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Sunni Kurd Minorities Take Refuge in ...
Homs, Syria
By TTM Contributor 8
09 Jun 2016

June 9, 2016
Homs, Syria

Kurdish Sunni minorities of Akrad Dasneh, a small town in north-eastern Homs, have been kicked out of their hometown encircled by towns predominated by Alawites loyal to the Assad regime.
Hundreds of families are now distributed among Ghanto and neighboring towns in rural Homs. They are taking refuge in buildings mainly used for cattle and goats.
Abu Ibrahim, his mother and his family have fled their home in Akrad Dasneh and had to relocate several times. The family is now sheltering in one of these barns under miserable living conditions.

00:59 Abu Ibrahim
“We are Kurds of Dasneh. We used to live with other Alawite residents loyal to Assad regime. They put pressure on us and shot at our homes. They also killed two of our young men and kidnapped some others. Residents loyal to Assad regime joined the fights in central Homs and the neighboring areas, and some of their men got killed in the clashes so they used to come after us for revenge. We are minorities and we were force to flee our homes. It’s been four years now and out situation is getting worse. Everything is expensive and the Russian airstrikes hit non-stop. We keep on moving from one place to another.”

01:47 Abu Ibrahim
“The kids eat thyme and goat very often, sometimes we don’t even have bread. We cannot afford to buy bread; it coasts between 300 SYP (1.4 USD) and 500 SYP (2.3 USD). In Ramadan we fast all day and when it’s time to eat we have almost nothing, no food. Women who are supposed to fast are also breast-feeding their babies and they should be having enough food and nutrition to produce enough milk for the babies.”

02:30 Abu Ibrahim
“We are here sheltering in stores with cattle. Just behind this shelter there are cows and sheep. The kids here are suffering from asthma and respiration problems because of the smell. We live in miserable conditions. Look here how can this shelter be an isolation tool. If I could remove it you could see the cattle right behind us.. The babies one month and two months old are suffering from asthma because of these conditions.”

03:28 Hassan
Q: “What are you lacking?”
A: “We are lacking everything, we need clothing we need everything.. We used to go to public guarding and playgrounds, now it’s impossible because of the shelling. We used to go to school, but now we cannot go anymore.
Q: “What is that you need the most?”
A: “Clothing.. School.. Everything.”

04:26 Aisha
“We don’t have enough food. Thank God we are alive. We only seek God’s mercy.. May God bless you.. He wanted us to be here. We thank him for everything.”

05:08 Um Ibrahim
“We are Kurds of Dasneh. We used to live with people loyal to Assad regime in our hometown, but they were pressuring us and forced us to leave our homes. We fled at night with our kids and here we are it’s been four years and we are still away from our homes. You can see our living conditions. We have to keep relocating from place to another. We are barely receiving one meal per day and it’s insufficient for us and our children. No one is looking after us it’s been four years. The children can’t even play they sit here with us all day in the stores. It’s been four years. Where shall we go? We were kicked out of our homes and lands. Where shall we go?"

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Sunni and Shiite Joint Prayers in Bah...
Manama
By MazenMahdi
03 Jul 2015

Sunnis and Shiites hold joint Friday prayers in Bahrain amid tight security following bombing attacks believed to have been carried out by the Islamic State group against Shiite mosques in Kuwait and the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia.

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Long Delays at Checkpoints for Refuge...
Karbala, Iraq
By mushtaq mohammed
20 Apr 2015

Some one hundred families have been stuck in the desert, waiting for hours at checkpoints manned by Iraqi government forces, as they attempt to flee their homes in Anbar and Salahuddine towards the predominantly Shiite province of Karbala.

ISIS militants launched an offensive on Ramadi, the capital of Anbar, in mid-April 2015, and were able to seize at least three villages.

SHOTLIST AND TRANSCRIPT

Various of refugees in the outdoors

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman) Shamia Ibrahim, Refugee from Ramadi
00:47 – 01:42

“We were displaced from Ramadi by the indiscriminate bombing and airstrikes. We came to Karbala so that people would take care of us and help us. We have suffered. Q: Why did you come to Karbala?
A: We came looking for safety. We want to find a place where we can settle down with our children.
Q: Why are waiting in the desert?
A: We are waiting… we came to Karbala because we want them to consider our situation. We need you to help us. Helps and take our situation into consideration. You can see our situation.
Q: What do you think about the security measures? Are they good? Are they strict?
A: They are very good. They helped and let us in and treated us very well from the start. They have been good to us.
Q: What is your name?
A: Shamia Ibrahim.”

Close-up of registration plate from Baghdad
Various of refugees
Close-up of registration plate from Anbar
Medium of refugees eating
Various of security personnel searching vehicles

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Abu Fouad, Refugee from Ramadi
02:44 – 03:24

“You do not feel safe at home. Bombs are falling and there are militiamen. A gas canister costs 40,000 dinars. A liter of gasoline costs 2,000 dinars. A kilogram of tomatoes costs 3,000 dinars. There is no work. We stayed on the road for two days. We were held at each checkpoint for four to five hours. Guards repeat the same procedures at each checkpoint, even though the distance is only 30 km. The procedures are very tough. We have been on the road since the morning and we have not reached Karbala.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman), Um Mohamad, A refugee from Tikrit
03:31 – 04:26

“Q: Where do you come from? A: I have come from Tikrit.
Q: From Tikrit?
A: Yes from Tikrit.
Q: Why did you come to Karbala?
A: We have been displaced. Our homes were bombed. We do not have any houses left. When can we go?
Q: Honestly, what do you think about the way you have been received in Karbala?
A: Thanks be to God, it is good.
Q: Why do you mean by ‘good’? Were you allowed in?
A: The checkpoint let us through, but they are searching us.
Q: [UNINTELLIGIBLE]
A: Let them search. We do not have anything [to hide].
Q: At the end, will they let you in?
A: I do not know. But why would they not let us? We do not carrying anything [threatening].
Q: Who did you exactly run away from? ISIS? The Iraqi army? The Popular Mobilization?
A: I do not know. Everyone fled and we fled with them.
Q: Why did they flee?
A: I do not know. People were scared.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Amjad Ali Talab, Refugee from Anbar
04:27 – 05:56

“From Anbar. We came to flee the suffering due to the bombing by mortars and artillery. We came by car. The checkpoints searched and helped us. They conducted their duties properly and did everything they should. We came to Karbala looking for safety and a place to settle in.”

Close-up of food leftovers
Various of refugees

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Iraqis Flee Ramadi as ISIS Advance to...
Anbar, Ramadi
By Arshed
15 Apr 2015

Photos shot on a mobile phone show hundreds of Iraqis stuck in traffic as they attempt to flee Ramadi and the surrounding villages. ISIS militants launched a large offensive on Wednesday 15, April, and were able to seize control over the villages of Sjariyah, Albu-Ghanim and Soufiya, which had been under government control. The locals fear that the advance could reach Ramadi giving ISIS control over the capital of Anbar, Iraq’s largest province. ISIS insurgents are now about 100Km from Anbar’s Ain Al-Asad air base, where hundreds of US and coalition forces have been training Iraqi troops.

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Iraqis Flee ISIS Attack on Ramadi and...
Karbala
By mushtaq mohammed
15 Apr 2015

Dozens of Anbar province residents have fled their homes and headed to the Shiite-majority province of Karbala.

People interviewed at checkpoints said that they left their homes in fear of an onslaught by ISIS. They added that they feel safe to be in Karbala.
Anbar is a predominantly Sunni area.

Iraqi government forces have started to dig a trench to isolate desert areas of Karbala from Anbar and Babel provinces. Coverage of this story can be found here: https://transterramedia.com/media/59441

TRANSCRIPT

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Ali Taleb Abbas al-Jumaili, Displaced person heading to Karbala.
00:00 – 01:30

“I am from Anbar province, al-Karma district. I will go to Baghdad or any other place. Ramadi has been bombed and ISIS has done so much and killed people. There are no safe areas left in Anbar. Interviewer: You are Sunni. Are you not scared of going to a Shiite area?
Why would I be scared? They are our families. My clan is located in Karbala, Hilla, Mahmoudiya.
Interviewer: What do you think about the security measures?
The measures are very good. They are treating us very well. People have been inviting me to stay with them.
Interviewer: What is your name?
Ali Taleb Abbas al-Jumaili."

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman) Um Eyad, Displaced person heading to Karbala
00:46 – 04:31

“Interviewer: Are you from Fallujah? Yes, Fallujah.
Interviewer: Why did you leave your house and come to Karbala?
We fled the bombing. Rockets have wrecked our homes. We left because we were scared.
Interviewer: How was the road?
It was rough.
Interviewer: Did you all leave your homes?
Yes, we left our homes. God is witness. Houses have been destroyed. We fled because we were scared. We took the families and went away.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman) Unnamed displaced person heading to Karbala
04:32 – 05:26

“I am from Karma. Interviewer: In Fallujah?
Yes.
Interviewer: Why did you leave your homes?
We left because of the situation. We brought the families and came here.
Interviewer: Was the bombing carried out by ISIS? The Iraqi forces?
We fled ISIS.
Interviewer: Did you feel threatened?
Yes, we did.
We were besieged. We were scared of ISIS and the bombing.
Interviewer: How the people of Karbala, the police and the army receive you?
Thanks be to God, they have done everything they should have.
Interviewer: Why are you sitting here?
We are waiting for the car search to be over. "

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Trench Shields Shiite Iraqi Province ...
Karbala
By mushtaq mohammed
27 Mar 2015

Karabala, Iraq
March 27, 2015

A trench is being dug on the border of the southern Shiite-majority Iraqi province of Karbala with the provinces of al-Anbar and Babel. The ditch, which extends for 50km, is 6m deep and 10m wide and is guarded by surveillance towers and checkpoints manned by Iraqi government forces and a Shiite militia known as the Al-Abbas Combat Division.

Colonel Hassan al-Silawi, the commander of the 33rd Infantry Brigade in the Iraqi army, said in an interview that this trench aims to keep ISIS fighters from entering Karbala from al-Anbar province. Silawi denied that this obstacle was conceived to separate Sunni and Shiite populations.

Another interviewed officer denied claims made by Sunni politicians that the aim of the trench was to annex territory to the province Karbala. The city of Karbala hosts the tomb of Imam Hussein, one of the holiest shrines for Shiite Muslims.

SHOTLIST AND TRANSCRIPT

Wide of soldiers standing next to surveillance tower
Wide of trench
Various of soldiers guarding trench
Wide of Iraqi army Humvee and soldier
Wide of soldiers running on sand barrier
Interview with Colonel Hassan al-Silawi, Commander of the 33rd Infantry Brigade
Wide of soldiers next to sand barricade
Various of soldier manning machinegun behind sand barricade
Various of soldiers guarding trench
Various of soldiers and military vehicles next to sand barricade
Interview with Colonel Hassan al-Silawi, Commander of the 33rd Infantry Brigade
Various of soldiers and military vehicles
Wide of pickup truck moving and banner with Shiite religious symbols
Wide of tents and Iraqi flags
Interview with Major Jaber Ahmed, Infantry Platoon Commander
Various of trench
Various of soldier in surveillance tower looking through binoculars
Wide of soldiers and vehicles at checkpoint. Phrase written with bricks in Arabic reads: “Long live Iraq.”
Wide of solider next to Iraqi flag
Wide of Iraqi soldier on guard

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Colonel Hassan al-Silawi, Commander of the 33rd Infantry Brigade
01:18 – 02:50

“The trench extends for about 50km along the administrative border between the provinces of Babel and Karbala. No, it is not about Sunni or Shiite provinces. This trench is an obstacle set up for military purposes. It has nothing to do with whether an area is Sunni or Shiite. This is a desert. These lands do not belong to any individual; they belong to the Ministry of Agriculture.

"The trench will be guarded by platoons from the 33rd Infantry Brigade in addition to groups from the Popular Mobilization [Shiite militia umbrella], especially the Al-Abbas Combat Division. The trench was dug by the province of the holy Karbala in agreement with the local governments of neighboring provinces. This system involves surveillance towers and cameras, as well as a dirt barrier that is 5m high and 6m wide.

"This trench was dug in the desert – an unpopulated area. There are no agricultural areas or shepherds. This is a desert, barren land. The aim of digging the trench is to stop the terrorist ISIS organization from training in this area.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Colonel Hassan al-Silawi, Commander of the 33rd Infantry Brigade
04:00- 04:48

"The soldiers are not scared because it is their duty to fight. We are terrorizing ISIS; ISIS is scared of us. The proof is that we liberated areas with the support of the Popular Mobilizations forces. This is a border of separation in desert areas neighboring the province of Karbala. The trench goes along the administrative border of three regions – Babel, Ramadi and the province of Karbala.

"There is no transgression. There is an agreement among local governments. This [trench] serves all the provinces. The public interest comes ahead of everything, especially when it comes to security. There are no lands that belong to the state or agricultural land, either. It is a desert area."

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Major Jaber Ahmed, Infantry Platoon Commander
05:12 – 05:51

“Thanks be to God, so far no security breach has been recorded in this district. Thanks be to God, it was because of the efforts of the head of operations, the commander of the 33rd Brigade."

Interviewer: "How would describe your morale?"

"Our morale is very high, thanks to [the military commanders]. God willing, the operations to liberate Falluja, which is close to us, as well as Tikrit, have started. God willing, operations will also start within Al-Anbar. God willing, the operations will keep going. We are guarding the northern district of the province of Karbala. Our morale is high, thanks be to God.”

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Death and Destruction after Ambush Ag...
Aden, Yemen
By Dhaifallah Homran
27 Mar 2015

Aden, Yemen
March, 27th

THIS VIDEO CONTAINS GRAPHIC IMAGES

Clashes between Houthi rebels and Sunni militia fighters, who support the President Abed Rabbu Mansour Hadi, have left a number of dead and wounded from both sides on a road between the port city of Aden and Lahij on Friday, March 27th.
This video shows the aftermath of an ambush set up by the Popular Resistance Committees, a pro-Hadi militia, against Houthi rebels and other fighters loyal to former President Ali Abdallah Saleh, who is supporting the Houthis.
Images of burned military vehicles belonging to the rebels be seen in the video. In the port city of Aden, pro-Hadi fighters patrol the streets and have set up tents as temporary military barracks.

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Houthis Fire Upon Protestors in Taiz
Taiz
By Muatasm Mansor Al-Hitari
22 Mar 2015

March 23, 2015
Taiz, Yemen

In this video, Sunni protestors demonstrate against the Houthi takeover of Taiz in front of the "Special Security Forces" building where Houthis rebels stationed their reinforcements.

The protestors burn tires while militants loyal to the Houthis respond with live ammunition in central Taiz.

According to eyewitnesses, Houthi rebels have transported militiamen from Sana'a to Taiz to reinforce local security forces already under their control.

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President of Kurdistan Meets Arab Tribes
Dohuk
By Jawdat Ahmed
16 Mar 2015

March 15, 2015
Duhuk, Iraq


(IraqiNews.com) President of Kurdistan Massoud Barzani said on Sunday, that the doors are open for Arabs to fight in the ranks of the Kurdish Peshmerga forces, calling the federal government to do its duty in the liberated areas. Barzani said during a meeting with Arab tribal elders attended by IraqiNews.com, “The doors are open for Arabs to join the Peshmerga ranks in their fight against terrorism, and without discrimination,” urging the federal government to do its duty and provide services in the liberated areas. Barzani added, “We should not feed grudges and hatred. Those who refused loyalty to ISIS must live freely and with dignity, while those who chose to be with ISIS, their fate will be like ISIS’ fate.” “All Kurdish areas have been liberated and are now ready to contribute in the operations to liberate the rest of Iraq,” calling on everyone to cooperate in order to build a spirit of cooperation and brotherhood.

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Syrians Scrape a Living in Jordan (1 ...
Jarash
By Camilla Schick
12 Mar 2015

As Syria’s civil war enters its fifth year, nine million people have been displaced, with 3.7 million of those having fled the country. Millions of Syrian refugees are scraping by in neighboring countries.

Jordan has registered 600,000 refugees – constituting almost 10% of the Hashemite Kingdom’s total population of 6.6 million, though the actual number may be much higher. One fifth now live in refugee camps, including Za'atari camp, the second largest in the world. It's illegal for them to leave Jordan's now overcrowded and increasingly insecure refugee camps, but many are now making the leap to urban areas, seeking work and a better life. Some Syrian families who fled to Jordan at the start of the war are fairing better than others who've arrived more recently. But they’re still struggling to survive beyond the camps, without enough allowance from the UN nor local charities to pay for food and medical care, or taking their chances with working illegally.

Despite not being legally entitled to work, many have taken up jobs at local shops at the discretion of Jordanian employers, while others are too afraid to leave their homes and are surviving on as little as 13 dinars ($18) per person per month from the UN.

UN REPORT
A recent UNHCR urban report, entitled ‘Living in the Shadows’ in January this year, based on 150,000 Syrian refugees living outside of Jordan’s camps, concluded that two thirds of the refugees now in urban areas are living below Jordan’s poverty line. 1/6 are living in abject poverty barely surviving off the equivalent of 1.3 dollars per person per day. The UN has expressed grave concern that refugees are now turning desperate measures to make ends meet, with children dropping out of school and even women turning to prostitution.

STORY:
This is the ancient Jordanian city of Jerash, 50 kilometres north of the capital Amman. It’s now home to approximately 8,000 Syrian refugee families / 50,000 refugees.

34-year-old Ali and his younger brother Mohammed work shifts at a local coffee and tea shop. Living as refugees has put a huge strain on Ali's marriage, and he is now separated from his wife, and rarely gets to see his young son. He says they used to live in Al Midan, an affluent Sunni suburb of Syria’s capital Damascus. But when fighting between the Assad government forces and Syrian rebels began in their neighborhood, the family took the heart-wrenching decision to prepare to leave the country. Being the eldest, Ali headed to Jordan first to set things up for the rest of the family. Mohammed and his parents followed after.

The brothers live with their mother Yusra, who warmly invites us into their two-bedroom one-floor home. Yusra was recently widowed. Their father died of health complications shortly after joining them in Jordan. They know how terrible the living conditions are for those now living in Jordan’s over-crowded refugee camps. They tell us they consider themselves among the luckier refugees, who arrived in Jordan almost four years ago at the start of the conflict, having found work and a place to live.

Jordanian shop owner Khaled says he hired the brothers not only because Syrians will work for a lower wage, but also because he wants to help the refugees who are desperately seeking work. He says the Jordanian authorities are fairly lax when it comes to illegal refugee workers. He says all Arabs are brothers, and need to help Syrians until its safe enough for them to return home.

NOTES
We chose to focus the interview on the elder brother – Ali
Their mother, Yusra, did not want us to film her face

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Badr Corps and Iraqi Army Shell ISIS ...
Salahuddin
By mushtaq mohammed
05 Mar 2015

March 5, 2015
Tikrit, Iraq

In conjunction with Iraqi Army soldiers, Shiite fighters from the Badr Corps advance towards the al-Alam area of northern Tikrit, supported by helicopter. The video shows the soldiers firing on a vehicle in the distance, which they claim is laden with explosives, until it blows up. It also shows the fighters driving through the liberated villages in convoys before reaching the frontline of the battle, where begin firing on ISIS positions with automatic weapons and RPGs. The troops claim to have liberated around 30 villages in the Salahuddin province en route to al-Alam.

In an interview with a Badr militia commander, the latter identified the vehicle laden with explosives but blown up in the video as having been sent by ISIS to thwart their advance. He also claims that, thanks to the help of the Prophet and Ali (the son-in-law of Mohammed and revered by Shiites), they suffered zero casualties or injuries.

Transcript:

Abu Hassan, Field Commander
(Man, Arabic) (06:42-07:04)

Over 30 villages were liberated but the most important liberated villages were al-Boueitha, al-Boutalha, al-Bouchenif and the area of Hemreen and its surrounding villages. We are heading now to the frontline of Sheikh Mohamad. All the units will meet here and head to Tikrit from the al-Alam road.

(07:05-07:39) Abbas, Fighter
(Man, Arabic)

We are now in Salah al-din near al-Alam and will reach al-Alam either this afternoon or at worst very early tomorrow morning.

We have enough people. We faced a bunch of them in cars this morning and beat them.

They sent us a vehicle planted with explosives, but we were able to destroy it with cannons before it reached us. They were not able to kill or injure any of our men. Prophet Mohamad and Ali are on our side.

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Sunni Tribesmen Guard Their Borders A...
Shabwa
By Dhaifallah Homran
19 Feb 2015

February 19, 2015
Shabwa, Yemen

Sunni tribesmen, belonging to the Markha al-Alya tribe of the southern Yemeni province of Shabwa, announced today that they are closing their border with the neighboring al-Baydaa province. Situated to the west of Shabwa, al-Baydaa has been the scene of fierce battles between the Houthis and local tribesmen, who are trying to prevent the Houthis from advancing south.

In their announcement the Markha al-Alya tribe emphatically rejected the constitutional declaration of the Houthis and banned any military group from entering Shabwa. They have positioned their fighters along the border and installed sentries on the Farsha passage, the road which connects the neighboring provinces.

The tribesmen assured that they will defend their land to the death and not allow it to become a thoroughfare for Houthis and other armed groups to transport their soldiers and weapons. They are working in conjunction with the local authorities who support their mission to defend Shabwa.

Transcript

Soundbite Sheikh Monser Salem al-Kabali, Tribal Leader (Man, Arabic)

"Based on the agreement among the tribe leaders, dignitaries and local authorities, we announce that we refuse the constitutional declaration made by the Houthis. We support the constitutionally legitimate authorities and will not accept any agreement outside the consensus among political powers in Yemen. Our stance regarding the Shabwa province follows that of the governor. It is guided by the governor of Shabwa as well as the security committee and the tribes in Shabwa and the regions of Hadramoot and Muhar al-Shabwa. We will stand against anyone who wants to use our province as a gate for chaos, whether they are armed militias, tribes or [any other] groups. We declare our support of the local authorities in the province in their bid to protect Shabwa borders from all directions."

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Iraqi Troops Counterattack ISIS
Ramadi, Iraq
By mushtaq mohammed
04 Feb 2015

December 16, 2014
Anbar, Iraq

Iraqi security forces repelled an ISIS attack on Ramadi city center, in the Anbar province in Iraq. The special counter terrorist unit then launched a counterattack on ISIS locations in the the center of the city, with the support of fighters from local Sunni tribes.

According to a local security source, who refused to give his name, the attack caused the death of 13 ISIS fighters. In addition, the Iraqi forces seized light and heavy munitions, along with seven ISIS fighters who surrendered to the police during the conflict.

Over the past year Iraqi armed forces, with the support of Sunni tribal fighters, have been battling ISIS militants in many areas of the majority Sunni province of Anbar, in an attempt to regain control over the area.

Transcription:

Amer al-obeidi, Lieutenant, (Man, Arabic):

(01:33-01:59) "The attack was blocked, and our groups moved forward towards the area. In the upcoming days, the whole area will be wiped out. There is cooperation between the security forces and the army forces. We are ready to clean all the areas of remaining members of ISIS."

Ahmed al-Fahdawi, Field Commander, (Man, Arabic):

(02:00-02:14) "We are ready to fight ISIS and all the terrorist organizations that are pushing against us from the outside. We are hanging in here and we do not need anything, we only need the tribes because our strength lies in our cooperation with the tribes."

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Inside Hezbollah (Last version)
Nabatieh
By Cherine Yazbeck
30 Nov 2014

Shot list:
00:00 - 00:05
A wide shot shows a large billboard featuring portraits of Hezbollah fighters killed in Syria, with Hezbollah and Amal flags around it. The writing at the bottom of the billboard reads: “The Martyrs of Holy Defense.”
00:06 – 00:10
A medium shot shows details of the billboard.
00:11 – 00:14
A medium shot shows a billboard featuring Hezbollah’s Secretary-General Sayyid Hassan Nasrallah.
00:15 – 00:47
Interview with Ali Arab, a Hezbollah supporter, man, Arabic/ interview transcript below
A medium shot shows young Hezbollah scouts holding large portraits of Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, the founder of the Islamic Republic of Iran; Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, Iran’s Supreme Leader; and Sayyid Abbas al-Mussawi, a Hezbollah Secretary-General assassinated by Israel.
00:48 – 01:15
Various shots show a large number of male Hezbollah supporters wearing uniforms inspired by Ashura and beating their chests as a sign of grief for Imam Hussein.
01:16 – 02:48
Interview with Habib Fayyad, a political analyst affiliated with Hezbollah, man, Arabic / interview transcript below
Archive footage of Hezbollah parade in south Beirut; recent footage of children participating in Ashura commemoration in Nabatieh; archive footage of the Lebanese parliament; recent footage of missile launchers and Hezbollah fighters in military fatigues and as part Ashura parade in Nabatieh
02:49 – 03:37
Interview with participant in Ashura commemoration, man, Arabic/ interview transcript below

03:38 – 04:23
Interview with Habib Fayyad, a political analyst affiliated with Hezbollah, man, Arabic / interview transcript below
Archive footage shows Hezbollah’s leader Hassan Nasrallah and fighters during a parade in south Beirut.

Interviews
00:15 – 00:47
Interview with Ali Arab, a Hezbollah supporter, man, Arabic/ interview transcript below
A medium shot shows young Hezbollah scouts holding large portraits of Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, the founder of the Islamic Republic of Iran; Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, Iran’s Supreme Leader; and Sayyid Abbas al-Mussawi, a Hezbollah Secretary-General assassinated by Israel.
“It is normal that we are at risk from different parties and we should be aware of what is happening around us. It is true we are ready on all fronts against all of the Tafkiris [religious extremists], and even against Israel. This parade, particularly in Nabatieh, is a challenge to the Israelis, so they know we are not afraid of them. This is a big Jihad for us.” 01:16 – 02:48 Interview with Habib Fayyad, a political analyst affiliated with Hezbollah, man, Arabic “Hezbollah defines itself as a resistance movement against Israeli occupation and against any danger that may affect Lebanon. It is a resistance movement that is also involved in politics. It is also an Islamic movement, but it does not practice Islam in politics. Hezbollah has an Islamic doctrine, but it does not apply it in the political agenda it advocates in the Lebanese political arena. It [Hezbollah] is also is merged with other active political parties and movements in the Lebanese scene. “Hezbollah’s legitimacy is derived, firstly, from its partisans [its popular support base]; and secondly from the Taif Agreement [agreement ending the Lebanese civil war], which states that Lebanon shall resist Israel in all possible ways. Its legitimacy is also derived from the Lebanese parliament, since Hezbollah has members in it; and from the Lebanese government, of which it is a part. All of the pervious and current governments have clearly recognized the legitimacy of Hezbollah as a pillar of resistance against Israel. However, the most important thing is that its [Hezbollah’s] legitimacy is obvious and logical because, whenever there is an occupation, there is the right of the population to resist the occupation.”

02:49 – 03:37
Interview with participant in Ashura commemoration, man, Arabic
“Of course, Hezbollah is legitimate as it has liberated the South along with other allied parties including the Amal Movement, the Syrian Social National Party (SSNP) and the Communist Party. “All parties have fought [against Israel]. “Hezbollah’s weapons are targeted against innocent civilians and are not to be used in [civilian] neighborhoods. “It never fought in the streets. It is not only me; everybody says that its weapon is the most honest. Without [its weapons], Lebanon would not exist and there would be no one ruling the country, not even a president of the republic. “On the contrary, the weapons must remain in the hands of Hezbollah, in the hands of the resistance. “More than that, it [Hezbollah] should be more powerful. “We need ten times more rockets. It shall remain and we will protect it.”

03:28 – 04:23
Interview with Habib Fayyad, a political analyst affiliated with Hezbollah, man, Arabic
“Hezbollah has qualified and capable leaders in various domains: in politics, in military, social welfare, in security, in culture, in education and in economy. Hezbollah does not have to give a list of its leaders for security reasons, since the enemy, Israel, targets it. It only publishes the names of those who appear in the media. Aside from these [people], Hezbollah does not have to publish the names and tasks of its ranks.”

Hezbollah Fighters Defy ISIS and Israel on Ashura

Giant portraits of Hezbollah fighters killed in Syria tower over the main square in the Lebanese southern city of Nabatieh.
The commemoration of Ashura has taken place every year in this square. It is a tribute to Imam Hussein, the grandson of Prophet Mohammad and a central figure for Shiite Muslims who was killed more than 1,300 years ago. But Hezbollah’s engagement in defending the regime of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad has cast a heavy shadow on this religious occasion.
“We are here today to renew our allegiance to Imam Hussein, who died defending Islam, and also to show a good image of Islam, which other organizations, like ISIS, do not show,” said Ahmad Daifi, a Hezbollah militant in his twenties who was participating in organizing the event. The battle against ISIS and other groups that Hezbollah describes as “takfiri” or extremist has spilled into Lebanon. Explosions as well as attacks across the border, believed to be orchestrated by ISIS and Nusra Front, have shaken the fragile country during the past year. “It is normal that we are at risk from different parties and we should be aware of what is happening around us,” said Ali Arab, a Hezbollah supporter. Hezbollah and Amal, another major Shiite party, took special measures to secure the crowds against suicide bombings in Nabatieh and other predominantly Shiite areas in Lebanon during Ashura. In Beirut’s southern suburbs, Hezbollah special forces, fully clad in black, were seen for the time on the streets. But Hezbollah claims that the fight against militant groups originating in Syria has not distracted it from its war with Israel. In a speech commemorating Ashura, Hezbollah’s Secretary-General Sayyid Hassan Nasrallah said that his party is winning the fight in Syria and is also ready to retaliate against any Israeli attack. Hezbollah staged a military parade in front of a large crowd in Nabatieh. Dozens of fighters wearing military fatigues marched behind missile launchers mounted on military trucks. Hezbollah considers missiles the backbone of its arsenal in its fight against Israel, despite a Security Council resolution that put an end to a bloody war with Israel in 2006 and banned the party from stockpiling weapons near the border.
Hezbollah’s opponents, however, say that its ongoing military activities are actually a source of instability, not protection. Sunni and Christian major political forces have repeatedly demanded that the militant group hand over its weapons to the government after Israel withdrew most of its forces from south Lebanon in 2000. The party’s critics have also urged Hezbollah to stop fighting in Syria.
Habib Fayyad, an analyst affiliated with Hezbollah, reiterated the party’s official position in defense of its choice to maintain its weapons.
“Hezbollah’s legitimacy is derived, firstly, from [its popular support base], and secondly from the Taif Agreement [agreement ending the Lebanese civil war], which states that Lebanon shall resist Israel in all possible ways,” Fayyad said. “Its legitimacy is also derived from the Lebanese parliament, since Hezbollah has members in it, and from the Lebanese government, of which it is a part. All of the pervious and current governments have clearly recognized the legitimacy of Hezbollah as a pillar of resistance against Israel,” he added. Hezbollah has had members of the parliament since 1992, when the first elections were organized two years after the end of the 15-year-long civil war. In 2005, Prime Minister Rafiq Hariri was assassinated. The Syrian regime was seen as the culprit behind the attack and Syrian forces withdrew under international and popular pressure. Hezbollah has since participated in government coalitions, which is seen as way to protect its military activities. Four members of Hezbollah were later indicted of Hariri’s killing by an international tribunal, but the party refused to hand them over. Despite a claim that it does use weapons inside Lebanon, Hezbollah fought against the Sunni Future Movement in 2007 when the latter demanded that Hezbollah dismantles its secret telecommunication network. This exacerbated sectarian tensions – Hezbollah was accused of militarily occupying Beirut, a predominantly Sunni city. But Fayyad referred to the Israeli occupation of a small area called Shebaa farms in south Lebanon to say that Hezbollah still has to right to maintain its arsenal. “The most important thing is that [Hezbollah’s] legitimacy is obvious and logical because, whenever there is an occupation, there is the right of the population to resist the occupation,” he said.

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Reinforcement Iraqi Troops Arrive in ...
Ramadi, Anbar
By mushtaq mohammed
26 Nov 2014

November 27, 2014
Ramadi, Anbar, Iraq

More Iraqi troops being sent to Ramadi, a majority Sunni area, to help Sunni tribal fighters and Shia militants in their fight against ISIS. This action was taken after Iraqi army and militia fighters held of an ISIS assault on a government complex in central Ramadi, on Wednesday night.

The video shows military Humvees roving the streets of Ramadi and saluting the troops. Sheikh Hassan, a head of a coalition of Sunni tribal fighters, celebrates the defeat of ISIS, surrounded by his soldiers.

Transcription:

Chanting

"ISIS, we will hit you in the knee so you would bow down, We will curse your ancestors and whoever supports you,
The courageous men have risen to fight, unlike you,
They will destroy people like you,
ISIS, you have existed in the past,
You fought the prophet and slaughtered the judge,
Today we avenge the father of al-Hassan and al-Hussein,
We will come and face you, so you should be afraid."

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Tajik Kitchen Stories
Istravashan
By karolinasamborska
29 Sep 2014

The best meetings are always in the kitchen, because they are most intimate and sincere. There are no unasked questions, but only timid responses. In the kitchen people talk about life, about men, about dresses, love stories, and unrequited loves. There are no cultural or religious differences. Tajiks, including Yaghnobi people, are Sunni, where a woman’s position is often discriminated against. Pamiris are Ismailis, they practice a progressive Islam often earning them the label heretic through this progress.

"Here in the Pamir Mountains, women are free, they are not like other muslims who live only for cooking and cleaning. They go to school and then go to college in Khorog.” Ismaili women, who can be considered Islamic feminists are educated, some of them even work. Their position in society may have its differences, but could be looked on as equal to that of men. Most marriages in Sunni Tajikistan are arranged. Polygamy is permitted up to a maximum of four wives. Tajiks get engaged at 18 and then marry two years later. In European culture, the young become very quickly independent from their families and young couples live on their own. Tajikistan is different. Because of a difficult economic situation, one's mate comes to live in the new family circle, so the decision of who is to live under a common roof is also a family decision. Love between married couples is considered not as important as loyalty to blood relations. A man’s world and that of a woman are clearly divided here. Women take care of the household and raise children. It is instinctive. Men, if they have a chance to work, they work, but certainly never refuse a glass of vodka. When they drink they become rash, harsh, mirroring their surrounding word. They know that drinking, and the behavior it prompts is bad, so they keep their families out of this world. Maybe it’s why the worlds between men and women remain distant. The kitchen is a woman’s world.

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Churches and Christian Real Estate Se...
By TTM Contributor 18
24 Jul 2014

Following an ultimatum issued by ISIS, there was a Christian exodus from Mosul. The houses and churches they left behind have been seized by Sunni extremists. ISIS has locked the doors and put signs of Islamic State ownership on the buildings left by the Christians.

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The Streets of Kirkuk
Kirkuk
By Tracey Shelton
16 Jul 2014

KIRKUK, Iraq — For decades, the oil-rich city of Kirkuk has been the epicenter of a territorial dispute between the Iraqi central government and the semi-autonomous Kurdish region.

When Sunni militants seized control of a large area of north and central Iraq, they surrounded Kirkuk from two sides, cutting off the city's land borders from the central government. Kurdish forces wasted no time moving in to secure Kirkuk from Islamic State militants gaining control of what they claim to be Kurdish land.

But the population of Kirkuk is diverse with Turkmen, Kurds, Arabs and both Assyrian and Chaldean Christians who all likewise stake a claim to this historical land.

The city has frequently been described as a "powder keg" of racial hostility waiting to explode, though the streets of Kirkuk tell a different story. Amid political conflict and instability, citizens have lived side by side and mixed freely for centuries. Between the police roadblocks and front lines that surround it, the generosity and welcoming nature of the people of Kirkuk give hope for the future of this extraordinary city.

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Iraqi-Shia Fighters Celebrate Complet...
By mushtaq mohammed
27 Jun 2014

Armed Shia fighters from the al-Akida brigade celebrate their graduation after seven days of combat training under guidance of Iranian military advisors. Sheikh Maytham al-Karbalaei, a leader in the brigade stated, “This regiment was trained in the most modern tactics of urban warfare, and how to respond to any sudden attack against the Shiite holy sites.”

The brigade of 2,500 fighters is independent and does not answer to any governmental authority. It is responsible for the protection of al-Ataba al-Abasey shrine and receives its orders from Iraqi-Shia spiritual leader Sheikh Ali al-Sayed al-Sistani.

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Iraqi Farmers Take Up Arms to Fight ISIL
By TTM Contributor 16
18 Jun 2014

June 19, 2014
Baghdad, Iraq

Iraqi-farmers from the area around Baghdad gather in the city to form fighting brigades that will fight ISIL. Under the administration of the Iraqi Ministry of Agriculture, the farmers are answering the call of Ayatollah Sayed Ali al-Sistani, the spiritual leader of the Iraqi-Shia, to take up arms against ISIL. The Ministry of Agriculture is helping organize farmers across the country form their own fighting brigades.

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Mahdi Army Marches in Najaf
By Ahmad Mousa
18 Jun 2014

June 18, 2014
Najaf, Iraq

Mahdi Army fighters loyal to Iraqi-Shia cleric Moqtada al-Sadr march in the holy city of Najaf. The Mahdi Army, also known as the Jaish al-Mahdi, vowed to defend the city from the Sunni insurgent group Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant as it continues its assault across Iraq.

The deployment of the Mahdi Army to the streets of Najaf is yet another significant sign that Iraq is headed to larger, more widespread civil war.

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Iraqi Volunteers in Training Camps
By TTM Contributor 16
17 Jun 2014

June 17, 2014
Baghdad, Iraq

420 Iraqi Army volunteers undergo basic training at an Iraqi Army training camp in the central Baghdad neighborhood of al-Jadliya. Most new recruits are only given 3 days of training and then sent to the front lines to battle ISIL. The recruits responded to the call of Iraqi-Shia Spiritual leader to Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani to take up arms against ISIL.

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Al Qaeda Affiliated Rebels Execute Al...
Raqqa, Syria
By Transterra Editor
16 Sep 2013

-Al Qaeda affiliated rebels in Syria executed two Alawite men on September 16 in the main square of the rebel-controlled city of Raqqa. Fighters from the “Islamic state of the Levant and Iraq”, a Sunni extremist group affiliated with Al Qaeda, justified the execution on the grounds that the men were “Nusaries”, a derogritory term used to describe members of the Alawite sect of Islam, from which Syrian president Bashar al-Assad hails.

When local women witnessing the execution protested the actions of the fighters, the fighters cursed the women and claimed that the men had raped women in the city of Homs. The men were subsequently executed and their bodies carted away in the back of a pick-up truck. This event has reinforced fears that Sunni extremists will try to eliminate the Alawite community of Syria if president Bashar al-Assad falls from power.

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Al Qaeda-affiliated Rebels Execute Tw...
Raqqa, Syria
By Al Raqqa Hurra
16 Sep 2013

Al Qaeda affiliated rebels in Syria executed two Alawite men September 16 in the main square of the rebel-controlled city of Raqqa. Fighters from the “Islamic state of the Levant and Iraq”, a Sunni extremist group affiliated with Al Qaeda, justified the execution on the grounds that the men were “Nusaries”, a derogritory term used to describe members of the Alawite sect of Islam, from which Syrian president Bashar al-Assad hails.

When local women witnessing the execution protested the actions of the fighters, the fighters cursed the women and claimed that the men had raped women in the city of Homs. The men were subsequently executed and their bodies carted away in the back of a pick-up truck. This event has reinforced fears that Sunni extremists will try to eliminate the Alawite community of Syria if president Bashar al-Assad falls from power.

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Street Fighters of Tripoli 2
Lebanon Tripoli
By Osie Greenway
17 Aug 2013

This building covered in Sunni martyr posters who have died both in Tripoli and fighting in Syria is monumental to the Sunni militias in the area and symbol to the older fighters who stopped the Syrian army occupation at this building from advancing deeper into Tripoli in the early 1980s.Tripoli's Bab al Tabbaneh.

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Street Fighters of Tripoli 3
Lebanon Tripoli
By Osie Greenway
16 Aug 2013

Sunni fighters in Tripoli’s Bab al Tabbaneh prepare for possible night clashes against the Alawite militias based in Jabal Mohsen by checking weapons and loading magazine into their web gear, the night ended in sporadic sniper fire between the neighborhoods.

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Street Fighters of Tripoli 16
Lebanon Tripoli
By Osie Greenway
16 Aug 2013

The Lebanese army has been raiding Bab al Tebbaneh for weapons stashes inside homes and shops like this one, the neighborhoods are anticipating the next round of clashes in Tripoli that they fear to be the worst, these mortar rounds are extremely illegal and highly prized among the militias even though the munitions are dated.

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Street Fighters of Tripoli 5
Lebanon Tripoli
By Osie Greenway
16 Aug 2013

Bab al Tabbaneh, rests at the base of the pro Assad neighborhood of Jabal a Mohsen, inside Lebanon's second largest city Tripoli. The area is well known for its decades of sectarian clashes and its streets that are always under the watch of militia snipers.

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Street Fighters of Tripoli 1
Lebanon Tripoli
By Osie Greenway
16 Aug 2013

Sunni fighters some who have been fighting in the area for over twenty years in Bab al Tabbaneh believe the time is coming for major conflict against the Alawite militias based in nearby Jabal Mohsen in Tripoli, Lebanon.

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Street Fighters of Tripoli 4
Lebanon Tripoli
By Osie Greenway
16 Aug 2013

Sunni Fighter from Bab al Tebbaneh displays his recent wounds from clashes with the Alawite fighters, a bullet entered from behind his jaw and exited at the lower gums and another shattered his thumb. He explained that Lebanese hospitals are weary of treating wounded fighters because of consequences from the Lebanese Army.

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SUNNI MILITIAS PREPARE FOR WAR 10
Lebanon Tripoli
By Osie Greenway
16 Aug 2013

"If the Lebanese army came and disarmed all militias, I would be pleased," says one of the Sunni fighters in Tripoli continuing, "I'm an interior decorator, I miss my line of work and I'm tired of fighting."

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Street Fighters of Tripoli 15
lebanon Tripoli
By Osie Greenway
16 Aug 2013

Private arsenals filled with new and old weaponry in Tripoli are scattered throughout the city inside shops and homes, both Sunni and Alawite militias are preparing for major clashes in Lebanon due to the direct effect of the Syrian conflict that has spilled into the streets of the country since it began over two years ago.

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Street Fighters of Tripoli 14
Tripoli Lebanon
By Osie Greenway
31 May 2013

Lebanese armored vehicles block the main up hill road that has seen the worst fighting in the last months, this road separates the battling neighborhoods of Jabal Mohsen and Bab Tebbaneh in Tripoli.

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A Story of a Syrian Village
Homs, Syria
By Smart Media
07 May 2013

Oyoun Hsain is a small village located in the northeastern countryside of Homs with a population of less than 4000 people.

The area was not subjected to either armed or peaceful revolutionary movements, but it fell victim to shelling and other destructive measures.

A massacre was on the verge of occurring, but the Free Syrian Army intervened and stopped it by evacuating the villagers away.

However, many people were killed due to the continuous shelling by warplanes, artillery and tanks from the battalion next to the village. Mercenaries also broke into the village several times and killed people. In addition to that, more than 120 people were kidnapped. Until this moment, nobody knows anything about what happened to those kidnapped people.

The film shows the destruction in the village after the evacuation of its inhabitants.

The buildings’ ruins embed the village’s memory, the people’s properties and their children’s food.

The film authenticates the story of the village. The film is a call for humanity sent to the neighboring villages, where mercenaries live in and still support the regime. It reminds them of the past years when they lived peacefully together; when all the sects in Syria lived in peaceful coexistence.

The film aims to wake up the remnant of humanity and mercy in neighbors’ hearts; the friends yesterday and the executioners today.

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Tunisia: the guardians of the saints 05
By Steven Wassenaar
14 Feb 2013

The temple of patron saint Sidi Mehrez in the center of Tunis is guarded, maintained and visited by women. 79 year-old Khira (left), who has been guarding the temple for 50 years, gives holy water to a faithful. The well in the mausoleum is blessed. to complete the "ziara" (the visit), the faithfuls have to drink its water. On the right, next to the door, is Zora. The mausoleum is protected by the police. Since the fall of Ben Ali's regime in 2011, attacks against mausoleums and Sufi places of worship by radical Islamists are frequent. Islamists consider prayers to saints a sin because it associates other gods or beings with Allah. Since 2011, 80 mausoleums, mainly guarded by women, have been attacked.

Le temple de Sidi Mehrez à Tunis. A gauche, Khira, 79 ans, gardienne du temple de Sidi Mehrez depuis 50 ans. A droite de la porte : Zora. Le mausolé est protégé par la police : depuis la chute de Ben Ali en 2011 les attaques contre les mausolées et les lieux de culte des confréries soufies, très nombreux en Tunisie, sont l'œuvre de l’islam rigoriste: la prière des saints est une hérésie à leurs yeux (les djihadistes d'Ansar Dine ont par le même raisonnement saccagés les mausolées à Tombouctou, au Mali. ). Depuis 2011, 80 Mausolée - le plus souvent tenus par des femmes - ont été attaqués en Tunisie.

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PRESSURE BUILDS IN LEBANON - Editor's...
Beirut, Lebanon
By Editor's Picks
06 Dec 2012

Clashes continued Wednesday in Lebanon's northern city of Tripoli, between residents in the Bab al-Tabbaneh and Jabal Mohsen neighborhoods who are loyal to opposing sides in Syria's civil war. In response, Prime Minister Mikati called on the Lebanese people to disassociate themselves from Syria's conflict and refrain from resorting to violence. Meanwhile, in Aleppo the conflict rages on; neighborhoods are reduced to rubble and children play in the remnants of a bombed-out school yard.

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The New Kids On The Block
Tripoli, Lebanon
By U.S. Editor
05 Dec 2012

The new kids on the block

The emergence of the Sunni extremists groups in Lebanon

Photo-reportage by Randa Mirza

In October 2011, I started covering the Syrian revolution and the repercussions for Lebanon; the “Arab spring” had finally reached Syria. Throughout the year, I found myself increasingly reporting on Lebanese Sunni extremists groups, which used to play a very marginal role in the political life of Lebanon prior to the Syrian uprising.

The emergence of the Sunni extremists in Lebanon was first catalyzed by the “Arab Spring” that led to the fall of dictators and authoritarian regimes; traditionally oppressive against Muslim extremists, and lately from the conflict in Syria.

The Syrian conflict is reinforced by the wide spectrum of Lebanese Sunni groups, and principally by the most extreme ones, in their struggle for political gains in Lebanon.

The Lebanese Sunni extremists do not share the same position towards the Syrian uprising. However, a majority endorses the Syrian people’s fight for freedom against the secular, non-Sunni dictator. Hezbollah is perceived as a foe since the Shia party has pledged allegiance to the Syrian Alawite regime increasing the split between the Sunni and Shia communities in Lebanon.

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Returning from Tazia rally
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Khandaker Azizur Rahman
25 Nov 2012

The Day of Ashura is on the 10th day of Muharram in the Islamic calendar and marks the climax of the Mourning of Muharram.
It is commemorated by Shi'a Muslims as a day of mourning for the martyrdom of Husayn ibn Ali, the grandson of Muhammad at the Battle of Karbala on 10 Muharram in the year 61 AH (in AHc: October 9 and in AHt: October 10, 680 CE).

For Shi'as, commemoration of Ashura is not a festival, but rather a sad event, while Sunni Muslims view it as a victory God has given to his prophet, Moses . This victory is the very reason, as Sunni Muslims believe, Muhammad mentioned when recommending fasting on this day.Sunnis also commemorate this day as the day of victory for Islam. The martyrdom of Hussain, gave new life to the message of Islam. Sunnis gather at the mosques, to remember the noble sacrifice made by Hussain and his companions, hold seminars and take out procession in the remembrance of this great martyr of Islam.
For Shi'as, it is a period of intense grief and mourning. Mourners, congregate at a Mosque for sorrowful, poetic recitations such as marsiya, noha, latmiya and soaz performed in memory of the martyrdom of Husayn

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Youth are Beating the Drums as They a...
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Khandaker Azizur Rahman
25 Nov 2012

The Day of Ashura is on the 10th day of Muharram in the Islamic calendar and marks the climax of the Mourning of Muharram.
It is commemorated by Shi'a Muslims as a day of mourning for the martyrdom of Husayn ibn Ali, the grandson of Muhammad at the Battle of Karbala on 10 Muharram in the year 61 AH (in AHc: October 9 and in AHt: October 10, 680 CE).

For Shi'as, commemoration of Ashura is not a festival, but rather a sad event, while Sunni Muslims view it as a victory God has given to his prophet, Moses . This victory is the very reason, as Sunni Muslims believe, Muhammad mentioned when recommending fasting on this day.Sunnis also commemorate this day as the day of victory for Islam. The martyrdom of Hussain, gave new life to the message of Islam. Sunnis gather at the mosques, to remember the noble sacrifice made by Hussain and his companions, hold seminars and take out procession in the remembrance of this great martyr of Islam.
For Shi'as, it is a period of intense grief and mourning. Mourners, congregate at a Mosque for sorrowful, poetic recitations such as marsiya, noha, latmiya and soaz performed in memory of the martyrdom of Husayn

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A Rushing Rally of Tazia
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Khandaker Azizur Rahman
25 Nov 2012

The Day of Ashura is on the 10th day of Muharram in the Islamic calendar and marks the climax of the Mourning of Muharram.
It is commemorated by Shi'a Muslims as a day of mourning for the martyrdom of Husayn ibn Ali, the grandson of Muhammad at the Battle of Karbala on 10 Muharram in the year 61 AH (in AHc: October 9 and in AHt: October 10, 680 CE).

For Shi'as, commemoration of Ashura is not a festival, but rather a sad event, while Sunni Muslims view it as a victory God has given to his prophet, Moses . This victory is the very reason, as Sunni Muslims believe, Muhammad mentioned when recommending fasting on this day.Sunnis also commemorate this day as the day of victory for Islam. The martyrdom of Hussain, gave new life to the message of Islam. Sunnis gather at the mosques, to remember the noble sacrifice made by Hussain and his companions, hold seminars and take out procession in the remembrance of this great martyr of Islam.
For Shi'as, it is a period of intense grief and mourning. Mourners, congregate at a Mosque for sorrowful, poetic recitations such as marsiya, noha, latmiya and soaz performed in memory of the martyrdom of Husayn