Frame 0004
Barclays/Unreasonable
San Antonio
By TTM Originals
09 Jan 2018

Travis Green lost both legs from combat wounds while deployed as a Marine in Afghanistan. His injuries left him with little hope of picking back up the life he left at home. He’s a dad to five young girls, an avid martial arts practitioner and enjoys working on his truck and trekking around the wilderness of his land in San Antonio, Texas. “I wondered how I could do simple things again like climb a ladder and get on a roof.” Traditional prosthetics, he hoped, might give him a shot. Instead, he says, “I looked like Robocop. They were good for walking, but not for kneeling. And really heavy. Not good for getting under a truck or moving across different terrain.” He put his mechanical skills to work as his own test subject. In his own garage, he invented an early prototype of Stump Armour, a multipurpose foot design. It locks into his knee socket and gives him enough traction to move across pavement or a roof. He can even roll around when performing close to the ground activities like tinkering under his truck. This mobility allows him to perform a myriad of tasks he can’t do in traditional prosthetics. As a participant in the 100 Entrepreneurs Project and the Entrepreneurial Bootcamp for Veterans (EBV), he started a business to show other amputees that an active, outdoor lifestyle is attainable. Along the way, he met Samantha Snabes, NASA scientist and co-founder of re:3D. She invented a mid-sized 3D printer geared towards individuals and community businesses. Last winter, she kickstarted his business by printing a batch for his local veteran hospital. Since then, he’s honed the design and is hard at work training other veterans how to reclaim movement using Stump Armour. More than 1,300 American service members suffer from amputation due to injuries sus-tained while fighting in Afghanistan or Iraq. In addition to American veterans, Stump Ar-mour’s mission is to make devices as affordable as possible worldwide. “I want to em-power other amputees like myself to be more independent with certain tasks and to open more work options. An amputee in my position in a developing country often do not have many options for work to earn a living. With Stump Armour and future projects along the same concept, some amputees may have more fulfilling lives.”

Frame 0004
Stump Armor: Barclays/Unreasonable (L...
San Antonio
By TTM Originals
14 Apr 2017

Travis Green lost both legs from combat wounds while deployed as a Marine in Afghanistan. His injuries left him with little hope of picking back up the life he left at home. He’s a dad to five young girls, an avid martial arts practitioner and enjoys working on his truck and trekking around the wilderness of his land in San Antonio, Texas. “I wondered how I could do simple things again like climb a ladder and get on a roof.” Traditional prosthetics, he hoped, might give him a shot. Instead, he says, “I looked like Robocop. They were good for walking, but not for kneeling. And really heavy. Not good for getting under a truck or moving across different terrain.”

He put his mechanical skills to work as his own test subject. In his own garage, he invented an early prototype of Stump Armour, a multipurpose foot design. It locks into his knee socket and gives him enough traction to move across pavement or a roof. He can even roll around when performing close to the ground activities like tinkering under his truck. This mobility allows him to perform a myriad of tasks he can’t do in traditional prosthetics.

As a participant in the 100 Entrepreneurs Project and the Entrepreneurial Bootcamp for Veterans (EBV), he started a business to show other amputees that an active, outdoor lifestyle is attainable. Along the way, he met Samantha Snabes, NASA scientist and co-founder of re:3D. She invented a mid-sized 3D printer geared towards individuals and community businesses. Last winter, she kickstarted his business by printing a batch for his local veteran hospital. Since then, he’s honed the design and is hard at work training other veterans how to reclaim movement using Stump Armour.

More than 1,300 American service members suffer from amputation due to injuries sus-tained while fighting in Afghanistan or Iraq. In addition to American veterans, Stump Ar-mour’s mission is to make devices as affordable as possible worldwide. “I want to em-power other amputees like myself to be more independent with certain tasks and to open more work options. An amputee in my position in a developing country often do not have many options for work to earn a living. With Stump Armour and future projects along the same concept, some amputees may have more fulfilling lives.”

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Rana Plaza and The Long Recovery 3
By Karim Mostafa
21 Apr 2014

Rehanna, who used to work in Rana Plaza, lost one of her legs in the accident.

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Rana Plaza and The Long Recovery 4
By Karim Mostafa
21 Apr 2014

Amjad Hussein, who worked on the fourth floor of the Rana Plaza, remembers falling and feeling an incredible pain. Then, everything went black. After having been unconscious for 11 days, he woke up with his both legs missing.

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Rana Plaza and The Long Recovery 5
By Karim Mostafa
21 Apr 2014

Rehanna, who had one of her legs amputated, is now getting accustomed to walking with her artificial leg at a physiotherapy clinic in Savar. 9 year-old Monira lives in the room next to her – her father also lost one of his legs in the accident.

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Rana Plaza and the Long Recovery 13
By Karim Mostafa
17 Apr 2014

Amjad Hussein lost both his legs in the Rana Plaza accident. He's now trying his new legs for the first time. "I feel strange, like I'm floating. Not connected to the ground. But God gave me my life back."

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Syrian Limb Center 2
Reyhanli, Turkey
By Leyland Cecco
26 Nov 2013

Some of the amputees never thought they would be able to walk again, with the help of the NSPPL, now they can.

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Syrian Limb Center 4
Reyhanli, Turkey
By Leyland Cecco
26 Nov 2013

The transition to a prosthetic limb can be painful and frustrating. While the NSPPL has a rehabilitation center in Turkey, they hope to also set one up in Syria.

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Syrian Limb Center 3
Reyhanli, Turkey
By Leyland Cecco
26 Nov 2013

A patient gives feedback to one of the NSPPL's technicians about how the leg fits.

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Syrian Limb Center 7
Reyhanli, Turkey
By Leyland Cecco
26 Nov 2013

A worker clamps down a prothestic limb for further adjustments. The clinic has produced more than 200 legs to date.

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Syrian Limb Center 6
Reyhanli, Turkey
By Leyland Cecco
26 Nov 2013

Raed al-Masri, the limb center's founder, gives advice to an amputee as he uses his new leg for the first time. Al-Masri used to be a math teacher in Syria until he fled to Turkey and now runs the clinic full-time.

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"The Difference Between Lightning and...
Mazar-e-Sharif, Afghanistan
By Giovanni Diffidenti
09 Nov 2013

Portrait of Nickbakht, 21 years old, double arm amputee. This image was taken in her home in the village of Aliabod, in Mazar-e-Sharif. Nickbakht was in a car accident seven years ago when all of the family was travelling to Kabul. Both her parents died and her younger brother has difficulty walking. In the first year Nickbakht was depressed, but she managed to overcome her disability and now she is the bread-winner of the family. Until six months ago she was working as a counsellor and providing peer support for the Afghan Landmine Survivors Organization (ALSO). Now she is unemployed, but she still does lot of social volunteer work. Nickbakht is a very smart girl and hopes to continue studying.

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"The Difference Between Lightning and...
Bamyan, Afghanistan
By Giovanni Diffidenti
30 Oct 2013

Sayed, 25 years old, is a landmine survivor and double amputee. Here, Sayed is climbing a hill on his way to the grocery shop where he works part-time in the city of Bamyan. During the day he frequents university, where he recently enrolled himself in the faculty of psychology. Twice a day he walks 4.6 km in order to attend the course.

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"The Difference Between Lightning and...
Kabul, Afghanistan
By Giovanni Diffidenti
27 Oct 2013

A mentally disturbed man is stretched out on the pavement in one of the main streets in west Kabul. He receives no assistance. In Afghanistan people with mental disabilities are among the most vulnerable groups of the community. So far several NGOs and government agencies have provided a few services for mental disabilities, but their programs fall far from meeting the needs of these people and there are no specific actions taken to alleviate the problem.

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"The Difference Between Lightning and...
Kabul, Afghanistan
By Giovanni Diffidenti
27 Oct 2013

Zubair, 28 years old, is training in a private swimming pool in the city of Kabul. Zubair lost his hand in a landmine when he was seven years old. Now he is a member of the national Paralympics team as a swimmer but he also practices other disciplines, including Taekwondo and running. In 2012 he won a silver medal at the Southeast Asian Paralympics games in Taekwondo.

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"The Difference Between Lightning and...
Kabul, Afghanistan
By Giovanni Diffidenti
26 Oct 2013

Malik Mohammad, 20 years old, shows how he can walk on his hands at the Ghazi Stadium in the city of Kabul. Malik is a landmine survivor who lost both of his legs, near the airport in Kabul. Before the accident Malik worked in a bakery. After the accident he tried many different sports including basketball, skiing, swimming, surfing and running. But his favorite is swimming and lately running. His next competition is the 2014 Asian Paralympics Games in South Korea, where he will compete as a swimmer.

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Syrian Limb Center 5
Reyhanli, Turkey
By Leyland Cecco
26 Dec 2012

The process of fitting legs is difficult and also requires many check-ups afterwards.

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THE CAMBODIA TRUST PROSTHETICS AND OR...
Kampong Chhnang, Cambodia
By George Nickels
05 Nov 2012

A severe problem that Cambodia faces is the magnitude of landmines littered over virtually every provence throughout the country. more than 40% of the villages in Cambodia have a mine problem.
This is the legacy of three decades of savage war leaving 40,000+ amputees through out the country. Recent estimates show that there may be as many as four to six million mines and unexploded devices left undetected in Cambodia although some estimates run as high as ten million. Last year The Cambodia Trust clinics in Cambodia fitted over 600 limbs ensuring that individuals are empowered to impact their communities and provide for their families. Across the developing world, there are millions of people with disabilities who need physical rehabilitation services to enable them to go to school, find work and participate in society. However in many low income countries there is a severe shortage of local staff with the skills and experience to provide the rehabilitation services needed by persons with disabilities.
In the warfare that raged in Cambodia from 1970 until 1998, all sides used land mines.
Most were manufactured in China, Russia, or Vietnam and the United States. Pol Pot, whose regime was responsible for the deaths of some 1.7 million Cambodians between 1975 and 1979, purportedly called land mines his “perfect soldiers.”

Major minefields have been mapped and are being systematically demined. Although estimates show that it may take between 10 and 20 years to eradicate the threat and with serious amounts of money involved to do so.

Cambodia reported 96 landmine casualties in the first five months of 2012, according to a report of the Cambodian Mine and Explosive Remnants of War Victim Information System, and they quoted sadly young children account for about half of all landmine victims.