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Battle of Bakara Market
Mogadishu
By Noe Falk Nielsen
29 Apr 2015

The internationally recognised Somali Government, the Transitional Federal Government, had been under siege since the Ethiopian Army pulled out in January 2009. Protected by a small force of Ugandan and Burundian soldiers deployed as the African Union's Mission to Somalia (AMISOM) the government was functioning in a 25 km2 pocket in the capital, Mogadishu, consisting of the State House Complex, the port and the airport base, where AMISOM had their HQ. In the fall of 2010 Al Shabaab attempted to push the government and the AMISOM forces into the sea in a large offensive referred to as the Ramadan Offensive, but AMISOM held their ground and eventually fought back. One of the main turning points of the conflict appeared at the end of July and beginning of August 2011, where combined AMISOM and government forces managed to push Al Shabaab out of Mogadishu, leaving the group wiht only limited footholds in the north and east of the capital.
The present collection depicts the fighting on the first two days of the offensive, where AMISOM and government forces attacked the Bakara Market in the attempt to dislodge the group from it main stronghold in the city.  

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 15
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
26 Apr 2015

'Fodoy' (right) orders food to the cook of Foni Restaurant, a business in Raval area, Barcelona, specialized in Gambian food. 'Fodoy' is a nickname for this migrant from Gambia, who arrived to Barcelona in 2007 without residence permit. He fled the country due to political prosecution and departed in a boat to Canary Islands. Then, the Spanish authorities reallocated him to Valencia and then to Barcelona. His asylum request has been blocked until 2017 due to having been condemned for drugs dealing. Until then, he is struggling to find accommodation and to have income to survive, although organizations such as CCAR assist him from time to time.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 14
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
26 Apr 2015

'Fodoy' rolls a cigarette after lunch in Foni Restaurant, located in Raval area, Barcelona, run by Gambian cooks and specialized in Gambian food. 'Fodoy' is a nickname for this migrant from Gambia, who arrived to Barcelona in 2007 without residence permit. He fled the country due to political prosecution and departed in a boat to Canary Islands. Then, the Spanish authorities reallocated him to Valencia and then to Barcelona. His asylum request has been blocked until 2017 due to having been condemned for drugs dealing. Until then, he is struggling to find accommodation and to have income to survive, although organizations such as CCAR assist him from time to time.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 08
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
26 Apr 2015

'Fodoy' is a nickname for this migrant from Gambia, who arrived to Barcelona in 2007 without residence permit. He fled the country due to political prosecution and departed in a boat to Canary Islands. Then, the Spanish authorities reallocated him to Valencia and then to Barcelona. His asylum request has been blocked until 2017 due to having been condemned for drugs dealing. Until then, he is struggling to find accommodation and to have income to survive, although organizations such as CCAR assist him from time to time.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 16
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
26 Apr 2015

'Fodoy' rests in Ciutadilla parc, in Barcelona. 'Fodoy' is a nickname for this migrant from Gambia, who arrived to Barcelona in 2007 without residence permit. He fled the country due to political prosecution and departed in a boat to Canary Islands. Then, the Spanish authorities reallocated him to Valencia and then to Barcelona. His asylum request has been blocked until 2017 due to having been condemned for drugs dealing. Until then, he is struggling to find accommodation and to have income to survive, although organizations such as CCAR assist him from time to time.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 12
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
22 Apr 2015

'Fodoy', from Gambia, attends practicals lessons of sewing by the owner (left) of a workshop in Barcelona, Spain. He has experience as a tailor back in his country and he wants to develop his skills. 'Fodoy' is a nickname for this migrant from Gambia, who arrived to Barcelona in 2007 without residence permit. He fled the country due to political prosecution and departed in a boat to Canary Islands. Then, the Spanish authorities reallocated him to Valencia and then to Barcelona. His asylum request has been blocked until 2017 due to having been condemned for drugs dealing. Until then, he is struggling to find accommodation and to have income to survive, although organizations such as CCAR assist him from time to time.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 13
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
22 Apr 2015

'Fodoy', from Gambia, attends practicals lessons of sewing in a workshop in Barcelona, Spain. He has experience as a tailor back in his country and he wants to develop his skills. 'Fodoy' is a nickname for this migrant from Gambia, who arrived to Barcelona in 2007 without residence permit. He fled the country due to political prosecution and departed in a boat to Canary Islands. Then, the Spanish authorities reallocated him to Valencia and then to Barcelona. His asylum request has been blocked until 2017 due to having been condemned for drugs dealing. Until then, he is struggling to find accommodation and to have income to survive, although organizations such as CCAR assist him from time to time.

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Sudan: The Ancient Nubian Pyramids at...
Meroe
By sorinfurcoi
21 Apr 2015

More than 200km from the Sudanese capital Khartoum, the remains of an ancient city rise from the arid and inhospitable terrain like a science-fiction film set. Nestled between sand dunes, the secluded pyramids seem to have been forgotten by the modern world, with no nearby restaurants or hotels to cater to tourists. The Nubian Meroe pyramids, much smaller but just as impressive as the more famous Egyptian ones, are found on the east bank of the Nile river, near a group of villages called Bagrawiyah. The pyramids get their name from the ancient city of Meroe, the capital of the Kingdom of Kush, an ancient African kingdom situated in what is now the Republic of Sudan. Around 1000 BCE, after the fall of the 24th Egyptian dynasty, the Nubian Kingdom of Kush arose as the leading power in the middle Nile region. The Kushite kings took over and ruled much of Egypt from 712 to 657 BCE. In 300 BCE, when the capital and royal burial ground of the kingdom moved to the Meroe region, the pharaonic tradition of building pyramids to encapsulate the tombs of rulers continued here.

FULL ARTICLE AVAILABLE ON REQUEST

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Europe-bound Migrants Held in Libyan ...
Misrata
By Mohamed Lagha
20 Apr 2015

Misrata, Libya
April 21, 2015

Dozens of men, women and children are held in deplorable conditions in a jail in Misrata, controlled by the security forces loyal to the Islamist Libyan government in Tripoli. The detainees who appear in this video, most of whom come from east African countries, were caught in Libya on their way to try to reach Europe. An office that controls immigration is deporting the detainees to their countries through their countries’ embassies in Tunisia. However, Somalian and Eritrean detainees cannot return because of the instability plaguing their countries. Some of them have been in this prison for five months.

An interviewed female detainee from Eritrea, who introduced herself as Yodit, said that she was arrested with her cousin and other immigrants in the Libyan desert as they were heading to Europe. The group had started their clandestine journey in Khartoum, Sudan. Yodit said that they spent one month on the road before being arrested. By the time of the interview, she had spent two weeks in custody and was worried that her family back home might think that she was dead. The woman, who appears to be in her twenties, also complained that the detention center is overcrowded and lacks proper ventilation.

Various shots of detainees.

TRANSCRIPT
Soundbite (Arabic/English, Woman) Yodit, Female Eritrean detainee

00:48 – 04:14

"Q: What is your name? [Arabic]

A: What? [Arabic]

Q: Your name. [Arabic]

A: Yodit.

Q: How long have you been here?

A: Just one week.

Q: One week?

A: Yeah.

Q: Where are you from?

A: From Eritrea.

Q: You came by… the desert?

A: Yeah, the desert.

Q: How exactly? Through which country?

A: By the Khartoum to the Libya desert. [UNINTELLIGIBLE] When [we] came here, they catch us.

Q: Where?

A: In the desert of Libya.

Q: Where?

A: In Libya, but the place exactly, what it’s called…. I don’t know.

Q: In the desert, or a gate?

A: Desert, desert.

Q: The desert?

A: Yeah.

Q: Is it near from here?

A: I think [it is] far.

Q: One hour? Two hours? How much time?

A: Four hours from here.

Q: And then what are you doing here? What did they tell you?

A: We want to travel to Europe. So they catch us, they arrest us… even before here, just one week another place, the place which kept us. We came also here one week. That means two weeks under arrest. So they… you see they are stand up all night here. The [UNINTELLIGIBLE] is bad It smells bad all night. There is no air. The place is bad, really. [UNINTELLIGIBLE]The condition is bad, seriously.

Q: What did they tell you? Did they tell you that they are going out? Did they call your embassy?

A: No. No phone. We families don’t know where we are.

Q: They didn’t call your families?

A: Yeah. Because we don’t have a phone here. So no one knows where they are. I don’t know. Maybe our families they think [we] die or something.

Q: You are here alone? You don’t have any family here?

A: She’s my cousin. So we are two.

Q: Now you are here for one week.

A: Here. But another place also one week. The way…. but one month is in the way in the desert. We are hungry, there is no water, there is no anything. We were about to die. But that is good, they save us and keep us here. But I don’t know [UNINTELLIGIBLE] about time I don’t know anything.

Q: Thank you.

A: You’re welcome. Thank you, too.”

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The Horror of War - Somalia
Lafole, Somalia
By Noe Falk Nielsen
16 Apr 2015

A Medic sees the fireball followed by thick billowing smoke from a helicopter heading south from Mogadishu. As she calls it in the incident has already been reported to HQ and an AMISOM Quick Reaction Force has been mobilized. The convoy moves aggressively through the congested streets of Mogadishu heading out of the capital towards Lafole 20 kilometres away. We reach the site of the incident 50 minutes after an Al Shabaab operative detonated his car bomb. The suicide bomber was targeting an AMISOM Armoured Personnel Carrier, which was scorched and incapacitated, but otherwise fine, and all the passengers could exit the vehicle by own means. This was, however, not the case for the two civilian minibuses located on the other side of the car bomb as it detonated. When we arrive the wrecks of the two busses are still smoldering, while cans of food litter the surrounding area some having exploded spilling their mangy content due to the intense heat. One mini bus has been sent 20 meters off the road by the explosion and is left as a burning wreck, while the charred bodies and interior continue to smolder. Next to the bus lies the remains of a woman, whose white teeth are clearly visible in the charred face, as she lies half covered in car parts with her hands up to protect her face. At her feet lies another body, this one of a man whose skin has been burned clear off lying entangled in the remains of the bus half way out of the passenger cabin. Inside the cabin are the remains of at least six people of which at least four were children. The remains are too small to be adults. In the back of the burned out bus sits the remains of a child, where only the top of the torso is left. The top of the skull has been sawn clean off and lies below the seat. Another body lies on a seat and consists of a very small skull and a small pile of ashes. A third is nothing but a charred skeleton entangled with the remains of the interior of the bus. The smell of burned meat and rubber is heavy and sickening and lingers over the entire area. A bit of charred meat and bloody clothes lie on the ground some 30 meters away. Back on the road the other bus is left a short distance down the road. The bus was mostly hit from behind and was luckily not a passenger bus, but carried provisions. Next to it lies the remains of the suicide bombers vehicle, which by now is nothing more than unrecognizable junk. Spectators move about and inspect the scene of destruction. Death fascinates. The body of the woman outside of the first bus is photographed and inspected. An older Somali man uses his cane to point out the remains of a child to another man. Others stand around and watch. Covering their noses and mouths to avoid the stench. More photos are taken. Some take selfies. I photograph it all. The spectacle is terribly and tragic. At least 12 were killed and 27 injured. All civilians. Statistics in the real world.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 09
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
13 Apr 2015

German Acevedo, 23, from La Paz province, El Salvador, prepares the lunch for his other 10 housemates from Fundacio Putxet, in Barcelona.
German arrived to Europe in summer 2012, running away from the gangs ("pandilleros") in San Salvador. The Spanish Government rejected his asylum request, but he is remaining in the country and attending courses to becomes a social worker in the future. He does not want to go back to El Salvador because he is afraid of being killed by the gangs.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 11
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
13 Apr 2015

German Acevedo, 23, from La Paz, El Salvador, chats with the cook Marifa in the kitchen, during the preparation of the lunch for his other 10 housemates from Fundacio Putxet, in Barcelona.
German arrived to Europe in summer 2012, running away from the gangs ("pandilleros") in San Salvador. The Spanish Government rejected his asylum request, but he is remaining in the country and attending courses to becomes a social worker in the future. He does not want to go back to El Salvador because he is afraid of being killed by the gangs.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 10
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
13 Apr 2015

German Acevedo (back left), 23, from El Salvador, shares the lunch with (back center and right) Saihou and Houssein, two of his 10 housemates from Fundacio Putxet, in Barcelona, and (foreground) two staff members.
German arrived to Europe in summer 2012, running away from the gangs ("pandilleros") in San Salvador. The Spanish government rejected his asylum request, but he is remaining in the country and attending courses to becomes a social worker in the future. He does not want to go back to El Salvador because he is afraid of being killed by the gangs.

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Child Labor in Bangladesh 09
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Anik Rahman
10 Apr 2015

Two children are carrying grass to sell in a local market.

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Miss Mama Kilo 2015 16
Brazzaville
By Patrick
04 Apr 2015

DRC contestants Soudi Fatou (left) and Thethe Ntumba talk backstage between acts.

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Miss Mama Kilo 2015 17
Brazzaville
By Patrick
04 Apr 2015

Stella gets her make up done for the “native” part of the event, where music from all 5 countries is played.

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Miss Mama Kilo 2015 18
Brazzaville
By Patrick
04 Apr 2015

One of the many wardrobe changes that take place during the event.

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Miss Mama Kilo 2015 19
Brazzaville
By Patrick
04 Apr 2015

The view from backstage as participants in Miss Mama Kilo 2015 enter the stage.

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Miss Mama Kilo 2015 20
Brazzaville
By Patrick
04 Apr 2015

The "native" performance is the last act contestants have to perform alone in front judges and a packed crowd.

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Miss Mama Kilo 2015 21
Brazzaville
By Patrick
04 Apr 2015

Soudi Fatou dances during the native performance. This year's jury came from Mali, Ivory Coast and Benin.

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Miss Mama Kilo 2015 22
Brazzaville
By Patrick
04 Apr 2015

Nelly Okombi, from Republic of Congo, won the 7th edition of Miss Mama Kilo. As the new Miss Mama Kilo, she gets a weekend trip to Paris offered by one of the sponsors. This is Congo's third crown in seven years, but all of the contestants received cash prizes regardless of the their result.

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Miss Mama Kilo 2015 10
Brazzaville
By Patrick
03 Apr 2015

Preparations continue until the day of the event at the Olympic Palace Hotel.

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Miss Mama Kilo 2015 11
Brazzaville
By Patrick
03 Apr 2015

The event starts at 19H00, however contestants arrive early in the morning to get their hair and make up done.

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Miss Mama Kilo 2015 12
Brazzaville
By Patrick
03 Apr 2015

Two contestants help each other prepare their hair in the backstage area of Miss Mama Kilo 2015.

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Miss Mama Kilo 2015 13
Brazzaville
By Patrick
03 Apr 2015

Make up artists work all night on the day of Miss Mama Kilo. The event has 6 wardrobe changes, and contestants' makeup has to match each style.

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Miss Mama Kilo 2015 14
Brazzaville
By Patrick
03 Apr 2015

Stella waits with the other contestants in anticipation, just moments before going on stage.

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Miss Mama Kilo 2015 15
Brazzaville
By Patrick
03 Apr 2015

All 18 contestants carry their countries' flags. Republic of Congo was the most represented with five contestants.

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Miss Mama Kilo 2015 23
Brazzaville
By Patrick
03 Apr 2015

Nelly Okombi from Congo took home the title of Miss Mama Kilo 2015.

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Miss Mama Kilo 2015 07
Brazzaville
By Patrick
02 Apr 2015

The last rehearsal takes place at the Olympic Palace Hotel the day before the ceremony.

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Miss Mama Kilo 2015 08
Brazzaville
By Patrick
02 Apr 2015

Magalie Opangot from Republic of Congo (left) and Jenny Elongo from Central African Republic share a moment together during rehearsal. It´s the third time they participate side by side in Miss Mama Kilo.

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Miss Mama Kilo 2015 09
Brazzaville
By Patrick
02 Apr 2015

Rosine surveys the runway during the last rehearsal at the Continental Palace Hotel. She directs contestants with a firm hand at all times.

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Nigerian Election: Buhari Gives Victo...
Abuja
By Chima NWANKWO
01 Apr 2015

It was a sheer carnival in Abuja, Nigeria as General Muhammadu Buhari gave his victory speech after winning the 2015 Presidential elections in Nigeria. Buhari was magnanimous in victory, and made it clear that it was the Nigerian people who had voted him into office.

On the 1st of April, 2015 General Muhammadu Buhari defeated President Goodluck Jonathan in one of Nigeria's most tense elections. The vote had been postponed amid Nigeria's fight against Boko Haram, with many claiming that this was a tactic by current President Jonathan to make gains against the militant group in order to bolster his campaign.

This marks Buhari's second turn as Head of State, having ruled Nigeria as a military dictator between 1983-1985.

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Miss Mama Kilo 2015 05
Brazzaville
By Patrick
01 Apr 2015

Stella Amoussou, from Porto Novo, Benin, runs a little cosmetic shop in Brazzaville with her family.

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Miss Mama Kilo 2015 06
Brazzaville
By Patrick
01 Apr 2015

Julie Mangono, a comedian from Kinshasa, and Stella are close. Miss Mama Kilo has a friendly atmosphere where contestants always help each other out.

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Miss Mama Kilo 2015 01
Brazzaville
By Patrick
26 Mar 2015

This year´s edition drew contestants from five countries: Republic of Congo, Democratic Republic of Congo, Angola, Benin and the Central African Republic.

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Miss Mama Kilo 2015 04
Brazzaville
By Patrick
26 Mar 2015

Stella Amoussou is from Porto Novo, Benin. She moved to Brazzaville 15 years ago. Rosine approached her in the street and asked her to be part of this year´s Miss Mama Kilo.

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Northern Nigeria's Displaced Fear Ret...
Yola, Niger
By jfaden
25 Mar 2015

The Nigerian Army with the collaboration of foreign mercenaries are recording victories and declaring more and more towns captured from the hands of Boko Haram, however the question still remains if it is really safe for the residents of those towns to go back.

The about 1.5 million displaced people scattered in different locations in and outside Nigeria believe it is too early for them to go back as they have lost everything. To return and start a new life before the rainy season in June would prove a serious challenge.

As the presidential election draws closer, the question of voters' safety on polling day remains unanswered as some parts of Borno State have seen fresh attacks and suicide bombings of recent.

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Miss Mama Kilo 2015 02
Brazzaville
By Patrick
25 Mar 2015

Contestants rehearse twice a week at Rosine´s restaurant in Brazzaville.

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Miss Mama Kilo 2015 03
Brazzaville
By Patrick
25 Mar 2015

Rehearsals become an attraction in the neighbourhood.

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Child Labor In Bangladesh
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Anik Rahman
23 Mar 2015

Child labor in Bangladesh is common, with 4.7 million or 12.6% of children aged below 14 in the work force. Out of the child laborers engaged in the work force, 83% are employed in rural areas and 17% are employed in urban areas. Employment ranges from brick fields, garbage collecting, street hawker, different factories etc. In 2006, Bangladesh passed a Labor Law setting the minimum legal age for employment as 14. Nevertheless, the enforcement of such labor laws is virtually impossible in Bangladesh because 93% of child laborers are employed at this moment. The main reason is poverty. Due to poverty most of the parents can’t afford to send their children to school. Resulting, children are adopting child labor to contribute to their family and for their future as well.