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Egypt's unemployment rate jumped to 1...
Cairo, Egypt
By Video Cairo Sat
03 May 2013

Egypt's unemployment rate increased to 12.7% in 2012, up from 12% in 2011, and 9% in 2010, according to a report released by the Central Agency for Public Mobilization and Statistics (CAPMAS).

This brings the total number of unemployed to 3.4 million, up from 3.1 million in 2011, an increase of 242,000 people.

Particularly, the unemployment rate was 42.7 percent among young people between 20 and 24 years old and was 23 percent among those between 25 and 29 in that year.

SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Ahmed Bahaa El-Din Shaaban, member of both the ‎National Association for Change reform movement and ‎Egypt's Socialist Party:

The number of those employed in 2012 was 23.6 million workers; also there were only about 4.7 million working women in Egypt in 2012, according to the figures.

CAPMAS attributed the increase to the circumstances in Egypt following the 25 January Revolution and the ensuing events “that resulted in a slowdown in economic activities during this period.

These data show the need to embark on an economic reform program that prevents the government from relying on foreign aid, loans and deposits in order to provide the resources.

SOUNDBIDTE 2 (Arabic) – Haytham Mohamadeen, member of the political bureau of the revolutionary socialists:

On the other hand, hundreds of workers marked the Labour Day with marches and protests to voice their discontent with the unfulfilled longstanding demands of workers even after the revolution.

Among these demands are the implementation of minimum wage, independent and representative syndicates for workers, and putting an end to legislation that harms the labour movement.

Local News Agency: Middle East Bureau / VCS
Shooting Dateline: Archive except the soundbites
Shooting Location: Cairo, Egypt
Publishing Time: May 2, 2013
Length: 00:02:11
Video Size: 107 MB
Language: Arabic
Column:
Organized by:
Correspondent:
Camera: VCS

SHOTLIST:

  1. Various shots of youth at the universities (Archive)
  2. Various shots of people seating in cafes downtown Cairo (Archive)
  3. SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Ahmed Bahaa El-Din Shaaban, member of both the ‎National Association for Change reform
  4. Various shots of workers preparing materials and working women inside the factories (Archive)
  5. SOUNDBIDTE 2 (Arabic) – Haytham Mohamadeen, member of the political bureau of the revolutionary socialists:
  6. Various shots of protestors raising banners and poster of former president Gamal Abdel Nasser during a protest marking the Labour Day, downtown Cairo (Archive May: 1)
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Poverty And Tourism In Laos
Luang Prabang, Laos
By U.S. Editor
26 Apr 2013

Although Laos has been a top ranked tourist destination in recent years, the country remains one of the world's poorest nations, and relies heavily on foreign aid and donations. People in Laos continue to struggle with severe poverty, and have extremely low life expectancy despite the country's booming tourism industry.

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Azaz Camp, Syria (4 of 41)
Azaz, Syria
By Michele Pero
06 Dec 2012

Refugee camp of Azaz, Syrian border.
Refugees from Halep and surrounding areas have lost their houses under the bombings. They left Halep with just the clothes they had at the time. They have no documents, no money, no belongings. The refugees believed the could cross the Turkish border to escape the massacres, but after a limited number of refugees were accepted by the Turkish government who settled in the nearby camp of Kilis, the border was closed. They had to settle in the camp right on the Syrian border, waiting for a move that does not arrive.

Turkey cannot take more refugees and cannot do more than what actually it does. The refugees must stay were they are, with no home in Syria anymore, no passport to leave the country, as if convicted to stay in the camp.
The excess number refugees not accepted into Turkey settled in September 2012 under big hangars once used by Syrian customs police for storing and checking goods before letting them pass the border. For months the refugees had to sleep right on the pavement, under hangars, under trucks or any other shelter available. No heating, no running water, no latrines, no roof above their heads.

Tents arrived just at around the middle of November 2012, donated by the Red Crescent of Qatar. Since that, three hangars were filled with tents, then other tents were placed on open ground. In December 2012, the number of refugees at the Azaz camp reached about 7000.

Life at the camp is hard. Volunteers from various ONG such as IHH provide meals every day. Supplies come from world wide relief organizations and volunteer donations, but they are not enough to meet the needs of so many. Tents are not waterproof. The pavement is constantly wet when the rain falls, especially hard for those ones settled on open ground. No electricity is supplied. Water is scarce and is brought in big containers for those who need it most. Heating becomes a real issue with the oncoming winter. Kids are sent to the surrounding fields to gather any burning material, but they cannot go too far since the mine fields protecting the no-man’s land are right at border line next to the camp. Refugees burn dry grass. At dusk, they must make return to their tents, because all around there is no light to even walk. They rest by candlelight in their tents until they fall asleep.
Recently a protest calling for better conditions at the camp was held at the border (see other reportage “Syria - protest in the camp of Azaz”, © Michele Pero) to get attention from the Turkish Governor of the area, with no results. These people must stay here. No place where to go, no place to return to. Convicted, forgotten. No one knows for how long.

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Azaz Camp, Syria (5 of 41)
Azaz, Syria
By Michele Pero
06 Dec 2012

Refugee camp of Azaz, Syrian border.
Refugees from Halep and surrounding areas have lost their houses under the bombings. They left Halep with just the clothes they had at the time. They have no documents, no money, no belongings. The refugees believed the could cross the Turkish border to escape the massacres, but after a limited number of refugees were accepted by the Turkish government who settled in the nearby camp of Kilis, the border was closed. They had to settle in the camp right on the Syrian border, waiting for a move that does not arrive.

Turkey cannot take more refugees and cannot do more than what actually it does. The refugees must stay were they are, with no home in Syria anymore, no passport to leave the country, as if convicted to stay in the camp.
The excess number refugees not accepted into Turkey settled in September 2012 under big hangars once used by Syrian customs police for storing and checking goods before letting them pass the border. For months the refugees had to sleep right on the pavement, under hangars, under trucks or any other shelter available. No heating, no running water, no latrines, no roof above their heads.

Tents arrived just at around the middle of November 2012, donated by the Red Crescent of Qatar. Since that, three hangars were filled with tents, then other tents were placed on open ground. In December 2012, the number of refugees at the Azaz camp reached about 7000.

Life at the camp is hard. Volunteers from various ONG such as IHH provide meals every day. Supplies come from world wide relief organizations and volunteer donations, but they are not enough to meet the needs of so many. Tents are not waterproof. The pavement is constantly wet when the rain falls, especially hard for those ones settled on open ground. No electricity is supplied. Water is scarce and is brought in big containers for those who need it most. Heating becomes a real issue with the oncoming winter. Kids are sent to the surrounding fields to gather any burning material, but they cannot go too far since the mine fields protecting the no-man’s land are right at border line next to the camp. Refugees burn dry grass. At dusk, they must make return to their tents, because all around there is no light to even walk. They rest by candlelight in their tents until they fall asleep.
Recently a protest calling for better conditions at the camp was held at the border (see other reportage “Syria - protest in the camp of Azaz”, © Michele Pero) to get attention from the Turkish Governor of the area, with no results. These people must stay here. No place where to go, no place to return to. Convicted, forgotten. No one knows for how long.

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Poverty And Tourism In Laos (9 of 9)
Luang Prabang, Laos
By hiroko tanaka
05 Aug 2008

Local Lao children sell a wishing bird to set free for $1 USD to tourists at Pak Ou Cave in Luang Prabang, Laos. Although Laos has been a top ranked tourist destination in recent years, the country remains one of the world's poorest nations and relies on foreign aid and donations. Lao people struggle with severe poverty and their life expectancy is extremely low.

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Poverty And Tourism In Laos (8 of 9)
Luang Prabang, Laos
By hiroko tanaka
05 Aug 2008

A young girl walks in the dirty street with minimal clothing and no shoes in a village near Luang Prabang. Although Laos has been a top ranked tourist destination in recent years, the country remains one of the world's poorest nations and relies on foreign aid and donations. Lao people struggle with severe poverty and their life expectancy is extremely low.

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Poverty And Tourism In Laos (7 of 9)
Luang Prabang, Laos
By hiroko tanaka
05 Aug 2008

Kid shoes on the dirty ground in a village near Luang Prabang, Laos. Although Laos has been a top ranked tourist destination in recent years, the country remains one of the world's poorest nations and relies on foreign aid and donations. Lao people struggle with severe poverty and their life expectancy is extremely low.

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Poverty And Tourism In Laos (6 of 9)
Luang Prabang, Laos
By hiroko tanaka
05 Aug 2008

Children with bare feet play at Pak Ou Cave in Luang Prabang, Laos. Although Laos has been a top ranked tourist destination in recent years, the country remains one of the world's poorest nations and relies on foreign aid and donations. Lao people struggle with severe poverty and their life expectancy is extremely low.

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Poverty And Tourism In Laos (5 of 9)
Luang Prabang, Laos
By hiroko tanaka
05 Aug 2008

Local Lao children sell a wishing bird to set free for $1 USD to tourists at Pak Ou Cave in Luang Prabang, Laos. Although Laos has been a top ranked tourist destination in recent years, the country remains one of the world's poorest nations and relies on foreign aid and donations. Lao people struggle with severe poverty and their life expectancy is extremely low.

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Poverty And Tourism In Laos (4 of 9)
Luang Prabang, Laos
By hiroko tanaka
05 Aug 2008

A barefoot Lao boy plays in a village near Luang Prabang, Laos. Although Laos has been a top ranked tourist destination in recent years, the country remains one of the world's poorest nations and relies on foreign aid and donations. Lao people struggle with severe poverty and their life expectancy is extremely low.

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Poverty And Tourism In Laos (3 of 9)
Luang Prabang, Laos
By hiroko tanaka
05 Aug 2008

A group of young girls sell crafts in Luang Prabang, Laos. Although Laos has been a top ranked tourist destination in recent years, the country remains one of the world's poorest nations and relies on foreign aid and donations. Lao people struggle with severe poverty and their life expectancy is extremely low.

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Poverty And Tourism In Laos (2 of 9)
Luang Prabang, Laos
By hiroko tanaka
05 Aug 2008

A young girl sells crafts in the village streets near Luang Prabang. Although Laos has been a top ranked tourist destination in recent years, the country remains one of the world's poorest nations and relies on foreign aid and donations. Lao people struggle with severe poverty and their life expectancy is extremely low.

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Poverty And Tourism In Laos (1 of 9)
Luang Prabang, Laos
By hiroko tanaka
05 Aug 2008

Although Laos has been a top ranked tourist destination in recent years, the country remains one of the world's poorest nations and relies on foreign aid and donations. Lao people struggle with severe poverty and its life expectancy is extremely low.