Frame 0004
Hunting to Survive in Besieged Ghouta
Eastern Ghouta, Syria
By Jawad Arbini
09 May 2015

May 9, 2015
Eastern Ghouta, Syria

Desperate for food and left with little resources, the residents of besieged Eastern Ghouta, east of Damascus, are hunting to survive.
44 year old Abu Adnan and 42 year old Abu Munther used to hunt as a hobby.
But following the 2011 uprising, the situation in their home area of Eastern Ghouta has critically changed. It has been two years since the opposition-held area has been besieged by the forces of the Assad regime.
Now, Abu Adnan and Abu Munther, who lost their jobs as construction workers, are obliged to hunt in order to feed their children. They can barely get 20 to 40 birds per day.
In addition to their daily struggle, the bullets in the besieged area are rare and very expensive and the hunters have to hand-make their own shotgun cartridges.

TRANSCRIPT

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man)Abu Andnan, Bird Hunter
02:57 – 03:46
“We are out hunting today. We set up the machine at night and we came to hunt quails. We do this every day. We set up the machine at night and go during the day to hunt because we do not have any work. We also do this to provide food for our families. We hunt about 30 to 40 birds a day, which are nothing. They are not enough to make a meal. They are half a meal. Our livelihood depends on God; some days we get a duck, a chicken, a big or a small bird. On some days we get a raven, which is bitter and cannot be eaten, but we are forced to eat it, given the situation and the siege under which we are living.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Abu Munther, Bird Hunter
03:47 – 04:12

“We are hunting because of the siege and lack of work. We hunt about 20 to 30 birds. We pluck them and feed them to our children. This is because of the lack of work and the siege, as you can see for yourself. Q: How does hunting before the revolution differ from hunting after it?
A: There is a big difference. Before the revolution we used to go out hunting for fun; now it is a primary necessity.”

04:13 – 04:30
“Q: Do you face any difficulties in filling cartridges? A: We are facing a lot of difficulties. There is a lack of needed material. We have to fix the machines by hand to be able to do this work. It would cost us too much to buy them readymade; we cannot afford them.”

Thumb sm
Trekking in a 20 million year old rai...
Madeira, Portugal
By Luis Miguel Rodrigues
15 Jun 2013

After some flora, many birds are also endemic species that can be found only in this island

Thumb sm
Hippos in Gorongosa
Gorongosa, Mozambique
By Luis Miguel Rodrigues
05 May 2013

Hippos are one of the more active fauna in Gorongosa. After decades of civil war the park is growing again thanks to an American millionaire that is donating part of his wealth to the park.

Thumb sm
Gorongosa National Park
Gorongosa, Mozambique
By U.S. Editor
05 May 2013

After decades of civil war Gorongosa National Park is growing again thanks to an American millionaire that is donating part of his wealth to preserve the diversity of flora and fauna living on the reserve. Around and inside Gorongosa live around 250,000 persons that continue struggling to survive from a hard daily life after decades of civil war that came after independence from Portugal

Thumb sm
Coastal Lagoon Clean-up on Earth Day ...
Coastal Lagoon, Las Pinas, Philippines
By Sherbien Dacalanio
23 Apr 2013

Volunteers joined the first organized coastal clean-up last July 17, 2011

Two years ago, the coastline Coastal Lagoon, officially known as the Las Piñas Parañaque Critical Habitat and Ecotourism Area (LPPCHEA), more popularly known as Freedom Island is covered with thick garbage and rubbish. Thru the efforts of Wild Birds Club of the Philippines, Save Freedom Island Movement and various environmental NGO’s helped in cleaning the coastal bay and as a result, the coastal lagoon is almost clean now.
The clean-up event at Freedom Island (Las Pinas-Paranaque Critical Habitat and Ecotourism area) on April 20, 2013, Saturday, is in celebration of Earth Day which is observed in more than 192 countries every year to promote awareness and appreciation of our environment and to demonstrate support for its protection and restoration.

Freedom Island is the last remaining mangrove frontier in Metro Manila that serves as a sanctuary for avian, terrestrial and marine species. It is home for more than 80 species of migratory and endemic birds, including the already vulnerable Chinese Egret and Philippine Duck. The mangrove ecosystem also serves as a feeding, nesting and nursery grounds for commercially important fish, prawns, mollusks, crabs and shellfish where livelihoods of coastal communities depend. By this virtue, it has been declared as a critical habitat by Proclamation 1412 in 2007 and, also, been recently included in the Ramsar List of Wetlands of International Importance.

However, threats against the bird sanctuary’s existence, such as the controversial reclamation project, relentless dumping of waste and pollution, continue to remain. Thus, more action from the people is needed to protect and restore it.

Said coastal clean-up event is not only a campaign to inspire people to clean up their surroundings but a show of an alarming concern about further environmental depletion. It serves as a call to action to all citizens to take part in saving the environment, as well as a call to the government to act upon the garbage problem and to stop all disastrous reclamation projects. (Source: http://www.facebook.com/events/362286580548042/?fref=ts)

Thumb sm
Coastal Lagoon Clean Up For Earth Day
Coastal Lagoon, Las Pinas, Philippines
By U.S. Editor
20 Apr 2013

Two years ago, the Coastal Lagoon, officially called the Las Piñas Parañaque Critical Habitat and Ecotourism Area (LPPCHEA), but popularly known as Freedom Island, was covered with garbage and rubbish. Through the efforts of the Wild Birds Club of the Philippines, the Save Freedom Island Movement and various environmental NGO’s have helped clean the coastal bay and as a result, the lagoon is now almost clean.

The clean-up event at Freedom Island on April 20, 2013, is in celebration of Earth Day, which is observed in more than 192 countries every year to promote awareness and appreciation of our environment and to demonstrate support for its protection and restoration.

Freedom Island is the last remaining mangrove frontier in Metro Manila that serves as a sanctuary for avian, terrestrial and marine species. It is home to more than 80 species of migratory and endemic birds, including the already vulnerable Chinese Egret and the Philippine Duck. The mangrove ecosystem also serves as a feeding, nesting and nursery grounds for commercially important fish, prawns, mollusks, crabs and shellfish. By this virtue, it has been declared a critical habitat by Proclamation 1412 in 2007 and has also recently been included in the Ramsar List of Wetlands of International Importance.

However, threats against the bird sanctuary’s continue to exist, such as the controversial reclamation project, and continuous dumping of waste and pollution. Thus, more action from the people is needed to protect and restore it.

The coastal clean-up event is not only a campaign to inspire people to clean up their surroundings, but also a show of concern about further environmental depletion. It serves as a call to action to all citizens to take part in saving the environment, as well as a call to the government take action and to stop all disastrous reclamation projects.

Thumb sm
Nile Valley sun-bird
By awaheed.lifesinai
08 Mar 2013

The Nile Valley sunbird’s habitat is all along the Nile Valley. The color of the bird’s feathers changes throughout the year. In the winter, males and females look alike. The sunbird is tiny, just 9 to 10 cm long. It has a pale-grey head and light-yellow breasts. Its bill is long, slender and slightly down-curved. In February, the male sunbird becomes glossy green, with a brilliant sulfur-yellow belly and long tail streamers that add an extra five cm to his total length.

Thumb sm
Pigeon Trainers in Cairo
Cairo, Egypt
By Teo Butturini
21 Feb 2013

In the suburbs of Cairo ain't difficult to see wooden towers rising above the buildings. They are huge bird cages, where some locals breed and feed their pigeons. These men train their fowls, in order to command their flight with a flag, and teach them to perform tricks at the sound of a whistle. From time to time the breeders challenge each other : the aim of the game is to "steal" birds from the rival's flock, when the pigeons are flying.
This series is a portrait of another side of Cairo, a gaze into the daily life of the suburbs of this city, that goes on beyond the revolution and the politics. These pictures have been taken by chance an year ago, when working on a different project, and they gave me the idea for a this new story, that I plan to complete during this summer.

Thumb sm
Spotted Sandgrouse
By awaheed.lifesinai
31 Dec 2012

Sand grouses are common desert birds. The species pictured can be found in the Sinai and Eastern Desert of Egypt. The sand grouse has a musical, “queeto-queeto” call which distinguishes it from similar-looking species. This is how the bird was given its Arabic name, “Qata.”

Thumb sm
Spotted sandgrouse
By awaheed.lifesinai
31 Dec 2012

A close-up picture of the spotted sand grouse taken in the desert near Ra’s Gharib, Red Sea Governorate.

Thumb sm
western Reef Egret
Hurghada
By awaheed.lifesinai
31 Dec 2012

The Western Reef egret looks like the cattle egret but lives on the shores of lakes and other large bodies of water and eats fish. The Western Reef egret is also known as the Western Reef heron. It is a medium-sized bird with an extremely wide range. It is native to the coasts of tropical West Africa, the Red Sea, the Persian Gulf and eastwards to India. It sometimes appears in Brazil, the Caribbean, North America and the Cocos Islands in the eastern Indian Ocean.

Thumb sm
Pigeons
Melaka, Malaysia
By Dominic.J.Lucarelli
04 Jul 2012

A woman is engulfed by pigeons in Melaka, Malaysia.

Thumb sm
Coastal Lagoon Clean-up on Earth Day ...
Coastal Lagoon, Las Pinas, Philippines
By Sherbien Dacalanio
18 Jul 2011

Volunteers joined the first organized coastal clean-up last July 17, 2011. Different slippers, sandals and shoes are picked-up during the clean-up.

Two years ago, the coastline Coastal Lagoon, officially known as the Las Piñas Parañaque Critical Habitat and Ecotourism Area (LPPCHEA), more popularly known as Freedom Island is covered with thick garbage and rubbish. Thru the efforts of Wild Birds Club of the Philippines, Save Freedom Island Movement and various environmental NGO’s helped in cleaning the coastal bay and as a result, the coastal lagoon is almost clean now.
The clean-up event at Freedom Island (Las Pinas-Paranaque Critical Habitat and Ecotourism area) on April 20, 2013, Saturday, is in celebration of Earth Day which is observed in more than 192 countries every year to promote awareness and appreciation of our environment and to demonstrate support for its protection and restoration.

Freedom Island is the last remaining mangrove frontier in Metro Manila that serves as a sanctuary for avian, terrestrial and marine species. It is home for more than 80 species of migratory and endemic birds, including the already vulnerable Chinese Egret and Philippine Duck. The mangrove ecosystem also serves as a feeding, nesting and nursery grounds for commercially important fish, prawns, mollusks, crabs and shellfish where livelihoods of coastal communities depend. By this virtue, it has been declared as a critical habitat by Proclamation 1412 in 2007 and, also, been recently included in the Ramsar List of Wetlands of International Importance.

However, threats against the bird sanctuary’s existence, such as the controversial reclamation project, relentless dumping of waste and pollution, continue to remain. Thus, more action from the people is needed to protect and restore it.

Said coastal clean-up event is not only a campaign to inspire people to clean up their surroundings but a show of an alarming concern about further environmental depletion. It serves as a call to action to all citizens to take part in saving the environment, as well as a call to the government to act upon the garbage problem and to stop all disastrous reclamation projects. (Source: http://www.facebook.com/events/362286580548042/?fref=ts)

Thumb sm
Coastal Lagoon Clean-up on Earth Day ...
Coastal Lagoon, Las Pinas, Philippines
By Sherbien Dacalanio
18 Jul 2011

Volunteers joined the first organized coastal clean-up last July 17, 2011

Two years ago, the coastline Coastal Lagoon, officially known as the Las Piñas Parañaque Critical Habitat and Ecotourism Area (LPPCHEA), more popularly known as Freedom Island is covered with thick garbage and rubbish. Thru the efforts of Wild Birds Club of the Philippines, Save Freedom Island Movement and various environmental NGO’s helped in cleaning the coastal bay and as a result, the coastal lagoon is almost clean now.
The clean-up event at Freedom Island (Las Pinas-Paranaque Critical Habitat and Ecotourism area) on April 20, 2013, Saturday, is in celebration of Earth Day which is observed in more than 192 countries every year to promote awareness and appreciation of our environment and to demonstrate support for its protection and restoration.

Freedom Island is the last remaining mangrove frontier in Metro Manila that serves as a sanctuary for avian, terrestrial and marine species. It is home for more than 80 species of migratory and endemic birds, including the already vulnerable Chinese Egret and Philippine Duck. The mangrove ecosystem also serves as a feeding, nesting and nursery grounds for commercially important fish, prawns, mollusks, crabs and shellfish where livelihoods of coastal communities depend. By this virtue, it has been declared as a critical habitat by Proclamation 1412 in 2007 and, also, been recently included in the Ramsar List of Wetlands of International Importance.

However, threats against the bird sanctuary’s existence, such as the controversial reclamation project, relentless dumping of waste and pollution, continue to remain. Thus, more action from the people is needed to protect and restore it.

Said coastal clean-up event is not only a campaign to inspire people to clean up their surroundings but a show of an alarming concern about further environmental depletion. It serves as a call to action to all citizens to take part in saving the environment, as well as a call to the government to act upon the garbage problem and to stop all disastrous reclamation projects. (Source: http://www.facebook.com/events/362286580548042/?fref=ts)

Thumb sm
Coastal Lagoon Clean-up on Earth Day ...
Coastal Lagoon, Las Pinas, Philippines
By Sherbien Dacalanio
18 Jul 2011

Volunteers joined the first organized coastal clean-up last July 17, 2011

Two years ago, the coastline Coastal Lagoon, officially known as the Las Piñas Parañaque Critical Habitat and Ecotourism Area (LPPCHEA), more popularly known as Freedom Island is covered with thick garbage and rubbish. Thru the efforts of Wild Birds Club of the Philippines, Save Freedom Island Movement and various environmental NGO’s helped in cleaning the coastal bay and as a result, the coastal lagoon is almost clean now.
The clean-up event at Freedom Island (Las Pinas-Paranaque Critical Habitat and Ecotourism area) on April 20, 2013, Saturday, is in celebration of Earth Day which is observed in more than 192 countries every year to promote awareness and appreciation of our environment and to demonstrate support for its protection and restoration.

Freedom Island is the last remaining mangrove frontier in Metro Manila that serves as a sanctuary for avian, terrestrial and marine species. It is home for more than 80 species of migratory and endemic birds, including the already vulnerable Chinese Egret and Philippine Duck. The mangrove ecosystem also serves as a feeding, nesting and nursery grounds for commercially important fish, prawns, mollusks, crabs and shellfish where livelihoods of coastal communities depend. By this virtue, it has been declared as a critical habitat by Proclamation 1412 in 2007 and, also, been recently included in the Ramsar List of Wetlands of International Importance.

However, threats against the bird sanctuary’s existence, such as the controversial reclamation project, relentless dumping of waste and pollution, continue to remain. Thus, more action from the people is needed to protect and restore it.

Said coastal clean-up event is not only a campaign to inspire people to clean up their surroundings but a show of an alarming concern about further environmental depletion. It serves as a call to action to all citizens to take part in saving the environment, as well as a call to the government to act upon the garbage problem and to stop all disastrous reclamation projects. (Source: http://www.facebook.com/events/362286580548042/?fref=ts)

Thumb sm
Coastal Lagoon Clean-up on Earth Day ...
Coastal Lagoon, Las Pinas, Philippines
By Sherbien Dacalanio
18 Jul 2011

Volunteers joined the first organized coastal clean-up last July 17, 2011

Two years ago, the coastline Coastal Lagoon, officially known as the Las Piñas Parañaque Critical Habitat and Ecotourism Area (LPPCHEA), more popularly known as Freedom Island is covered with thick garbage and rubbish. Thru the efforts of Wild Birds Club of the Philippines, Save Freedom Island Movement and various environmental NGO’s helped in cleaning the coastal bay and as a result, the coastal lagoon is almost clean now.
The clean-up event at Freedom Island (Las Pinas-Paranaque Critical Habitat and Ecotourism area) on April 20, 2013, Saturday, is in celebration of Earth Day which is observed in more than 192 countries every year to promote awareness and appreciation of our environment and to demonstrate support for its protection and restoration.

Freedom Island is the last remaining mangrove frontier in Metro Manila that serves as a sanctuary for avian, terrestrial and marine species. It is home for more than 80 species of migratory and endemic birds, including the already vulnerable Chinese Egret and Philippine Duck. The mangrove ecosystem also serves as a feeding, nesting and nursery grounds for commercially important fish, prawns, mollusks, crabs and shellfish where livelihoods of coastal communities depend. By this virtue, it has been declared as a critical habitat by Proclamation 1412 in 2007 and, also, been recently included in the Ramsar List of Wetlands of International Importance.

However, threats against the bird sanctuary’s existence, such as the controversial reclamation project, relentless dumping of waste and pollution, continue to remain. Thus, more action from the people is needed to protect and restore it.

Said coastal clean-up event is not only a campaign to inspire people to clean up their surroundings but a show of an alarming concern about further environmental depletion. It serves as a call to action to all citizens to take part in saving the environment, as well as a call to the government to act upon the garbage problem and to stop all disastrous reclamation projects. (Source: http://www.facebook.com/events/362286580548042/?fref=ts)

Frame 0004
Coastal Lagoon Clean-up on Earth Day ...
Coastal Lagoon, Las Pinas, Philippines
By Sherbien Dacalanio
18 Jul 2011

Timelapse photography of coastal lagoon clean-up taken last July 17, 2011.

Two years ago, the coastline Coastal Lagoon, officially known as the Las Piñas Parañaque Critical Habitat and Ecotourism Area (LPPCHEA), more popularly known as Freedom Island is covered with thick garbage and rubbish. Thru the efforts of Wild Birds Club of the Philippines, Save Freedom Island Movement and various environmental NGO’s helped in cleaning the coastal bay and as a result, the coastal lagoon is almost clean now.
The clean-up event at Freedom Island (Las Pinas-Paranaque Critical Habitat and Ecotourism area) on April 20, 2013, Saturday, is in celebration of Earth Day which is observed in more than 192 countries every year to promote awareness and appreciation of our environment and to demonstrate support for its protection and restoration.

Freedom Island is the last remaining mangrove frontier in Metro Manila that serves as a sanctuary for avian, terrestrial and marine species. It is home for more than 80 species of migratory and endemic birds, including the already vulnerable Chinese Egret and Philippine Duck. The mangrove ecosystem also serves as a feeding, nesting and nursery grounds for commercially important fish, prawns, mollusks, crabs and shellfish where livelihoods of coastal communities depend. By this virtue, it has been declared as a critical habitat by Proclamation 1412 in 2007 and, also, been recently included in the Ramsar List of Wetlands of International Importance.

However, threats against the bird sanctuary’s existence, such as the controversial reclamation project, relentless dumping of waste and pollution, continue to remain. Thus, more action from the people is needed to protect and restore it.

Said coastal clean-up event is not only a campaign to inspire people to clean up their surroundings but a show of an alarming concern about further environmental depletion. It serves as a call to action to all citizens to take part in saving the environment, as well as a call to the government to act upon the garbage problem and to stop all disastrous reclamation projects. (Source: http://www.facebook.com/events/362286580548042/?fref=ts)

Thumb sm
Poverty And Tourism In Laos (9 of 9)
Luang Prabang, Laos
By hiroko tanaka
05 Aug 2008

Local Lao children sell a wishing bird to set free for $1 USD to tourists at Pak Ou Cave in Luang Prabang, Laos. Although Laos has been a top ranked tourist destination in recent years, the country remains one of the world's poorest nations and relies on foreign aid and donations. Lao people struggle with severe poverty and their life expectancy is extremely low.

Frame 0004
What a Trip! Cycling from Germany to ...
Germany, Tschech Republik, Poland, Ukraine, Russia, Kazakhstan, Thailand, Cambodia, Malaysia, Singapore
By Maximilian Semsch
02 May 2008

In 2008 Maximilian Semsch at the age of 24 cycled from Munich to Singapore to find out more about himself and to go on a real adventure, as life must be more than just working. He did the journey all by himself, without the help of a professional camera team. As there was no one to talk to, his camera became his best friend during the trip. His journey started in May 2008 in his hometown Munich. His route took him through Czech Republic, Poland, Ukraine into Russia and further on to Kazakhstan. Semsch then did hit rock bottom, as he was refused a visa and couldn't enter China. After days of consideration he did decide to skip China and flew to Thailand. His route through south-east Asia took him from Thailand to Cambodia back into Thailand and via Malaysia he finally reached Singapore, after 211 days and 13.500km on his bike. Semsch recorded everything on his trip. The nice and helpful people he bumped into, drinking vodka in Russia with complete strangers and its aftermath of a hangover the next day but he also tells about his fight against loneliness, heat and extreme headwind. He always does it in a very personal way that gives the audience the feeling of sitting on the back of his bike.

Frame 0004
Pet Shop in Damascus in 2007
Damascus
By Martin Jay
01 Mar 2007

Footage of a pet shop in Damascus, Syria, in 2007.