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German Doctors NGO
Cebu City
By Ralf Falbe
12 Feb 2016

A Filipina volunteer nurse works with the NGO German Doctors to provide free medical treatment in a village of trash collectors near Cebu City in the Philippines.

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German Doctors Hospital
Cebu City
By Ralf Falbe
12 Feb 2016

A nurse examines a child at the German Doctors Hospital in Cebu City, Philippines. The NGO German Doctors offers free medical treatment to the city's slum dwellers.

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My Son's Birth, Through my Lens
Phnom Penh, Cambodia
By George Nickels
27 Dec 2014

If you’re a man in Cambodia, being present at the birth of your child is widely frowned upon. As both the prospective father and a camera-wielding photo-journalist, attending and documenting the birth of my son was a challenge, to say the least.

At 8pm on 26 December 2014, my partner of nearly nine years alerted me that her water had broken. She started to have her first contractions, but we were advised to stay home, get some food and rest, and wait it out until the morning.

By 7am and after a sleepless night, the intensity of Madeline’s contractions reached a peak every ten minutes; it was time to leave. Descending seven flights of stairs from our apartment in Phnom Penh, we hailed a remork (tuk tuk) to take us across the city on a journey that would change our lives forever. As is common in the capital city, the driver said he knew where to go, (which meant no, I don’t, please tell me), so with the limited Khmer that I knew, and ten minutes trying to explain where the clinic was, we came to an agreement and departed.

For twenty minutes, in a rickety wooden carriage towed by a 125cc motorcycle, on substandard roads, we careered through early morning city traffic on with Madeline panting heavily all the way to the clinic. On arrival, Doctors and midwives monitored the baby’s heartbeat, and then lead us to the room that we had pre booked, ready for Madeline to start the first stages of labour.

For the next four hours, the intensity in the room increased tenfold; I watched as the midwives coached Madeline with every technique in the book to ease her pain and mental state. Encouraging deep breathing and keeping her calm was part of my support role .When the staff decided she was ready, my partner told me to grab my camera. She was screaming as they wheeled her upstairs to the delivery room, and I realized I was about to begin documenting the birth of my son.

From a photographer’s point of view, taking photographs of my woman giving birth was not easy. She was in a lot of discomfort and pain, so trying document this, whilst retaining her dignity, was both mentally and physically draining.

There were other factors I had to take into consideration. Room to move was at a premium; I was in a small delivery room with six medical staff and a pregnant woman, so gaining the trust of the midwives and doctors was essential. Lighting conditions were very harsh, and Madeline was constantly moving from one chair to another, from standing to sitting, and from crouching and crawling positions.

The majority of the time I was supporting my partner and wishing for a safe and problem free delivery, and she says she can only recall one moment of me taking photographs from the entire labour. Madeline was having very heavy contractions whilst kneeling on the floor on her hands and knees. My natural instinct as a photographer kicked in, and as I lay on my back in front of her, pointing the camera at her pain stricken face, I composed the frame and took the photograph. This was the only point in the delivery when my partner told me to stop taking photos and to hold her hands!

The images shown were taken in the last three hours of a fairly short seven-hour natural labour, and at 1.50 p.m. on the 27th of December, we were blessed with our first son, Frank Nickels.

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Syrian Refugee Nurse Gives Help to Ya...
Mount Sinjar
By rsoufi
23 Dec 2014

December 21 2014
Sinjar Mountain

Khansaa Shamdeen Ali is a is a young Syrian Kurdish surgical nurse who became a refugee in Iraqi Kurdistan. Hearing of the desperate plight of Iraqi Yazidis trapped on Mount Sinjar under siege by Islamic State forces she volunteered to provide medical help to the Yazidis. Khansaa was transported to the mountain by military helicopter where she remained for three months tending to the medical needs of the hundreds of people unable to leave the area and Peshmerga fighters who were defending the mountain..
During this time she built a strong bond with the Yazidis and the Peshmergas. Khansaa says she does not want anything in return for work and she is just happy to have been able to help.

Khnassa assures that she does not want anything in return of her favors and she is just happy to serve the refugees.

Transcription:
(03:31)

Interviewer: All the medications are available with you?

Khansaa: yes of course, Dr. Nizar is doing the best he can to provide all the medications.

My name is Khansaa Shamdeen Ali, from Syrian Kurdistan, Derek area in Al-Hasakeh province. I have been here for three months, I treat the Yazidis and the Peshmerga fighters. Sometimes i get 400 patients per day, I have a very good relationship with them, and with the Yazidis.

I am also a refugee, my family is residing in Dar Shokran. When i heard about the situation, i immediately came to the health directory of Dohuk and spoke with Dr. Nizar, and I asked him to allow me to help the Yazidi refugees, so he said that they support me and they are willing to help me with whatever I need, I told them that I want nothing but to help people. Dr. Nizar helped me with everything, I stayed in Khaneqi for a month and after that i came here to the mountain, i have been in the mountain for three months now. I volunteered here to serve my country and help the Kurds. We receive all types of medications, even the medication required for surgical procedures.

Yesterday we received 12-13 people who were injured on the front and we treated them.

Interviewer: Do you do surgeries here?

Khansaa: yes we do, then we transfer them to Dohuk.

Yes Of course i have a degree, without my degree i cannot serve them. I have a degree from the health institution, Surgery section.

Once there was a strong conflict between ISIS and the Peshmerga fighters, and ISIS came close to the mountain, and there were many injuries, some of them were abdominal and shoulder injuries, i treated them and they stayed here with me for four days then were transferred to Dohuk and now they are fine.

This is the weapon of Fadel al-Mirani, He gave it to me as a present because I served the Yazidis. They said that they are very proud of me to be here in this situation, in the cold and the starvation and in a place where there i no bathrooms or toilets. I count myself as one of the Peshmerga, so he gave me this present because i served the Yazidis.

Some of the births that happened here, they gave two of the girls my name, and i personally named two boys, and i gave three girls my sister's name and two girls, I gave them my niece's name.

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Destroyed Aleppo Field Hospital - Dar...
Dar al Shifaa, Aleppo, Syria
By Jean Carrere
28 Nov 2012

In front of the now fully destroyed hospital is Zachariah, a young man who volunteered at the hospital since the start of the conflict in July. He was married to a nurse last month, but she was killed in the air raid on 22/11.

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The Cambodia Trust Prosthetics and Or...
Kampong Chhnang, Cambodia
By George Nickels
05 Nov 2012

Nurse Ms Tech Aundoung go's through the first process of sizing and making a prosthetic limb.Mr Soung Sophat triggered a landmine in 1981. Kampong Chhnang province was one of the most heavily mined areas of cambodia. Ms Tech Aundoung is relocating to Myanmar soon to help deal with the growing numbers of victims affected there during the recent conflicts.

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The Cambodia Trust Prosthetics and Or...
Kampong Chhnang, Cambodia
By George Nickels
05 Nov 2012

Nurse Ms Tech Aundoung go's through the first process of sizing and making a prosthetic limb. Mr Soung Sophat triggered a landmine in 1981 and this is now his 10th casting over a 30 year period. Kampong Chhnang province was one of the most heavily mined areas of cambodia. Ms Tech Aundoung is relocating to Myanmar soon to help deal with the growing numbers of victims affected there during the recent conflicts.

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The Cambodia Trust Prosthetics and Or...
Kampong Chhnang, Cambodia
By George Nickels
05 Nov 2012

Nurse Ms Tech Aundoung go's through the first process of sizing and making a prosthetic limb. Mr Soung Sophat triggered a landmine in 1981 and this is now his 10th casting over a 30 year period. Kampong Chhnang province was one of the most heavily mined areas of Cambodia. Ms Tech Aundoung is relocating to Myanmar soon to help deal with the growing numbers of victims affected there during the recent conflicts.

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The Cambodia Trust Prosthetics and Or...
Kampong Chhnang, Cambodia
By George Nickels
05 Nov 2012

Nurse Ms Tech Aundoung wraps the patients stub ready for casting. Mr Soung Sophat triggered a landmine in 1981 and this is now his 10th casting over a 30 year period. Kampong Chhnang province was one of the most heavily mined areas of Cambodia. Ms Tech Aundoung is relocating to Myanmar soon to help deal with the growing numbers of victims affected there during the recent conflicts.

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The Cambodia Trust Prosthetics and Or...
Kampong Chhnang, Cambodia
By George Nickels
05 Nov 2012

Nurse Ms Tech Aundoung go's through the final stages of casting a landmine survivors new prosthetic limb. Ms Tech Aundoung is relocating to Myanmar soon to help deal with the growing numbers of victims affected there during the recent conflicts.

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The Cambodia Trust Prosthetics and Or...
Kampong Chhnang, Cambodia
By George Nickels
05 Nov 2012

Nurse Ms Tech Aundoung shows the finished cast, the cast will now be sent into the prosthetics workshop where the technicians will finish the process. Ms Tech Aundoung is relocating to Myanmar soon to help deal with the growing numbers of victims affected there during the recent conflicts.

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Children Of Agent Orange (2 of 32)
Ho Chi Minh City, VIetnam
By hiroko tanaka
18 Jan 2011

A nurse and children at Peace Village at Tudu Hospital share time together.