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Female Migrant Workers Overcome Chall...
Beirut, Lebanon
By Transterra Editor
07 Jan 2014

Migrant workers in Lebanon have little protection under current labor laws, leaving them vulnerable to exploitation. Many of Lebanon’s estimated 200,000 domestic workers who come to the country for work often face extremely challenging living and working conditions. The Human Rights Watch estimated that in 2008, an average of one domestic worker died in Lebanon per week. Most of these deaths are a result of suicides or attempts to escape their employers. Even when they manage to escape, once their contract is broken, they no longer have identification documents and can end up in an even more deplorable situation.

But despite the challenges and dire situations for a majority of migrant domestic workers, some of them done incredible things in Lebanon with their personal strength and the support of their network in the country. Women like Rahel Zegeye, who is a domestic worker by day and a filmmaker/artist by night, or Rahel Abebe, who started a catering service for Ethiopian food in Lebanon’s capital of Beirut, and was Lebanon's first migrant worker to have a lawsuit filed on her behalf against discrimination, are some of the women who have come the Middle East as migrant workers and thrived.

Photos by Omar Alkalouti
Text by Melissa Tabeek

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Migrant Workers of Lebanon 2
Beirut, Lebanon
By Osie Greenway
31 Dec 2013

Masaret, 28, sits in the room provided for her by the old couple she works with. Though she desperately misses her family, she has grown to love the couple she has lived with for more than seven years, and is grateful to have the opportunity to put her late sister's two children through school, and be able provide them housing and clothes. She sends nearly all of her money home to Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, every month.

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Observance of International Labor Day...
Lahore, Pakistan
By Murtaza Syed
30 Apr 2013

A laborer recovers metal pieces from the soil, working hard to ensure that his children will have a good day’s meal.

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Observance of International Labor Day...
Lahore, Pakistan
By Murtaza Syed
30 Apr 2013

A laborer separates metal from soil with the help of a small magnet.

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Observance of International Labor Day...
Lahore, Pakistan
By Murtaza Syed
30 Apr 2013

"Black and Bold"- A labourer holds out his discolored and calloused hands which have endured years of hard shifts at the metal polishing factory.

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Observance of International Labor Day...
Lahore, Pakistan
By Murtaza Syed
30 Apr 2013

"A rusty affair"- A worker covers his face with a piece of cloth while working at a metal polishing factory during International Labour Day in Lahore, Pakistan. Many laborers throughout the country often work under difficult and dangerous circumstances without using proper safety equipment.

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Observance of International Labor Day...
Lahore, Pakistan
By Murtaza Syed
30 Apr 2013

Rhemat, a laborer in a metal polishing factory, spares a moment from work to pose for the camera.

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Observance of International Labor Day...
Pakistan,Lahore
By Murtaza Syed
30 Apr 2013

A labourer separates metal from soil with the help of a small magnet.

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Observance of International Labor Day...
Lahore, Pakistan
By Murtaza Syed
30 Apr 2013

A job notice is displayed outside a factory to attract new recruits. The daily income of labourers is set at one dollar per day, equaling to $60 per month.

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Observance of International Labor Day...
Lahore, Pakistan
By Murtaza Syed
30 Apr 2013

Rehmat, age 30, manages to flash a bright smile despite years of working in harsh conditions at the metal factory.

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Made in Bangladesh (23 of 23)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
01 Apr 2013

Bangladesh’s garment industry is responsible for nearly 80% of the country’s exports – mainly to Europe and the United States – and therefore the single greatest source of economic growth.

An estimated number of two to three million people are employed in more than 4,000 factories all over the country, not including the thousands of sub-suppliers. About 80% of the working force are women. Although violating national law sub-suppliers often still employ children under the age of 14.

Workers are reliant on the engagement to support their families. Jobs are highly underpaid – most factories pay the maximum of 1,500-2,000 Taka (about 15 – 20 Euros) per month. Labor time is up to 12 hours a day, 6 days a week.

Several clothing buyers asked the Bangladeshi government to raise the minimum wages but factory owners argue that they will not be competitive against Vietnam, China and other big producers if they raise wages and therefore would have to close their factories and discharge all their employees.

As people are reliant on their jobs they are still willing to work even if underpaid. Continuous riots by textile workers break out – leading to short-term shutdowns and often to injuries and fatalities among workers. It is unlikely that either the international clothing companies nor the local Bangladeshi factory owners will bear the costs of raised wages.

A change of the situation will only be achieved if consumers are aware of the social inequity and put pressure on the companies involved.

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Made in Bangladesh (22 of 23)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
01 Apr 2013

Bangladesh’s garment industry is responsible for nearly 80% of the country’s exports – mainly to Europe and the United States – and therefore the single greatest source of economic growth.

An estimated number of two to three million people are employed in more than 4,000 factories all over the country, not including the thousands of sub-suppliers. About 80% of the working force are women. Although violating national law sub-suppliers often still employ children under the age of 14.

Workers are reliant on the engagement to support their families. Jobs are highly underpaid – most factories pay the maximum of 1,500-2,000 Taka (about 15 – 20 Euros) per month. Labor time is up to 12 hours a day, 6 days a week.

Several clothing buyers asked the Bangladeshi government to raise the minimum wages but factory owners argue that they will not be competitive against Vietnam, China and other big producers if they raise wages and therefore would have to close their factories and discharge all their employees.

As people are reliant on their jobs they are still willing to work even if underpaid. Continuous riots by textile workers break out – leading to short-term shutdowns and often to injuries and fatalities among workers. It is unlikely that either the international clothing companies nor the local Bangladeshi factory owners will bear the costs of raised wages.

A change of the situation will only be achieved if consumers are aware of the social inequity and put pressure on the companies involved.

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Made in Bangladesh (21 of 23)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
01 Apr 2013

Bangladesh’s garment industry is responsible for nearly 80% of the country’s exports – mainly to Europe and the United States – and therefore the single greatest source of economic growth.

An estimated number of two to three million people are employed in more than 4,000 factories all over the country, not including the thousands of sub-suppliers. About 80% of the working force are women. Although violating national law sub-suppliers often still employ children under the age of 14.

Workers are reliant on the engagement to support their families. Jobs are highly underpaid – most factories pay the maximum of 1,500-2,000 Taka (about 15 – 20 Euros) per month. Labor time is up to 12 hours a day, 6 days a week.

Several clothing buyers asked the Bangladeshi government to raise the minimum wages but factory owners argue that they will not be competitive against Vietnam, China and other big producers if they raise wages and therefore would have to close their factories and discharge all their employees.

As people are reliant on their jobs they are still willing to work even if underpaid. Continuous riots by textile workers break out – leading to short-term shutdowns and often to injuries and fatalities among workers. It is unlikely that either the international clothing companies nor the local Bangladeshi factory owners will bear the costs of raised wages.

A change of the situation will only be achieved if consumers are aware of the social inequity and put pressure on the companies involved.

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Made in Bangladesh (20 of 23)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
01 Apr 2013

Bangladesh’s garment industry is responsible for nearly 80% of the country’s exports – mainly to Europe and the United States – and therefore the single greatest source of economic growth.

An estimated number of two to three million people are employed in more than 4,000 factories all over the country, not including the thousands of sub-suppliers. About 80% of the working force are women. Although violating national law sub-suppliers often still employ children under the age of 14.

Workers are reliant on the engagement to support their families. Jobs are highly underpaid – most factories pay the maximum of 1,500-2,000 Taka (about 15 – 20 Euros) per month. Labor time is up to 12 hours a day, 6 days a week.

Several clothing buyers asked the Bangladeshi government to raise the minimum wages but factory owners argue that they will not be competitive against Vietnam, China and other big producers if they raise wages and therefore would have to close their factories and discharge all their employees.

As people are reliant on their jobs they are still willing to work even if underpaid. Continuous riots by textile workers break out – leading to short-term shutdowns and often to injuries and fatalities among workers. It is unlikely that either the international clothing companies nor the local Bangladeshi factory owners will bear the costs of raised wages.

A change of the situation will only be achieved if consumers are aware of the social inequity and put pressure on the companies involved.

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Made in Bangladesh (19 of 23)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
01 Apr 2013

Bangladesh’s garment industry is responsible for nearly 80% of the country’s exports – mainly to Europe and the United States – and therefore the single greatest source of economic growth.

An estimated number of two to three million people are employed in more than 4,000 factories all over the country, not including the thousands of sub-suppliers. About 80% of the working force are women. Although violating national law sub-suppliers often still employ children under the age of 14.

Workers are reliant on the engagement to support their families. Jobs are highly underpaid – most factories pay the maximum of 1,500-2,000 Taka (about 15 – 20 Euros) per month. Labor time is up to 12 hours a day, 6 days a week.

Several clothing buyers asked the Bangladeshi government to raise the minimum wages but factory owners argue that they will not be competitive against Vietnam, China and other big producers if they raise wages and therefore would have to close their factories and discharge all their employees.

As people are reliant on their jobs they are still willing to work even if underpaid. Continuous riots by textile workers break out – leading to short-term shutdowns and often to injuries and fatalities among workers. It is unlikely that either the international clothing companies nor the local Bangladeshi factory owners will bear the costs of raised wages.

A change of the situation will only be achieved if consumers are aware of the social inequity and put pressure on the companies involved.

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Made in Bangladesh (17 of 23)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
01 Apr 2013

Bangladesh’s garment industry is responsible for nearly 80% of the country’s exports – mainly to Europe and the United States – and therefore the single greatest source of economic growth.

An estimated number of two to three million people are employed in more than 4,000 factories all over the country, not including the thousands of sub-suppliers. About 80% of the working force are women. Although violating national law sub-suppliers often still employ children under the age of 14.

Workers are reliant on the engagement to support their families. Jobs are highly underpaid – most factories pay the maximum of 1,500-2,000 Taka (about 15 – 20 Euros) per month. Labor time is up to 12 hours a day, 6 days a week.

Several clothing buyers asked the Bangladeshi government to raise the minimum wages but factory owners argue that they will not be competitive against Vietnam, China and other big producers if they raise wages and therefore would have to close their factories and discharge all their employees.

As people are reliant on their jobs they are still willing to work even if underpaid. Continuous riots by textile workers break out – leading to short-term shutdowns and often to injuries and fatalities among workers. It is unlikely that either the international clothing companies nor the local Bangladeshi factory owners will bear the costs of raised wages.

A change of the situation will only be achieved if consumers are aware of the social inequity and put pressure on the companies involved.

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Made in Bangladesh (16 of 23)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
01 Apr 2013

Bangladesh’s garment industry is responsible for nearly 80% of the country’s exports – mainly to Europe and the United States – and therefore the single greatest source of economic growth.

An estimated number of two to three million people are employed in more than 4,000 factories all over the country, not including the thousands of sub-suppliers. About 80% of the working force are women. Although violating national law sub-suppliers often still employ children under the age of 14.

Workers are reliant on the engagement to support their families. Jobs are highly underpaid – most factories pay the maximum of 1,500-2,000 Taka (about 15 – 20 Euros) per month. Labor time is up to 12 hours a day, 6 days a week.

Several clothing buyers asked the Bangladeshi government to raise the minimum wages but factory owners argue that they will not be competitive against Vietnam, China and other big producers if they raise wages and therefore would have to close their factories and discharge all their employees.

As people are reliant on their jobs they are still willing to work even if underpaid. Continuous riots by textile workers break out – leading to short-term shutdowns and often to injuries and fatalities among workers. It is unlikely that either the international clothing companies nor the local Bangladeshi factory owners will bear the costs of raised wages.

A change of the situation will only be achieved if consumers are aware of the social inequity and put pressure on the companies involved.

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Made in Bangladesh (15 of 23)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
01 Apr 2013

Bangladesh’s garment industry is responsible for nearly 80% of the country’s exports – mainly to Europe and the United States – and therefore the single greatest source of economic growth.

An estimated number of two to three million people are employed in more than 4,000 factories all over the country, not including the thousands of sub-suppliers. About 80% of the working force are women. Although violating national law sub-suppliers often still employ children under the age of 14.

Workers are reliant on the engagement to support their families. Jobs are highly underpaid – most factories pay the maximum of 1,500-2,000 Taka (about 15 – 20 Euros) per month. Labor time is up to 12 hours a day, 6 days a week.

Several clothing buyers asked the Bangladeshi government to raise the minimum wages but factory owners argue that they will not be competitive against Vietnam, China and other big producers if they raise wages and therefore would have to close their factories and discharge all their employees.

As people are reliant on their jobs they are still willing to work even if underpaid. Continuous riots by textile workers break out – leading to short-term shutdowns and often to injuries and fatalities among workers. It is unlikely that either the international clothing companies nor the local Bangladeshi factory owners will bear the costs of raised wages.

A change of the situation will only be achieved if consumers are aware of the social inequity and put pressure on the companies involved.

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Made in Bangladesh (14 of 23)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
01 Apr 2013

Bangladesh’s garment industry is responsible for nearly 80% of the country’s exports – mainly to Europe and the United States – and therefore the single greatest source of economic growth.

An estimated number of two to three million people are employed in more than 4,000 factories all over the country, not including the thousands of sub-suppliers. About 80% of the working force are women. Although violating national law sub-suppliers often still employ children under the age of 14.

Workers are reliant on the engagement to support their families. Jobs are highly underpaid – most factories pay the maximum of 1,500-2,000 Taka (about 15 – 20 Euros) per month. Labor time is up to 12 hours a day, 6 days a week.

Several clothing buyers asked the Bangladeshi government to raise the minimum wages but factory owners argue that they will not be competitive against Vietnam, China and other big producers if they raise wages and therefore would have to close their factories and discharge all their employees.

As people are reliant on their jobs they are still willing to work even if underpaid. Continuous riots by textile workers break out – leading to short-term shutdowns and often to injuries and fatalities among workers. It is unlikely that either the international clothing companies nor the local Bangladeshi factory owners will bear the costs of raised wages.

A change of the situation will only be achieved if consumers are aware of the social inequity and put pressure on the companies involved.

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Made in Bangladesh (13 of 23)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
01 Apr 2013

Bangladesh’s garment industry is responsible for nearly 80% of the country’s exports – mainly to Europe and the United States – and therefore the single greatest source of economic growth.

An estimated number of two to three million people are employed in more than 4,000 factories all over the country, not including the thousands of sub-suppliers. About 80% of the working force are women. Although violating national law sub-suppliers often still employ children under the age of 14.

Workers are reliant on the engagement to support their families. Jobs are highly underpaid – most factories pay the maximum of 1,500-2,000 Taka (about 15 – 20 Euros) per month. Labor time is up to 12 hours a day, 6 days a week.

Several clothing buyers asked the Bangladeshi government to raise the minimum wages but factory owners argue that they will not be competitive against Vietnam, China and other big producers if they raise wages and therefore would have to close their factories and discharge all their employees.

As people are reliant on their jobs they are still willing to work even if underpaid. Continuous riots by textile workers break out – leading to short-term shutdowns and often to injuries and fatalities among workers. It is unlikely that either the international clothing companies nor the local Bangladeshi factory owners will bear the costs of raised wages.

A change of the situation will only be achieved if consumers are aware of the social inequity and put pressure on the companies involved.

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Made in Bangladesh (12 of 23)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
01 Apr 2013

Bangladesh’s garment industry is responsible for nearly 80% of the country’s exports – mainly to Europe and the United States – and therefore the single greatest source of economic growth.

An estimated number of two to three million people are employed in more than 4,000 factories all over the country, not including the thousands of sub-suppliers. About 80% of the working force are women. Although violating national law sub-suppliers often still employ children under the age of 14.

Workers are reliant on the engagement to support their families. Jobs are highly underpaid – most factories pay the maximum of 1,500-2,000 Taka (about 15 – 20 Euros) per month. Labor time is up to 12 hours a day, 6 days a week.

Several clothing buyers asked the Bangladeshi government to raise the minimum wages but factory owners argue that they will not be competitive against Vietnam, China and other big producers if they raise wages and therefore would have to close their factories and discharge all their employees.

As people are reliant on their jobs they are still willing to work even if underpaid. Continuous riots by textile workers break out – leading to short-term shutdowns and often to injuries and fatalities among workers. It is unlikely that either the international clothing companies nor the local Bangladeshi factory owners will bear the costs of raised wages.

A change of the situation will only be achieved if consumers are aware of the social inequity and put pressure on the companies involved.

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Made in Bangladesh (18 of 23)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
31 Mar 2013

Bangladesh’s garment industry is responsible for nearly 80% of the country’s exports – mainly to Europe and the United States – and therefore the single greatest source of economic growth.

An estimated number of two to three million people are employed in more than 4,000 factories all over the country, not including the thousands of sub-suppliers. About 80% of the working force are women. Although violating national law sub-suppliers often still employ children under the age of 14.

Workers are reliant on the engagement to support their families. Jobs are highly underpaid – most factories pay the maximum of 1,500-2,000 Taka (about 15 – 20 Euros) per month. Labor time is up to 12 hours a day, 6 days a week.

Several clothing buyers asked the Bangladeshi government to raise the minimum wages but factory owners argue that they will not be competitive against Vietnam, China and other big producers if they raise wages and therefore would have to close their factories and discharge all their employees.

As people are reliant on their jobs they are still willing to work even if underpaid. Continuous riots by textile workers break out – leading to short-term shutdowns and often to injuries and fatalities among workers. It is unlikely that either the international clothing companies nor the local Bangladeshi factory owners will bear the costs of raised wages.

A change of the situation will only be achieved if consumers are aware of the social inequity and put pressure on the companies involved.

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Hunger Strike at Telefonica (2 of 8)
Barcelona, Spain
By Francesc Xavier Subias Salvo
18 Nov 2012

Five employees of Telefónica (Movistar) are on the 27th day of a hunger strike to protest the dismissal of an employee, demanding reinstatement of the worker, but the company refuses to negotiate. The employee was fired from the company in 2010 after a herniated disc; the company justified his dismissal under the labor reform of Zapatero, that allows a worker to be let go after missing 20% of work hours within a four month period.

The first court stated that the worker appealed the dismissal last year so Andres Marcos Armenteros returned for a few months to Telefónica, but the company turned to the Superior Tribunal of Justice of Catalonia which determined that the worker should be compensated but his readmission is at the discretion of the company.

Marcos Andrés Armenteros con otros cuatro trabajadores de Telefónica (Movistar) están en huelga de hambre desde hace 27 dias en Barcelona en protesta por el despido de uno de ellos y que Telefónica echó por haber presentado varias bajas consecutivas en pocos meses durante año 2010. Los huelguistas reclaman la readmisión del trabajador, mientras que la empresa se niega a negociar.

Fue despedido de la empresa en 2010 tras varias bajas, por una hernia discal, La empresa justificó el despido acogiéndose a la reforma laboral de Zapatero, que permitía echar a un trabajador si faltaba más de un 20% del tiempo dentro de un período de cuatro meses consecutivos.

El primer tribunal al que recurrió el trabajador declaró el año pasado nulo el despido, por lo que Marcos Andrés Armenteros regresó durante unos meses a Telefónica, pero la empresa recurrió al TSJC ( Tribunal Superior de Justicia de Catalunya), que dictó improcedencia al considerar que la empresa aplicó injustamente la reforma laboral de manera retroactiva. Según esta última sentencia, el trabajador debía ser indemnizado, pero la readmisión queda a criterio de la compañía.

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Hunger Strike at Telefonica (3 of 8)
Barcelona, Spain
By Francesc Xavier Subias Salvo
18 Nov 2012

Five employees of Telefónica (Movistar) are on the 27th day of a hunger strike to protest the dismissal of an employee, demanding reinstatement of the worker, but the company refuses to negotiate. The employee was fired from the company in 2010 after a herniated disc; the company justified his dismissal under the labor reform of Zapatero, that allows a worker to be let go after missing 20% of work hours within a four month period.

The first court stated that the worker appealed the dismissal last year so Andres Marcos Armenteros returned for a few months to Telefónica, but the company turned to the Superior Tribunal of Justice of Catalonia which determined that the worker should be compensated but his readmission is at the discretion of the company.

Marcos Andrés Armenteros con otros cuatro trabajadores de Telefónica (Movistar) están en huelga de hambre desde hace 27 dias en Barcelona en protesta por el despido de uno de ellos y que Telefónica echó por haber presentado varias bajas consecutivas en pocos meses durante año 2010. Los huelguistas reclaman la readmisión del trabajador, mientras que la empresa se niega a negociar.

Fue despedido de la empresa en 2010 tras varias bajas, por una hernia discal, La empresa justificó el despido acogiéndose a la reforma laboral de Zapatero, que permitía echar a un trabajador si faltaba más de un 20% del tiempo dentro de un período de cuatro meses consecutivos.

El primer tribunal al que recurrió el trabajador declaró el año pasado nulo el despido, por lo que Marcos Andrés Armenteros regresó durante unos meses a Telefónica, pero la empresa recurrió al TSJC ( Tribunal Superior de Justicia de Catalunya), que dictó improcedencia al considerar que la empresa aplicó injustamente la reforma laboral de manera retroactiva. Según esta última sentencia, el trabajador debía ser indemnizado, pero la readmisión queda a criterio de la compañía.

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Hunger Strike at Telefonica (4 of 8)
Barcelona, Spain
By Francesc Xavier Subias Salvo
18 Nov 2012

Five employees of Telefónica (Movistar) are on the 27th day of a hunger strike to protest the dismissal of an employee, demanding reinstatement of the worker, but the company refuses to negotiate. The employee was fired from the company in 2010 after a herniated disc; the company justified his dismissal under the labor reform of Zapatero, that allows a worker to be let go after missing 20% of work hours within a four month period.

The first court stated that the worker appealed the dismissal last year so Andres Marcos Armenteros returned for a few months to Telefónica, but the company turned to the Superior Tribunal of Justice of Catalonia which determined that the worker should be compensated but his readmission is at the discretion of the company.

Marcos Andrés Armenteros con otros cuatro trabajadores de Telefónica (Movistar) están en huelga de hambre desde hace 27 dias en Barcelona en protesta por el despido de uno de ellos y que Telefónica echó por haber presentado varias bajas consecutivas en pocos meses durante año 2010. Los huelguistas reclaman la readmisión del trabajador, mientras que la empresa se niega a negociar.

Fue despedido de la empresa en 2010 tras varias bajas, por una hernia discal, La empresa justificó el despido acogiéndose a la reforma laboral de Zapatero, que permitía echar a un trabajador si faltaba más de un 20% del tiempo dentro de un período de cuatro meses consecutivos.

El primer tribunal al que recurrió el trabajador declaró el año pasado nulo el despido, por lo que Marcos Andrés Armenteros regresó durante unos meses a Telefónica, pero la empresa recurrió al TSJC ( Tribunal Superior de Justicia de Catalunya), que dictó improcedencia al considerar que la empresa aplicó injustamente la reforma laboral de manera retroactiva. Según esta última sentencia, el trabajador debía ser indemnizado, pero la readmisión queda a criterio de la compañía.

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Hunger Strike at Telefonica (5 of 8)
Barcelona, Spain
By Francesc Xavier Subias Salvo
18 Nov 2012

Five employees of Telefónica (Movistar) are on the 27th day of a hunger strike to protest the dismissal of an employee, demanding reinstatement of the worker, but the company refuses to negotiate. The employee was fired from the company in 2010 after a herniated disc; the company justified his dismissal under the labor reform of Zapatero, that allows a worker to be let go after missing 20% of work hours within a four month period.

The first court stated that the worker appealed the dismissal last year so Andres Marcos Armenteros returned for a few months to Telefónica, but the company turned to the Superior Tribunal of Justice of Catalonia which determined that the worker should be compensated but his readmission is at the discretion of the company.

Cinco trabajadores de Telefónica (Movistar) están en huelga de hambre desde hace 27 dias en Barcelona en protesta por el despido de uno de ellos y que Telefónica echó por haber presentado varias bajas consecutivas en pocos meses durante año 2010. Los huelguistas reclaman la readmisión del trabajador, mientras que la empresa se niega a negociar.

Fue despedido de la empresa en 2010 tras varias bajas, por una hernia discal, La empresa justificó el despido acogiéndose a la reforma laboral de Zapatero, que permitía echar a un trabajador si faltaba más de un 20% del tiempo dentro de un período de cuatro meses consecutivos.

El primer tribunal al que recurrió el trabajador declaró el año pasado nulo el despido, por lo que Marcos Andrés Armenteros regresó durante unos meses a Telefónica, pero la empresa recurrió al TSJC ( Tribunal Superior de Justicia de Catalunya), que dictó improcedencia al considerar que la empresa aplicó injustamente la reforma laboral de manera retroactiva. Según esta última sentencia, el trabajador debía ser indemnizado, pero la readmisión queda a criterio de la compañía.

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Hunger Strike at Telefonica (6 of 8)
Barcelona, Spain
By Francesc Xavier Subias Salvo
18 Nov 2012

Medical review of the strikers
Revision medica de los huelgistas.
Five employees of Telefónica (Movistar) are on the 27th day of a hunger strike to protest the dismissal of an employee, demanding reinstatement of the worker, but the company refuses to negotiate. The employee was fired from the company in 2010 after a herniated disc; the company justified his dismissal under the labor reform of Zapatero, that allows a worker to be let go after missing 20% of work hours within a four month period.

The first court stated that the worker appealed the dismissal last year so Andres Marcos Armenteros returned for a few months to Telefónica, but the company turned to the Superior Tribunal of Justice of Catalonia which determined that the worker should be compensated but his readmission is at the discretion of the company.

Cinco trabajadores de Telefónica (Movistar) están en huelga de hambre desde hace 27 dias en Barcelona en protesta por el despido de uno de ellos y que Telefónica echó por haber presentado varias bajas consecutivas en pocos meses durante año 2010. Los huelguistas reclaman la readmisión del trabajador, mientras que la empresa se niega a negociar.

Fue despedido de la empresa en 2010 tras varias bajas, por una hernia discal, La empresa justificó el despido acogiéndose a la reforma laboral de Zapatero, que permitía echar a un trabajador si faltaba más de un 20% del tiempo dentro de un período de cuatro meses consecutivos.

El primer tribunal al que recurrió el trabajador declaró el año pasado nulo el despido, por lo que Marcos Andrés Armenteros regresó durante unos meses a Telefónica, pero la empresa recurrió al TSJC ( Tribunal Superior de Justicia de Catalunya), que dictó improcedencia al considerar que la empresa aplicó injustamente la reforma laboral de manera retroactiva. Según esta última sentencia, el trabajador debía ser indemnizado, pero la readmisión queda a criterio de la compañía.

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Hunger Strike at Telefonica (7 of 8)
Barcelona, Spain
By Francesc Xavier Subias Salvo
18 Nov 2012

Five employees of Telefónica (Movistar) are on the 27th day of a hunger strike to protest the dismissal of an employee, demanding reinstatement of the worker, but the company refuses to negotiate. The employee was fired from the company in 2010 after a herniated disc; the company justified his dismissal under the labor reform of Zapatero, that allows a worker to be let go after missing 20% of work hours within a four month period.

The first court stated that the worker appealed the dismissal last year so Andres Marcos Armenteros returned for a few months to Telefónica, but the company turned to the Superior Tribunal of Justice of Catalonia which determined that the worker should be compensated but his readmission is at the discretion of the company.

Marcos Andrés Armenteros con otros cuatro trabajadores de Telefónica (Movistar) están en huelga de hambre desde hace 27 dias en Barcelona en protesta por el despido de uno de ellos y que Telefónica echó por haber presentado varias bajas consecutivas en pocos meses durante año 2010. Los huelguistas reclaman la readmisión del trabajador, mientras que la empresa se niega a negociar.

Fue despedido de la empresa en 2010 tras varias bajas, por una hernia discal, La empresa justificó el despido acogiéndose a la reforma laboral de Zapatero, que permitía echar a un trabajador si faltaba más de un 20% del tiempo dentro de un período de cuatro meses consecutivos.

El primer tribunal al que recurrió el trabajador declaró el año pasado nulo el despido, por lo que Marcos Andrés Armenteros regresó durante unos meses a Telefónica, pero la empresa recurrió al TSJC ( Tribunal Superior de Justicia de Catalunya), que dictó improcedencia al considerar que la empresa aplicó injustamente la reforma laboral de manera retroactiva. Según esta última sentencia, el trabajador debía ser indemnizado, pero la readmisión queda a criterio de la compañía.

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Hunger Strike at Telefonica (8 of 8)
Barcelona, Spain
By Francesc Xavier Subias Salvo
18 Nov 2012

Five employees of Telefónica (Movistar) are on the 27th day of a hunger strike to protest the dismissal of an employee, demanding reinstatement of the worker, but the company refuses to negotiate. The employee was fired from the company in 2010 after a herniated disc; the company justified his dismissal under the labor reform of Zapatero, that allows a worker to be let go after missing 20% of work hours within a four month period.

The first court stated that the worker appealed the dismissal last year so Andres Marcos Armenteros returned for a few months to Telefónica, but the company turned to the Superior Tribunal of Justice of Catalonia which determined that the worker should be compensated but his readmission is at the discretion of the company.

Cinco trabajadores de Telefónica (Movistar) están en huelga de hambre desde hace 27 dias en Barcelona en protesta por el despido de uno de ellos y que Telefónica echó por haber presentado varias bajas consecutivas en pocos meses durante año 2010. Los huelguistas reclaman la readmisión del trabajador, mientras que la empresa se niega a negociar.

Fue despedido de la empresa en 2010 tras varias bajas, por una hernia discal, La empresa justificó el despido acogiéndose a la reforma laboral de Zapatero, que permitía echar a un trabajador si faltaba más de un 20% del tiempo dentro de un período de cuatro meses consecutivos.

El primer tribunal al que recurrió el trabajador declaró el año pasado nulo el despido, por lo que Marcos Andrés Armenteros regresó durante unos meses a Telefónica, pero la empresa recurrió al TSJC ( Tribunal Superior de Justicia de Catalunya), que dictó improcedencia al considerar que la empresa aplicó injustamente la reforma laboral de manera retroactiva. Según esta última sentencia, el trabajador debía ser indemnizado, pero la readmisión queda a criterio de la compañía.

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HUNGER STRIKE IN TELEFONICA, BARCELONA
Barcelona, Spain
By Mais Istanbuli
17 Nov 2012

Five employees of Telefónica (Movistar) are on the 27th day of a hunger strike to protest the dismissal of an employee, demanding reinstatement of the worker, but the company refuses to negotiate. The employee was fired from the company in 2010 after a herniated disc; the company justified his dismissal under the labor reform of Zapatero, that allows a worker to be let go after missing 20% of work hours within a four month period.

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Made in Bangladesh
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By U.S. Editor
10 Apr 2012

Bangladesh’s garment industry, responsible for nearly 80% of the country’s exports, employs an estimated two to three million people, 80% of which are women, in over 4,000 factories all over the country. Although violating national law, some suppliers still employ children under the age of 14. Workers, reliant on their wages to support their families, are highly underpaid; most people earn approximately 1,500-2,000 Taka (15 - 20 Euros) per month while working 12 hour days, 6 days a week.

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Made in Bangladesh (6 of 23)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
10 Apr 2012

Female workers in Bangladesh's garment industry.

Bangladesh’s garment industry is responsible for nearly 80% of the country’s exports – mainly to Europe and the United States – and therefore the single greatest source of economic growth.

An estimated number of two to three million people are employed in more than 4,000 factories all over the country, not including the thousands of sub-suppliers. About 80% of the working force are women. Although violating national law sub-suppliers often still employ children under the age of 14.

Workers are reliant on the engagement to support their families. Jobs are highly underpaid – most factories pay the maximum of 1,500-2,000 Taka (about 15 – 20 Euros) per month. Labor time is up to 12 hours a day, 6 days a week.

Several clothing buyers asked the Bangladeshi government to raise the minimum wages but factory owners argue that they will not be competitive against Vietnam, China and other big producers if they raise wages and therefore would have to close their factories and discharge all their employees.

As people are reliant on their jobs they are still willing to work even if underpaid. Continuous riots by textile workers break out – leading to short-term shutdowns and often to injuries and fatalities among workers. It is unlikely that either the international clothing companies nor the local Bangladeshi factory owners will bear the costs of raised wages.

A change of the situation will only be achieved if consumers are aware of the social inequity and put pressure on the companies involved.

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Made in Bangladesh (5 of 23)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
10 Apr 2012

Child labor in Bangladesh's garment industry. In a hot and dusty room kids package jeans for export.

Bangladesh’s garment industry is responsible for nearly 80% of the country’s exports – mainly to Europe and the United States – and therefore the single greatest source of economic growth.

An estimated number of two to three million people are employed in more than 4,000 factories all over the country, not including the thousands of sub-suppliers. About 80% of the working force are women. Although violating national law sub-suppliers often still employ children under the age of 14.

Workers are reliant on the engagement to support their families. Jobs are highly underpaid – most factories pay the maximum of 1,500-2,000 Taka (about 15 – 20 Euros) per month. Labor time is up to 12 hours a day, 6 days a week.

Several clothing buyers asked the Bangladeshi government to raise the minimum wages but factory owners argue that they will not be competitive against Vietnam, China and other big producers if they raise wages and therefore would have to close their factories and discharge all their employees.

As people are reliant on their jobs they are still willing to work even if underpaid. Continuous riots by textile workers break out – leading to short-term shutdowns and often to injuries and fatalities among workers. It is unlikely that either the international clothing companies nor the local Bangladeshi factory owners will bear the costs of raised wages.

A change of the situation will only be achieved if consumers are aware of the social inequity and put pressure on the companies involved.

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Made in Bangladesh (4 of 23)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
10 Apr 2012

Young and sometimes underaged workers in Bangladesh's garment industry.

Bangladesh’s garment industry is responsible for nearly 80% of the country’s exports – mainly to Europe and the United States – and therefore the single greatest source of economic growth.

An estimated number of two to three million people are employed in more than 4,000 factories all over the country, not including the thousands of sub-suppliers. About 80% of the working force are women. Although violating national law sub-suppliers often still employ children under the age of 14.

Workers are reliant on the engagement to support their families. Jobs are highly underpaid – most factories pay the maximum of 1,500-2,000 Taka (about 15 – 20 Euros) per month. Labor time is up to 12 hours a day, 6 days a week.

Several clothing buyers asked the Bangladeshi government to raise the minimum wages but factory owners argue that they will not be competitive against Vietnam, China and other big producers if they raise wages and therefore would have to close their factories and discharge all their employees.

As people are reliant on their jobs they are still willing to work even if underpaid. Continuous riots by textile workers break out – leading to short-term shutdowns and often to injuries and fatalities among workers. It is unlikely that either the international clothing companies nor the local Bangladeshi factory owners will bear the costs of raised wages.

A change of the situation will only be achieved if consumers are aware of the social inequity and put pressure on the companies involved.

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Made in Bangladesh (3 of 23)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
10 Apr 2012

Young and sometimes underaged workers in Bangladesh's garment industry.

Bangladesh’s garment industry is responsible for nearly 80% of the country’s exports – mainly to Europe and the United States – and therefore the single greatest source of economic growth.

An estimated number of two to three million people are employed in more than 4,000 factories all over the country, not including the thousands of sub-suppliers. About 80% of the working force are women. Although violating national law sub-suppliers often still employ children under the age of 14.

Workers are reliant on the engagement to support their families. Jobs are highly underpaid – most factories pay the maximum of 1,500-2,000 Taka (about 15 – 20 Euros) per month. Labor time is up to 12 hours a day, 6 days a week.

Several clothing buyers asked the Bangladeshi government to raise the minimum wages but factory owners argue that they will not be competitive against Vietnam, China and other big producers if they raise wages and therefore would have to close their factories and discharge all their employees.

As people are reliant on their jobs they are still willing to work even if underpaid. Continuous riots by textile workers break out – leading to short-term shutdowns and often to injuries and fatalities among workers. It is unlikely that either the international clothing companies nor the local Bangladeshi factory owners will bear the costs of raised wages.

A change of the situation will only be achieved if consumers are aware of the social inequity and put pressure on the companies involved.

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Made in Bangladesh (9 of 23)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
10 Apr 2012

Worker in Dhaka's garment industry.

Bangladesh’s garment industry is responsible for nearly 80% of the country’s exports – mainly to Europe and the United States – and therefore the single greatest source of economic growth.

An estimated number of two to three million people are employed in more than 4,000 factories all over the country, not including the thousands of sub-suppliers. About 80% of the working force are women. Although violating national law sub-suppliers often still employ children under the age of 14.

Workers are reliant on the engagement to support their families. Jobs are highly underpaid – most factories pay the maximum of 1,500-2,000 Taka (about 15 – 20 Euros) per month. Labor time is up to 12 hours a day, 6 days a week.

Several clothing buyers asked the Bangladeshi government to raise the minimum wages but factory owners argue that they will not be competitive against Vietnam, China and other big producers if they raise wages and therefore would have to close their factories and discharge all their employees.

As people are reliant on their jobs they are still willing to work even if underpaid. Continuous riots by textile workers break out – leading to short-term shutdowns and often to injuries and fatalities among workers. It is unlikely that either the international clothing companies nor the local Bangladeshi factory owners will bear the costs of raised wages.

A change of the situation will only be achieved if consumers are aware of the social inequity and put pressure on the companies involved.

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Made in Bangladesh (8 of 23)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
10 Apr 2012

Underage workers in Dhaka's textile industry.

Bangladesh’s garment industry is responsible for nearly 80% of the country’s exports – mainly to Europe and the United States – and therefore the single greatest source of economic growth.

An estimated number of two to three million people are employed in more than 4,000 factories all over the country, not including the thousands of sub-suppliers. About 80% of the working force are women. Although violating national law sub-suppliers often still employ children under the age of 14.

Workers are reliant on the engagement to support their families. Jobs are highly underpaid – most factories pay the maximum of 1,500-2,000 Taka (about 15 – 20 Euros) per month. Labor time is up to 12 hours a day, 6 days a week.

Several clothing buyers asked the Bangladeshi government to raise the minimum wages but factory owners argue that they will not be competitive against Vietnam, China and other big producers if they raise wages and therefore would have to close their factories and discharge all their employees.

As people are reliant on their jobs they are still willing to work even if underpaid. Continuous riots by textile workers break out – leading to short-term shutdowns and often to injuries and fatalities among workers. It is unlikely that either the international clothing companies nor the local Bangladeshi factory owners will bear the costs of raised wages.

A change of the situation will only be achieved if consumers are aware of the social inequity and put pressure on the companies involved.

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Made in Bangladesh (7 of 23)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
10 Apr 2012

Textile workers in Bangladesh's garment industry.

Bangladesh’s garment industry is responsible for nearly 80% of the country’s exports – mainly to Europe and the United States – and therefore the single greatest source of economic growth.

An estimated number of two to three million people are employed in more than 4,000 factories all over the country, not including the thousands of sub-suppliers. About 80% of the working force are women. Although violating national law sub-suppliers often still employ children under the age of 14.

Workers are reliant on the engagement to support their families. Jobs are highly underpaid – most factories pay the maximum of 1,500-2,000 Taka (about 15 – 20 Euros) per month. Labor time is up to 12 hours a day, 6 days a week.

Several clothing buyers asked the Bangladeshi government to raise the minimum wages but factory owners argue that they will not be competitive against Vietnam, China and other big producers if they raise wages and therefore would have to close their factories and discharge all their employees.

As people are reliant on their jobs they are still willing to work even if underpaid. Continuous riots by textile workers break out – leading to short-term shutdowns and often to injuries and fatalities among workers. It is unlikely that either the international clothing companies nor the local Bangladeshi factory owners will bear the costs of raised wages.

A change of the situation will only be achieved if consumers are aware of the social inequity and put pressure on the companies involved.