Frame 0004
Drawing Conflict: Cartoon Journalist ...
Bekaa
By travis beard
04 Feb 2015

Bekaa, Lebanon

February 4, 2015

Some say the Charlie Hebdo attack changed the political cartoon world forever and that the threat to cartoonists has never been so strong. However, should this perceived threat prevent cartoonists from still covering sensitive issues? Should all journalistic cartoonists feel threatened?

One cartoon journalist set out to show that cartoonists should not limit themselves. Jules Callis, who comes from the Netherlands, had clear doubts about his decision to travel to Lebanon to document the Syrian refugee crisis just days after the attack. However, Callis was not about to shy away from a subject and determinedly made the decision to travel to the Syrian border to tell the real story of Syria's refugees through comic journalism.

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Peter Greste Interview, Kenyan Electi...
Nairobi
By fahruq
23 Sep 2014

Raw footage of Peter Greste recorded during the Kenyan General election in March 2013. This was recorded before Peter was jailed in Egypt. He was recently released after over one year in prison.

Frame 0004
Transition
Moscow, Russia
By Marina Fonda
03 Apr 2013

Wissam is a Journalism student in Moscow and former Syrian Army officer. After being forbidden by his advisor teacher of writing his final paper on the farce of Russian coverage of the conflicts on Syria, a brainwashing aimed to make Russians stand by Bashar al Assad and the Russian government protecting him, he decides to head back to his homeland to make a film and show Russians what's really going on in his country. The film depicts Wissam's entrance in Syria by a Free Syrian Army controled border, citizens running from snipers and their stations working mode, temporary hospitals, refugees crossing the border with Turkey, destroyed Suni mosques, schools, residential buildings by government army's bombs and contains interviews with refugees (internal and fleeing abroad), injured, FSA soldiers etc.
This is a 15 min, full-HD documentary film.

Transcription:

(VO) My name is Wissam and I'm from Syria, I'm a student of Journalism in my final year ...In Moscow The reason why I came to study in a country that lacks freedom of press is that Russia was the only country to give me a visa after I resigned. Oh, I forgot to tell you... I was an officer in the Syrian army

(VO) After the Syrian dictator Hafez al-Assad's death, his son Bashar inherited the power for that, the Constitution was amended, in the world's fastest assembly. The former Constitution demanded that the minimum age for being president should be 40 years of age. They've changed it for 34, the age of Bashar at the time I realized it was about time to write my resignation letter and leave Syria I didn't see my mom for the last 8 years I was afraid of visiting my family in Syria since an old friend from the army told me I was wanted
by the Syrian intelligence they've received a report from the embassy in Moscow saying I was against the regime I remembered my father at that point When I was a kid, he used to say: “The walls have ears” By that time, I didn't understand He lived 79 years in fear. When I was in the army, he advised me not to speak about the regime in front of other officers I used to find it funny, him worried about me, and then he told me: “These people are criminals, you didn't see what I saw” Once, he told me about an event so that I could understand his uncommon fear of the regime He told me how the army came and took one person from each house during the Muslim holiday of Eid al-Adha, in 1980, in Aleppo They took around 100 people, among them children and elderly. It was a very difficult moment for my father, when he saw his childhood friends lined against the wall and get executed These crimes were called Al Mashariqa Massacre, named after the neighborhood where it occurred That's how Hafez al-Assad controlled the country for 3 decades, committing the worse massacres of these times The most famous of them was the Hama Massacre In this city, he killed dozens of thousands of civilians through shelling and artillery in 1982

(VO) In March 2011, the revolution began in Syria I realized then that the blood series started again The dictator inherited from his father not only the country, but also his criminality The difference this time was the will of the people, which had already changed with the generations The dictator used all means of intimidation, such as executions, torture and rape to eliminate the peaceful protests He counts on the support of loyal states, such as Iran and Russia, which provide him with weapons and hinder international resolutions against him But with the continuous bloodshed, people decided to take up arms and defend themselves After the liberation of wide areas in Aleppo, I decided to go back there where I grew up and from where I was away for a long time

(VO) This is the border of Bab al Salam, the security entrance which leads to Turkey

Bashar’s hired thugs, the “shabihha”, spent a long time in the region stealing The “Shabihha” used these offices to torment civilians A bunch of impolite people who got from the regime the power of making Syrian people’s lives unbearable

(Wissam says) But, thank God for the Free Syrian Army and free militias, we are free!

(Driver shout) Peace be upon you!

(VO) We entered Aleppo during the night to avoid the air strikes and snipers I was afraid, but my fears spread away when I saw the first FSA control station

(Militia) Peace be upon you! Where are you from?
(Driver) Aleppo (Militia) Where in Aleppo? (Driver) Al Jamiliyeh (Militia) Show me your documents (Driver) Here it is (Militia) Brother, could you show me your document as well? There are people trying to infiltrate during the night
(Driver) Ok, ok Did we arrive in Al Mushat already?
(Militia) It's Al Mushat! (Driver) We didn't realize because it's night We are part of your Tawhid Brigade
(Militia) Welcome! Honestly, it's because the regime infiltrated last week and took two of us
(Driver) Really? (Militia) Yes! Take care in Al Sinaa! The regime's snipers killed already 4 people there!

(VO) So much destruction made impossible for me to recognize the streets where I grew up The smell of blood replaced the fragrance of flowers
The sound of shelling took the place of birds singing The birds, just like the Syrian people, either died or ran away Young people lost their limbs in savage shelling I couldn't see any of this on Russian TV in 2 years of revolution World history doesn't know anyone who have killed its own people and destroyed its own country such as Bashar al Assad This fool overcame the madness of Nero burning Rome, and didn't spare women, children or elderly

(Wissam) This is an innocent 2year old child “Mig” bomber planes killed her parents and she was rescued by a civilian who brought her to a temporary hospital

(Wissam) Cluster bombs are still incubated. There it is. Bombs that didn't explode. It's a danger to every civilian who lives in this building, because inside there are dozens of bombs. It's internationally forbidden to use these bombs in populated areas. But this criminal regime doesn't see the difference between civilians and militaries. It points to residential buildings just to force people to leave Syria

(Wissam) This... We can hear the snipers, who’d target anyone that crosses the parallel street. They are based there, to the left. These are residential areas, which were abandoned because of the air strikes. Assad's snipers are on the top of the buildings. Anything that crosses their field of view will be targeted: children, women, and elderly... Even a dog or a cat!

(Wissam) Now we are in a building in Salah al Deen neighborhood and, because of the snipers, we are going to cross trough these wholes that the FSA opened. The fear of snipers forced these people to flee. Even they left their clothes behind. They left everything in the wardrobe. Here is a sniper shot. Looking down... Two more shots. And one here, through the glass. I can't continue, or a sniper will notice us.
This is a kitchen in a residence. They even targeted a kitchen... There are no terrorists here. It's a peaceful people's home.

(FSA soldier) Can you see him? (Wissam) I see! (FSA soldier) Do you want me to open the curtain a little bit? (Wissam) No, no, I see it! (Wissam) That's a mosque’s minaret in front of this house. There it is one, of them... There are many snipers based there. He shoots! He shoots, targeting civilians...

(FSA soldier) I'm an army deserter (Wissam) Why did you desert? (FSA soldier) Because of the injustice we presented (Wissam) Where did you serve? (FSA soldier) In Qatana's 10th platoon (Wissam) Did they order you to kill peaceful protesters? (FSA soldier) Yes (Wissam) Or isn't it true? (FSA soldier) Of course, and they gave us pills... (Wissam) They medicated you? (FSA soldier) Yes (Wissam) And the protesters? (FSA soldier) They'd put us in front of the protesters and told us to open fire. They didn't have permission to pass by. We wanted to protect the people, but we were only protecting a throne.

(VO) After all this, I arrived to my uncle's home. I wanted to surprise him with my visit. But I was the one surprised. The building was already empty. Aleppo is a historical city that the terror of the regime turned into a ghost city. People abandoned
their neighborhoods, leaving behind piles of pain and destruction that tears won't eliminate from
memory.

(Wissam) Did they shoot you in your leg? (Old man) They shot 4 times (Wissam) 4 times! (Old man) Russian shots AK-47 And what happened to you? (Old man) It’s broke! This bone here was shattered as well. Yes, it’s broke. (Wissam) Was it the Syrian army? (Old man) It was Bashar al-Assad's army! (Wissam) May God heal you! Who destroyed all this?

(Old man) It was his bombers and mortars, which invaded the Martyrs' street. We renamed it... (Wissam) Martyr's street? (Old man) We called it this way... (Wissam) Why Martyr's street? (Old man) Because during peaceful protests the regime opened fire and killed 14 civilians in here. The army sacked us, stole us, emptied our homes.

(Wissam) “Bashar's men passed here”... This school was used as a prison and headquarters. It was terrible for this neighborhood’s people.

(Wissam) “Scud” soviet missiles are sent from the capital, about a Km from Aleppo. Artillery and aviation are the means used to terrify the remaining population and force it to obey

(Boy) He attacked us with missiles, cluster bombs, “Mig” and “Shukhoi” airplanes...

(Woman) We came here because of Bashar. May he go to hell!

(Wissam) Why are you in this mosque? (Kid) Because of the bombings (Wissam) did you flee to the mosque because of the bombings?

(Wissam) What's your name? (Girl) Kifaa (Wissam) What? (Girl) Kifaa (Wissam) How old are you, Kifaa? (Girl) I'm seven years old (Wissam) Why do you live in the mosque? (Girl) They bombed our house

(VO) Terrifying the local population and destroying their homes, forcing people to flea the homeland: this is the regime's policy to try to eliminate the revolution.

(Refugee) The air force is bombing the Northern villages (Wissam) The air force? (Refugee) Yes (Wissam) Might God protect you! Is your family in Turkey?
(Refugee) Yes

Frame 0004
Transition (Part 1 of 2)
Moscow, Russia
By Marina Fonda
03 Apr 2013

PART 2: http://transterramedia.com/media/18536

Wissam is a Journalism student in Moscow and former Syrian Army officer. After being forbidden by his advisor teacher of writing his final paper on the farce of Russian coverage of the conflicts on Syria, a brainwashing aimed to make Russians stand by Bashar al Assad and the Russian government protecting him, he decides to head back to his homeland to make a film and show Russians what's really going on in his country. The film depicts Wissam's entrance in Syria by a Free Syrian Army controled border, citizens running from snipers and their stations working mode, temporary hospitals, refugees crossing the border with Turkey, destroyed Suni mosques, schools, residential buildings by government army's bombs and contains interviews with refugees (internal and fleeing abroad), injured, FSA soldiers etc.
This is a 26 min, full-HD documentary film.

Transcription:

(VO) My name is Wissam and I'm from Syria, I'm a student of Journalism in my final year ...In Moscow The reason why I came to study in a country that lacks freedom of press is that Russia was the only country to give me a visa after I resigned. Oh, I forgot to tell you... I was an officer in the Syrian army

(VO) After the Syrian dictator Hafez al-Assad's death, his son Bashar inherited the power for that, the Constitution was amended, in the world's fastest assembly. The former Constitution demanded that the minimum age for being president should be 40 years of age. They've changed it for 34, the age of Bashar at the time I realized it was about time to write my resignation letter and leave Syria I didn't see my mom for the last 8 years I was afraid of visiting my family in Syria since an old friend from the army told me I was wanted by the Syrian intelligence they've received a report from the embassy in Moscow saying I was against the regime I remembered my father at that point When I was a kid, he used to say: “The walls have ears” By that time, I didn't understand He lived 79 years in fear. When I was in the army, he advised me not to speak about the regime in front of other officers I used to find it funny, him worried about me, and then he told me: “These people are criminals, you didn't see what I saw” Once, he told me about an event so that I could understand his uncommon fear of the regime He told me how the army came and took one person from each house during the Muslim holiday of Eid al-Adha, in 1980, in Aleppo They took around 100 people, among them children and elderly. It was a very difficult moment for my father, when he saw his childhood friends lined against the wall and get executed These crimes were called Al Mashariqa Massacre, named after the neighborhood where it occurred That's how Hafez al-Assad controlled the country for 3 decades, committing the worse massacres of these times The most famous of them was the Hama Massacre In this city, he killed dozens of thousands of civilians through shelling and artillery in 1982

(VO) In March 2011, the revolution began in Syria I realized then that the blood series started again The dictator inherited from his father not only the country, but also his criminality The difference this time was the will of the people, which had already changed with the generations The dictator used all means of intimidation, such as executions, torture and rape to eliminate the peaceful protests He counts on the support of loyal states, such as Iran and Russia, which provide him with weapons and hinder international resolutions against him But with the continuous bloodshed, people decided to take up arms and defend themselves After the liberation of wide areas in Aleppo, I decided to go back there where I grew up and from where I was away for a long time

Frame 0004
Transition (Part 2 of 2)
Syria
By Marina Fonda
03 Apr 2013

Wissam is a Journalism student in Moscow and former Syrian Army officer. After being forbidden by his advisor teacher of writing his final paper on the farce of Russian coverage of the conflicts on Syria, a brainwashing aimed to make Russians stand by Bashar al Assad and the Russian government protecting him, he decides to head back to his homeland to make a film and show Russians what's really going on in his country. The film depicts Wissam's entrance in Syria by a Free Syrian Army controled border, citizens running from snipers and their stations working mode, temporary hospitals, refugees crossing the border with Turkey, destroyed Suni mosques, schools, residential buildings by government army's bombs and contains interviews with refugees (internal and fleeing abroad), injured, FSA soldiers etc.
This is a 26 min, full-HD documentary film.

Transcription:

(VO) This is the border of Bab al Salam, the security entrance which leads to Turkey

Bashar’s hired thugs, the “shabihha”, spent a long time in the region stealing The “Shabihha” used these offices to torment civilians A bunch of impolite people who got from the regime the power of making Syrian people’s lives unbearable

(Wissam says) But, thank God for the Free Syrian Army and free militias, we are free!

(Driver shout) Peace be upon you!

(VO) We entered Aleppo during the night to avoid the air strikes and snipers I was afraid, but my fears spread away when I saw the first FSA control station

(Militia) Peace be upon you! Where are you from? (Driver) Aleppo (Militia) Where in Aleppo? (Driver) Al Jamiliyeh (Militia) Show me your documents (Driver) Here it is (Militia) Brother, could you show me your document as well? There are people trying to infiltrate during the night (Driver) Ok, ok Did we arrive in Al Mushat already? (Militia) It's Al Mushat! (Driver) We didn't realize because it's night We are part of your Tawhid Brigade (Militia) Welcome! Honestly, it's because the regime infiltrated last week and took two of us (Driver) Really? (Militia) Yes! Take care in Al Sinaa! The regime's snipers killed already 4 people there!

(VO) So much destruction made impossible for me to recognize the streets where I grew up The smell of blood replaced the fragrance of flowers The sound of shelling took the place of birds singing The birds, just like the Syrian people, either died or ran away Young people lost their limbs in savage shelling I couldn't see any of this on Russian TV in 2 years of revolution World history doesn't know anyone who have killed its own people and destroyed its own country such as Bashar al Assad This fool overcame the madness of Nero burning Rome, and didn't spare women, children or elderly

(Wissam) This is an innocent 2year old child “Mig” bomber planes killed her parents and she was rescued by a civilian who brought her to a temporary hospital

(Wissam) Cluster bombs are still incubated. There it is. Bombs that didn't explode. It's a danger to every civilian who lives in this building, because inside there are dozens of bombs. It's internationally forbidden to use these bombs in populated areas. But this criminal regime doesn't see the difference between civilians and militaries. It points to residential buildings just to force people to leave Syria

(Wissam) This... We can hear the snipers, who’d target anyone that crosses the parallel street. They are based there, to the left. These are residential areas, which were abandoned because of the air strikes. Assad's snipers are on the top of the buildings. Anything that crosses their field of view will be targeted: children, women, and elderly... Even a dog or a cat!

(Wissam) Now we are in a building in Salah al Deen neighborhood and, because of the snipers, we are going to cross trough these wholes that the FSA opened. The fear of snipers forced these people to flee. Even they left their clothes behind. They left everything in the wardrobe. Here is a sniper shot. Looking down... Two more shots. And one here, through the glass. I can't continue, or a sniper will notice us. This is a kitchen in a residence. They even targeted a kitchen... There are no terrorists here. It's a peaceful people's home.

(FSA soldier) Can you see him? (Wissam) I see! (FSA soldier) Do you want me to open the curtain a little bit? (Wissam) No, no, I see it! (Wissam) That's a mosque’s minaret in front of this house. There it is one, of them... There are many snipers based there. He shoots! He shoots, targeting civilians...

(FSA soldier) I'm an army deserter (Wissam) Why did you desert? (FSA soldier) Because of the injustice we presented (Wissam) Where did you serve? (FSA soldier) In Qatana's 10th platoon (Wissam) Did they order you to kill peaceful protesters? (FSA soldier) Yes (Wissam) Or isn't it true? (FSA soldier) Of course, and they gave us pills... (Wissam) They medicated you? (FSA soldier) Yes (Wissam) And the protesters? (FSA soldier) They'd put us in front of the protesters and told us to open fire. They didn't have permission to pass by. We wanted to protect the people, but we were only protecting a throne.

(VO) After all this, I arrived to my uncle's home. I wanted to surprise him with my visit. But I was the one surprised. The building was already empty. Aleppo is a historical city that the terror of the regime turned into a ghost city. People abandoned their neighborhoods, leaving behind piles of pain and destruction that tears won't eliminate from
memory.

(Wissam) Did they shoot you in your leg? (Old man) They shot 4 times (Wissam) 4 times! (Old man) Russian shots AK-47 And what happened to you? (Old man) It’s broke! This bone here was shattered as well. Yes, it’s broke. (Wissam) Was it the Syrian army? (Old man) It was Bashar al-Assad's army! (Wissam) May God heal you! Who destroyed all this?

(Old man) It was his bombers and mortars, which invaded the Martyrs' street. We renamed it... (Wissam) Martyr's street? (Old man) We called it this way... (Wissam) Why Martyr's street? (Old man) Because during peaceful protests the regime opened fire and killed 14 civilians in here. The army sacked us, stole us, emptied our homes.

(Wissam) “Bashar's men passed here”... This school was used as a prison and headquarters. It was terrible for this neighborhood’s people.

(Wissam) “Scud” soviet missiles are sent from the capital, about a Km from Aleppo. Artillery and aviation are the means used to terrify the remaining population and force it to obey

(Boy) He attacked us with missiles, cluster bombs, “Mig” and “Shukhoi” airplanes...

(Woman) We came here because of Bashar. May he go to hell!

(Wissam) Why are you in this mosque? (Kid) Because of the bombings (Wissam) did you flee to the mosque because of the bombings?

(Wissam) What's your name? (Girl) Kifaa (Wissam) What? (Girl) Kifaa (Wissam) How old are you, Kifaa? (Girl) I'm seven years old (Wissam) Why do you live in the mosque? (Girl) They bombed our house

(VO) Terrifying the local population and destroying their homes, forcing people to flea the homeland: this is the regime's policy to try to eliminate the revolution.

(Refugee) The air force is bombing the Northern villages (Wissam) The air force? (Refugee) Yes (Wissam) Might God protect you! Is your family in Turkey? (Refugee) Yes

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Being a gay journalist in Hong Kong
Hong Kong
By Joan Planas
10 Jan 2013

Things are changing in Hong Kong since the city has become a part of China. Josh is a Hong Kong gay journalist who is afraid of what might happen in the future, for now he is a victim of censorship that affects his profession and his privacy. His desire is to scape from Hong Kong.

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Being a gay journalist in Hong Kong
Hong Kong, China
By Serene Yordi
10 Jan 2013

Things are changing in Hong Kong since the city has become a part of China. Josh is a Hong Kong gay journalist who is afraid of what might happen in the future, for now he is a victim of censorship that affects his profession and his privacy. His desire is to scape from Hong Kong.

To view video, click here: http://transterramedia.com/media/20731
To view article, click here: http://transterramedia.com/media/20225

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Escaping Hong Kong (1 of 8)
Hong Kong, China
By Joan Planas
10 Jan 2013

One of the streets of Hong Kong (January 2013). The city air is not good, there are a lot of people, many cars and a lot of noise.

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Escaping Hong Kong (8 of 8)
Hong Kong, China
By Joan Planas
09 Jan 2013

Josh, age 45, is waiting for some event to occur to go to cover the story (January 2013). His profession has lost a lot of adrenaline during these last years since the government introduced radio digital systems for the police and denied the access code to journalists.

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Escaping Hong Kong (5 of 8)
Hong Kong, China
By Joan Planas
09 Jan 2013

One of the streets of Hong Kong (January 2013). The city air is not good, there are a lot of people, many cars and a lot of noise.

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Escaping Hong Kong (4 of 8)
Hong Kong, China
By Joan Planas
09 Jan 2013

Josh, age 45, is walking through his neighborhood of Hong Kong (January 2012). He lives in Sham Po, an overcrowded neighbourhood known for its electronic devices open market, where houses are narrow and small.

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Escaping Hong Kong (7 of 8)
Hong Kong, China
By Joan Planas
09 Jan 2013

Josh, age 45, is having breakfast in Hong Kong (January 2012). He always frequents the same restaurant that is very close to his home in Sham Po.

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Escaping Hong Kong (2 of 8)
Hong Kong, China
By Joan Planas
09 Jan 2013

Josh, age 45, is sitting on his bike (January 2013). His office is a motorbike where he waits impatiently for the news so he can get quickly to the site to take the first pictures.

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Escaping Hong Kong (3 of 8)
Hong Kong, China
By Joan Planas
09 Jan 2013

Josh, age 45, is working in Hong Kong (January 2013). He works as a cameraman in a popular television.

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The Pilgrimage (5 of 29)
Lalibela, Ethiopia
By Leyland Cecco
29 Dec 2012

Serenity and fulfillment consummate one's spiritual journey. For the pilgrims transfixed in prayer, the experience has been a voyage both into the depths of the earth as well as the depths of their own faith. Perched high in the mountains of Northern Ethiopia, in the small town of Lalibela, Bet Giyorgis is one of the most important pilgrimage sites for one of the oldest Christian sects in the world, the Ethiopian Orthodox Christians. Lalibela, Ethiopia. December 2012.

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Somali journalists in Kenya
Nairobi, Kenya
By Ruud Elmendorp
23 Nov 2012

25-years old Amina Ismail is one of the students on the Somali Journalist School in Kenya’s capital Nairobi. Amina came to Nairobi many years ago with her parents when they fled neighboring Somalia for the civil conflict that started in 1991. As a refugee Amina was raised in Kenya and lives in the Somali neighborhood Eastleigh in Nairobi.
The area nicknamed Little Mogadishu is thriving with high rise offices and apartments, shops, restaurants, hotels, markets, music stores, artists, and a stark contrast with Somalia’s capital Mogadishu that remains destroyed after so many years of war. For journalists there it is very dangerous. This year only 16 journalists were killed. The Somali Exiled Journalists Association in Nairobi who organizes the journalist training commemorates these journalists with ceremonies in its office in Eastleigh. For Amina the violence against journalists is one of the topics she studies during her classes. She also goes out in Eastleigh to practice reporting, and it is very interesting because of its liveliness, economic activity, association with Somali pirates and even the extremists of Al Shabaab. Everything an aspiring journalist would hope for. Still Amina wants to return to Somalia as a journalist.

Soundbite 1: In the name of Allah, the most merciful and the most gracious, let peace be with you.

Soundbite 2: Later as a journalist, I want to interview any person in politics. Whether he is president, vice president or weather he is a parliamentarian. I want to interview them.

Soundbite 3: I know that one day, I will die anyway. So I am not afraid to be next to the ones who are killed. I have my ambitions, and if I die, it means it was my time.

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Letterpress of Mogadishu (1 of 20)
Mogadishu, Somalia
By jonathankalan
01 Oct 2012

Daha Printing Press first opened its doors to Mogadishu in 1967. Despite a brief period of nationalization during the 70's, the shop has remained with its original owners, and printers, for over three generations.

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Letterpress of Mogadishu (3 of 20)
Mogadishu, Somalia
By jonathankalan
01 Oct 2012

Kasim Shiek Ahmed, 60 (left), and Liban Egal, 43 (right), and their families have been linked through the letterpress for nearly half a century. Kasims father was Dahas first printer, and Libans father, Abdi Egal Hassan, founded Daha. The two play a game of Shax, similar to checkers, during down time at the shop.

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Letterpress of Mogadishu (4 of 20)
Mogadishu, Somalia
By jonathankalan
01 Oct 2012

After Somalia's independence in 1960, many young Somali students were offered scholarships from European universities. One such student, Abdi Egal Hassan (left), just 19 at the time, earned a scholarship to studying printing in Germany in 1961. He graduated in 1963, and returned to Somalia to start Daha Printing Press, named after his first daughter.

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Letterpress of Mogadishu (5 of 20)
Mogadishu, Somalia
By jonathankalan
01 Oct 2012

A little-used stockroom is now a scattered archive littered with years of printed history; tax receipt books, business cards, customs forms, completed jobs forms and unpaid invoices. On the shelves are leftover national ID cards from the tumulous years of the Somali National Alliance, from 1992-2001.

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Letterpress of Mogadishu (6 of 20)
Mogadishu, Somalia
By jonathankalan
01 Oct 2012

The main room of Daha Printing Press, a sweltering cellar beneath the former Las Vegas Bar, where decades of ink and sweat have spilled on the dark concrete floor. A massive Heidelberg Original Cylinder press takes up most of the space.

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Letterpress of Mogadishu (7 of 20)
Mogadishu, Somalia
By jonathankalan
01 Oct 2012

German-made Heidelberg presses are often hailed as the finest letterpress machines ever made. Dahas Heidelberg Original Cylinder was built sometime around the 1940's, and fits Mogadishu perfectly. Its a workhorsecheap, reliable, and easy to maintain. Unlike newer lynotypes, it costs nearly same to print one sheet as it does 10,000.

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Letterpress of Mogadishu (8 of 20)
Mogadishu, Somalia
By jonathankalan
01 Oct 2012

Letterpress printing, invented by Johannes Gutenberg in the 1440s was the primary method of mass-printing until the invention of offset printing in the early 20th century. This 'cylinder' press, from the 1940s, creates a type impression on only a tiny strip of the paper, while older presses make impressions of a whole page at once, making cylinder presses more powerful and accurate.

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Letterpress of Mogadishu (9 of 20)
Mogadishu, Somalia
By jonathankalan
01 Oct 2012

In the printing hayday of the 1980s Dahas Heidelberg was operating around the clock. The business was lucrative. "Its where our family made our money before the diaspora," says Liban. The civil war occationally ground production to halt, but most days, the printing went on.

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Letterpress of Mogadishu (10 of 20)
Mogadishu, Somalia
By jonathankalan
01 Oct 2012

Kasim Sheik Ahmed, 60, oversees production of customs declaration forms for Mogadishus busy port. The same exact forms his father printed at Daha in the late 1960s - in both Italian and Englishare being repurposed for the new government.

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Letterpress of Mogadishu (11 of 20)
Mogadishu, Somalia
By jonathankalan
01 Oct 2012

Nicknamed "Tobleno" (cartoon, in Italian,) fitting for his wiry, humorous, and highly animated presence, Kasim has worked at Daha Printing Press for 45 years, except during the 11-year period of nationalization. He still works at Daha from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m., every day except Friday, and is always found wearing a traditional somali macawiis (sarong) and tank top-and typically with a cigarrete dangling from his mouth.

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Letterpress of Mogadishu (15 of 20)
Mogadishu, Somalia
By jonathankalan
01 Oct 2012

Liban, who inherited Daha after his father died, leafs through a collection of old receipts. As a teenager, Liban worked in the shop with his father after school, and briefly ran it in the 80s before moving to the US. When Liban visited in 1997, he found over $1 million in outstanding loans from the government, which had taken prints on loan but never paid. He quickly turned the shop around stating No credit for anyone!

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Letterpress of Mogadishu (16 of 20)
Mogadishu, Somalia
By jonathankalan
01 Oct 2012

UNDP's Somalia Annual Development Report from 1985. One notable excerpt: Currently, the government is not placing a high priority on the development of tourism. There nevertheless exists a considerable potential to exploit the attractions of the extensive and wholly unspoilt coast.

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Letterpress of Mogadishu (17 of 20)
Mogadishu, Somalia
By jonathankalan
01 Oct 2012

Receipts from the 1980s, before the Somali civil war. Some are written in Somali, others in Italian. The price, 6,650 Somali Shillings, is worth less than 25 cents today

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Letterpress of Mogadishu (18 of 20)
Mogadishu, Somalia
By jonathankalan
01 Oct 2012

Business card of former Col. Axmed Cumar Jees. Throughout Somalias troubled recent history, Daha has remained an impartial and unbiased entity, printing for anyone who has attempted to control Mogadishu, legitimately or by force.

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Letterpress of Mogadishu (19 of 20)
Mogadishu, Somalia
By jonathankalan
01 Oct 2012

An original business card of General Mohamed Farrah Hassan Aidid, one of Mogadishus most notorious warlords and former Chairman of the Somali National Alliance. A failed attempt by US Army Rangers in 1993 to capture General Aidid resulted in the now famous Black Hawk Down incident. He declared himself president of Somalia briefly, and died during a battle in 1996.

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Letterpress of Mogadishu (20 of 20)
Mogadishu, Somalia
By jonathankalan
01 Oct 2012

A paper printout of the Somali flag hangs on the wall. Despite dramatic shifts of power and control since the nation's independence, the flag, much like Daha, has remained unchanged.

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THE LETTERPRESS OF MOGADISHU
Mogadishu, Somalia
By Mais Istanbuli
01 Oct 2012

A print shop in the Somali capital tells the story of the country's two decades of turmoil -- and rebirth.
In a tiny, damp, oil-soaked cellar tucked behind one of Mogadishu's bullet-pocked central streets, fragile remnants of a city's survival clutter the rickety shelves. Their location, hidden just beneath Mogadishu's shelled façade, is perhaps their only reason for survival.

For 45 years, Daha Printing Press has accumulated an inked archive of Mogadishu's intricate, vibrant and violent political and social history. As governments, dictators, warlords, and militias battled for control of the streets above, Daha operated like a well-oiled machine, printing for all who walked in their door. Everybody, it seems, has something to print.

"Even warlords needed to collect taxes," Liban Egal, the son of Daha's original owner, asserts.

Customs declaration forms for Mogadishu's bustling port, still written in Italian from early post-colonial days, sit freshly pressed on the table; they are being repurposed for Somalia's new government. Tax collection slips and Central Bank account ledgers from the military rule of Mohamed Siad Barre -- whose ousting in 1991 launched two decades of civil war -- litter the stock room. Business cards, like that of notorious warlord Mohamed Farrah Aidid, who was the target of a failed American assassination attempt (which in turn resulted the infamous 'Black Hawk Down' incident), fill old wooden drawers. Even United Nations Development Program reports from the 1980's hide under crumbling shelves.

Originally opened in central Mogadishu in 1967, Daha Printing Press was founded by 25 year-old Abdi Egal Hassan. Hassan took skills he mastered studying printmaking in Germany through a scholarship, and built a thriving enterprise.

By 1969, General Mohamed Siad Barre staged a successful military coup and took control of Somalia. He experimented with Chinese-influenced 'scientific socialism,' and in 1971 all private sector workers became government employees. All large businesses became government businesses. Daha was shut down.

Barre eventually switched sides during the Cold War, aligning with the US. In 1983 Abdi was able to reopen Daha Printing Press. The small letterpress shop has remained unchanged in location, machinery and employees, ever since.

Liban Egal, Abdi Egal Hassan's son, currently owns Daha. Liban, who grew up working the printing press after school, has recently returned to Mogadishu after spending more than twenty years abroad. In addition to resuming work at the press, he is founding the First Somali Bank -- Somalia's first since the collapse of the country's Central Bank in 1991 -- along with Somalia Wireless, a mobile internet company.

With Mogadishu quivering on the edge of sustained peace for the first time in two decades, Kasim Shiek Ahmed, whose family has labored behind the machines for 3 generations, and Liban are ready to welcome the arrival of Somalia's first real government in as many years. On August 20th, the Federal Parliament of Somalia was inaugurated, and the Federal Government of Somalia, the first permanent central government since 1991, replaced the Transitional Federal Government. On September 16th, Hassan Sheik Mohamud, a political activist and academic, was sworn in as Somalia's newest President.

"As soon as this new government begins, that's when we begin," exclaims Liban "Every Ministry will need some kind of paper."

The old Heidelberg printing press, its slickly oiled gears churning beneath the shell-shocked streets, will also press on. "We can't forget this machine," Kasim expresses with a wide grin. "It's like family