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Last Day Thai Elections 2019
Bangkok
By GonzaloAbad
22 Mar 2019

Last Day Thai Elections 2019. Democracy Party Meeting.

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Greek Parliament
Athens
By Nicola Zolin
13 Jul 2015

Greek Parliament Debates Debt Crisis

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Burundi Unrest Spills into Rural Comm...
Bujumbura
By Bernard Bankukira
10 May 2015

Residents in Bujumbura and in rural commune surrounding Bujumburaare in the streets since April 26 to say no to the third term of President Pierre Nkurunziza.

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Residents of the Mugongomanga and Nya...
Bujumbura
By Bernard Bankukira
10 May 2015

Residents of the Mugongomanga and Nyabiraba Communes outside Bujumbura have joined their fellows in the Capital to say No to a 3rd term for Burundi President Pierre Nkurunziza.

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Residents of the Mugongomanga and Nya...
Bujumbura
By Bernard Bankukira
10 May 2015

Residents of the Mugongomanga and Nyabiraba Communes outside Bujumbura have joined their fellows in the Capital to say No to a 3rd term for Burundi President Pierre Nkurunziza.

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Residents of the Mugongomanga and Nya...
Bujumbura
By Bernard Bankukira
10 May 2015

Residents of the Mugongomanga and Nyabiraba Communes outside Bujumbura have joined their fellows in the Capital to say No to a 3rd term for Burundi President Pierre Nkurunziza.

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Residents of the Mugongomanga and Nya...
Bujumbura
By Bernard Bankukira
10 May 2015

Residents of the Mugongomanga and Nyabiraba Communes outside Bujumbura have joined their fellows in the Capital to say No to a 3rd term for Burundi President Pierre Nkurunziza.

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Residents of the Mugongomanga and Nya...
Bujumbura
By Bernard Bankukira
10 May 2015

Residents of the Mugongomanga and Nyabiraba Communes outside Bujumbura have joined their fellows in the Capital to say No to a 3rd term for Burundi President Pierre Nkurunziza.

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Residents of the Mugongomanga and Nya...
Bujumbura
By Bernard Bankukira
10 May 2015

Residents of the Mugongomanga and Nyabiraba Communes outside Bujumbura have joined their fellows in the Capital to say No to a 3rd term for Burundi President Pierre Nkurunziza.

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Residents of the Mugongomanga and Nya...
Bujumbura
By Bernard Bankukira
10 May 2015

Residents of the Mugongomanga and Nyabiraba Communes outside Bujumbura have joined their fellows in the Capital to say No to a 3rd term for Burundi President Pierre Nkurunziza.

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Residents of the Mugongomanga and Nya...
Bujumbura
By Bernard Bankukira
10 May 2015

Residents of the Mugongomanga and Nyabiraba Communes outside Bujumbura have joined their fellows in the Capital to say No to a 3rd term for Burundi President Pierre Nkurunziza.

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Residents of the Mugongomanga and Nya...
Bujumbura
By Bernard Bankukira
10 May 2015

Residents of the Mugongomanga and Nyabiraba Communes outside Bujumbura have joined their fellows in the Capital to say No to a 3rd term for Burundi President Pierre Nkurunziza.

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Residents of the Mugongomanga and Nya...
Bujumbura
By Bernard Bankukira
10 May 2015

Citizens demonstrate in the streets of Bujumbura. Since the beginning of the unrest, the Burundian army has maintained a neutral face, as police have been accused of harassing protesters.

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Residents of the Mugongomanga and Nya...
Bujumbura
By Bernard Bankukira
10 May 2015

Citizens demonstrate in the streets of Bujumbura. Since the beginning of the unrest, the Burundian army has maintained a neutral face, as police have been accused of harassing protesters.

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Residents of the Mugongomanga and Nya...
Bujumbura
By Bernard Bankukira
10 May 2015

Citizens demonstrate in the streets of Bujumbura. Since the beginning of the unrest, the Burundian army has maintained a neutral face, as police have been accused of harassing protesters.

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Nigerian Election: Buhari Gives Victo...
Abuja
By Chima NWANKWO
01 Apr 2015

It was a sheer carnival in Abuja, Nigeria as General Muhammadu Buhari gave his victory speech after winning the 2015 Presidential elections in Nigeria. Buhari was magnanimous in victory, and made it clear that it was the Nigerian people who had voted him into office.

On the 1st of April, 2015 General Muhammadu Buhari defeated President Goodluck Jonathan in one of Nigeria's most tense elections. The vote had been postponed amid Nigeria's fight against Boko Haram, with many claiming that this was a tactic by current President Jonathan to make gains against the militant group in order to bolster his campaign.

This marks Buhari's second turn as Head of State, having ruled Nigeria as a military dictator between 1983-1985.

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Nigeria Votes: Jos Residents Await El...
Jos
By jfaden
31 Mar 2015

March 31, 2015
Jos, Nigeria

The streets of the north-central Nigerian city of Jos stand empty as local residents await the results of what many are considering the most followed and participated in election in Nigeria's history.

As the Independent National Electoral Commission INEC collate results from various parts of the country, Nigerians are following with keen interest and hoping the man of their choice will win the election.

The election resulted in a surprise upset for incumbent candidate Goodluck Jonathan, who has faced heavy scrutiny for his handling of the Boko Haram crisis. Former military ruler Muhammadu Bahari went home the luckier and will be taking over the presidency.

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Ukraine Marks Anniversary Of Maidan M...
Kiev
By Arturas Morozovas
21 Feb 2015

Commemorations in Kiev to honor the victims of deadly clashes between anti-government protesters and security forces a year ago. The violence killed more than 100 people, including 17 security officers, between February 18 and 21, 2014.

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Ukraine Marks Anniversary Of Maidan M...
Kiev, Ukraine
By Arturas Morozovas
21 Feb 2015

Commemorations in Kiev to honor the victims of deadly clashes between antigovernment protesters and security forces a year ago. The violence killed more than 100 people, including 17 security officers, between February 18 and 21, 2014.

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Muslim and German: Safyah's Story
Berlin, Germany
By luigi serenelli
24 Jan 2015

Safyah Hassan-Yavuz, a 28 years old German Muslim, feels constantly pressured to justify herself for being a Muslim in Germany. She believes that conditions for Muslims in Germany worsened in the wake of Paris attacks. The political movement PEGIDA, or Patriotic European Against the Islamization of the West, has also triggered divisions in German society. This story focuses on a slice of Safyah's life as a Muslim woman with both German and Muslim heritage and her experience in a country going through an identity crisis that has both united people and torn them apart.

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2014 Presidential elections in Tunisia
Tunis
By Adeline Bailleul
24 Nov 2014

Raw footage of the polling stations in Tunis during Tunisia's first presidential election since a new constitution was adopted in January 2014.

With a voter turnout around 64 percent, this election marks the country's first democratic transition of power. Over 80,000 servicemen were deployed to ensure safety at polling stations, where voting went fairly smoothly throughout the day.

Beji Caid Essebsi of the secular Nida Tounes is expected to emerge on top, with Moncef Marzouki of the moderate Islamist Ennahda party following close behind. However, at the close of polling, no candidate seemed likely to have enough votes to win outright, in which case a run-off would take place in December.

Official results are expected to be released Wednesday.

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2014 Presidential elections in Tunisia
Tunis
By Adeline Bailleul
22 Nov 2014

Photos of the polling stations in Tunis during the 2014 presidential elections.

With a voter turnout around 64 percent, this election marks the country's first democratic transition of power. Over 80,000 servicemen were deployed to ensure safety at polling stations, where voting went fairly smoothly throughout the day.

Beji Caid Essebsi of the secular Nida Tounes is expected to emerge on top, with Moncef Marzouki of the moderate Islamist Ennahda party following close behind. However, at the close of polling, no candidate seemed likely to have enough votes to win outright, in which case a run-off would take place in December.

Official results are expected to be released Wednesday.

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Hong Kong: The Umbrella Revolution
Hong Kong
By nomichele
08 Nov 2014

On the 27th of September 2014 pro-democracy protesters in Hong Kong occupied the busiest areas of the city: Admiralty, Mongkok and the Causeway bay.
Umbrellas were used as shields by supporters to protect themselves from police's massive use of tear gas.
The Umbrella Revolution is a pacific movement made by students and workers that are fighting for democracy and rights.
In the temporary camps every supporters can find free information, tents, food, water, disposable cleaning items, blankets, battery recharging station and wifi.
No infrastructure was damaged and volunteers clean daily the occupied areas, promoting politeness and respectfulness as weapon against politic corruption.

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Occupy Central Demonstrators Clash wi...
Hong Kong
By Miguel Candela
07 Oct 2014

A new era of disobedience in Hong Kong started 4 days after a student strike was officially declared on September 22. On Friday 26, supporters of the Occupy Central with Love and Peace movement occupied government headquarters. Their discontent began when China refused to reconsider the existing Hong Kong electoral reform. Protesters began to demand that people to freely choose the city's next leader in 2017. Even though the upcoming election would allow Hong Kong citizens to vote for the first time, the current system restricts the number of candidates, who need to secure support from at least 50% of the 1,200 members on a nominating committee. Their numbers will be capped in any given race at two or three candidates. Hong Kong has enjoyed political autonomy and freedom since its return from British to Chinese rule in 1997 under a formula known as "one country, two systems." Chinese leaders agreed then that the chief executive would be chosen by "universal suffrage" in 2017 but Beijing has not kept its promises. The historical, unprecedented and massive occupations in Hong Kong Island and Kowloon want to put pressure on the government by limiting the city's capabilities and commerce. Seeking for "true" universal suffrage and democracy in a peaceful and organized manner, protesters barricaded themselves in key touristic and economic areas. Protestors conveniently armed themselves with umbrellas, which subsequently became the rallying symbol with the catchy name Umbrella Revolution, to deflect volleys of pepper spray by police and as protection in sunny and wet weather. An overwhelmed police force and government have shown their lack of experience in handling peaceful protestors when they resorted to what some are calling unnecessary force on September 28 when 87 cans of tear gas were fired. Many citizens are starting to question whether protestors can maintain their momentum and keep putting pressure on the government or if civil disobedience may backfire and cause waves of hatred between anti- and pro-Occupy movement citizens. Whatever the result may be after the demonstrations, a new era in Hong Kong may be on the horizon.

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Weapons of Mass Obstruction - Hong Ko...
Hong Kong
By Gordon Arthur
30 Sep 2014

Hong Kong (01 October 2014) — Together, they resemble a Spartan phalanx. Every self-respecting protestor carries this weapon – usually concealed in a backpack or handbag – and he or she would not contemplate leaving home without it. It has been the weapon of choice for Hong Kong protestors calling for the democratic right of universal suffrage. Indeed, even sightseers with tunnel vision strolling through any of the several protest zones in Hong Kong would see this weapon in abundance. Arms dealers, generally in the guise of student activist groups, are blatantly hawking these instruments to all.

What is perhaps even more remarkable is that these weapons are being given away to normally peace-loving Hong Kong citizens free of charge. It has become a powerful and popular symbol representing the protest movement that has swept through Hong Kong, a Special Administrative Region of China. The umbrella.

A humble artifact has become a potent weapon of mass obstruction in the streets of Hong Kong.

On 28 September, as thousands of disgruntled citizens took to the streets, protestors armed with umbrellas were out in full force. Umbrellas were swiftly put to good use as members of the Hong Kong Police wearing full riot gear and lining barricades surrounding the government headquarters in the city’s Admiralty district fired streams of pepper spray at a restless crowd. Even those not directly in the firing line unfurled their umbrellas just in case.

These simple but effective devices certainly proved their worth in this first round of clashes. Protestors took shelter behind their dome-shaped canopies and efficiently shielded themselves from the capsicum jets. Realizing just how potent these defensive weapons actually were, police officers made it their business to tear umbrellas from protestors’ hands, rendering them defenseless. Indeed, the police had soon amassed an impressive mound of damaged and mangled umbrellas. Cracked ribs, pierced canopies and bent shafts were spotted in several umbrella graveyards just behind the police line.

However, every weapon has its limitations. Even deftly wielded umbrellas proved no match for the volleys of teargas canisters fired by police that night. Instead, protestors resorted to other defensive weapons in their arsenals to combat the acrid and debilitating smoke – goggles, face-masks and cling-film.

Since that fateful first day, protestors have professed ongoing infatuation with their umbrellas, causing some to name this the “Umbrella Movement” or the “Umbrella Revolution.” As peace and calm returned to the occupied streets of Hong Kong, umbrellas were used to fend off the hot sun as protestors settled in for a long day of civil disobedience. On the last night of September, umbrellas also served admirably as thunderstorms and heavy rain lashed Hong Kong. The umbrella again proved its weight in aluminum and fabric as demonstrators sheltered themselves from the weather.

The pro-democracy sit-ins have taken on an almost carnival-like atmosphere. Thousands are content to sit in clusters on once busy roads, avenues upon which expensive European luxury cars belonging to tycoons normally rush between urgent appointments and lucrative deals. Now there are numerous stalls offering free water, free food and free umbrellas to all. As one student volunteer explained, the arrays of umbrellas of all sizes and colors were available to all, and they had all been donated anonymously.

The usual Chinese entrepreneurial spirit has been surpassed by an overwhelming sense of bonhomie and friendship. In fact, there is not one money-making stall to be found at the protest sites. Instead, students help people to clamber over roadblocks, while others spray cooling water on passers by. There is a genuine sense of purpose and friendship.

Ravin Wu and a group of friends started a roadside exhibition where people can express their feelings about the protests by writing messages on old squares of cardboard. By mid-afternoon of the first day, several hundred sympathizers had already laid out messages on the asphalt. On many of the messages were images of umbrellas. Ravin agreed that the umbrella is an apt icon. “It helps protect us,” he acknowledged.

Another remarkable thing about the protests is the environmental concern being displayed. There has been no wanton looting and sacking in this city. Rather, teams of young people go around and pick up rubbish before taking it back to a collection point for recycling. By the end of the third day, the Hong Kong Environmental Protection Association (HKEPA) had collected 100,000 plastic bottles for recycling.

Ricky Fan, the HKEPA’s chairman, revealed his non-governmental organization also recycles umbrellas. He disclosed some statistics that portray just how valuable the umbrella has been. However, these figures also reveal the lifespan of an umbrella is remarkably short. On the opening day, when police confronted demonstrators, some 1,600 battle-damaged umbrellas were collected for recycling. On day two there were 650, as remnants were cleared from the protest site. There were still 410 salvaged on the peaceful third day. Clearly, umbrellas are still being put to heavy use, even if not in confrontation.

Fan explained that aluminum parts of umbrellas will be recycled, while other components such as the canopies will be used by students for artwork and other such evocative uses. The trusty umbrella, this icon of the Hong Kong pro-democracy movement, has acquitted itself well so far.

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Hong Kong Pro-Democracy Protest
Hong Kong
By Gordon Arthur
27 Sep 2014

Hong Kong,
Sunday, September 28, 2014

There has long been simmering discontent within Hong Kong regarding the granting of universal suffrage when voting for the chief executive in the upcoming 2017 elections. When Beijing handed down a decision that effectively restricted candidates to those of China’s choosing, the pro-democracy camp in Hong Kong promised to fulfil its threat of widespread demonstrations led by a movement known as Occupy Central with Love and Peace.

University students led the way with protests in the government headquarters in late September. This prompted Occupy Central organisers to bring forward their anticipated protests in the Central district. On 28 September thousands gathered near the government headquarters to express their dissatisfaction with Beijing’s arrangements and the Hong Kong’s government’s failure to respond to concerns.

The protesters were remarkable peaceful, but were antagonised by police firing pepper spray into one section of the crowd. Protesters had donned goggles, face masks and raincoats, and armed with umbrellas, protesters were prepared to resist police efforts to disperse the crowds. However, when the police started firing teargas into the crowd, this evoked outrage and shock among many. In fact, the action had the opposite action because it drew out more people to protest against the use of police force.

The protests have remained remarkably peaceful. Protesters have remained ‘camped’ in several areas of Hong Kong to blockade traffic. Many were also seen picking up rubbish and even separating it for recycling! The protest movement, heavily populated with young people, knows it needs to maintain the moral upper ground by not provoking the police.

Crowds are expected to swell in central Hong Kong ahead of Chinese National Day on October 1.

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Occupy Central Demonstrators Clash wi...
Hong Kong
By Miguel Candela
26 Sep 2014

A new era of disobedience in Hong Kong started 4 days after a student strike was officially declared on September 22. On Friday 26, supporters of the Occupy Central with Love and Peace movement occupied government headquarters. Their discontent began when China refused to reconsider the existing Hong Kong electoral reform. Protesters began to demand that people to freely choose the city's next leader in 2017. Even though the upcoming election would allow Hong Kong citizens to vote for the first time, the current system restricts the number of candidates, who need to secure support from at least 50% of the 1,200 members on a nominating committee. Their numbers will be capped in any given race at two or three candidates. Hong Kong has enjoyed political autonomy and freedom since its return from British to Chinese rule in 1997 under a formula known as "one country, two systems." Chinese leaders agreed then that the chief executive would be chosen by "universal suffrage" in 2017 but Beijing has not kept its promises. The historical, unprecedented and massive occupations in Hong Kong Island and Kowloon want to put pressure on the government by limiting the city's capabilities and commerce. Seeking for "true" universal suffrage and democracy in a peaceful and organized manner, protesters barricaded themselves in key touristic and economic areas. Protestors conveniently armed themselves with umbrellas, which subsequently became the rallying symbol with the catchy name Umbrella Revolution, to deflect volleys of pepper spray by police and as protection in sunny and wet weather. An overwhelmed police force and government have shown their lack of experience in handling peaceful protestors when they resorted to what some are calling unnecessary force on September 28 when 87 cans of tear gas were fired. Many citizens are starting to question whether protestors can maintain their momentum and keep putting pressure on the government or if civil disobedience may backfire and cause waves of hatred between anti- and pro-Occupy movement citizens. Whatever the result may be after the demonstrations, a new era in Hong Kong may be on the horizon.

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Taipei Protest 5
By Benedict Young
30 Mar 2014

March 30th 2014, mass rally in Taipei: The Sunflower Movement spread from a young group of student activists to citizens of all ages.

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Taipei Protest 13
By Benedict Young
30 Mar 2014

At the "4AM" sunflower movement protest in Taipei. The symbol of the sunflower has been interpreted in many ways by the protestors.

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Taipei Protest 12
By Benedict Young
30 Mar 2014

March 30th 2014, mass rally in Taipei: Young protestor sporting a V for Vendetta style mask.

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Taipei Protest 8
By Benedict Young
30 Mar 2014

March 30th 2014, mass rally in Taipei: Many of the older generation who lived through the white terror are still afraid to protest, fearing the brutal suppression they suffered in the past. However, the Sunflower Movement, lead by young students, has inspired many of the older generation to come out en masse and stand up for their beliefs.

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Taipei Protest 20
Taiwan
By Benedict Young
24 Mar 2014

His sign expresses solidarity amongst all the protestors. Initially student lead, the sunflower movement spread to all walks of life.

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Taipei Protest 19
Taiwan
By Benedict Young
24 Mar 2014

Have we got your attention yet? The protestors' unflappable resolve to keep going and to escalate the protests while sticking to non-violent means has caught international attention.

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Taipei Protest 18
By Benedict Young
24 Mar 2014

Have we got your attention yet? The protestors' unflappable resolve to keep going and to escalate the protests while sticking to non-violent means has caught international attention.

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Taipei Protest 17
Taiwan
By Benedict Young
24 Mar 2014

President Ma is lampooned for a comment in which he apparently said that antlers are the hair that grows out from a deer's ears. Since the slip, he has been mocked by references to antlers or portrayed with large tufts of hair growing out of his ears.

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Taipei Protest 15
Taiwan
By Benedict Young
24 Mar 2014

Some student protestors are so diligent in their studies that they took their books with them as they occupied the streets around the Legislative Yuan, continuing to study in the streets.

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Taiwan Sunflower Protestors
By Benedict Young
21 Mar 2014

Freedom of expression should be a basic human right. Pictured is a Taiwanese-language punk band, right after they performed at an spontaneous outdoor protest in Taiwan’s second most populous city Kaohsiung 3 days after the occupation of the Legislative Yuan. For now, musicians, writers and artists in Taiwan can express themselves freely, but many fear for their right to free speech without censorship should Beijing exert dominance on them.

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Taiwan Sunflower Protestors
Kaohsiung
By Benedict Young
20 Mar 2014

"No Cross-Strait Service Agreement" The demonstrators oppose the Cross-Strait Service Trade Agreement and are demanding the treaty be withdrawn and reconsidered. They are also advocating setting up a legal framework that would make close scrutiny of all future cross-Strait negotiations obligatory.