Frame 0004
Lebanese Snowstorm Adds to Misery of ...
Aarsal
By TTM Contributor 32
19 Feb 2015

Set largely against a bleak grey sky, this video sheds light on the rough conditions in which many are forced to spend the winter months in Ersal, a northern Lebanese town with a large population of Syrian refugees that's long since been troubled with spillover from the civil war next door. The scene of major clashes between the Lebanese government and Al-Nusra/ISIS in August 2014, the video reveals the town's struggles to cope with harsh winter conditions such as strong wind and snow storms.

Frame 0004
"We Are Dying of the Cold": Syrian Re...
Qoub Elias
By Cherine Yazbeck
14 Jan 2015

Qoub Elias, Beqaa Lebanon

January 14, 2015

Syrian refugees in the town of Qoub Elias in eastern Lebanon say that their fragile tents collapsed under the snow during the recent storm that has hit Lebanon for the past week.
Dozens of malnourished children run in the snow wearing light clothes. Many of them only have plastic slippers to protect their feet from the icy ground.
Refugee camp residents in Qoub Elias, many of whom are unemployed, complained that the aid they are receiving is not enough to cover their needs.

Shot List
1. Wide of snow-covered hills and Beqaa Valley
2. Wide (pan right) of snow-covered plain
3. Various Syrian refugee children running and shouting NAT SOUND: (Arabic) “We want a school! We want a school!”
4. Traveling of children walking in the snow
5. Tilt down on children/ Close up of feet (wearing slippers) on snow
6. Traveling of child walking in snow/ entering tent
7. Medium of woman cooking outside a tent
8. Close up of woman cooking rice outside a tent
9. Wide of young girl carrying baby and children walking around and shoveling snow
10. Medium of young boy shoveling snow
11. Wide/ zoom in of children wearing slippers and no socks standing on the snow
12. Close up of girl’s feet in slippers stepping in the snow
13. Close up of Rawaa’s (young Syrian refugee girl) face
14. Wide of children standing next to tents
15. Medium/ close up of barefoot children
16. Wide of boy removing snow from top of tent. NAT SOUND (Arabic) Man to his boy: “Give it to him. Remove the snow. It is behind you.”

17 Wide of children throwing snow at each other

18 Various of refugees and World Vision staff taking supplies out of pickup truck

19 Various of refugees outside tents

Soundbites

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, boy) Syrian refugee, Moayyad al-Rasheed
01:06
Moayyad: There is no school.
Interviewer: What is there no school?
Moayyad: ah…
Interviewer: How long has it been that you have not gone to school?
Moayyad: It has been 10 years [children laugh]. I have not gone [to school]
Interviewer: Not even once?
Moayyad: Not even once.

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Child) Syrian refugee, Moayyad al-Rasheed
01:59
Interviewer: Do you feel cold at night?
Child: Yes
Interviewer: Too cold?
Child: Yes

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Syrian refugee, Moayyad’s father, Mohammad al-Rasheed
02:06
Mohammad al-Rasheed: There are 19 people of us here in this tent.
Interviewer: How can you fit?
Mohammad al-Rasheed: What can we do? This crisis has done this to us. We burn wood, nylon and anything else to have heat. What can we do? This storm has affected us a lot. At night, you have to clear the tent’s roof every hour, otherwise it would collapse. During the storm, we have to do this every hour or two hours.
During the summer, I worked as a manual laborer, but there is no work in the winter. I am sitting around. God help us. We received aid a couple of days ago from a sheikh… ah… the imam of Al-Salam Mosque. He gave each household a cardboard box in which there was rice, sugar and oil. And the rest of the… every charity association that we approached said that the roads are closed because of the snow and ice. Members from the World Vision association came here a few days ago and wrote down the clothes that children need. They gave a coupon to each child. Each child is entitled to a box [of clothes]; here it is.
Interviewer: Yes, show it to me.
[Man shows a card that bears a barcode and a serial number as well as the following writing in Arabic: “Children’s Winter Clothing Program. UNICEF – Together for Children] Mohammad al-Rasheed: This is from World Vision. They gave each house [a card] that differed according to the [number] of children. Do you understand what I mean? Each child is entitled to a box of clothes. The box has good clothes in it. There is a group of people here in Qoub Elias who received [clothes]. A box contains, for example, a jacket, several pairs of trousers, gloves, boots….
These potatoes… we work as manual [agricultural] laborers in the summer. And there is a late crop [that is picked] in November. We take the girls with us to pick potatoes and the landowner gives each worker something to cook, depending on the [size] of his family.

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman) Unnamed Syrian refugee

04:08
We are dying of the cold. Could it be any worse? We can rely on God and be patient. I am pregnant, it is very cold and there is no heating. There is no aid, nothing… there is no firewood. We are miserable.

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Girl) Syrian refugee Rawaa
04:50
Rawaa: My name is Rawaa. We do not have money.
Interviewer: How cold do you feel?
Rawaa: Very cold. There is no heating.

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man), Jassem al-Nasser
05:13
“I have been here for two and a half years. We suffer from the cold, rain and snow. There is no aid or heating. Look at the situation. It is very disastrous. We were dying! The tents collapsed over our heads and water was going in from all sides. There is no heating. We are burning rags to provide heating for the children. There is no heating at all, we are dying! We put our feet on someone else’s to feel warm. “There is nothing that we do not need. We need everything: clothing, food, tents, mattresses… everything. We have not made any preparations; we only have God. We have nothing to set up. We sit and hold the wooden huts so that they do not fall on our heads. If they fall we go outside to avoid getting killed by wooden blocks. It is better to die of the cold. We are close to death. Most of us are nearly dying. Of course, we help each other. What can we do? If we did not help each other who will help us? If someone’s tent collapses we fix it for him; if someone’s tent is flooded we give him all the furniture we can offer.
“Our life [in Syria] was wonderful. We lived in bliss.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Moayyad’s father, Mohammad al-Rasheed
06:41
“The problem is that we need something to support the tent. We need to put a wooden block here to support the ceiling. The snow’s weight causes the tent to collapse. Look over here. If we did not thick tarpaulin sheets water will leak. Do you know what I mean? “We need a block of wood that is about three or four meters long. We also need to clear the roof. Otherwise, the tent will collapse.
“During a storm… the coming days will be very icy. If the tent was not supported it will fall, especially if it snowed at 2 a.m. We need to go out at 2 a.m. to clear the snow with shovels. Your hand would freeze.” 07:33 “This tent fell during the storm over the people who were inside. Bedouin men came here – we help each other out – we got these blocks of wood and put them here to support it.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, woman) Um Wissam
07:45
“During the storm the tent broke down, and Bedouin men came and lifted it again. It fell because of the snow. My children and I were sitting and saw that it fell suddenly. I started screaming and the men came right away. Thanks be to God. I started screaming, so the men were scared.” “I live with my 10 children. Interviewer: where is your husband?
-My husband is missing he is not here.” “I was scared. If there was no war in our country, my house would not been affected. “Nine children.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Abdulla Bourashed, World Vision staff member

09:26
Abdulla Borashed: At the time being, we are [helping people deal with the] snow, but in general we provide water and other supplies needed for displaced people.

Interviewer: what have you brought them?

Abdulla Borashed: We brought them sanitation kits. They include wheel barrels, boots and gloves. I have also brought them nylon for the tents. Wood? No, I did not find any at the warehouse, but we will get it.

“In the winter we provide seven pieces of clothing for each family.

“A sanitation kit consists of a wheel barrel that contains an axel and two shovels, two pairs of gloves and two pairs of boots, and masks. But the wheel barrels and boots did not fit [in the car]. I will bring them tomorrow. We have been working after the storm for two days but we have not able to do much because of the snow.”

Thumb sm
Occupy Maidan 4
Kiev, Ukraine
By Daniel Van Moll
04 Feb 2014

A man is resting on the occupied Independence Square (Maidan Nezalezhnosti) in Kiev, Ukraine on February 4th, 2014.

Thumb sm
Occupy Maidan 2
Kiev, Ukraine
By Daniel Van Moll
04 Feb 2014

A man is resting near a hot kettle with coffee on the occupied Independence Square (Maidan Nezalezhnosti) in Kiev, Ukraine on February 4th, 2014.

Frame 0004
Storm "Zeina" Hits Lebanon hard
Chebaa-Kfarchouba-Chouaa
By [email protected]
07 Dec 2013

8 January 2015 - Chebaa
People in the area of Marj’youn, south Lebanon woke up to find their villages covered with snow.

This heavy snowstorm killed at least three Syrian refugees who were trying to cross the border into Lebanon. Syrian refugees in east Lebanon also suffered harsh weather conditions.

While most roads in the area are still open, the snow thickness in the village of Jdaidat Marj’youn has reached 10 centimeters. Most areas located at 600 meters above sea level witnessed heavy snowfall during the storm Zeina, which hit Lebanon and neighboring countries on January 6.

Shot List

Close up of road sign during snow fall Various of hills covered with snow Wide of bulldozer removing snow Various of roads covered with snow Wide of heavy rain Wide of refugee tents Medium of shoes and firewood Various of refugees inside tent

Wide of food on the floor

Medium of man adding fuel to stove

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman) Unnamed Syrian refugee
“There is cold and snow. We are cooking using a gas burner and this heater. We do not have anything to do. We are scared. I could not sleep last night because I was scared of the wind and snow. We say that it would be better if the storm was during the day, not the night. During the day one is able to see.”

wide of refugees eating on the floor

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Unnamed Syrian refugee

“We have food supplies and firewood at home. People were given diesel. Whoever had installed a diesel heater also bought diesel. We are waiting for God’s mercy. No one is kinder to people than God is.”

Wide of young woman making coffee

Medium (zoom out) of tree covered with snow

Wide of excavation vehicle lifting snow

wide shot of Mrj oyoon sign board

shots of roads covered with snow

Various shots of areas covered with snow

shots of vehicles with chains on the wheels and other vehicles removing snow

Shots of a man removing snow from the roof of the tent

close up of a child

Wide shots of tents covered with snow

Close up of the sign board of Shebaa

shots of roads covered with snow and bulldozers removing snow

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Unnamed Lebanese man:

It is okay now, the roads were blocked before, but now they are open.

shots of cars on the snow covered road

Shots of vehicles covered with snow

Shots of vehicles removing snow

Shots of red cross vehicles passing by

shots of hills covered with snow

Shots of UN cars and members

shots of UN members removing snow.

Shots of people removing a car stuck in the snow

SOUNDBITE: (Man, Arabic) unnamed man:

it is a heavy snow, it has been years since it snowed like that. there were damages in the pine and olive trees. the trees that were damaged are the tress which carry their leaves during the winter.

Shots of a man removing snow from the front of his house

Shots of children playing with snow

SOUNDBITE: (Man, Arabic)

the snow reached 60-80 Cm and it is good. The municipality workers are opening the roads.

Interviewer: were you prepared for the snow?

We have supplies and people here always prepare for the snow. it is good.

Shots of children playing with snow

SOUNDBITE: (Man,Arabic):

for over six or seven years people got used to this kind of snow, however, people are surprised that it is continuos. the snow is about 50 cm thick, We are opening the roads now, and about 90% of the roads are now open, and in case of any emergency we send people to immediately open the blocked roads.

Shots of a bulldozer removing the snow

Frame 0004
Behind the Scenes-Oleg the Hunter (wi...
Diupkin Lake
By Berta Tilmantaite
02 Sep 2013

In one of the coldest places on earth, 1000km from the nearest city, in the depths of Siberia, one storyteller braved the deadly cold to tell the story of Oleg, a hunter who lives off the Siberian Taiga. Like Oleg, storyteller Berta Tilmantaite sees beauty and abundance in the harshest climates.

Frame 0004
Oleg the Hunter: Behind the Scenes (N...
Evenkia
By Berta Tilmantaite
02 Sep 2013

Diupkin Lake, Evenkia, Russia

In one of the coldest places on earth, 1000km from the nearest city, in the depths of Siberia, one storyteller braved the deadly cold to tell the story of Oleg, a hunter who lives off the Siberian Taiga. Like Oleg, storyteller Berta Tilmantaite sees beauty and abundance in the world's harshest climates.

This video takes a behind the scenes look at the production of Berta Tilmantaite's "Oleg the Hunter."

Thumb sm
Middle-distance Sled Dog Race 7
Russia, Petrozavodsk
By Yury Goldenshtein
19 Jan 2013

Sled Dog racer has finished the race. The temperature outside was - 20 C.

Thumb sm
La Rinconada, into the gold's bubble 21
La RInconada, Peru
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
13 Jan 2013

People play football under the snow in a neighborhood in La Rinconada, Ananea, Peru.

Thumb sm
Azaz Camp, Syria (8 of 41)
Azaz, Syria
By Michele Pero
06 Dec 2012

Refugee camp of Azaz, Syrian border.
Refugees from Halep and surrounding areas have lost their houses under the bombings. They left Halep with just the clothes they had at the time. They have no documents, no money, no belongings. The refugees believed the could cross the Turkish border to escape the massacres, but after a limited number of refugees were accepted by the Turkish government who settled in the nearby camp of Kilis, the border was closed. They had to settle in the camp right on the Syrian border, waiting for a move that does not arrive.

Turkey cannot take more refugees and cannot do more than what actually it does. The refugees must stay were they are, with no home in Syria anymore, no passport to leave the country, as if convicted to stay in the camp.
The excess number refugees not accepted into Turkey settled in September 2012 under big hangars once used by Syrian customs police for storing and checking goods before letting them pass the border. For months the refugees had to sleep right on the pavement, under hangars, under trucks or any other shelter available. No heating, no running water, no latrines, no roof above their heads.

Tents arrived just at around the middle of November 2012, donated by the Red Crescent of Qatar. Since that, three hangars were filled with tents, then other tents were placed on open ground. In December 2012, the number of refugees at the Azaz camp reached about 7000.

Life at the camp is hard. Volunteers from various ONG such as IHH provide meals every day. Supplies come from world wide relief organizations and volunteer donations, but they are not enough to meet the needs of so many. Tents are not waterproof. The pavement is constantly wet when the rain falls, especially hard for those ones settled on open ground. No electricity is supplied. Water is scarce and is brought in big containers for those who need it most. Heating becomes a real issue with the oncoming winter. Kids are sent to the surrounding fields to gather any burning material, but they cannot go too far since the mine fields protecting the no-man’s land are right at border line next to the camp. Refugees burn dry grass. At dusk, they must make return to their tents, because all around there is no light to even walk. They rest by candlelight in their tents until they fall asleep.
Recently a protest calling for better conditions at the camp was held at the border (see other reportage “Syria - protest in the camp of Azaz”, © Michele Pero) to get attention from the Turkish Governor of the area, with no results. These people must stay here. No place where to go, no place to return to. Convicted, forgotten. No one knows for how long.

Thumb sm
Azaz Camp, Syria (11 of 41)
Azaz, Syria
By Michele Pero
06 Dec 2012

Refugee camp of Azaz, Syrian border.
Refugees from Halep and surrounding areas have lost their houses under the bombings. They left Halep with just the clothes they had at the time. They have no documents, no money, no belongings. The refugees believed the could cross the Turkish border to escape the massacres, but after a limited number of refugees were accepted by the Turkish government who settled in the nearby camp of Kilis, the border was closed. They had to settle in the camp right on the Syrian border, waiting for a move that does not arrive.

Turkey cannot take more refugees and cannot do more than what actually it does. The refugees must stay were they are, with no home in Syria anymore, no passport to leave the country, as if convicted to stay in the camp.
The excess number refugees not accepted into Turkey settled in September 2012 under big hangars once used by Syrian customs police for storing and checking goods before letting them pass the border. For months the refugees had to sleep right on the pavement, under hangars, under trucks or any other shelter available. No heating, no running water, no latrines, no roof above their heads.

Tents arrived just at around the middle of November 2012, donated by the Red Crescent of Qatar. Since that, three hangars were filled with tents, then other tents were placed on open ground. In December 2012, the number of refugees at the Azaz camp reached about 7000.

Life at the camp is hard. Volunteers from various ONG such as IHH provide meals every day. Supplies come from world wide relief organizations and volunteer donations, but they are not enough to meet the needs of so many. Tents are not waterproof. The pavement is constantly wet when the rain falls, especially hard for those ones settled on open ground. No electricity is supplied. Water is scarce and is brought in big containers for those who need it most. Heating becomes a real issue with the oncoming winter. Kids are sent to the surrounding fields to gather any burning material, but they cannot go too far since the mine fields protecting the no-man’s land are right at border line next to the camp. Refugees burn dry grass. At dusk, they must make return to their tents, because all around there is no light to even walk. They rest by candlelight in their tents until they fall asleep.
Recently a protest calling for better conditions at the camp was held at the border (see other reportage “Syria - protest in the camp of Azaz”, © Michele Pero) to get attention from the Turkish Governor of the area, with no results. These people must stay here. No place where to go, no place to return to. Convicted, forgotten. No one knows for how long.

Thumb sm
Azaz Camp, Syria (39 of 41)
Azaz, Syria
By Michele Pero
06 Dec 2012

Refugee camp of Azaz, Syrian border.
Refugees from Halep and surrounding areas have lost their houses under the bombings. They left Halep with just the clothes they had at the time. They have no documents, no money, no belongings. The refugees believed the could cross the Turkish border to escape the massacres, but after a limited number of refugees were accepted by the Turkish government who settled in the nearby camp of Kilis, the border was closed. They had to settle in the camp right on the Syrian border, waiting for a move that does not arrive.

Turkey cannot take more refugees and cannot do more than what actually it does. The refugees must stay were they are, with no home in Syria anymore, no passport to leave the country, as if convicted to stay in the camp.
The excess number refugees not accepted into Turkey settled in September 2012 under big hangars once used by Syrian customs police for storing and checking goods before letting them pass the border. For months the refugees had to sleep right on the pavement, under hangars, under trucks or any other shelter available. No heating, no running water, no latrines, no roof above their heads.

Tents arrived just at around the middle of November 2012, donated by the Red Crescent of Qatar. Since that, three hangars were filled with tents, then other tents were placed on open ground. In December 2012, the number of refugees at the Azaz camp reached about 7000.

Life at the camp is hard. Volunteers from various ONG such as IHH provide meals every day. Supplies come from world wide relief organizations and volunteer donations, but they are not enough to meet the needs of so many. Tents are not waterproof. The pavement is constantly wet when the rain falls, especially hard for those ones settled on open ground. No electricity is supplied. Water is scarce and is brought in big containers for those who need it most. Heating becomes a real issue with the oncoming winter. Kids are sent to the surrounding fields to gather any burning material, but they cannot go too far since the mine fields protecting the no-man’s land are right at border line next to the camp. Refugees burn dry grass. At dusk, they must make return to their tents, because all around there is no light to even walk. They rest by candlelight in their tents until they fall asleep.
Recently a protest calling for better conditions at the camp was held at the border (see other reportage “Syria - protest in the camp of Azaz”, © Michele Pero) to get attention from the Turkish Governor of the area, with no results. These people must stay here. No place where to go, no place to return to. Convicted, forgotten. No one knows for how long.

Thumb sm
Azaz Camp, Syria
Azaz, Syria
By U.S. Editor
02 Dec 2012

Refugee camp of Azaz, Syrian border.
Refugees from Halep and surrounding areas have lost their houses under the bombings. They left Halep with just the clothes they had at the time. They have no documents, no money, no belongings. The refugees believed the could cross the Turkish border to escape the massacres, but after a limited number of refugees were accepted by the Turkish government who settled in the nearby camp of Kilis, the border was closed. They had to settle in the camp right on the Syrian border, waiting for a move that does not arrive.

Turkey cannot take more refugees and cannot do more than what actually it does. The refugees must stay were they are, with no home in Syria anymore, no passport to leave the country, as if convicted to stay in the camp.
The excess number refugees not accepted into Turkey settled in September 2012 under big hangars once used by Syrian customs police for storing and checking goods before letting them pass the border. For months the refugees had to sleep right on the pavement, under hangars, under trucks or any other shelter available. No heating, no running water, no latrines, no roof above their heads.

Tents arrived just at around the middle of November 2012, donated by the Red Crescent of Qatar. Since that, three hangars were filled with tents, then other tents were placed on open ground. In December 2012, the number of refugees at the Azaz camp reached about 7000.

Life at the camp is hard. Volunteers from various ONG such as IHH provide meals every day. Supplies come from world wide relief organizations and volunteer donations, but they are not enough to meet the needs of so many. Tents are not waterproof. The pavement is constantly wet when the rain falls, especially hard for those ones settled on open ground. No electricity is supplied. Water is scarce and is brought in big containers for those who need it most. Heating becomes a real issue with the oncoming winter. Kids are sent to the surrounding fields to gather any burning material, but they cannot go too far since the mine fields protecting the no-man’s land are right at border line next to the camp. Refugees burn dry grass. At dusk, they must make return to their tents, because all around there is no light to even walk. They rest by candlelight in their tents until they fall asleep.
Recently a protest calling for better conditions at the camp was held at the border (see other reportage “Syria - protest in the camp of Azaz”, © Michele Pero) to get attention from the Turkish Governor of the area, with no results. These people must stay here. No place where to go, no place to return to. Convicted, forgotten. No one knows for how long.