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Security
Jerusalem
By Ralf Falbe
11 May 2015

Israeli Security in the Old City of Jerusalem, Israel.

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Bar Mitzvah
Jerusalem
By Ralf Falbe
11 May 2015

Bar Mitzvah service, a Jewish religious tradition, in the old city of Jerusalem.

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Mea Shearim
Jerusalem
By Ralf Falbe
11 May 2015

A man reads a notice posted in the Mea Shearim district, an Ultra Orthodox Jewish neighborhood in Jerusalem.

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Jerusalem: the Birthplace of Monotheism
Jerusalem
By Noe Falk Nielsen
20 Apr 2015

The old city of Jerusalem contains the holiest places for two major monotheistic religions and the third holiest place for a third. The old city of Jerusalem contains the Wailing Wall, the holiest site for Jews; the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, which is said to stand on the ground where Jesus was crucified, interred, and later resurrected; and the nearby Al-Aqsa Mosque, which is one of the oldest mosques in Islam and represents the place where the prophet arrived on his nightly journey from Mecca. Al-Aqsa is regarded as the third holiest place in Islam, after Mecca and Medina.


Together, these religious sites hold significance for approximately four billion Christians, Muslims and Jews around the world. 

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Snow Blankets Jerusalem
Jerusalem
By Andrea DiCenzo
18 Feb 2015

The city of Jerusalem woke up to a blanket of ten inches of snow from a storm the night before. Winters in the region have become increasingly colder and this is the fourth year in a row that snow has fallen on Jerusalem. The Jerusalem Municipality has asked the residents of Jerusalem and surrounding areas to refrain from using the roads and schools have remained closed. As children are starting to appear outside to revel in the beautiful views of the city covered in snow, the government has stressed its responsibility to ensure safety in the city. "The first objective is to save lives, the second to open roads and the third to supply electricity," said Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu in a statement released on Thursday night.

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Pioneer Artist Samia Halaby: “Abstrac...
Biel
By AmmarParis
04 Feb 2015

Beirut, Lebanon

February 4, 2015

At the age of 79, Samia Halaby is one of the leading artists in the Arab world.
Halaby’s first retrospective exhibition, Samia Halaby: Five Decades of Painting and Innovation, currently held in Beirut, celebrates more than 70 of her artworks she has produced. Halaby wishes to hold similar retrospective exhibitions in different parts of the world. Her work is widely sought around by art collectors. One her paintings were sold at Christie’s auction house for $179,000.
As an international and Arab pioneer of abstraction, Halaby aims to place abstract painting within the reach of a very wide audience.
“People say that they do not understand abstract art,” she says. “Therefore, I give paintings titles to open the door for spectators to enter and see whatever they want.” Halaby has remained faithful to abstract painting throughout her long career because she believes it is “an image of nature.” “While [Photography] builds a perspective using a lens, [abstract art] imitates nature without a lens,” Halaby adds. The Jerusalem-born artist’s work reflects her political and historical background. Her vast array of paintings includes a collection on olive trees, an icon of Palestinian culture and symbol of resistance. She has also written a book on the artistic representation of the Palestinian intifada and believes that it constitutes a distinct artistic school.

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Ground Zero: The Tug of War over Jeru...
Jerusalem, Israel
By Jonathan Giesen
28 Dec 2014

As tensions in Jerusalem boil over into open conflict between Israelis and Palestinians, the issue of the Al-Aqsa Mosque complex remains one of the key issues in the conflict. This story explores the cultural and religious significance of the complex to the two sides and illustrates how the area has yet again become a catalyst for violence. Some fear this newest round of violence may lead to a third Palestinian Intifada.

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After the Punishment: Home Demolition...
Silwan
By Ibrahim Husseini
24 Dec 2014

In Jerusalem, the Israeli Army has been destroying the family homes of militants as a form of collective punishment. This story explores what happens to those families after they have lost their home.

Article:

Text by Youssef Zbib

In October, 21-year-old Abdel Rahman Shalodi drove his car into a light rail train station on a line that connects Israeli settlements in Jerusalem. He killed a baby and a woman from Ecuador and wounded at least seven other people. This act was part of a recent series of attacks against Israelis, fueled in part by a religious conflict over the ownership of the holy site that Israelis call the Temple Mount and to which Palestinians refer as the Noble Sanctuary.
In retaliation for the attack, the Israeli government ordered the destruction of the Shalodi family’s apartment unit, located in the Silwan neighborhood near the disputed old center of Jerusalem. His mother, father and five siblings, are now without a home.

"Right now we are living in my brother-in-law’s apartment. He is in Jordan now and will come back in five months,” said Enas Shalodi, Abdel Rahman’s 43-year-old mother.

“We can only use the living room and one bedroom in the apartment in which we are staying, so the situation is a little difficult. Some of my children sleep at their grandmother's and some sleep here," she added.

The Israeli police have not left the family alone since the demolition. Police officers interrupted a reporter’s interview with Enas to inspect the apartment, something which has happened repeatedly since the family moved into their temporary residence.
“They came here when we moved in and said that we are not allowed to stay. [They show up whenever] a reporter comes here,”Enas said while her teenage daughter Nebras spoke with the police officers.

“The [Israeli police] are also threatening to demolish the home where we are staying now, which belongs to my brother-in-law (…) Since the demolition, approximately 34 days ago, they broke in here about 10 times,” Enas said.

Enas’s daughter Nebras finds it hard to deal with the family’s difficult circumstances.
“We have no computer, no TV, no devices and the house is too small. It is not enough," Nebras said.

Human Rights Watch (HRW) has labeled the demolition of the family homes of militants as a “war crime.”
“Justifying punishment of people who are not responsible for a criminal act just because they might ‘support’ it would set a dangerous precedent which could come back to haunt Israelis,” reads a statement issued by HRW in November 2014. Israeli critics of this policy, on the other hand, argue that it is ineffective because, as figures show, the number of attacks by Palestinians against Israel increases following house demolitions.

Demolition to expand settlements

In addition to demolishing homes as a punitive measure, Israeli authorities also destroy Palestinian homes built without a permit. Palestinians in the West Bank, however, usually cannot obtain such permits even if they apply for them.
According to the pro-peace Israeli monitoring group B’Tselem, Israel has demolished 545 houses that belong to Palestinians in east Jerusalem between 2004 and 2014. This has made 2,115 people homeless. Some people take down their homes with their own hands in order to avoid paying demolition charges to Israeli authorities, according to the organization’s official website.
The Zeer family, made up of a mother, a father and five children, now lives in a cave after Israeli authorities razed their house twice, without giving them a clear explanation.
“Sometimes they [Israeli authorities] claim that this is an agricultural area. At other times they claim that we do not a have a [building] permit,” said 40-year-old Khalid al-Zeer. “It seems that they want to uproot us and ethnically cleanse the original inhabitants from this land and move in settlers that they have gathered from around the world.” The small community of Israeli settlers in Silwan has recently expanded as dozens of them moved into the neighborhood in October, with the help of a right-wing organization called Ateret Kohanim that promotes Jewish settlement in east Jerusalem. The organization considers this influx a legitimate return to a village established by Yemenite Jews in the 1880s known in Hebrew as Kfar Hashiloah, which disappeared in the 1920s.
Eli Hazan, a member of the Israeli Likud party, defended his government’s policy of building settlements in the West Bank.
“We are going to stay in [the West Bank], therefore we are going to build in these places,” Hazan said. “We remember what happened from 1948 to 1967. Jews could not go to East Jerusalem. They could not go to the Western Wall and Mount of Olives.”

From the Palestinian point of view, however, this will only lead to more grief.

“This suffering and the suffering of every Jerusalemite will not be over until the end of the occupation,” said Enas Shalodi.

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After the Punishment: Home Demolition...
Jerusalem
By Ibrahim Husseini
21 Dec 2014

Silwan, East Jerusalem, Palestinian Territories

December 23, 2014

Enas Shalodi is a 43-year-old mother of five children who lives in Silwan, a densely populated and poor suburb south of Jerusalem.
The Israeli military demolished Shalodi’s house in November at the orders of Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s after her oldest son, 21-year-old Abdel Rahman, drove his car into a light train in Jerusalem, killing a three month old baby and a 21-year-old woman from Ecuador. Abdul Rahman was shot on the scene, and later died of his wounds.
Critics say the demolition of the family's home is a pure act of vengeance and a case in point of a double-standard policy practiced by Israel. The homes belonging to the killers of Mohammad Abu Khdair, a Palestinian teenager who was kidnapped and beaten to death in July by Israeli settlers, were not demolished.
Abdul Rahman Shalodi was previously jailed for 16 months on counts of throwing rocks at Israelis, according to Enas. He was released in December 2012. Following his release, he was arrested several times for short periods of time without being charged. The Shabak, Israel's internal security service, regularly called him and pressured him to collaborate with it, Enas said, then “he started to have psychological problems."
This video aims to shed light on the struggle of a Palestinian family in one of Jerusalem's toughest neighborhoods.
Israeli policemen interrupted the interview with Enas Shanodi when the suddenly arrived to inspect the building where she is staying with her children. She says that the police have raided this building at least 10 times.
Silwan, adjacent to the Noble Sanctuary which houses the Al-Aqsa Mosque and the Dome of the Rock, is a target for hardline Jewish groups who are trying to settle in Palestinian neighborhoods in east Jerusalem. The neighborhood is often the site of heavy clashes between Palestinian youth and Israeli security, which usually end with the arrest of young Palestinians.
Archaeological excavations in Silwan are also an unsettling factor. Israel is carrying them out in order to prove that Jerusalem has a Jewish origin. Palestinians say these excavations often result in confiscating their lands and denying them the right to build homes.

Shot List

Shot List

1 Various of Jerusalem
2 Various of Israeli police troops on the streets
3 Wide of street
4 Medium of banner with logo of Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine commemorating Abdel Rahman Shalodi as a martyr
5 Wide of street where Enas Shalodi lives. Graffiti “Palestina Libre!! Argentina” (Free Palestine!! Argentina)
6 SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman) Enas Shalodi

“Ten days before the demolition, when they [Israeli police] came and took measurements of the house, we knew they were going to demolish [it]. We removed all the furniture and the children’s belongings.

“Here, we live in the Shalodi building, which belongs to my husband’s brothers. We transported all of our furniture to the building and put them in seven apartments.

"Right now we are living in my brother-in-law’s apartment. He is in Jordan now and will come back in five months. We are staying in his place and our furniture is stored in seven other apartments that belong to my brothers-in-law and my mother-in-law. We can only use the living room and one bedroom in the apartment in which we are staying, so the situation is a little difficult. Some of my children sleep at their grandmother's and some sleep here…"

[A young man’s voice]: "The police are here"

"They are here"

“The police are here"

Enas: They came? Who came? The police are here!

[Conversation among police officers in Hebrew.]

7 SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman) Enas Shalodi
“They came here when we moved in and said that we are not allowed to stay. [They show up whenever] a reporter comes here.

“Also, no one had lived in my brother-in-law’s apartment for a year and a half. We were fixing it. Whenever we brought something to the [apartment], they [Israeli police] would immediately come and say: ‘You cannot repair the [apartment].’ They [Israeli police] also told us that we cannot stay in my brother-in-law’s apartment. They [Israeli police] are also threatening us to demolish the home where we are staying now, which belongs to my brother in law. They [Israeli police] came here last night at 8 pm. Last week they came here on four days: Thursday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday. The week before, they came on Sunday. Since the demolition, approximately 34 days ago, they broke in here about 10 times.”

8 Various of Enas Shalodi’s demolished house
9 SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman) Enas Shalodi

“I do not know, ending the occupation! I mean this suffering will not end and the suffering of every Jerusalemite will not end until the occupation ends.

10 Various of Enas Shalodi’s demolished house

“If we receive aid from benefactors or any international organizations, we will buy a house or a small apartment because we cannot afford to buy a house [on our own] right now. Two [of my children] are studying in the university and three in school and my husband is a humble worker. He works at a car wash station owned by Jews. So his income is barely enough to pay daily expenses. Add to that our kids university tuition costs a lot. We cannot save to buy a home and pay for their tuition. So we are asking help from the organizations. They all promised help but we have not received any."

11 SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Teenage girl) Nebras, Enas Shalodi's daughter

“We have no computer, no TV, no devices and the house is too small. It is not enough."

12 Various of Knesset, the Israeli Parliament, West Jerusalem
13 SOUNDBITE (English with Hebrew accent, Man) Likud Party member
“I think that me and you, we have a disagreement. There are some territories which you consider to be Palestinian and I consider to be Israeli. For instance, East Jerusalem, Gush Etzion, Ariel, and what we call the settlement block.

“We want to make it real. We are going to stay in these places, therefore we are going to build in these places. We remember what happened from 1948 to 1967. Jews could not go to East Jerusalem. They could not go to the Western Wall and Mount of Olives.

“We want to protect ourselves. This is why we are doing that. Now, besides, that, we have a dispute in Israel itself -- whether to build in other places in the territories. We are trying to manage this dispute. We don’t fully agree inside Israel, but we are making our best.”

14 Various of settlement
15 SOUNDBITE (English with Hebrew accent, Man) Likud Party member

“We are willing to deal with it. We remember what happened [in] every territory that Israel pulled out of. If you remember, we pulled out in 1993 from territories and we got terror. We pulled out in the year 2000 from South Lebanon, and we got terror. We pulled out of Gaza, completely, in the year 2005, and we got terror.

“We are only asking to protect ourselves. Besides that, do not forget that even before; we came into the territories in 1967 and we were under criticism.”

16 Various of separation wall
17 SOUNDBITE (English with Hebrew accent, Man) Eli Hazan, Likud Party member

“Personally, I accept the two-state solution of Benjamin Netanyahu from (…) June 2009, which says that (…) Jerusalem will be united under Israeli sovereignty. We are under the settlement block in Jerusalem in Gosh Etzion and Ariel and the recognition by Palestinians [of] the Israeli State. That is the solution for me and my point of view.”

18 Various of settlements

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Al Aqsa and the Conflict in Jerusalem
Jerusalem, Israel
By Iliay
27 Nov 2014

November 2014
Jerusalem

As tensions in Jerusalem boil over into open conflict between Israelis and Palestinians, the issue of the Al-Aqsa Mosque complex remains one of the key issues in the conflict. This story explores the cultural and religious significance of the complex to the two sides and illustrates how the area has yet again become a catalyst for violence. Some fear this newest round of violence may lead to a third Palestinian Intifada.

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A Tale of Two Cities - Jerusalem
Jerusalem
By David Vaaknin
07 Oct 2014

October 2-5, 2014
Jerusalem

Perhaps the most culturally significant city in the world, Jerusalem is a mosaic of religions, cultures, and traditions. It is a city where the past and the present collide in a both harmonious and conflictual way. Hip shopping malls are frequented by both secular Israelis and orthodox Jewish clientele who adhere to an ancient way of life; Palestinians buy mobile phones from a telecommunications kiosk in the walled old city; and international tourists marvel at one of the world's oldest churches. On the Jewish holiday of Yom Kippur, the city's modern highways and light rail tramline stand empty as the use of all electronics is discouraged in recognition of the holiday. These photos illustrate the layers of this timeless, yet modern city.

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Jerusalem - the birthplace of Monotheism
Jerusalem
By Noe Falk Nielsen
02 Oct 2014

The Wailing Wall with the Dome of the Rock and Al Aqsa Mosque in the background in the Temple Mount.

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Jerusalem - the birthplace of Monotheism
Church of the Nativity
By Noe Falk Nielsen
01 Oct 2014

The site where Jesus is said to have been born. Church of Nativity, Bethlehem, West Bank.

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Jerusalem - the birthplace of Monotheism
Jerusalem
By Noe Falk Nielsen
30 Sep 2014

Jewish devotees attend evening prayer at the Wailing Wall. The wailing wall is the last remaining part of the second temple built by Herod in 19 BC. The wall comprised the western wall of the former temple, thus its alternate name the "Western Wall".

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Jerusalem - the birthplace of Monotheism
Jerusalem
By Noe Falk Nielsen
30 Sep 2014

Christian woman pray at the site where it is said Jesus was laid to rest.

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Jerusalem - the birthplace of Monotheism
Jerusalem
By Noe Falk Nielsen
29 Sep 2014

The Dome of the Rock towering above the Wailing Wall in the right foreground. The Foundation Stone inside the Dome is significant to both Muslims, Christians and Jews.

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Jerusalem - the birthplace of Monotheism
Jerusalem
By Noe Falk Nielsen
29 Sep 2014

Christian woman lighting a candle for Jesus at the site of the cave at the Church of theHoly Sepulcher in Jerusalem.

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Erasing Palestine: Historic Village N...
Lifta
By Vinciane Jacquet
23 Sep 2014

September 7-19, 2014
Lifta, West Bank, Palestine

The last remaining deserted, pre-1948 Palestinian village in Israel is now facing possible destruction. Located on the outskirts of Jerusalem, the village of Lifta is now an empty collection of old stone houses falling into neglect. For the past 20 years, the Israeli government has been pushing to destroy the remaining buildings to make room for new luxury homes, hotels, a shopping mall, and a recreation park. The courts have rejected governmental requests to build, but the construction of a new railway line running through the village has many thinking that the end is near. In the meantime, local Israeli Jews use Lifta as a picnic spot and swim in its ancient spring. For the few surviving Palestinians who were born in Lifta, visiting their former village brings about a mix of emotions: nostalgia for an idyllic childhood spent amongst the olive groves, and bitterness at the destruction and appropriation of their home and heritage.

Lifta's inhabitants were systematically expelled by Israeli forces between 1947 and 1948. After the residents were expelled, Jewish immigrants, mostly from Yemen, moved into the empty homes. After the 6-Day War in 1967, the Israeli government offered the Jewish residents of Lifta new homes in Jerusalem. The residents happily accepted the offer and blew up the roofs of Lifta's houses before they left to ensure that no one would return to the village.

The Palestinian villages inside present day Israel which were deserted in 1948 have been largely erased from the map. While Israel still retains around 1 million Palestinian residents, many fear that the destruction of Lifta would erase, once and for all, the memory of those Palestinians who once inhabited much of present day Israel, but lost their homes when the state was created.

Dying Trades in the Holy Land
By dafnatal7
04 Sep 2014

A look at some of Israel's last family businesses, which are being crushed by changing times. For some of the most traditional Jewish and Arab businesses, it won't be long before their doors close for the last time. New technologies, large corporations, and the draw of the modern world mean that the next generation of consumers and the heirs to the businesses no longer have an interest in the businesses' futures.

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Israeli soldiers
Jerusalem, Israel
By Florin Ghioca
19 Jan 2014

Israeli soldiers preparing the Romanian president's visit to Mount Hertzl.

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Global LGBT Spotlight
Worldwide
By Transterra Editor
01 Jan 2014

A Transterra spotlight with selected images documenting LGBT communities and issues in Armenia, Myanmar, Malaysia, Pakistan, Nepal, Hong Kong, Mongolia, Moscow, Turkey and Iran. Most images below are selected from collections and photo essays available on Transterra. See the links below for some examples:
Transgender in Armenia: http://transterramedia.com/collections/879
Natkadaw Festival in Myanmar: http://transterramedia.com/collections/1375
Transgender Political Candidate in Pakistan: http://transterramedia.com/collections/1030
My Life as a Nepalese Transgender: http://transterramedia.com/collections/1430
Being a Gay Journalist in Hong Kong: http://transterramedia.com/collections/1291
TransMongolian: http://transterramedia.com/collections/939
Turkey's LGBT Asylum Seekers: http://transterramedia.com/collections/1107
The Holy Wigs - Jerusalem Drag Queens: http://transterramedia.com/collections/1399

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Israeli soldiers
Jerusalem, Israel
By Florin Ghioca
31 Dec 2013

Israeli soldiers preparing the visit of the Romanian President Traian Basescu at Mount Hertzl.

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Ramallah Today (3 of 8)
Jerusalem
By Florin Ghioca
30 Aug 2013

An Israeli car in Jerusalem, inscribed with the "Free Palestine!" message.

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Peace Tour with Mohammad Assaf
West Bank, Palestine
By Serene Yordi
04 Aug 2013

"Arab Idol" winner Mohammad Assaf visits the Nativity church with the FC Barcelona football team during their Peace Tour. He also performed in front of 20,000 Palestinians, who came from across the West Bank to see FC Barcelona team train in Dura stadium.

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Demonstrations in three major cities ...
Tel Aviv, Israel
By Carlos van as
01 Jun 2013

Hundreds of people protested Saturday evening in Haifa, Tel Aviv and Jerusalem against the one-percentage point VAT increase, which was set to go into effect at midnight.

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Demonstrations in three major cities ...
Tel Aviv, Israel
By Carlos van as
01 Jun 2013

Hundreds of people protested Saturday evening in Haifa, Tel Aviv and Jerusalem against the one-percentage point VAT increase, which was set to go into effect at midnight.

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Demonstrations in three major cities ...
Tel Aviv, Israel
By Carlos van as
01 Jun 2013

Hundreds of people protested Saturday evening in Haifa, Tel Aviv and Jerusalem against the one-percentage point VAT increase, which was set to go into effect at midnight.

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Demonstrations in three major cities ...
Tel Aviv, Israel
By Carlos van as
01 Jun 2013

Hundreds of people protested Saturday evening in Haifa, Tel Aviv and Jerusalem against the one-percentage point VAT increase, which was set to go into effect at midnight.

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Demonstrations in three major cities ...
Tel Aviv, Israel
By Carlos van as
01 Jun 2013

Hundreds of people protested Saturday evening in Haifa, Tel Aviv and Jerusalem against the one-percentage point VAT increase, which was set to go into effect at midnight.

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Demonstrations in three major cities ...
Tel Aviv, Israel
By Carlos van as
01 Jun 2013

Hundreds of people protested Saturday evening in Haifa, Tel Aviv and Jerusalem against the one-percentage point VAT increase, which was set to go into effect at midnight.

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Demonstrations in three major cities ...
Tel Aviv, Israel
By Carlos van as
01 Jun 2013

Hundreds of people protested Saturday evening in Haifa, Tel Aviv and Jerusalem against the one-percentage point VAT increase, which was set to go into effect at midnight.

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Demonstrations in three major cities ...
Tel Aviv, Israel
By Carlos van as
01 Jun 2013

Hundreds of people protested Saturday evening in Haifa, Tel Aviv and Jerusalem against the one-percentage point VAT increase, which was set to go into effect at midnight.

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Demonstrations in three major cities ...
Tel Aviv, Israel
By Carlos van as
01 Jun 2013

Hundreds of people protested Saturday evening in Haifa, Tel Aviv and Jerusalem against the one-percentage point VAT increase, which was set to go into effect at midnight.

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Demonstrations in three major cities ...
Tel Aviv, Israel
By Carlos van as
01 Jun 2013

Hundreds of people protested Saturday evening in Haifa, Tel Aviv and Jerusalem against the one-percentage point VAT increase, which was set to go into effect at midnight.

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Demonstrations in three major cities ...
Tel Aviv, Israel
By Carlos van as
01 Jun 2013

Hundreds of people protested Saturday evening in Haifa, Tel Aviv and Jerusalem against the one-percentage point VAT increase, which was set to go into effect at midnight.

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Demonstrations in three major cities ...
Tel Aviv, Israel
By Carlos van as
01 Jun 2013

Hundreds of people protested Saturday evening in Haifa, Tel Aviv and Jerusalem against the one-percentage point VAT increase, which was set to go into effect at midnight.

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Demonstrations in three major cities ...
Tel Aviv, Israel
By Carlos van as
01 Jun 2013

Hundreds of people protested Saturday evening in Haifa, Tel Aviv and Jerusalem against the one-percentage point VAT increase, which was set to go into effect at midnight.

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Demonstrations in three major cities ...
Tel Aviv, Israel
By Carlos van as
31 May 2013

Hundreds of people protested Saturday evening in Haifa, Tel Aviv and Jerusalem against the one-percentage point VAT increase, which was set to go into effect at midnight.

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Demonstrations in three major cities ...
Tel Aviv, Israel
By Carlos van as
31 May 2013

Hundreds of people protested Saturday evening in Haifa, Tel Aviv and Jerusalem against the one-percentage point VAT increase, which was set to go into effect at midnight.

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Demonstrations In Three Major Cities ...
Tel Aviv, Israel
By U.S. Editor
31 May 2013

Hundreds of people protested Saturday evening in Haifa, Tel Aviv and Jerusalem against the one-percentage point VAT increase, which was set to go into effect at midnight.