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Life Along The Railway (6 of 11)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
20 Jun 2013

A grandmother and her grandson are sitting next to a wall in a slum in Dhaka. As more and more women are working in factories to raise money for the familiy, grandmothers are taking care of children.

Space is scarce in Dhaka, Bangladesh’s vibrant capital. So is money. An estimated number of more than 10 million people live in Dhaka, making it one of the world’s most populated cities. Poor neighborhoods, by western definitions called slums, are continuously growing. The space next to railway tracks has long been occupied by numerous makeshift homes.

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Kenyan Grandmothers' Survival (20 of 34)
Nairobi, Kenya
By Karel Prinsloo
28 May 2013

Seventy year old Wairimu Gachenga clean herself as she arrive at her home from the Dandora dump site on 28 May 2013 near the Nairobi slum of Korogocho, Kenya. Once a week a group of grandmothers from the area get together to practice self defense techniques after one of them was raped in 2007. Rape of elderly woman has increased in Kenya as people believe that grandmothers have a lower risk of HIV compared to younger women. KAREL PRINSLOO.

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Kenyan Grandmothers' Survival (30 of 34)
Nairobi, Kenya
By Karel Prinsloo
10 May 2013

Seventy year old Wairimu Gachenga prepares to take her granddaughter Wairimu Njeri (7) to school, 10 May 2013 in the Nairobi slum of Korogocho, Kenya. Once a week a group of grandmothers from the area get together to practice self defense techniques after one of them was raped in 2007. Rape of elderly woman has increased in Kenya as people believe that grandmothers have a lower risk of HIV compared to younger women. KAREL PRINSLOO.

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Kenyan Grandmothers' Survival (4 of 34)
Nairobi, Kenya
By Karel Prinsloo
10 May 2013

Seventy year old Wairimu Gachenga prepares to take her granddaughter Wairimu Njeri (7) to school, 10 May 2013 in the Nairobi slum of Korogocho, Kenya. Once a week a group of grandmothers from the area get together to practice self defense techniques after one of them was raped in 2007. Rape of elderly woman has increased in Kenya as people believe that grandmothers have a lower risk of HIV compared to younger women. KAREL PRINSLOO.

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Kenyan Grandmothers' Survival (1 of 34)
Nairobi, Kenya
By Karel Prinsloo
10 May 2013

Seventy year old Wairimu Gachenga stands outside her house on 10 May 2013 in the Nairobi slum of Korogocho, Kenya. Once a week a group of grandmothers from the area get together to practice self defense techniques after one of them was raped in 2007. Rape of elderly woman has increased in Kenya as people believe that grandmothers have a lower risk of HIV compared to younger women. KAREL PRINSLOO.

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Kenyan Grandmothers' Survival (33 of 34)
Nairobi, Kenya
By Karel Prinsloo
10 May 2013

Seventy year old Wairimu Gachenga prepares breakfast while her grand daughter Wairimu Njeri (7) do her homework, 10 May 2013 in the Nairobi slum of Korogocho, Kenya. Once a week a group of grandmothers from the area get together to practice self defense techniques after one of them was raped in 2007. Rape of elderly woman has increased in Kenya as people believe that grandmothers have a lower risk of HIV compared to younger women. KAREL PRINSLOO.

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Kenyan Grandmothers' Survival (32 of 34)
Nairobi, Kenya
By Karel Prinsloo
10 May 2013

Seventy year old Wairimu Gachenga prepares breakfast for her grand children, Wahome Njeri (19) and Wairimu Njeri (7), 10 May 2013 in the Nairobi slum of Korogocho, Kenya. Once a week a group of grandmothers from the area get together to practice self defense techniques after one of them was raped in 2007. Rape of elderly woman has increased in Kenya as people believe that grandmothers have a lower risk of HIV compared to younger women. KAREL PRINSLOO.

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Kenyan Grandmothers' Survival (2 of 34)
Nairobi, Kenya
By Karel Prinsloo
10 May 2013

Seventy year old Wairimu Gachenga washes herself after preparing breakfast for her grandson Wahome Njeri (19) and her grand daughter on 10 May 2013 in the Nairobi slum of Korogocho, Kenya. Once a week a group of grandmothers from the area get together to practice self defense techniques after one of them was raped in 2007. Rape of elderly woman has increased in Kenya as people believe that grandmothers have a lower risk of HIV compared to younger women. KAREL PRINSLOO.

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Kenyan Grandmothers' Survival (13 of 34)
Nairobi, Kenya
By Karel Prinsloo
09 May 2013

Seventy year old Wairimu Gachenga prepares to take her granddaughter Wairimu Njeri (7) to school, 10 May 2013 in the Nairobi slum of Korogocho, Kenya. Once a week a group of grandmothers from the area get together to practice self defense techniques after one of them was raped in 2007. Rape of elderly woman has increased in Kenya as people believe that grandmothers have a lower risk of HIV compared to younger women. KAREL PRINSLOO.

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Kenyan Grandmothers' Survival (14 of 34)
Nairobi, Kenya
By Karel Prinsloo
01 May 2013

Seventy year old Wairimu Gachenga prepares breakfast for her two grandchildren she looks after, 10 May 2013 in the Nairobi slum of Korogocho, Kenya. Once a week a group of grandmothers from the area get together to practice self defense techniques after one of them was raped in 2007. Rape of elderly woman has increased in Kenya as people believe that grandmothers have a lower risk of HIV compared to younger women. KAREL PRINSLOO.

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Island of Twins (23 of 23)
Alabat Island, Philippines
By Sherbien Dacalanio
03 Feb 2013

There are around 60 pairs of twins in a small town on Alabat Island. Eudosia and Antonia are the oldest twins living in the island turning 82 next year,w hile the five month-old babies, Jane and Joy, are the youngest twins on the island.
According to the mayor, the population of the island is composed of .4% of twins of the 12,039 residents of their town. When he and his wife migrated to the island in 1980s they were amazed that the island had so many twins. As a matter of fact, the former mayor of the island had a twin brother. Town folks are shocked when they think they've seen that the dead mayor is alive, but later learn that the former mayor has a twin brother.
No studies have been conducted on the island as to why the prevalence of twins in this small town is growing. According to a study conducted between 1996 to 2006, the Philippine Obstetric and Gynecologic Society found out that there was 182% increase in multiple pregnancies in 35 year-old women due to the use of fertility drugs. Due to the remoteness of the island and the limited access to fertility drugs, other influences could be considered such as inheritance of twinning or the food intake of mothers.
According to Wikipedia, Yoruba in South Africa has the highest rate of twinning in the world, with 45-50 twin sets (or 90-100 twins) per 1,000 live births, possibly because of high consumption of a specific type of yam containing a natural phytoestrogen which may stimulate the ovaries to release an egg from each side.
The main source of sustenance on the island is farming and fishing and according to the oldest midwife in the island, heredity is the major culprit of twinning in the island, and so far, their island has the highest population of twins in the entire Philippines.

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Bedouin Settlement Near Israeli Housi...
Ma’aleh Adumim, West Bank
By javiervidela
06 Dec 2012

A Bedouin child plays in the care of his grandmother in a Bedouin home, in front of Ma’aleh Adumim settlement.

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Kalasha People of Pakistan (11 of 18)
Chitral, Pakistan
By Jodi Hilton
01 Jul 2008

Kalash girl and her grandmother. The Kalash believe themselves to be descended from Alexander the Great. Bumburet Valley.

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The People of Pingelap (7 of 27)
Pingelap, Federated States of Micronesia
By Hannes von der Fecht
23 Mar 2008

Carla, a color-blind girl with her grandmother.

Pingelap is a small island in the Pacific Ocean, a part of the Federate States of Micronesia. About 240 people live on this atoll. Ten per cent of them have a genetic form of colour blindness, achromatopsia, meaning their sight is extremely diffused and their eyes very sensitive to light. This disease is locally known as "Maskun", which in Pingelapese language means "to not see".
In his book, The Island of the Colorblind, Oliver Sacks, author and neurologist, describes the life of the inhabitants of Pingelap. His interest is based on the question, if, because of the multitude of people with Maskun in Pingelap, there is an independent culture of colour blind people. This book inspired me to travel to Pingelap and create a photographic series as a study in the perception of people with Maskun. I discovered that in everyday life people with Maskun are hardly distinguishable from those without – only the constant blinking of the eyes in the bright sunshine reveals any difference. With my camera I wanted to somehow visualise how the island was percieved by its inhabitants and come to terms with those who are living with Maskun.