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Uganda's NSSF hits 2billion dollar ma...
Kampala
By Colllins Hinamundi
28 Jan 2015

Uganda's is Eastafrica's gateway into central africa, it is at the centre of trade between more than 7 countries in the region, it has also got Eastafrica's only dollar billionaire Sudhir Ruparelia, and with the country's National social security fund portfolio hittting the 2billion dollar mark,it now has the regions largest fund. The fund is run by the ugandan government as a way of forcing workers in the private sector to save for their future and is mandated by law to collect savings from these companies on behalf of workers NSSF then INVESTS this money and pays it back with interest when the workers reach retirement age, or to their next of kin incase of death. over the last one year, the funds total assets have grown from 1.2 billion dollars to 2 billion dollars, compare to Kenya's NSSF which has an asset portfolio of 1.7Billion dollars and Tanzania that stands at 1.3 billion dollars.

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Albinism in Tanzania 03
Ilula, Iringa
By Federico Roscioli
23 Jul 2014

Ilula, Tanzania, July 23, 2014 - Sista Laurentina Bukombe doing a skin check-up during the trimestral meeting. She is a nun graduated in dermatology who is collaborating with Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Centre and Tulime Association, providing albinos with sunscreen lotion, medical check-ups and proper treatment if needed. In this area there had never been killings, so the first enemy of albinos is the sun.

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Albinism in Tanzania 02
Ilula, Iringa
By Federico Roscioli
21 Jul 2014

Ilula, Tanzania, July 21, 2014 - Alufema mends a carpet. She is one of the persons with albinism of the Kilolo District censed by the Tulime Association. There have never been killings in this area, so the first enemy of albinos is the sun. The census was fundamental in order to be able to help the albinos of the area with sunscreen cream and medical check-ups. The national census does not provide correct and actual data about albinism.

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Albinism in Tanzania 07
Ilula, Iringa
By Federico Roscioli
21 Jul 2014

Ilula, Tanzania, July 21, 2014 - Angela with one of her four children, none of whom have albinism. She is one of the persons with albinism of the Kilolo District censed by Tulime Association. There have never been killings in this area, so the first enemy of albinos is the sun. The census was fundamental in order to be able to help the albinos of the area with sunscreen cream and medical check-up. The national census does not provide correct and actual data about albinism.

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Sacrifice and Salvation: Albinism in ...
Shinyanga
By Federico Roscioli
13 Jul 2014

“I was pretending to be asleep, but I saw them cutting her throat and drinking her blood, and then cutting her arms and legs…” These are the words of Mmindi, recalling the night in December 2008 when her 5-year-old sister, Mariam, was murdered in front of her.

Mariam had albinism. In the inner regions of Sub-Saharian Africa people with albinism have a very hard life. Not only do they need to fight against the cancer-causing rays of the harsh tropical sun, but they must also fight stigma and discrimination. Myths and stigmas about Albinos sometimes have horrific results. For examlpe, in recent years, traditional medicine has furthered the belief that albino body parts have elements with magical powers that give success and fortune. This myth has resulted in brutal killings of albinos with the aim of harvesting their body parts. Mariam was a victim of such an attack.

Another major struggle for albinos is protecting themselves from the sun. Those living in areas with little access to health care also struggle to protect themselves from the sun and treat problems arising from UV exposure. 

From the Lake Victoria region, where killings and discrimination still infringe upon these people's human rights, to the Iringa region tormented with an absence of healthcare, albinos in Tanzania are increasingly at risk as of late. The lack of proper information about albinism, in a country in which 1 out of 2.000 people is albino (in Europe and North America the ratio is 1 out of 20.000), leaves the doors to discrimination wide open. For these people, the Tanzanian government has never been able to guarantee health, education or security. Only through the help of N.G.O.s like Under The Same Sun and Tulime does a bright future seem possible for the albinos.

FULL ARTICLE AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST

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Albinism in Tanzania 08
Mwanza
By Federico Roscioli
10 Jul 2014

Mwanza, Tanzania, July 10, 2014 - Before a race during sports day in Lake View School, Mwanza, Tanzania. albinos play sports early in the morning to avoid exposure to the hot sun.

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Albinism in Tanzania 04
Mwanza
By Federico Roscioli
08 Jul 2014

Mwanza, Tanzania, July 8, 2014 - Jelly's Primary School in Mwanza. In this school Under The Same Sun (UTSS) is the full sponsor for 36 children. This allows them to study in a normal mixed school instead of centers for persons with sight disabilities. In Tanzania albinos are considered disabled, but they just might have sight problems.

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Albinism in Tanzania 05
Mwanza
By Federico Roscioli
08 Jul 2014

Mwanza, Tanzania, July 8, 2014 - Jelly's Primary School in Mwanza. In this school Under The Same Sun (UTSS) is the full sponsor for 36 children. This allows them to study in a normal mixed school instead of centers for persons with sight disabilities. In Tanzania albinos are considered disabled, but they just might have sight problems.

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Albinism in Tanzania 06
Mwanza
By Federico Roscioli
08 Jul 2014

Mwanza, Tanzania, July 8, 2014 - Jelly's Primary School in Mwanza. In this school Under The Same Sun (UTSS) is the full sponsor for 36 children. This allows them to study in a normal mixed school instead of centers for persons with sight disabilities. In Tanzania albinos are considered disabled, but they just might have sight problems.

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Albinism in Tanzania 09
Shinyanga
By Federico Roscioli
08 Jul 2014

Shinyanga, Tanzania, July 8, 2014 - Masalu, 18 years old is both deaf and mute. She arrived with her two siblings at the Buhangija Center for persons with sight disabilities in Shinyanga, Tanzania, after the last killing of an albino that took place in May 2014. She became pregnant after being raped. The center was the immediate answer by the government to the killings of albinos that started in 2007 in the lake area. Nowadays around 200 people of all ages are living in this center together.

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Albinism in Tanzania 10
Shinyanga
By Federico Roscioli
08 Jul 2014

Shinyanga, Tanzania, July 8, 2014 - A child dozes off in Buhangija Center for persons with sight disabilities in Shinyanga, Tanzania. The center is defined as a school, but it hosts 200 people of all ages assisted by two teachers and living in precarious conditions.

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Albinism in Tanzania 01
Shinyanga
By Federico Roscioli
08 Jul 2014

Shinyanga, Tanzania, July 8, 2014 - Courtyard of Buhangija Center for persons with sight disabilities in Shinyanga, Tanzania. The center was the immediate answer of the government to the killings of albinos that started in 2007 in the lake area. Nowadays around 200 people of all ages are living in this center together.

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Big Questions - Poverty is a System
Tanzania
By Patricia Werhane
24 Apr 2014

Go to Tanzania to see how health care and education are being used to deal with major illnesses in rural communities. We discuss the importance of how businesses and NGOs do work while looking at a leper colony and a project using communication to prevent malaria. Does a pharmaceutical company have a greater responsibility to people than other businesses?

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Lake Malawi - turbulent times in quie...
malawi
By Luis Miguel Rodrigues
05 Aug 2013

Fishing is the main activity at the lake and in the recent time there have been troubles, for both fisherman of Tanzania and Malawi, with maritime forces in both countries once they are accused of fishing in extra territorial waters.

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Lake Malawi (16 of 19)
Lake Malawi, Africa
By Luis Miguel Rodrigues
05 Aug 2013

Lake Malawi borders Malawi, Tanzania and Mozambique. Between Malawi and Mozambique the relationship has been cordial, at least about the lake since the borders stand exactly in the middle of the lake.

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Lake Malawi (17 of 19)
Lake Malawi, Africa
By Luis Miguel Rodrigues
05 Aug 2013

Due to the official low profile relationship between Tanzania and Malawi, the weekly boats that cross the lake from its south to the north just stop in Mozambique and Malawian shores, avoiding the Tanzanian side of the lake. People that need to cross to Tanzania must use traditional boats to cross the lake.

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Lake Malawi - turbulent times in quie...
malawi
By Luis Miguel Rodrigues
04 Aug 2013

Lake Malawi - turbulent times in quiet waters

David Livingstone named it lake of the starts in 1867 after seen the spectacle of the lights that hundreds of traditional fishing boats use during the night to fish in its waters. Mozambicans and Tanzanians call it Lake Niassa, but internationally it’s called Lake Malawi. It’s the 9th biggest lake in the world, the 3rd in Africa, after Lake Tanganyika and Lake Vitoria, and the most southern lake in the great African rift valley.
Even before the independence of Tanzania and Malawi, there was already a dispute on its name and its borders, but now the probable oil reserves that the 700 meters deep of its waters reserves for millions of years bring a new fear in this part of Southern Africa – the specter of war to keep the sovereignty of the water and what lays in its bottom.

With an average dimension of 560km length per 75km width, more than 1000 species of cichlids fish and more species of fishes than any other body of fresh water in the world, Lake Malawi hosts borders between three countries; Malawi, Mozambique and Tanzania. Between the first two, the water is divided by the middle and there are no questions of who manage which side. But between Tanzania and Malawi a crescent fight in words is taking place between both governments. That’s the reason why a committee from South Africa Development Community headed by the former South African President Tabo Mbheki and the former Mozambican President Joaquim Chissano are trying to solve amicably this dispute to keep the waters of Lake Malawi quiet as they always were.

The recent dispute, started two years ago when sounded that the lake could have big oil reserves and Malawi started allowing international firms to survey its bottom. Tanzania warned that half of the lake it´s from the country and recently, in July 2013, warned that if necessary its army is ready to guard and fight for the country territory. In the other side, Malawi, a poor country that never have seen war in its history, known as the Warm Heart of Africa and cited in various tourism guides as one of the peaceful and friendly countries in the world already said that don´t want war and it will take the case to the International Court of Justice to decide fairly who have reason.

Both countries guide themselves by the 1840 Heligoland Treaty signed by the victorious Great Britain over Tanganyika (the old name for Tanzania) from Germany. It was decided that all the water would be managed and part of Nyasaland which now is Malawi.
For the last 50 years, this fight has been cordial and peaceful once there was just water, fisherman in its canoes and wild life. But now, the oil industry and the perspectives of explore it, bringing income for one of the countries, makes this dispute increase the tone of the words changed between the two nations and worry the neighbor community.

Apart of this, fisherman all around the lake shores continues to live and survive in a simple way of life paddling their canoes and the cichlids fishes showing its colours above the waters of the lake.

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Tanzanian Bodaboda-driver Cracking A ...
Dar es Salaam, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
By dunianiduara
09 Oct 2012

Tanzania is growing. So does the inequality.

It is not easily overlooked in Dar es Salaam. Tanzania has a tiny super-rich elite and a vast poor majority.

The poorest part of the population crowd into the uswahilini - the slums - places with dense population and poor sanitation. Their richest inhabit houses in the Peninsula where the rent for a 3-bed room house may easily reach 2000-3000 USD, maybe even more.

In order to survive you got to be smart. Look for ways to make a living. Many young men become boda-boda drivers. 'Boda' is a swahilification of 'border'. The Swahili name originates from when motorbikes were used to cross borders in East Africa.
Now they are commonly used to name the small motorbikes which navigate through the Dar es Salaam 'fuleni' (fourlane) traffic jam.