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Regular Flights between Iran and Yeme...
Sanaa International Airport
By Yousef Mawry
01 Mar 2015

March 1, 2015
Sanaa, Yemen

For the first time in 25 years, an Iranian flight landed in Yemen at Sanaa International Airport after Houthi and Iranian officials signed a contract in Tehran to open a direct aviation service between the two countries. They agreed to set up 14 weekly flights between the two countries. The plane was from Mahan Air, a private airline based in Tehran that operates domestically in Iran and internationally to the Far East, the Middle Eat, Central Asia, and Europe. Keen to show that they were not supplying the Houthis with weapons, the Iranian flight arrived with a donation of 12 tons of medical supplies and equipment from the Iranian Red Crescent. Iranian officials at the airport said they regret that such an agreement was not signed years ago to help build Iranian-Yemeni relations.

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Life in an Ebola Isolation Unit
By Wreckxjunior
26 Sep 2014

Audio report by Sheriff Bojang Jr.

Ebola has been spreading in the three affected West African countries: Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia. And the last hope of every Ebola patient lies in an isolation unit or treatment center.

Length: 5:12

SCRIPT

Inside this Ebola treatment center, Gabriel shows his Body Management team of five the tricks of dead body collection and handling.

Gabriel: “If the family members want to see the face of the victim, they can just open [the body bag] like this…”

A young girl inside the high risk area has just died and Gabriel must remind his colleagues of their responsibilities before they go in to collect the body.

Gabriel: “I work as the dead body manager, so I’m responsible for bagging the bodies and taking them to the morgue. Body bags are just standard practice. Whenever we go in to do our work, we have to practice it first, because we don’t want to go in there to start looking for someone and say ‘Oh we forgot this…’”

This center was opened by the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies to complement efforts to curb the Ebola virus. Tina Saragoski is the manager.

Tina Saragoski: “We have opened the center the 13th of September. Before that, it took one month to build the center up. The first patients arrived on the 13th. Ever since, we have slowly started to take in patients, and at the moment we have eighteen inpatients with us here at the center.”

What is particularly interesting about this center is the fact that out of the 127 staff, about 109 are Sierra Leoneans. Most of them are young men and women who could have gone for exciting jobs or even sat at home and stayed away from anything that has to do with Ebola. But they are here on a daily basis doing different works to help save lives.

Hygienist: “I am a hygienist. My responsibility here is to make sure that the surrounding environment of the patients is well cleaned, and to keep it tidy. Every day I come here and make sure that I go in there [the isolation unit] to collect all the waste, especially body fluids. If there is a dead body, then the fluid that remains, I should also make sure the fluids are well collected to put them into the waste box.”

Nurse: “I administer medication and cells of the patients, normally to take care of the patients in the ward. We talk to them, encourage them to hope… to give them hope.”

Sound of dressing…

Inside a plastic tent, three volunteers are getting set to go into the high risk area to treat the patients. These young volunteers are being dressed in yellow protective suits made of woven plastic fiber. This is one of the trickiest processes here and there cannot be any mistake in protecting these people from exposure to the virus. I can see this young man breathing heavily in his gear.

Reporter SOT: “How are you feeling right now?”

Isolation unit worker: “It’s getting hot, little by little.”

Reporter SOT: “And where are you going now?”

Isolation unit worker: “I’m going to the high risk area. We’ll spend approximately five minutes inside.”

Reporter SOT: “It’s very hot. How do you feel?”

Isolation unit worker: “I’m getting hot right now.”

Reporter SOT: “How about with safety? Are you comfortable?”

Isolation unit worker: “This is correct with safety. It’s 100% safe.”

Reporter SOT: “And you don’t feel afraid?”

Isolation unit worker: “No, no.”

Young men and women working in treatment centers like this one are the frontline combatants fighting Ebola and no one can come as close to danger as them. But despite the potential risks, they’re determined to be here.

Treatment center worker 1: “As you can see, we always do live practice before we go in there, and when were inside, we’re well protected and comfortable to be here.”

Nurse: “As long as I’m here to protect lives, I’m ok. I promise to work with the Sierra Leone Red Cross until I see the end of this Ebola. I’m going to fight against Ebola.”

In Sierra Leone, there are lot of rumors, myths and misconceptions surrounding Ebola. But the biggest Ebola enemy is fear. And because of the fear of contracting the virus, these local volunteers face discrimination in their own communities.

Isolation unit worker: “As far as they know that you are working in an Ebola case management center, they will be going away from you - they said to not become infected. But we are doing this to save the lives of our brothers and sisters.”

Nurse: “I came from Freetown. I have to relatives here, and even when I came to rent in different houses, they refused because I’m working in the Ebola center.”

Hygienist: “I’m not disclosing what I’m doing to my family, so I have to hide it away from them; because if they know what I’m doing, it won’t go down well with them.”

While I was on the ground in the Kenema treatment center, news came that an eleven-year-old patient from Freetown had successfully gone through treatment and would be discharged the next day. She would be the first discharged patient from this center, but with the determination and resilient of the staff like these young locals, many more success stories are expected to come out from here in the coming weeks and months.

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Lebanese for Syrians
Arsal, Lebanon
By Osie Greenway
21 Dec 2013

A young Syrian boy smiles as he receives medicine from the Lebanese for Syrians group after being examined by the volunteer doctor, Dr. Nick Batley.

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Lebanese for Syrians
Arsal, Lebanon
By Osie Greenway
21 Dec 2013

Dr Batley discuses with his medical student and the Lebanese for Syrians volunteer team the best way to treat a young boy suffering from chicken pox.

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Lebanese for Syrians
Arsal, Lebanon
By Osie Greenway
21 Dec 2013

Dr. Batley examines a two year old boy from Al Qusair who has a harsh cough. Tuberculosis is a fear for the Syrian refugees in Arsal do to their unhygienic conditions and lack of aid and medical care.

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Lebanese for Syrians
Arsal, Lebanon
By Osie Greenway
21 Dec 2013

Ahmad lights the room with a candle for Dr. Batley to examine his mothers frostbite feet, Ahmad lives in an area outside of Arsal past the last Lebanese military check point and the borders of Syria. He is from Al Qusair and fled with his family when heavy clashes broke out between Syrian regime forces and opposition group.

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Prosthetic Limb Center for Syrians
Reyhanli, Turkey
By Transterra Editor
26 Nov 2013

A prosthetic limb center recently opened just outside Reyhanli, Turkey. The center helps those who have lost limbs in the fighting in Syria. The center manufactures high quality prosthetics on-site, assigns them to the wounded and helps with the rehabilitation process afterwards.

The clinic now produces limbs with a quality that can be compared to European standards, however, none of the staff at the center have a medical background. Some of the staff are previous patients, and have been trained by teams visiting from teams that also visit Pakistan, the UK and elsewhere in Turkey.

The clinic is already treating up to 10 patients a day, but there are thousands more in need. To reach them those in need, there are plans in progress to launch a mobile center that will work from inside Syria next year.

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Syrian Limb Center 8
Reyhanli, Turkey
By Leyland Cecco
26 Nov 2013

The process of creating new prosthetic legs takes an average of two days. While none of the workers have medical equipment backgrounds, foreign training has allowed them to produce high quality prosthetics.

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Stuck Between A War & The Turkish Border
Azaz, Syria
By U.S. Editor
03 Apr 2013

In Azaz, Syria, hundreds live in UN tents sprawled across a makeshift transition camp. Though the refugees encamped here fled intense shelling in and around Aleppo, the health hazards in their new homes provide a whole new set of dangers.

Asad Hoammed, who previously worked in a weapons manufacturing facility for the Syrian government, and whose sons now fight with the opposition, is waiting in hopes that his wife may receive medical attention. She needs heart surgery, an operation only possible if they are able to cross into Turkey. Unless they are able to make the crossing soon, she will likely die within days.

Dr. Al-Nasr, who works for a group called “Medical Relief for Syria,” acknowledged that the spread of disease and lack of medical care have created a dire situation. “It’s a problem with sanitation, how to dispose of the bathing water and used toilet water,” he said. “There are lakes of waste in some areas.”

Most of the camp’s water and insect-linked health issues, such as diarrhea and scabies, are treatable. But when addressing complex civilian health emergencies, there’s simply no good option in northern Syria.

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Stuck Between A War & The Turkish Bor...
Azaz, Syria
By Ben Taub
03 Apr 2013

Transit Camp, A’zaz, SYRIA

“My wife will die if she doesn’t have heart surgery in three or four days,” Asad Hoammed lamented as he prepared tea in his UN refugee tent. But getting the operation first requires getting her out of war-torn Syria and into a Turkish hospital that would somehow be willing to treat her for free.

It’s been more than a month since Mr. Hoammed and his wife left their hometown of Tall Rifat seeking Turkish medical care, but having no money to begin a new life outside Syria has made the crossing impossible. Instead, they ended up in a refugee transit camp on the northern border with roughly 13,000 other Syrians waiting either to get into Turkey or for the war to end so they can go home and rebuild.

Most fled intense violence and shelling in and around Aleppo.

The tea was still too hot to drink, so Mr. Hoammed lit a cigarette. He took a slow drag as Syrian regime fighter jets bombed rebels laying siege to a military airport a few miles away. The distant thundering rattled none and inspired a few prayers for those likely killed, but the proximity posed no risk. Those few miles make a serious difference, as the transit camp is situated at the edge of the Turkish border. Any approaching jet would risk obliteration by Turkish air defenses.

Still, the transit camp isn’t a safe place to live. “One person is sick in every tent,” insisted the men gathered on Mr. Hoammed’s tarp floor. They blamed it on dirty drinking water.

Dr. Al-Nasr, who works for a group called “Medical Relief for Syria,” acknowledged the spread of disease is a dire situation but disputed that refugees’ drinking water is tainted in any way. “It’s a problem with sanitation, how to dispose of the bathing water and used toilet water,” he said. “There are lakes of waste in some areas.”

Most of the camp’s water and insect-linked health issues, such as diarrhea and scabies, are treatable. But when addressing complex civilian health emergencies, there’s simply no good option in northern Syria.

According to Dr. Al-Nasr, Turkish authorities will grant access and free hospital care if failure to perform a major operation would have urgent and imminent consequences. But how imminent is imminent? Mr. Hoammed thinks his wife has just a few days left to live, and that any action now may be too little, too late.

He paused for a moment, then reached for a plastic bag hanging from the tent wall from which he produced a coin-purse full of pills and a small Chinese charm sent by a business contact in Beijing two years ago. That was when his wife first fell ill. “This charm is to protect her health,” wrote the Chinese businessman.

At that time, Mr. Hoammed worked in a weapons manufacturing facility for the Syrian government. Soon after the war began, he defected and returned home to Tall Rifat. His two sons picked up arms a few months later, Abdel with the Free Syrian Army and Hamoud with Jabhat al-Nusra, the well-trained Islamist faction that also hopes to take down the Syrian regime.

Mr. Hoammed hasn’t seen his sons since he and his ill wife arrived at the transit camp in late February. Tonight he intends to plead his case and seek free crossing and heart surgery for the woman he has lived with and loved through war and peace.

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Lebanese for Syrians
Arsal, Lebanon
By Transterra Editor
31 Dec 2012

Young Syrian girl who was just examined by Lebanese for Syrians volunteer doctor.

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To The Ambulance
Alansari, Aleppo, Syria
By ward.furati
29 Nov 2012

The men crowd around to help get the survivor onto the ambulance to get medical aid. The man was injured after the bombing of the Alansari neighborhood of Aleppo on the morning of November 29, 2012

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Libya (34 of 40)
Misrata, Libya
By George Henton
05 Jun 2011

Doctors take a short rest at a medical aid centre a few kilometres behind the frontlines at Al Dafniyeh, to the west of Misrata, Libya, 04 June 2011. Badly injured rebel fighters are stabilised at the centre before being taken to Al Hikma, the main hospital in Misrata. GEORGE HENTON.

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Libya (35 of 40)
Misrata, Libya
By George Henton
05 Jun 2011

Doctors and other medical volunteers pray during a quiet period at a medical aid centre a few kilometres behind the frontlines at Al Dafniyeh, to the west of Misrata, Libya, 04 June 2011. Badly injured rebel fighters are stabilised at the centre before being taken to Al Hikma, the main hospital in Misrata. GEORGE HENTON.