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Syrian Assyrians Flee ISIS to Qamishli
Al-Qamishli
By TTM Contributor 33
25 Feb 2015

Qamishli, Syria
February 26, 2015

Christian-Assyrian refugees seek refuge in the Kurdish controlled city of Qamishli after fleeing ISIS advances on their villages of Tal Tamer, Tal Harmoza, Tal al-Jazeera, Tal Kouran and Abu Tina in the Hasakeh province. ISIS militants recently kidnapped 220 Assyrians in Hasakeh province setting a dangerous precedent for christians in the area and spurring entire villages to abandon their homes and flee ISIS advances.

SHOTLIST AND SOUNDBITES

Wide/ external of the Syriac Cultural Association in Syria
Wide of men holding diaper packs destined for displaced families
Wide of diaper packs and other supplies
Wide of supplies in pickup trucks
SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Michael Kourieh, Member of the Syriac Cross
00:23 – 01:30
The Syriac Cross for Relief and Development. Our work currently revolves on to help our Assyrian brothers who fled the Khabour and Tal Tamer areas. They are living in several Assyrian churches. Our aim is to help the Assyrian so that they would feel at home. As you see from these supplies, we work all day long so they would not feel like strangers.
More importantly, from the information that we gathered, we learned that the displaced came from the Khabour area in the hundreds.
We feel sad about that, but we are trying our best to help them and offer them aid.
Various associations in Qamishli are involved in this work, such as the United Nations and Mother Syria Association. Everyone is making an effort [UNINTELLIGIBLE]. We are all coordinating our work and we hope that everyone is pleased with our work. God willing, we shall remain a unified people. “

Wide of Syriac Cross members unloading aid supplies
Wide/ external Syriac Cultural Association in Syria
Wide of aid supplies

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman) Elizabeth Jouqa, A displaced from Tal Tamer area

01:50 – 03:30

We fled the moment we first heard that ISIS kidnapped women, young men and children. We ran away before ISIS arrived to avoid being captured.
Interviewer: Did many people flee?
Many! There is about 600 [displaced] families here in Qamishli. May God safeguard you.
My relatives were abducted. We do not where they are. Amy God protect them from [ISIS]. May God break their arms.
Interviewer: When did the attack take place?
It was in the morning. We heard about in the morning. We called our relatives In Tal Shmeiran who told us that [ISIS] invaded their village. They said that [ISIS] had taken the men two days earlier to an unknown location and that they were like sheep to the church and did not know what was going to happen to them.
Our men, fighters from the Sotoro organisation and the Kurds, may God protect them, defended the people, but what could they do? The others [ISIS] are many. There were probably 600 of them.
Interviewer: who do you demand help from? The international community? The autonomous administration here? Regional countries?

What can I say?
Interviewer: Do you want aid form the United Nations? Who do you want aid from?

We are grateful for anyone who wants to help us. I do not know who should help us.
Wide of Syriac Cross members unloading aid supplies
Wide of street
Traveling of street

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman) Julia Butros, A displaced from Tal Tawil village
03:49 – 05:27
It was in at five in the evening. They [the rescuers] took children and their father. It was at five o’clock. People fled using a mobile diesel tank. They removed the tank from the vehicle and put people in its place and took to Hasaka, and from Hasaka they were brought here to Qamishli. People arrived here at midnight. The trip started at five and took all night long.
We do not anyone who was kidnapped. It is said that people were kidnapped in other villages. We cannot say anything other than that we have seen did not see.
Interviewer: Did ISIS blow churches?
They did in another village but not in Tal Tawil. They blew up churches in another village. . In other villages there people whose whereabouts are not known.
Interviewer: How many people fled to Hasaka and Qamishli?

I do not know. May be around 300 or 400 people. Around 100 people fled from our village, Tal Tawil.

Interviewer: who do you demand help from? The international community? The United Nations?
May God reward them, whether they offered aid or not. May God reward you and anyone who helps these troubled people.
Interviewer: Is ISIS present in your village?
[ISIS] is present in other villages. This man’s wife does know anything about her family. Interviewer: Did the Kurdish fighters and the Syriac Council liberate these villages?
They are trying to help, I am not saying that they are not, but what can they do?

Wide of Syriac Cross members unloading aid supplies
Various of Christian icons hung on a wall
Close-up of sign hung on an aid vehicle reads: “An initiative of love and solidarity towards from Tal Tamer and Khabour.”

Close-up of sign on aid vehicle “Syriac Cross Organization for Relief & Development”
Medium of sign on aid vehicle “Syriac Cross Organization for Relief & Development”

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ISIS Food Inspectors in Raqqa
Raqqa
By TTM Contributor 20
09 Nov 2014

Raqqa, Syria
November 2014

DISCLAIMER: This video was shot with the approval of ISIS and subjected to review and censorship before publication. The appearance of this video on the Transterra Media website does not in anyway constitute an endorsement by Transterra Media of any claims or statements made in this video.

Footage shows members of the ISIS-run department of control and inspection at work. The video includes an interview with a member of the Control and Inspection Office, who says that the office monitors the quality of different food products and whether they have been produced according to Islamic law. It also includes an interview with a grocer. ISIS members are seen destroying what an announcer says are expired products.

SHOTLIST AND TRANSCRIPT

Wide/ external of “Control and Inspection” office run by ISIS
Wide of Raqqa city and ISIS flags

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Unnamed ISIS Official
00:08 - 00:44
“The Control and Inspection office has been established in Wilayat [Province] of Raqqa. The office is divided into [two] departments; the first is the Health Inspection Department, whose task consists of inspecting food items and other supplies in the markets. The reports filed by this department are eventually given to the Islamic court. The Meat Department, on the other hand, inspects the quality of all kinds of meat that are being sold. All meat obtained from animals that have not been slaughtered at the slaughterhouse is confiscated; butchers who slaughter animals outside the slaughterhouse are punished.”

Wide of people inside Control and Inspection Office
Close-up of inspector filling in Control and Inspection report
Wide of motorcycles with plates that read “Control and Inspection”
Wide of two men driving away on motorbike with a plate that reads “Control and Inspection”
Wide of pickup truck carrying melons and watermelons
Wide of street and passersby
Various of inspectors examining packed food items inside a grocery store
Various of packed food items stocks
Close-up of ISIS official reports

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Unnamed grocery store owner
01:33 – 02:10
“Thanks be to God, and peace be upon God’s Messenger. The Islamic State has set an office for control and inspection, which has had a positive role. It has reminded Muslims of the Prophet’s saying: ‘He who cheats us is not one of us.’ However, a merchant might unintentionally forget certain items on the shelf. Other grocers deliberately leave [expired] merchandise in their shops. We advise them to fear God. We have seen that they [inspectors] – may God reward them – bring this issue to people’s attention. Whenever they find expired products for the first time, they issue a warning and destroy these products. May God reward them.”

Various of inspectors spraying writings saying that stores are being sealed for malpractice

NAT SOUND (Arabic) Announcement by ISIS member
02:26 – 03:12
“In the name of God the Merciful, the Compassionate; thanks to be God, Lord of the worlds; and peace be upon God’s messenger. The Office of Control and Inspection, which is part of the Hisba [Islamic Police] department, has confiscated large amounts of spoiled, expired or badly stored goods, including foodstuff, grain legumes, detergents, beauty products and [UNINTELLGILBLE] products. These products were located in markets in Raqqa province and have an estimated value of 2 million Syrian pounds.
Now, we are going to destroy these products in this public square, in front of all the people. Thanks be to God, Lord of the worlds.”

Various of ISIS members destroying food and other items in public
Various of ISIS members unloading and burning boxes in a dumpster
Wide of clock tower covered with ISIS flag in central Raqqa
Various of ISIS traffic police
Various of workers removing garbage from the street

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Kenyan Grandmothers' Survival -Editor...
Nairobi, Kenya
By Mais Istanbuli
28 May 2013

Wairimu Gachenga, 70, lives in the notorious Nairobi slum of Korogocho, Kenya. She looks after her grandchildren, 19 year old Wahome Njeriand and 17 year old Wairimu Njeriafter, after their mother died from HIV. In order to make ends meet, she travels to the Dandora dumpsite to collect plastic and other recyclable material which she then sells. On a weekly basis, she receives some cabbage and other plant material from a church in the area that she uses to feed her family.

Gachenga regularly joins a group of grandmothers from the area who get together to practice self-defense techniques, after one of the natives was raped in 2007. Elderly women in Kenya are increasingly suffering from sexual assault, since many believe that they have a lower risk of catching HIV compared to younger women. In response to this problem, the group is also part of a support group for the women, where they swap stories and ensure each other's safety. When one of the women doesn't attend a meeting, the rest of the group suspects that she is in danger. Gachenga, like many other women in her condition, has resorted to communal means to secure her livelihood, where the weekly meetings act as a safe haven for those in need of help.

View More Photos Here: http://transterramedia.com/collections/1220

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Observance of International Labor Day...
Lahore, Pakistan
By Murtaza Syed
30 Apr 2013

A laborer recovers metal pieces from the soil, working hard to ensure that his children will have a good day’s meal.

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Observance of International Labor Day...
Lahore, Pakistan
By Murtaza Syed
30 Apr 2013

A laborer separates metal from soil with the help of a small magnet.

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Observance of International Labor Day...
Lahore, Pakistan
By Murtaza Syed
30 Apr 2013

"Black and Bold"- A labourer holds out his discolored and calloused hands which have endured years of hard shifts at the metal polishing factory.

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Observance of International Labor Day...
Lahore, Pakistan
By Murtaza Syed
30 Apr 2013

"A rusty affair"- A worker covers his face with a piece of cloth while working at a metal polishing factory during International Labour Day in Lahore, Pakistan. Many laborers throughout the country often work under difficult and dangerous circumstances without using proper safety equipment.

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Observance of International Labor Day...
Pakistan,Lahore
By Murtaza Syed
30 Apr 2013

A labourer separates metal from soil with the help of a small magnet.

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Observance of International Labor Day...
Lahore, Pakistan
By Murtaza Syed
30 Apr 2013

A job notice is displayed outside a factory to attract new recruits. The daily income of labourers is set at one dollar per day, equaling to $60 per month.

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Observance of International Labor Day...
Lahore, Pakistan
By Murtaza Syed
30 Apr 2013

Rehmat, age 30, manages to flash a bright smile despite years of working in harsh conditions at the metal factory.

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Living in the Ruins of Gaddafi's Comp...
Tripoli, Libya
By Tripcarbons
10 Apr 2013

A child rides his bike in Gadaffi's compound

Abdullah's Mother

'My family is not in a good situation. I'm holding onto God, but you can't expect anything from the government right now. We're not proud of living here, but at least someone is putting this land to use.'

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Living in the Ruins of Gaddafi's Comp...
Tripoli, Libya
By Tripcarbons
10 Apr 2013

Abdullah's Mother

'My family is not in a good situation. I'm holding onto God, but you can't expect anything from the government right now. We're not proud of living here, but at least someone is putting this land to use.'

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Living in the Ruins of Gaddafi's Comp...
Tripoli, Libya
By Tripcarbons
10 Apr 2013

Abdul Baset Al-Shibl
Security Guard

‘We try to make Bab Al-Azizia safe, but it’s not safe. Recently we found four bodies. Three of them were women and all of them had been shot in the head.

My militia helped to make a database of everyone living here. There’s more than 300 families and each one has its number spray painted on the wall next to its home. We gave a copy of the database to the interior ministry but never heard anything back.’

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Living in the Ruins of Gaddafi's Comp...
Tripoli, Libya
By Tripcarbons
03 Apr 2013

Abdul Baset Al-Shibl
Security Guard

‘We try to make Bab Al-Azizia safe, but it’s not safe. Recently we found four bodies. Three of them were women and all of them had been shot in the head.

My militia helped to make a database of everyone living here. There’s more than 300 families and each one has its number spray painted on the wall next to its home. We gave a copy of the database to the interior ministry but never heard anything back.’

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Bricks of Bangladesh (22 of 24)
Bandarban, Bangladesh
By Karim Mostafa
08 Jan 2013

Conditions at the fields are tough. The brick-making generates a lot of dust, which affects everyone working at the site as well as people living nearby. Bricks are the most efficient and widely used building material and new brick buildings are erected across the country. Bandarban, Bangladesh. January 2013.

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Roni Keidar's house
Erez, israel
By javiervidela
16 Nov 2012

The house of Roni is completely empty. Her family of two daughters and her gradsons was sent far away from rockets, for their own safety.

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Women in Uttar Pradesh Have a New Har...
Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh (INDIA)
By newspoint
15 Nov 2012

Uttar Pradesh's Chief Minister, Akhilesh Yadav, is scheduled to institute a telephone helpline service in the state for women to report harassment including indecent phone calls, SMSes and MMSes. The service named “Women Power line” will be available by dialling 1090 from 15 November, and will be charged at normal call rates. It offers a security cover for working women and college girls, facing insecurity at public places from eve teasers. The power line will not be an emergency service, but will operate between 8 am and 2 am.

The identity of the caller to the power line will be a kept secret and the caller won’t be summoned to the police station or any government office or the office of the power line. The calls would be attended only by women police officers and the power line office will maintain contact with the aggrieved women till her grievance is redressed.

Women police constables who will run the service have been imparted training and also an orientation programme. The selected personnel have also been trained to answer calls in English. The uniform of the women constables posted in power line will be different from the police uniform. They will be dressed in a sky blue shirt, dark grey trouser and navy blue blazer with the centre's monogram. The power line service would be further expanded after the staff gets familiar with the hi-tech IVRS-based operations. The initial staff strength of the power line would be a total of 45 women constables, 25 male constables, and two women sub-inspectors.

Byte-Akhilesh Yadav , U.P Chef Minister
I want to congratulate police officers, who are involved in Women helpline system. After being launched, this number 1090 will help victims through the police. On this occasion (Bhaiya Dooj) we have given power line to the sisters of Uttar Pradesh. I think, the number 1090 will help those victims who are in trouble. The society is constantly changing due to mobile technology.

Byte-AC Sharma , Director General of Police (DGP)
"Alarming". What it shows, he asserts, is that the police are now in "proactive mode". "See, who attacks a docile police party? It is only because we are issuing challis, raiding criminals and setting things right that we are being attacked. The people doing the attacking will be dealt with strictly,"

Byte -Navneet Sekera, DIG, Lucknow range
“The women power line will not be a toll free service like the emergency police and fire brigade service. The service is at normal, applicable call rates. It is not an emergency service and will help restrict hoax calls made on the number’’, who is also the nodal officer of the project. “Only 10 per cent of the calls made to city police control room dial 100 service are genuine and worth taking cognizance,’’

Byte -Navneet Sekera, DIG, Lucknow range
“Earlier we had planned to run the service 24x7, now it has been decided to run it in three shifts of six hours each, the first shift will be from 8am to 2pm, the second from 2pm to 8pm and the third from 8pm to 2am’’.

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DAILY LIFE IN ZAATARI REFUGEE CAMP - ...
Zaatari Refugee Camp, Mafraq, Jordan
By Editor's Picks
14 Nov 2012

Syrian refugees, faced with the possibility of an extended stay in Zaatari refugee camp in Jordan, settle in. One couple, despite the uncertainties ahead, decided to marry. Mothers and children resourcefully find places to build shelves, store supplies and do their best to keep the dust down. After long use of outdoor kitchens, women in the camp are relieved to finally have a real kitchen, recently finished, in which to cook and connect with each other, restoring a small sense of normalcy to their lives.

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The Dangerous Life of Bangladesh Ship...
Sitakund, Bangladesh
By Mais Istanbuli
10 Apr 2012

Ship-breaking is known as the breaking or recirculation of old ships for financial return. Old ships are sold so that the valuable steel can be reused. About 95 percent of a ship’s mass can be recycled.

Until the 1960s, ship-breaking was concentrated in western countries like the United States, Germany, United Kingdom or Italy. From the early 1980s, the majority of the world’s vessels taken out of service were sent to India, China, Pakistan or Bangladesh.

The workers at the ship-breaking yards in Sitakund, situated north of Chittagong in the Bay of Bengal, face the toughest working conditions of the whole country. Extremely hard labour, fatal working incidents, the exposure of abestos and toxic waste are among the deadly threats to those working in the ship-dismantling industry. Every step could be their last. Far away from their villages, the workers seldom see their families. They do all of this for only $1-3 per day.

Risky working conditions, environmental pollution and the adoption of child labor in the ship-breaking industry have drawn international attention on Bangladesh’s ship-dismantling. Changes occured but are far from international standards.

Over 100,000 workers are employed at ship breaking yards worldwide. It is estimated that some 50,000 people are directly employed in the ship-breaking industry in Bangladesh.

Local organisations in Bangladesh estimate that some 1,000-2,000 workers have died in the last 30 years, and many more have suffered serious injuries.

The ship breaking industry in Bangladesh is estimated worth an annual turn over of around 1.5 billion dollars.

Today access to the ship-breaking yards is very limited. Journalists and photographers, who covered grievance in the area, aren’t welcome anymore. The people of Bangladesh are aware of the problems and willing to change the situation.
The Labor Law Act 2006 has improved conditons on health, safety, working hours and compensation – but due to lack of political will and resources change is still not on the way.

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Made in Bangladesh (9 of 23)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
10 Apr 2012

Worker in Dhaka's garment industry.

Bangladesh’s garment industry is responsible for nearly 80% of the country’s exports – mainly to Europe and the United States – and therefore the single greatest source of economic growth.

An estimated number of two to three million people are employed in more than 4,000 factories all over the country, not including the thousands of sub-suppliers. About 80% of the working force are women. Although violating national law sub-suppliers often still employ children under the age of 14.

Workers are reliant on the engagement to support their families. Jobs are highly underpaid – most factories pay the maximum of 1,500-2,000 Taka (about 15 – 20 Euros) per month. Labor time is up to 12 hours a day, 6 days a week.

Several clothing buyers asked the Bangladeshi government to raise the minimum wages but factory owners argue that they will not be competitive against Vietnam, China and other big producers if they raise wages and therefore would have to close their factories and discharge all their employees.

As people are reliant on their jobs they are still willing to work even if underpaid. Continuous riots by textile workers break out – leading to short-term shutdowns and often to injuries and fatalities among workers. It is unlikely that either the international clothing companies nor the local Bangladeshi factory owners will bear the costs of raised wages.

A change of the situation will only be achieved if consumers are aware of the social inequity and put pressure on the companies involved.