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The Kurdish "Saturday Mothers"
Istanbul, Turkey
By Piero Castellano
17 Oct 2014

Istanbul (Turkey) October 18th, 2014: a man at the ÒSaturday MothersÓ 499th meeting holds a placard reading ÒFor 17 years from the disappearance we are asking ÔWhere is Yusuf Nergiz?ÕÓ (Photo by Piero Castellano)

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The Kurdish "Saturday Mothers"
Istanbul, Turkey
By Piero Castellano
17 Oct 2014

Istanbul (Turkey) October 18th, 2014: Ersoy Tan, a freelance journalist from Istanbul, takes photo of the 499th meeting of the so-called ÒSaturday Mothers,Ó Kurdish women protesting every Saturday for their children, who disappeared while in custody of Security Forces. (Photo by Piero Castellano)

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The Kurdish "Saturday Mothers"
Istanbul, Turkey
By Piero Castellano
17 Oct 2014

Istanbul (Turkey) October 18th, 2014: Some of the so-called ÒSaturday MothersÓ, Kurdish women who protest every Saturday about their childrenÕs disappearance while in custody of Security Forces. Dozens, then hundreds of people have joined their quest to know their children or
husbandsÕ fate.

During the 1980s and 1990s, hundreds of political activists, journalists or suspected sympathizers of the outlawed Kurdistan Workers Party, PKK, were detained by security forces and never seen alive again. PKK is considered a terrorist group by Turkey, the EU and USA.
(Photo by Piero Castellano)

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The Kurdish "Saturday Mothers"
Istanbul, Turkey
By Piero Castellano
17 Oct 2014

Istanbul (Turkey) October 18th, 2014: Three of the so-called ÒSaturday MothersÓ holding portraits of their disappeared relatives. The group was dubbed ÒMothersÓ by the press for the similarities with the Argentinian Mothers of Plaza de Mayo, who have often showed their solidarity with the Kurdish women. (Photo by Piero Castellano)

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The Kurdish "Saturday Mothers"
Istanbul, Turkey
By Piero Castellano
17 Oct 2014

Istanbul (Turkey) October 18th, 2014: Freelance journalist Ersoy Tan hugs another activist at the ÒSaturday MothersÕÓ 499th meeting. Mr. Tan has followed and photographed the latest 299 meetings of the group who asks to know the fate of people disappeared while in custody. (Photo by Piero Castellano)

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The Kurdish "Saturday Mothers"
Istanbul, Turkey
By Piero Castellano
17 Oct 2014

Istanbul (Turkey) October 18th, 2014: Freelance journalist Ersoy Tan shows a gift he has received from a Kurdish youth: a stick, decorated with traditional Kurdish colors red, green and yellow and the word ÒRojava,Ó the Kurdish region in Syria fighting against ISIS. (Photo by Piero Castellano)

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The Kurdish "Saturday Mothers"
Istanbul, Turkey
By Piero Castellano
17 Oct 2014

Istanbul (Turkey) October 18th, 2014: A woman in traditional Kurdish attire bows her head in despair while holding the portrait of her husband, detained by security forces in May 1994 and then disappeared, during the ÒSaturday MothersÓ 499th meeting. (Photo by Piero Castellano)

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The Kurdish "Saturday Mothers"
Istanbul, Turkey
By Piero Castellano
17 Oct 2014

Istanbul (Turkey) October 18th, 2014: red carnations and portraits of disappeared people over a banner laid on the ground, reading ÒPerpetrators are known, where are the disappeared?Ó at the ÒSaturday MothersÓ 499th meeting. Red carnations are a symbol of left wing activism and mourning in Turkey. (Photo by Piero Castellano)

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The Kurdish "Saturday Mothers"
Istanbul, Turkey
By Piero Castellano
17 Oct 2014

Istanbul (Turkey) October 18th, 2014: A young girl hold the portrait of a relative disappeared while in custody, long before she was born, at the ÒSaturday MothersÕÓ 499th meeting. (Photo by Piero Castellano)

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The Kurdish "Saturday Mothers"
Istanbul, Turkey
By Piero Castellano
17 Oct 2014

Istanbul (Turkey) October 18th, 2014: Hanim Tosun (center), wife of Fehmi Tosun, who was detained in Istanbul in 1995 for being a Kurdish activist and never seen again, is hugged by another woman while holding her granddaughter, who never met her grandfather, at the ÒSaturday MothersÕÓ 499th meeting. (Photo by Piero Castellano)

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The Kurdish "Saturday Mothers"
Istanbul, Turkey
By Piero Castellano
17 Oct 2014

Istanbul (Turkey) October 18th, 2014: A woman in traditional Kurdish attire looks for the photos of her disappeared daughter at the ÒSaturday MothersÕÓ 499th
meeting.

Despite undeniable improvements in the past ten years, and especially after the ceasefire and the Òpeace processÓ in the last two, tensions among Kurds, Nationalists, and security forces have led to bloody riots the past month, connected with a perceived inaction of TurkeyÕs government in the border crisis at Kobane. (Photo by Piero Castellano)

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The Kurdish "Saturday Mothers"
Istanbul, Turkey
By Piero Castellano
17 Oct 2014

Istanbul (Turkey) October 18th, 2014: After the ÒSaturday MothersÕÓ 499th meeting, the group traditionally gathers in a nearby cafŽ to drink ay, the traditional Turkish tea, and discuss the current situation. In these days, the main topics are the siege of Kobane, the ISIS offensive, and TurkeyÕs government attitude towards Kurds. (Photo by Piero Castellano)

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The Kurdish "Saturday Mothers"
Istanbul, Turkey
By Piero Castellano
17 Oct 2014

Istanbul (Turkey) October 18th, 2014: One of the so-called ÒSaturday MothersÓ does the defiant communist salute at the cafŽ where they traditionally gather after a meeting. Many of the disappeared people were left wing sympathizers or labor union activists, suspected by security forces to be close to PKK. (Photo by Piero Castellano)

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The Kurdish "Saturday Mothers"
Istanbul, Turkey
By Piero Castellano
17 Oct 2014

Istanbul (Turkey) October 18th, 2014: Some of the so-called ÒSaturday MothersÓ holding portraits of their disappeared loved ones during their 499th meeting. After 200 meetings, in 1999, the group had to stop their sit-ins because of constant police harassment. After great hopes in the new AKP government went disappointed, they started meeting again in 2009. (Photo by Piero Castellano)

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MOURNING THE DISAPPEARED - Editor's P...
Beirut, Lebanon
By Editor's Picks
18 Nov 2012

On Saturday, November 17, a Lebanese Human Rights organization gathered families for a march from Beirut National Museum to Downtown Beirut in memory of the approximately 17,000 disappeared persons missing since the Lebanese civil war 30 years ago. Women sadly displayed photos of their disappeared loved ones, wishing to know whether their loved ones are still alive, or if not, if their remains can be returned for a family burial

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Enough Waiting 2
Beirut, Lebanon
By Raha Askarizadeh
17 Nov 2012

The demonstration began in front of the National Museum in the Mathaf area, which marked the civil war’s “Green Line", demarcating East and West Beirut, where many people were forcibly and arbitrarily abducted by local and foreign militias.

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Enough Waiting 3
Beirut, Lebanon
By Raha Askarizadeh
17 Nov 2012

For the mothers and fathers, sisters and brothers, wives and children of the 17,000 people who went missing during and after the 1975-1990 Lebanese civil war, the war is still not over.

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Enough Waiting 5
Beirut,Lebanon
By Raha Askarizadeh
17 Nov 2012

Beirut refuses to forget its missing people.

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A Day Of Hope
Downtown, Beirut, Lebanon
By Roï
17 Nov 2012

She asks the government to find her husband saying, "Even if he's dead, give him to me, I want to bury him with my own hands."

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Mothers And Sisters
Downtown, Beirut, Lebanon
By Roï
17 Nov 2012

To date, the families of the disappeared continue to struggle for their right to know what happened to those who were taken from them. They want to know if they are still alive or, if they died, whether they can recover their remains.

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Grief Between Religions
Achrafieh, Beirut, Lebanon
By Roï
17 Nov 2012

Christian and Muslim women grieve for their lost ones.

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Cemetery Mothers
Mar Metri, Achrafieh, Lebanon
By Roï
17 Nov 2012

It gets emotional every time they hold their pictures. They visited 3 cemeteries where the state recognized the presence of mass graves, a gesture of hope, a reminder of their past and an act of determination.

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Who?
Adlieh, Beirut, Lebanon
By Roï
17 Nov 2012

Lebanese authorities are responsible for revealing the fate of the thousands of persons who went missing in Lebanon over the past decades.
The people have the right to know.

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We Have The Right To Know
Adlieh, Beirut, Lebanon
By Roï
17 Nov 2012

30 years have gone by and she still has hope of finding her, dead or alive. She demands her right to know what happened.

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Massive Grave
Horsh Beirut, Lebanon
By Roï
17 Nov 2012

Over 17,000 people disappeared during the 1975-90 Lebanese Civil War. To date, the families of the disappeared continue to struggle for their right to know what happened to those who were taken from them, if they are still alive and, if it turns out that they have died, whether they can recover their remains.

PICTURED: A woman holding her husband's photo in the cemetery.

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Compassion Among The families Of The ...
Horsh Beirut, Lebanon
By Roï
17 Nov 2012

Over 17,000 people disappeared during the 1975-90 Lebanese Civil War. To date, the families of the disappeared continue to struggle for their right to know what happened to those who were taken from them, if they are still alive and, if it turns out that they have died, whether they can recover their remains.

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Lebanese Women Hold Pictures Of Missi...
Horsh Beirut, Lebanon
By Roï
17 Nov 2012

Saturday, November 17, in the memory of 30 years and 17,000 missing and disappeared persons in Lebanon's civil war, "Act for the disappeared," a Lebanese Human Rights association, organized a march with the families of the disappeared starting at Beirut National Museum and passing by three cemeteries where the state recognized them with mass graves. The march ended in Downtown near the Unesco area, joining the Lebanese families of war prisoners and abductees in Syria.

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The Sorrow Of Losing
Horsh Beirut, Lebanon
By Roï
17 Nov 2012

There are several thousand people who were missing and forcibly disappeared in Lebanon. The great majority of them went missing during the Lebanese war (1975-1990) at the hands of Lebanese militias, as well as local and foreign armed groups.

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A Forcibly Disappeared Person
Horsh Beirut, Lebanon
By Roï
17 Nov 2012

In Lebanon most of the missing and disappeared are civilians. Many were kidnapped from their homes, from the streets, or at checkpoints controlled by militias or foreign troops.

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Enough Waiting 1
Beirut, National museum, Lebanon
By Raha Askarizadeh
17 Nov 2012

Lebanese NGOs ACT for the Disappeared, and Support of Lebanese in Detention and Exile (SOLIDE), along with the committee of parents of the people who went missing during the Lebanese civil war, held a gathering of around 200 people in Beirut on November 17, 2012.

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Enough Waiting
By Raha Askarizadeh
17 Nov 2012

Lebanese NGOs ACT for the Disappeared, and Support of Lebanese in Detention and Exile (SOLIDE), along with the committee of parents of the people who went missing during the Lebanese civil war, held a gathering of around 200 people in Beirut on November 17, 2012.

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Enough Waiting 4
Beirut, Lebanon
By Raha Askarizadeh
17 Nov 2012

Relatives of the disappeared people along with activists were also taken on a bus tour to three locations that were recognized as sites of mass graves by the Lebanese government in 2000.