and out of hospital frequently. He chose not to return there to spare his family from financial difficulties.

In Guatemala, death too often represents a heavy financial burden. On top of their daily struggle to secure money for food, many families have to deal not only with grief but also with huge debts for the wake and funeral.

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Antigua, Guatemala Celebrates Semana ...
Antigua, Sacatepequez, Guatemala
By hiroko tanaka
30 Mar 2013

Guatemalan women carry an Anda during Semana Santa (Holy Week) procession in Antigua, Guatemala.

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Antigua, Guatemala Celebrates Semana ...
Antigua, Sacatepequez, Guatemala
By hiroko tanaka
29 Mar 2013

Procession participants in a cloud of vanishing smoke during procession during Semana Santa in Antigua, Guatemala.

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The poor living conditions of indigen...
San Antonio Palopo
By hiroko tanaka
12 Aug 2012

Manuela, 34, live in a two room home with her husband Pedro, 34, and her 5 children including two year old Amicar, right. The family has two beds in each room. Pedro and three children sleep on the floor.

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Guatemala: Rescuing the memory
Guatemala
By carloscastro
30 Jul 2012

After its war, Guatemala had two Truth Commissions, one driven by the UN and the other by the Church. Both reports agree that the State is responsible for the majority of crimes committed during the conflict. They further point out that the State committed acts of genocide against the Mayan population. There were over 600 massacres like the one occurred on the community of Plan de Sánchez, that each year commemorates the crime. Even today, after 16 years, Guatemala fights a permanent battle both against oblivion and for justice. Institutions such as the Guatemalan National Police Historical Archive, the Centre for Human Rights Legal Action or the Forensic Anthropology Foundation work -without the support of the State-, to repair victims still seeking a clue, those responsible for the disappearance of a family member or justice.

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Health, Death and Poverty in Indigeno...
San Jorge La Laguna , Solola, Guatemala
By hiroko tanaka
27 Jul 2012

In Guatemala, death too often represents a heavy financial burden. On top of their daily struggle to secure money for food, many families have to deal not only with grief but also with huge debts for the wake and funeral.

The family of Rodrigo is no exception: this 49-years old father of five children passed away after seven years of suffering from diabetes and no access to proper treatment and nutrition.

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Health, Death and Poverty in Indigeno...
San Jorge La Laguna , Solola, Guatemala
By hiroko tanaka
27 Jul 2012

Mourners walk with the coffin to the cemetery during the funeral for Rodrigo, who passed away after 7 years of suffering from diabetes and nutritional deficiencies. In his last months, the 49 year-old father of five, decided not to seek further treatment in order to save his family the financial burden.

In Guatemala, death too often represents a heavy financial burden. On top of their daily struggle to secure money for food and necessities, many families have to deal not only with grief but also with huge debts for the wake and funeral.

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Health, Death and Poverty in Indigeno...
San Jorge La Laguna , Solola, Guatemala
By hiroko tanaka
03 Jul 2012

After seven years of suffering from diabetes and no access to adequate treatment and nutrition, 49-years old Rodrigo lays in bed, waiting for his last moment in his small home in San Jorge La Laguna, Guatemala. This father of five children has been in and out of hospital frequently. He chose not to return there to spare his family from financial difficulties.

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Health, Death and Poverty in Indigeno...
San Jorge La Laguna , Solola, Guatemala
By hiroko tanaka
03 Jul 2012

After seven years of suffering from diabetes and no access to adequate treatment and nutrition, 49-years old Rodrigo lays in bed, waiting for his last moment in his small home in San Jorge La Laguna, Guatemala. This father of five children has been in and out of hospital frequently. He chose not to return there to spare his family from financial difficulties.

In Guatemala, death too often represents a heavy financial burden. On top of their daily struggle to secure money for food, many families have to deal not only with grief but also with huge debts for the wake and funeral.

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Health, Death and Poverty in Indigeno...
San Jorge La Laguna , Solola, Guatemala
By hiroko tanaka
03 Jul 2012

After seven years of suffering from diabetes and no access to adequate treatment and nutrition, 49-years old Rodrigo lays in bed, waiting for his last moment in his small home in San Jorge La Laguna, Guatemala. This father of five children has been in and out of hospital frequently. He chose not to return there to spare his family from financial difficulties.

In Guatemala, death too often represents a heavy financial burden. On top of their daily struggle to secure money for food, many families have to deal not only with grief but also with huge debts for the wake and funeral.