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MVI_7713
Unnamed Road, Khan Shaykhun,Syria
By QUSAY NOOR
28 Apr 2018

The Chemical Massacre of Khan Sheikhan A pause on the first anniversary of the Khan Shikhun massacre of civil defense elements

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MVI_7769
Unnamed Road, Khan Shaykhun,Syria
By QUSAY NOOR
28 Apr 2018

The Chemical Massacre of Khan Sheikhan A pause on the first anniversary of the Khan Shikhun massacre of civil defense elements

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MVI_7718
Unnamed Road, Khan Shaykhun,Syria
By QUSAY NOOR
28 Apr 2018

The Chemical Massacre of Khan Sheikhan A pause on the first anniversary of the Khan Shikhun massacre of civil defense elements

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MVI_7719
Unnamed Road, Khan Shaykhun,Syria
By QUSAY NOOR
28 Apr 2018

The Chemical Massacre of Khan Sheikhan A pause on the first anniversary of the Khan Shikhun massacre of civil defense elements

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MVI_7768
Unnamed Road, Khan Shaykhun,Syria
By QUSAY NOOR
28 Apr 2018

The Chemical Massacre of Khan Sheikhan A pause on the first anniversary of the Khan Shikhun massacre of civil defense elements

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MVI_7801
Unnamed Road, Khan Shaykhun,Syria
By QUSAY NOOR
28 Apr 2018

The Chemical Massacre of Khan Sheikhan A pause on the first anniversary of the Khan Shikhun massacre of civil defense elements

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MVI_7809
Unnamed Road, Khan Shaykhun,Syria
By QUSAY NOOR
28 Apr 2018

The Chemical Massacre of Khan Sheikhan A pause on the first anniversary of the Khan Shikhun massacre of civil defense elements

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MVI_7810
Unnamed Road, Khan Shaykhun,Syria
By QUSAY NOOR
28 Apr 2018

The Chemical Massacre of Khan Sheikhan A pause on the first anniversary of the Khan Shikhun massacre of civil defense elements

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MVI_7822
Unnamed Road, Khan Shaykhun,Syria
By QUSAY NOOR
28 Apr 2018

The Chemical Massacre of Khan Sheikhan A pause on the first anniversary of the Khan Shikhun massacre of civil defense elements

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MVI_7855
Unnamed Road, Khan Shaykhun,Syria
By QUSAY NOOR
28 Apr 2018

The Chemical Massacre of Khan Sheikhan A pause on the first anniversary of the Khan Shikhun massacre of civil defense elements

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MVI_7883
Unnamed Road, Khan Shaykhun,Syria
By QUSAY NOOR
28 Apr 2018

The Chemical Massacre of Khan Sheikhan A pause on the first anniversary of the Khan Shikhun massacre of civil defense elements

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MVI_7667
Unnamed Road, Khan Shaykhun,Syria
By QUSAY NOOR
28 Apr 2018

The Chemical Massacre of Khan Sheikhan A pause on the first anniversary of the Khan Shikhun massacre of civil defense elements

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MVI_7666
Unnamed Road, Khan Shaykhun,Syria
By QUSAY NOOR
28 Apr 2018

The Chemical Massacre of Khan Sheikhan A pause on the first anniversary of the Khan Shikhun massacre of civil defense elements

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MVI_7693
Unnamed Road, Khan Shaykhun,Syria
By QUSAY NOOR
28 Apr 2018

The Chemical Massacre of Khan Sheikhan A pause on the first anniversary of the Khan Shikhun massacre of civil defense elements

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MVI_7694
Unnamed Road, Khan Shaykhun,Syria
By QUSAY NOOR
28 Apr 2018

The Chemical Massacre of Khan Sheikhan A pause on the first anniversary of the Khan Shikhun massacre of civil defense elements

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MVI_7695
Unnamed Road, Khan Shaykhun,Syria
By QUSAY NOOR
28 Apr 2018

The Chemical Massacre of Khan Sheikhan A pause on the first anniversary of the Khan Shikhun massacre of civil defense elements

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MVI_7912
Unnamed Road, Khan Shaykhun,Syria
By QUSAY NOOR
28 Apr 2018

The Chemical Massacre of Khan Sheikhan A pause on the first anniversary of the Khan Shikhun massacre of civil defense elements

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MVI_7913
Unnamed Road, Khan Shaykhun,Syria
By QUSAY NOOR
28 Apr 2018

The Chemical Massacre of Khan Sheikhan A pause on the first anniversary of the Khan Shikhun massacre of civil defense elements

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MVI_7941
Unnamed Road, Khan Shaykhun,Syria
By QUSAY NOOR
28 Apr 2018

The Chemical Massacre of Khan Sheikhan A pause on the first anniversary of the Khan Shikhun massacre of civil defense elements

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MVI_7952
Unnamed Road, Khan Shaykhun,Syria
By QUSAY NOOR
28 Apr 2018

The Chemical Massacre of Khan Sheikhan A pause on the first anniversary of the Khan Shikhun massacre of civil defense elements

Frame 0004
MVI_7953
Unnamed Road, Khan Shaykhun,Syria
By QUSAY NOOR
28 Apr 2018

The Chemical Massacre of Khan Sheikhan A pause on the first anniversary of the Khan Shikhun massacre of civil defense elements

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Eastern Ghouta: One Year After the Ch...
Damascus
By Abdu al-Fadel
21 Aug 2014

August, 2014
Eastern Ghouta, Damascus

Residents of the besieged Damascus suburb of Eastern Ghouta reflect on the chemical attack on their neighborhood one year later. The footage opens with shots from the night of the attack and then moves to footage shot one year later in which children and residents recall their experiences. A grave digger is also interviewed at a burial yard containing mass graves of people killed in the attack.

Translation:

Man at 1:50: Reminds me of Tragedy. tragedy "printed in our hearts" that will never go (fade) away. it will be transmitted to future generations, it will be saved in all history books. Imagine how in 1 glimpse, more than 2000 persons found death, children, women youth ...
Contributor: is this the neighborhood that was bombed?
Man: yes this is it. We removed the corpse of 60 persons from there houses you see in the back, kids and women. The way they bombarded this neighborhood can't be described, not even by a "Butcher", no words to describe how a person, a government or a regime can do this.
Contributor: These days remind you of what?
Man: Tragedy
Contributor: what were you doing the same time last year?
Man: Nothing, we were living a normal life. there was bombing, and we were trying to coop (adapt) with the situation, until God makes things better. It was normal until they gave us a gift (present) that took away the lives of nearly 2000 persons (kids, women..) You can see dead kids everywhere "like flowers". Look at those kids (showing the kids playing next to them), innocents. Isn't it a pity to kill this innocence, this laughter?
Girl at 3:24: We were sleeping at home when our neighbor started to yell at us : "go to the roof, there's chemicals here!" We went up to the roof, then we heard gunshots, we came back down. We entered our rooms, closed the doors, got water supplies with us and wore our masks, then we started to faint and fell on the floor, until the paramedics came to rescue us. Among the dead were my grandma, my uncle, my cousin, his wife and daughter.
Man at 4:20: Here are all the dead people.
Contributor: Approximately how many dead?
Man: Around 300
Contributor: Where were the others buried?
Man: In Hamoryah, in Kafr Batna. They were buried in mass graves, due to the incapability in burying them.
At 4:58: This grave used to fit approximately 40 corpses, we put 80, one on each side. Then we covered the bodies with soil and we did it over and over again.
At 5:14: Approximately 400 or a little bit less of those who were buried here were dead because of the chemicals, 150 of those who were living here were buried here. The other 150-200 were transported from other villages to here, and approximately 400-500 martyrs were buried in other neighborhoods in Eastern Ghouta.
At 5:34: There (pointing at a neighborhood in the background) you find around 204 martyrs that died because of the explosion, caused by a bomb planted in a car by the regime. Approximately 1800-2000 martyrs are in these graves.
It's a very tragic memory, all our loved ones, our women, our kids, our youth are dead. I pray for God to give everyone who participated in this massacre the punishment they deserve. Some media agencies said that other neighborhoods in Eastern Ghouta were affected, but the truth is that Zamalka and Ain Karma were the most affected.
At 6:32: I hope the international community thinks and punishes everyone who participated in this massacre in the courts, especially the Syrian regime and everyone else related to it.
At 6:52: on 8/21/2013, around 12:30-1 at night, we heard the first rocket. Everyone was horrified and started to shout :Chemicals, Chemicals, and it was at this time when the ambulances started to come to give the first aids. We helped as much as we could with the simple primitive capacities we had, few medicaments and Vaccines (syringes. needle..)
Unfortunately, those we couldn't help fell on the floor until they were transported to the hospitals in Eastern Ghouta. It was a really sad tragic day. Everything was expected, but not being bombed with chemicals, it was really hard. Around 3 at night, 2 or 3 more rockets were fired, targeting a crowded residential area, and people started to go up the the higher floors in the buildings, trying to escape. Unfortunately, the 2 rockets were fired simultaneously, the number of martyrs was really high. One of the medical centers was hit, all the medical crew and the people there were killed. We started to look for survivors from these medical centers, searching them one by one, and we buried all the martyrs, around 150 from Irbin and Kafr Batna, some women were buried there as well, due to our limited capacities.
Subhan Allah, it was one of the hardest days, we moved martyrs from 12 at night that day til the next day at noon, most of them were kinds and women from Irbin, and were buried in mass graves here.
It was a real tragic memory. An international committee of researches came and took samples, supposedly to hold the regime accountable for this massacre. And it was of course proven after the analysis that the regime was responsible for this tragedy, because the rebels don't have enough capacities to do it, And until now, we saw nothing from the international community, only few compensations and aids were given to the families of the martyrs.

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Aleppo Protesters Mark Chemical Attac...
Syria, Aleppo
By sultankitaz
21 Aug 2014

August 21, 2014
Aleppo, Syria

A group of activists participated in a silent march in Aleppo, condemning and commemorating the chemical attack that took place last year in the suburbs of Damascus. They denounced Syrian President Bashar al Assad and, what they consider, the silence of the Arab and International community.

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Syrian Children Learn How to Respond ...
Idleb
By Abdu al-Fadel
03 May 2014

April-May 2014.

Doctors in rural Idlib teach children how to respond to chemical gas attacks. The footage begins with images of a chemical attack in the town of Telmenes and then cuts to footage of a doctor in a classroom instructing children on how to respond to a chemical attack.

00:00 - 01:52
Video shot on April 21, 2014
The video shows people suffocating in Jarjanaz Field Hospital, in Talmenes, rural Idleb. Local witnesses said government helicopters hit the area with barrel bombs that contained toxic gases. According to activists, more than 130 people including women and children, suffered from respiratory problems and were transferred for treatment to field hospitals in Tel Mens, and Turkey.

01:53 - 08:47
Video shot on May 3rd, 2014, in Maarat al Noaman, rural Idleb
Shows Children at an elementary school attending training sessions to create awareness on how to deal with chemical and toxic attacks. Volunteer local doctors have launched a campaign to train children on basic methods and precautions to survive and overcome any chemical or toxic attack.

Transcription:
Dr Jamal Alwan- campaign supervisor:

You exit the explosion area immediately while covering your face with the mask and then you wash yourself with water to get rid of the toxic material. Any cough, shortness of breath, and eye burning requires immediate check from the closest medical point.
If we are in a place where masks are not available, we cover our nose and mouth with anything we can find, such as our sleeve.

Dr Jamal Alwan- campaign supervisor:
What should we do if we face a chemical attack?

Child1:
We should move away from the explosion area, cover our nose and mouth with a mask and if not available then with a piece of fabric, wash ourselves with water, and head to the nearest medical point in case of a cough or shortness of breath.

Child2:
If the regime drops toxic bombs on us, we should move away from the area immediately and cover our faces, then go home and wash with cold water, but the most important thing is to step away from the area where the toxic bomb was dropped.

Dr Jamal Alwan- campaign supervisor:

The purpose of this campaign is to spread awareness among children in order to decrease the number of injuries that might happen in case the horrible regime drops toxic bombs again. We don’t have advanced tools to shoot down the planes that are dropping the toxic bombs on us, nor to defend ourselves. All we can do is to escort the women, children, and civilians out of the area where the toxic bomb was dropped, and then to wash their faces and the exposed areas with water, and to hide them in a sealed room where there can be no leak for the toxic gas. In the cases where we witness, suffocating, shortness of breath, severe cough, and eye watering, we move these cases to the health care centers, medical points, and hospitals that can help them.

Dr. Houdeifa Hamoud- campaign supervisor:

When you witness the drop of a barrel bomb, you have to move away from the area immediately, do not go to the area where it dropped to watch. Most important thing is to cover your face, with a mask, a shirt, or any piece of fabric.
We started a campaign to spread awareness among school students and children specifically due to the increase of barrel bombs dropping which carry toxic gases such as Chlorine, Sarin , and we noticed many injuries from these chemical attacks in the country side of Idlib, so we started this campaign in order to protect children from these attacks, and we are teaching them techniques to deal with the attacks, such as when a barrel bomb drops, we run in the opposite direction of the wind, we cover our faces with any piece of fabric in order not to inhale the toxic substance, and taking the injuries to the nearest medical point. Very easy and simple instructions, as we said washing the face and covering in with a piece of fabric due to the lack of masks and the lack of support. We as a first aid crew, we’re trying to help these children, men of the future, avoid getting harmed and we hope for the best.

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Syria: Chlorine Gas Attack Aftermath ...
Aleppo
By Transterra Editor
24 Apr 2014

April 24, 2014

Talmanes, Syria

The town of Talmanes in the suburbs of eastern Ma'aret al Nau'man, Aleppo.

The barrel bombs dropped from the helicopters released chlorine gas, which caused many people to suffocate.

At the site where the barrels were dropped there are parts of the barrels with numbers and letters on them. There also burned trees and the home of a family that was affected by the gas. The family lost one child and four others were seriously affected.

Haj Abd Alkader Hashash:  (the uncle of the child who died)
"If they want to fight, fight the rebels. Don’t fight children or people sitting in their homes safely, cooking, washing dishes, doing laundry. Suddenly shells are dropped on us, fire everywhere."

"It has reached a point where chemical weapons are used, to choke people who don't expect this, children who are living their normal life. It’s not a battlefront here. These are just the homes of people."

"The time has not come yet for the global conscience to wake up and see what’s going on. They don’t see this low life creature who has no heart. How can anybody do this to his own people. Is it possible that a person who hopes to rule a country is destroying it."

"Night and day, the terror the children are suffering from is unbelievable. Many times at night when the plane comes and they hear it while I’m sleeping in my bed, they all come running to me and they all gather on the bed, and one of them, this little one, he’s too afraid because he was hurt by it before. He begs and says Dad please take us to the vineyard, please take us there. Isn’t this heartbreaking?"

"We’re suffering so much. No food, no water, and no life. People aren’t seeing this. They don’t see what’s going on. The global conscience, the human who is watching people dying, children, animals, plants. They even burned the rocks."

"We are in a very hard situation, and people who watch this, they don’t do anything. People are dying, suffocating, having their homes smashed on their heads while they do not expect it"

"We’re tired and desperate. We want a solution for this situation quickly. Just spare these people’s blood, just for the sake of that at least. Terror and fear has hit the heart of the old and the young. People hear planes and firing. They start running. They either die or suffocate. People don’t know what to do anymore. No house, no vineyard. There isn’t a safe place anymore."

Yaman Albasha : (works as a medic in the "Al Sadeek" field hospital)
"When the barrel bomb dropped, we were in the hospital. People naturally started moving faster and doing things faster. They just want to get away from where the barrel dropped. Sometimes even if they have children or family, they don’t dare to look for them. They just want to escape. So I got in the ambulance with a few men to go check on people and see if there’s anybody who is still stuck and couldn’t come out so we can take him to the hospital since it’s close and I work there, I witnessed something that really made me cry. While we were roaming around in one of the streets we saw a woman standing in the middle of the road crying while holding a little child, so we asked her “why are you crying”? But through her sobbing it took us a while to understand what she was saying and that is her other children and husband are stuck in the bathroom at home. We thought they fainted or something so we ran to get them out. We opened the house door and went to the bathroom and opened the door to see three children not older that 3-5 years covering their faces with their diapers , I couldn’t handle this scene and I started crying. And also while we were trying to get to the area of where the barrel dropped I got dizzy midway and I couldn’t reach there even though I had 6 masks on, and between each and every mask, a huge amount of cotton and sanitizers. Still I couldn’t get there. One of the rescue staff was able to get in and he actually found a dead cow and two dead doves. One of them is still right there."

"The fear people felt and suffered is a lot stronger and more harmful than the chemical attack and the suffocating. That’s how I felt from what I saw."

Haj ABd Alkader Hashash: (the uncle of the child who died)
"Thank God there village people who are willing to die in order to save a life. They all do the best they can. Hospitals did the best they can, I swear when I came in and saw people lying there sick and dying in the hospital, I swear it’s heartbreaking. It’s indescribable."

Mahmoud Alhashash: (the uncle of the child who died)
"This is the barrel dropped by the helicopter which suffocated people and children. Look at the destruction. Everybody is in the hospital now and a little child died. They dropped the barrel and toxic gas came out. People got hurt and they were taken to the hospital. All animals died, cows, chickens, doves and goats. Even trees were burned."  

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Bab Al Salameh IDP Camp
Bab El-Salameh IDP Camp, Syria
By zackbaddorf
23 Aug 2013

LEAD: As the US prepares to strike targets inside Syria, the people of Syria are preparing for a US response. Reporter Zack Baddorf, with Transterra Media, went to an Internally Displaced Persons camp in Syria to speak to some Syrians about their response to the attack and what they want the international community to do.

STORY:

Sameer Idris prepares tea outside her tent in the Bab al Salameh Internally Displaced Persons Camp. She’s been living here, alongside about 11,000 other Syrians, for about four months. She says she and her family had no choice but to flee her home in Marea, north of Aleppo.

SAMEER: “My house was bombed. Cluster bombs were dropped near my house. Machine guns shot up my house, opening a hole in the wall. We don’t have money. We’re afraid.”

After hearing about the chemical attacks in Damascus, this mother of five said she worries that the President Bashar al Assad’s regime will use chemical weapons on the camp. She called on the United States to act.

SAMEER: “Now we know Bashar al Assad has used chemical weapons. I expect Obama to act. He has to do something now,” “We ask the international community to do something about this situation, to support the opposition, to do something against the regime. Bashar al Assad has a lot of money now so he can go to any country and live like a prince.”

To make some extra money, Sameer, who was a saleswoman back home, repairs other Syrians’ clothing using her hand-operated sewing machine.

Although, she insists she will stay in Syria, other Syrians are now leaving the country -- out of fear of more chemical attacks.

At the Syrian-Turkish border crossing, Mustafa Husain and his sons sit with a few boxes and bags -- their worldly possessions -- as they prepared to cross into Turkey to go live in a refugee camp there. They were previously living in the Bab al Salameh camp.

HUSAIN: “We came to Bab al Salameh because of shelling in our home areas but it wasn’t safe here either. There was shelling. The kids were afraid. Some people were injured and a woman was killed inside the camp,”

When they heard about the chemical attacks, Husain had enough.

HUSAIN: “The regime used chemicals in Damascus and elsewhere and they can do it in the Bab al Salameh camp, too.”

Back in the camp, Said Mermet walks home to his tent. He’s a border guard with the Free Syrian Army. He thinks Assad is destroying the country, especially after he heard about the chemical attacks in Damascus.

He called on Western countries to support the FSA.

MERMET: “Of course, we don’t expect them to fight for us,“ “We are responsible for our country, we can defend our country, we can free the regime.”

Mermet said that Kalishnikovs, sniper weapons and other small weapons can’t do the job. The rebels need bigger, better weapons.

MERMET: “The FSA will do the rest. We will finish Bashar al Assad.” [This quote comes from within the last clip of Mermet]

For Transterra Media, I’m Zack Baddorf, Bab al Salameh Internally Displaced Persons Camp, Syria.