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In Akkar 10
halba, lebanon
By Emmanuel Haddad
10 Jan 2014

Just before arriving to Halba, the capital of Akkar, the car of the French volunteer teacher from Relief&Reconciliation turns left. Among the agricultural fields, a Syrian camp have been settled to host hundreds of families from Qusayr and Homs. Every day, the children receive French and English lessons for free from the NGO's teachers.

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Zaatari 15
Zaatari, Jordan
By Margaux Bergey
05 Jun 2013

A child being examined at Zaatari Médecins du Monde 's clinic.
Taken in june 2013

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Life In The Graves - La Vie Dans Les ...
Shanshrah, Idlib province, Syria
By Marie
13 Apr 2013

Children who live in the Shansharah archeological site in the north-east have fun in the ruins. They lauch stones into the tall herbs where the insects live that transmit leshmania are. This skin disease devastates this rural region.

Les enfants qui vivent dans le site archéologique de Shansharah au nord-ouest du pays s’amusent dans les ruines. Ils en profitent pour lancer des cailloux dans les herbes hautes où se trouvent les insectes qui transmettent la leishmaniose, maladie de peau qui fait des ravages dans cette région rurale.

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Life In The Graves - La Vie Dans Les ...
Shanshrah, Idlib Province, Syria
By Marie
13 Apr 2013

Entry of a graveyard occupied by a refugee family on the Shansharah archeological site, Idlib region. It has been one year since hundreds of displaced people have taken shelter in the ruins of these famous « dead cities » in the North-West. Far away from the surrounding cities, they are less exposed to the Syrian army air strikes.

Entrée d'un tombeau occupé par une famille réfugiée sur le site archéologique de Shansharah dans la région d'Idleb. Depuis un an des centaines de déplacés trouvent refuge dans les ruines des célèbres « villes mortes » du nord-ouest du pays. Eloignées des villes alentours, elles sont moins ciblées par les attaques aériennes de l'armée syrienne. Ici vit une famille de six personnes. La chambre funéraire est devenue leur lieu de vie.

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Children, victims of Syria's war (7 o...
Azaz, Syria
By Ryan Heughn Jacobs
14 Mar 2013

A Syrian boy walks between tents in the dank smoke filled wharehouse section of Azaz refugee camp on his way to collect water for his family. With 35% of Syria's population under the age of 14, what happens to them now will determine Syria's future.

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Children, victims of Syria's war (4 o...
Azaz, Syria
By Ryan Heughn Jacobs
14 Mar 2013

A young girl in Azaz refugee camp poses infront of her father(L) who lost his leg last year when a rocket hit their home in Aleppo. With 35% of Syria's population under the age of 14, what happens to them now will determine Syria's future.

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Children, victims of Syria's war (2 o...
Azaz, Syria
By Ryan Heughn Jacobs
14 Mar 2013

A group of Syrian refugee boys play marbles on land which is being prepared for the expected influx of more refugees as Syria's war enters its third year. With 35% of Syria's population under the age of 14, what happens to them now will determine Syria's future.

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Syrian Refugee Children Work in Beiru...
Hamra, Beirut, Lebanon ,
By hussein baydoun
12 Mar 2013

Fares, a 6-year-old Syrian refugee in Lebanon, works at night selling flowers besides bars and pubs.

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Syrian Children
Dalhamiye, Lebanon
By Docphot
13 Feb 2013

Syrian refugee children cannot afford school so they spend their days playing in the camps near the border.

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New Home
Dalhamiye, Lebanon
By Docphot
13 Feb 2013

A refugee child stands looking into the distance with the shadow of a house on the wall behind him.

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Refugee Child
Dalhamiye, Lebanon
By Docphot
13 Feb 2013

A young male refugee in a camp in the Bekaa Valley, along the Syrian border.

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Refugee Children
Dalhamiye, Lebanon
By Docphot
13 Feb 2013

A group of young male refugees in a camp in the Bekaa Valley along the border with Syria.

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Refugee Children
Dalhamiye, Lebanon
By Docphot
13 Feb 2013

Syrian refugee children wave from the camps in the Bekaa Valley near the Syrian border.

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Refugee Children
Dalhamiye, Lebanon
By Docphot
13 Feb 2013

Refugee Children standing in front of the Lebanese - Syrian Border.

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Albashayer School For Syrian Refugees
Antakya, Turkey
By U.S. Editor
23 Jan 2013

School for Refugees

The majority of the more than 150,000 Syrians who have fled to Turkey are children. Although many are sheltering in Turkey's state run refugee camps, a countless number are living under the radar, in the border cities like Antakya. For those Syrian children, many of whom have been traumatized by their experiences of the war, Turkey does not and cannot provide public education.

“Some children have been out of school for almost one or two years," according to Ted Chaiban, UNICEF’s head of emergency operations.

The privately-funded Albashayer School in Antakya was founded 18 month ago to address the needs of Antakya's Syrian children.

In the beginning, the school provided education in Arabic for just 16 Syrian children. In three months, the number had quadrupled, according to the school principal, Sally Albunni, herself a refugee from Hama. Now over 500 students flood through the front gates every morning, and numbers are increasing.
"Every day we have new students," says Albunni. The school just opened a new branch, so now it occupies two full apartment buildings. Total number of students served is currently over 800. Students arrive in two shifts, in order to accommodate as many as possible. Others are on a waiting list. In addition to learning math, science, arabic, Turkish and art, a school psychologist helps them work through difficult emotions. Needy children receive new clothes that have been donated.

According to UNICEF, half of the 4 million affected Syrians are children living in the worst conditions and suffering from the psycho-social effects of the violence they witness on a daily basis.

At the Albashayer School, signs of trauma are everywhere, from the playground, where children participate in violent play, to the art room, where student's drawings depict tanks, blood, soldiers and guns.

But after a few weeks, Albunni says she sees improvement. The children are very resilient, and happy to be in school.

"We want to remove everything about the war," says the principal.

"We want to see them happy and playing normally."

-Jodi Hilton

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School for Syrian Refugees in Turkey ...
Antakya, Turkey
By Jodi Hilton
15 Dec 2012

Maysam Selmo, 8, during her second day at Albashayer School for Syrian Refugee Children. She and her extended family fled their village in Idlib province of Syria. Now they live in a crowded apartment in the old city of Antakya. The school is overcrowded with 500 students and new students constantly arriving. Last week alone 115 new students enrolled.

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School for Syrian Refugees in Turkey ...
Antakya, Turkey
By Jodi Hilton
14 Dec 2012

A minibus drops children to the homes after school. Syrian refugee families a spread throughout Antakya, a small city close to the Syrian border, despite a new law prohibited them from residing there.

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School for Syrian Refugees in Turkey ...
Antakya, Turkey
By Jodi Hilton
14 Dec 2012

Children, including students at the Albashayer School for Syrian Refugee Children, often show signs of trauma after what they've experienced in Syria. After not attending for many months, some more than a year, many are happy just to be back in school.

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School for Syrian Refugees in Turkey ...
Antakya, Turkey
By Jodi Hilton
14 Dec 2012

Seventh grade students study at the Albashayer School for Syrian Refugee Children's upper school. Overcrowding has forced administrators to open a second building to accommodate new arrivals.

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School for Syrian Refugees in Turkey ...
Antakya, Turkey
By Jodi Hilton
14 Dec 2012

A first grade student at the Albashayer School for Syrian Refugee Children shows her drawing which includes the free Syria flag, chains, a yellow sun and big green heart.

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School for Syrian Refugees in Turkey ...
Antakya, Turkey
By Jodi Hilton
14 Dec 2012

Nureddin, 11, left, who arrived with his mother to Antakya after his father was killed 15 days ago in Syria, registers for the Albashayer School for Syrian Refugee Children, which is free for Syrian children living in Turkey.

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School for Syrian Refugees in Turkey ...
Antakya, Turkey
By Jodi Hilton
14 Dec 2012

Children during recess at the Albashayer School for Syrian Refugee Children, where many seem enthusiastic about being back in school.

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School for Syrian Refugees in Turkey ...
Antakya, Turkey
By Jodi Hilton
14 Dec 2012

Teacher Rafah Al Tinawie counsels a student outside class at the Albashayer School for Syrian Refugee Children. Al Tinawie says many children show signs of trauma and she sometimes meets with parents to understand what problems the children are facing.

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Displaced Syrians Brace For Winter's ...
Idlib, Syria
By U.S. Editor
14 Dec 2012

Displaced Syrians brace for winter’s onslaught.

There are nearly two million internally displaced people who are stuck inside Syria with no place to go. Cold and afraid, most say they want desperately want to cross into Turkey. But Turkey has refused to accept them citing overcrowding. Qah camp is inside Syria close to the Turkish border. It was founded three months ago and is now has 520 tents. More families arrive every day, many from Hass—a town 85 kilometers southwest of Aleppo. The population, mainly women, children and the elderly, has swelled to 3600 since it was established three months ago.

About 450,000 Syrians live in camps in neighboring countries including over 137,000 in Turkey. But for an estimated two million internally displaced people remain in Syria, in danger and living in very difficult conditions.

Two new refugee camps are being constructed in Turkey, ostensibly to accommodate those stuck at the border. But for the people whose homes have been destroyed, family members killed, villages abandoned, it’s a race against time, weather and war.

Just two weeks ago regime forces dropped bombs nearby, creating a panic as people ran desperately for the Turkish border. No deaths were reported, but the situation remains tense. “Six missiles hit this village and [nearby] Atmeh,” reported Hassan, 35, a former police officer who has joined the FSA and lives with his family in the camp.

Since winter began more than a month ago, the region has experienced many days of torrential rains. Water leaks into the tents, wetting blankets, mattresses and rugs. At night, temperatures sometimes drop below freezing. “From inside the tents, you can hear the children crying,” says Mustafa, a 22 year-old former chef and military sergeant who fled with nine members of his family.

A doctor working with Medicins du Monde who preferred not to be identified said that he has seen many cases of respiratory problems and say that about 30% of the camp’s residents suffer from diarrhea as a result of unclean drinking water. Hepatitis A is also spreading rapidly at the camp. And it’s only December—the toughest winter months are still ahead.

-Jodi Hilton

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School for Syrian Refugees in Turkey ...
Antakya, Turkey
By Jodi Hilton
14 Dec 2012

Albashayer School for Syrian Refugee Children's lower school is housed in a former apartment building on the outskirts of Antakya, near the border with Syria. Children attend in two shifts, morning and afternoon.

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School for Syrian Refugees in Turkey ...
Antakya, Turkey
By Jodi Hilton
14 Dec 2012

Cousins Suleyman Selmo, 9, and Kawthar Selmo, 10, receive donated clothes from the Albashayer School for Syrian Refugee Children on their second day at school. Many children and families are in need of basic supplies including food and clothing.

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STORIES IN TENTS - Editor's Picks 14 ...
Idlib, Syria
By Editor's Picks
14 Dec 2012

Syrian Refugees in Qah, and other small settlements across the border regions of Syria face dismal living conditions, made worse by the onset of winter. With torrential rain, and temperatures that regularly drop below freezing, the refugees suffer from a lack of adequate provisions to feed their families and protect them from the elements.
Health issues are on the rise due to overcrowding and the absence of proper sanitation and clean drinking water, causing widespread outbreaks of Hepatitis A and dysentery.

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Azaz Camp, Syria (7 of 41)
Azaz, Syria
By Michele Pero
06 Dec 2012

Refugee camp of Azaz, Syrian border.
Refugees from Halep and surrounding areas have lost their houses under the bombings. They left Halep with just the clothes they had at the time. They have no documents, no money, no belongings. The refugees believed the could cross the Turkish border to escape the massacres, but after a limited number of refugees were accepted by the Turkish government who settled in the nearby camp of Kilis, the border was closed. They had to settle in the camp right on the Syrian border, waiting for a move that does not arrive.

Turkey cannot take more refugees and cannot do more than what actually it does. The refugees must stay were they are, with no home in Syria anymore, no passport to leave the country, as if convicted to stay in the camp.
The excess number refugees not accepted into Turkey settled in September 2012 under big hangars once used by Syrian customs police for storing and checking goods before letting them pass the border. For months the refugees had to sleep right on the pavement, under hangars, under trucks or any other shelter available. No heating, no running water, no latrines, no roof above their heads.

Tents arrived just at around the middle of November 2012, donated by the Red Crescent of Qatar. Since that, three hangars were filled with tents, then other tents were placed on open ground. In December 2012, the number of refugees at the Azaz camp reached about 7000.

Life at the camp is hard. Volunteers from various ONG such as IHH provide meals every day. Supplies come from world wide relief organizations and volunteer donations, but they are not enough to meet the needs of so many. Tents are not waterproof. The pavement is constantly wet when the rain falls, especially hard for those ones settled on open ground. No electricity is supplied. Water is scarce and is brought in big containers for those who need it most. Heating becomes a real issue with the oncoming winter. Kids are sent to the surrounding fields to gather any burning material, but they cannot go too far since the mine fields protecting the no-man’s land are right at border line next to the camp. Refugees burn dry grass. At dusk, they must make return to their tents, because all around there is no light to even walk. They rest by candlelight in their tents until they fall asleep.
Recently a protest calling for better conditions at the camp was held at the border (see other reportage “Syria - protest in the camp of Azaz”, © Michele Pero) to get attention from the Turkish Governor of the area, with no results. These people must stay here. No place where to go, no place to return to. Convicted, forgotten. No one knows for how long.

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Azaz Camp, Syria (10 of 41)
Azaz, Syria
By Michele Pero
06 Dec 2012

Refugee camp of Azaz, Syrian border.
Refugees from Halep and surrounding areas have lost their houses under the bombings. They left Halep with just the clothes they had at the time. They have no documents, no money, no belongings. The refugees believed the could cross the Turkish border to escape the massacres, but after a limited number of refugees were accepted by the Turkish government who settled in the nearby camp of Kilis, the border was closed. They had to settle in the camp right on the Syrian border, waiting for a move that does not arrive.

Turkey cannot take more refugees and cannot do more than what actually it does. The refugees must stay were they are, with no home in Syria anymore, no passport to leave the country, as if convicted to stay in the camp.
The excess number refugees not accepted into Turkey settled in September 2012 under big hangars once used by Syrian customs police for storing and checking goods before letting them pass the border. For months the refugees had to sleep right on the pavement, under hangars, under trucks or any other shelter available. No heating, no running water, no latrines, no roof above their heads.

Tents arrived just at around the middle of November 2012, donated by the Red Crescent of Qatar. Since that, three hangars were filled with tents, then other tents were placed on open ground. In December 2012, the number of refugees at the Azaz camp reached about 7000.

Life at the camp is hard. Volunteers from various ONG such as IHH provide meals every day. Supplies come from world wide relief organizations and volunteer donations, but they are not enough to meet the needs of so many. Tents are not waterproof. The pavement is constantly wet when the rain falls, especially hard for those ones settled on open ground. No electricity is supplied. Water is scarce and is brought in big containers for those who need it most. Heating becomes a real issue with the oncoming winter. Kids are sent to the surrounding fields to gather any burning material, but they cannot go too far since the mine fields protecting the no-man’s land are right at border line next to the camp. Refugees burn dry grass. At dusk, they must make return to their tents, because all around there is no light to even walk. They rest by candlelight in their tents until they fall asleep.
Recently a protest calling for better conditions at the camp was held at the border (see other reportage “Syria - protest in the camp of Azaz”, © Michele Pero) to get attention from the Turkish Governor of the area, with no results. These people must stay here. No place where to go, no place to return to. Convicted, forgotten. No one knows for how long.

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Azaz Camp, Syria (11 of 41)
Azaz, Syria
By Michele Pero
06 Dec 2012

Refugee camp of Azaz, Syrian border.
Refugees from Halep and surrounding areas have lost their houses under the bombings. They left Halep with just the clothes they had at the time. They have no documents, no money, no belongings. The refugees believed the could cross the Turkish border to escape the massacres, but after a limited number of refugees were accepted by the Turkish government who settled in the nearby camp of Kilis, the border was closed. They had to settle in the camp right on the Syrian border, waiting for a move that does not arrive.

Turkey cannot take more refugees and cannot do more than what actually it does. The refugees must stay were they are, with no home in Syria anymore, no passport to leave the country, as if convicted to stay in the camp.
The excess number refugees not accepted into Turkey settled in September 2012 under big hangars once used by Syrian customs police for storing and checking goods before letting them pass the border. For months the refugees had to sleep right on the pavement, under hangars, under trucks or any other shelter available. No heating, no running water, no latrines, no roof above their heads.

Tents arrived just at around the middle of November 2012, donated by the Red Crescent of Qatar. Since that, three hangars were filled with tents, then other tents were placed on open ground. In December 2012, the number of refugees at the Azaz camp reached about 7000.

Life at the camp is hard. Volunteers from various ONG such as IHH provide meals every day. Supplies come from world wide relief organizations and volunteer donations, but they are not enough to meet the needs of so many. Tents are not waterproof. The pavement is constantly wet when the rain falls, especially hard for those ones settled on open ground. No electricity is supplied. Water is scarce and is brought in big containers for those who need it most. Heating becomes a real issue with the oncoming winter. Kids are sent to the surrounding fields to gather any burning material, but they cannot go too far since the mine fields protecting the no-man’s land are right at border line next to the camp. Refugees burn dry grass. At dusk, they must make return to their tents, because all around there is no light to even walk. They rest by candlelight in their tents until they fall asleep.
Recently a protest calling for better conditions at the camp was held at the border (see other reportage “Syria - protest in the camp of Azaz”, © Michele Pero) to get attention from the Turkish Governor of the area, with no results. These people must stay here. No place where to go, no place to return to. Convicted, forgotten. No one knows for how long.

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Azaz Camp, Syria (17 of 41)
Azaz, Syria
By Michele Pero
06 Dec 2012

Refugee camp of Azaz, Syrian border.
Refugees from Halep and surrounding areas have lost their houses under the bombings. They left Halep with just the clothes they had at the time. They have no documents, no money, no belongings. The refugees believed the could cross the Turkish border to escape the massacres, but after a limited number of refugees were accepted by the Turkish government who settled in the nearby camp of Kilis, the border was closed. They had to settle in the camp right on the Syrian border, waiting for a move that does not arrive.

Turkey cannot take more refugees and cannot do more than what actually it does. The refugees must stay were they are, with no home in Syria anymore, no passport to leave the country, as if convicted to stay in the camp.
The excess number refugees not accepted into Turkey settled in September 2012 under big hangars once used by Syrian customs police for storing and checking goods before letting them pass the border. For months the refugees had to sleep right on the pavement, under hangars, under trucks or any other shelter available. No heating, no running water, no latrines, no roof above their heads.

Tents arrived just at around the middle of November 2012, donated by the Red Crescent of Qatar. Since that, three hangars were filled with tents, then other tents were placed on open ground. In December 2012, the number of refugees at the Azaz camp reached about 7000.

Life at the camp is hard. Volunteers from various ONG such as IHH provide meals every day. Supplies come from world wide relief organizations and volunteer donations, but they are not enough to meet the needs of so many. Tents are not waterproof. The pavement is constantly wet when the rain falls, especially hard for those ones settled on open ground. No electricity is supplied. Water is scarce and is brought in big containers for those who need it most. Heating becomes a real issue with the oncoming winter. Kids are sent to the surrounding fields to gather any burning material, but they cannot go too far since the mine fields protecting the no-man’s land are right at border line next to the camp. Refugees burn dry grass. At dusk, they must make return to their tents, because all around there is no light to even walk. They rest by candlelight in their tents until they fall asleep.
Recently a protest calling for better conditions at the camp was held at the border (see other reportage “Syria - protest in the camp of Azaz”, © Michele Pero) to get attention from the Turkish Governor of the area, with no results. These people must stay here. No place where to go, no place to return to. Convicted, forgotten. No one knows for how long.

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Azaz Camp, Syria (36 of 41)
Azaz, Syria
By Michele Pero
06 Dec 2012

Refugee camp of Azaz, Syrian border.
Refugees from Halep and surrounding areas have lost their houses under the bombings. They left Halep with just the clothes they had at the time. They have no documents, no money, no belongings. The refugees believed the could cross the Turkish border to escape the massacres, but after a limited number of refugees were accepted by the Turkish government who settled in the nearby camp of Kilis, the border was closed. They had to settle in the camp right on the Syrian border, waiting for a move that does not arrive.

Turkey cannot take more refugees and cannot do more than what actually it does. The refugees must stay were they are, with no home in Syria anymore, no passport to leave the country, as if convicted to stay in the camp.
The excess number refugees not accepted into Turkey settled in September 2012 under big hangars once used by Syrian customs police for storing and checking goods before letting them pass the border. For months the refugees had to sleep right on the pavement, under hangars, under trucks or any other shelter available. No heating, no running water, no latrines, no roof above their heads.

Tents arrived just at around the middle of November 2012, donated by the Red Crescent of Qatar. Since that, three hangars were filled with tents, then other tents were placed on open ground. In December 2012, the number of refugees at the Azaz camp reached about 7000.

Life at the camp is hard. Volunteers from various ONG such as IHH provide meals every day. Supplies come from world wide relief organizations and volunteer donations, but they are not enough to meet the needs of so many. Tents are not waterproof. The pavement is constantly wet when the rain falls, especially hard for those ones settled on open ground. No electricity is supplied. Water is scarce and is brought in big containers for those who need it most. Heating becomes a real issue with the oncoming winter. Kids are sent to the surrounding fields to gather any burning material, but they cannot go too far since the mine fields protecting the no-man’s land are right at border line next to the camp. Refugees burn dry grass. At dusk, they must make return to their tents, because all around there is no light to even walk. They rest by candlelight in their tents until they fall asleep.
Recently a protest calling for better conditions at the camp was held at the border (see other reportage “Syria - protest in the camp of Azaz”, © Michele Pero) to get attention from the Turkish Governor of the area, with no results. These people must stay here. No place where to go, no place to return to. Convicted, forgotten. No one knows for how long.

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Victory Child
Mafraq Governate, Jordan
By Mat Wolf
16 Aug 2012

A Syrian boy flashes victory signs while waiting in line for a food truck in the Zaatari Syrian refugee camp in Mafraq Governorate Jordan. August 2012.

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Syrian refugees flock to aid truck in...
Zaatari, Mafraq Governate, Jordan
By Mat Wolf
15 Aug 2012

Crowds flock to a food distribution truck in the Zaatari Syrian refugee camp in Mafraq Governorate, Jordan. August 2012.

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Dust Brothers
Mafraq Governate, Jordan
By Mat Wolf
15 Aug 2012

Two teens mug for a photo outside of their shared tent in the Zaatari Syrian refugee camp in the Mafraq Governorate, Jordan. August 2012.