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The Wood, The Whale and The Sane
Villafranca de Bonany
By Marisa Candia Cadavid and Carwyn Jones
01 Oct 2016

A story of wooden whales, a seatime cemetery and splintered hands. A visual poem from Mallorca for Zooppa.

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The Amazonian Rain Forest: Farming an...
Amazon
By Illuminati Filmes
20 Sep 2016

This collection highlights the deforestation of the Amazon due to cattle farming and corn farming. Various shots provide a look at the rain forest in its virgin state; workers felling trees to clear the land; a fire at night from slash and burn agriculture; a cattle ranch on cleared rain forest and a corn farm on cleared rain forest land. 

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Fire in the Amazonian Rain Forest (Sl...
Amazon
By Illuminati Filmes
19 Sep 2016

Deforestation in the Amazonian Rain Forest using the slash and burn technique.

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Cattle Ranch in the Amazonian Rain Fo...
Amazon
By Illuminati Filmes
19 Sep 2016

Various shots of a cattle ranch in the Amazonian Rain Forest built on cleared Amazonian Rain Forest.

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Corn Farm in the Amazonian Rain Forest
Amazon
By Illuminati Filmes
19 Sep 2016

Various shots of a corn farm featuring wide, sweeping vistas of corn and irrigation equipment in the Brazilian province of Minas Gerais. The corn farm was built on cleared rain forest land.

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Deforestation in the Amazonian Rain F...
Amazon
By Illuminati Filmes
19 Sep 2016

Various shots of workers clearing and moving trees in the Amazonian Rain Forest using heavy equipment, bulldozers and front-loaders.

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Nepal portfolio final 23
Patan
By Taylor Weidman
04 May 2015

Carvings and other artwork from destroyed temples are stored in a secure location in Patan, Nepal on May 4, 2015. On April 25, 2015, Nepal suffered a magnitude 7.8 earthquake killing over 7,000 people and injuring thousands more.

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Handmade Yemeni Daggers, 10,000 Dolla...
Sanaa
By MENA Desk
01 Dec 2014

It is rare to see a Yemeni man in public without a traditional dagger on his waist. While many would think of a dagger as simply a weapon, Yemenis consider it a necessary tool in a man’s daily life.

Some Yemenis are even willing to spend a large amount of money for a dagger. Tens of
thousands of dollars, and more. Sheikh Naji Ben Abdil Aziz al-Shayef, the head of the Yemeni Sheikhs, is said to have paid one million dollars to buy a dagger once owned by Emam Ahmad Hamid Eddine, the ruler of Yemen from 1948 to 1962.

The al-Azizi Family has been handcrafting and selling daggers for over a hundred years. The craft has been handed down through generations. The family owns the most famous dagger workshop and store in Old Sanaa.

Hussein Mohamad al-Azizi, the family patriarch, says the dagger is an essential accessory, a
Yemeni tradition just like the ‘Oqal’, the white head dress worn by men in the Gulf. His son Hussein Hussein al-Azizi believes the dagger is a symbol of power and honor for Yemeni men.

Yemeni daggers consist of three parts. The first is the handle, which determines the price of the dagger based on the material used. The second part is the blade, and the third is the belt used to carry the dagger on the waist.

The fanciest and most expensive daggers are the ‘Seifani’, with handles made of the horn of a rhinoceros. These have become rare since the hunting and trade of rhinoceros parts was banned by international agreement.

The second level, ‘Ivory’, are daggers with handles made from the tusks of elephants. The third level, ‘Kerk’, have handles made of the horns of bulls. The lowest level, mainly manufactured in China, have handles of wood, fiberglass or plastic.

Interviews:

Hussein Hussein al-Azizi, Merchant:

(00:41-01:29) I carry the Dagger, because it is an accessory for myself, and a pride for all the Yemenis. It is not a weapon as many consider, it is an accessory for men, and they used it in the old times as a weapon when they used to travel from a city to another or from a village to another, and because Yemen is a wild area full of mountains, and because many wild animals are spread across the area, in that case it is used as a weapons for protection, for the lack of guns and mechanic weapons.

(01:37-02:20) What makes my dagger special is, apart from the fact that a man always prefers his own possessions, that it is made from the horn of a rhinoceros. I believe it is really special and better than other jambiyas and it is worth $10,000. There are even more luxurious ones but I believe in the old proverb which says, "My beast is better than the King's horse."

(02:26-03:09) The yemeni dagger has many usages, such as in weddings, it is used as an accessory specially by the groom, and it is essential in “al-Baraa” dance (traditional Yemeni dance). What differs the daggers is the shape and the way it is made. What determine its price is the shape and the type of horn it is made of.

Hussein Mohamad al-Azizi, Dagger Workshop Owner:

(04:27-06:47) It is made from the horn of the rhinoceros, dates back to the time of Bin Zi Yazan .

Dagger initially became popular because they are the main aspect of the Yemeni accessory. Daggers differ from city to another and from a village to another. For example; in Saade province, dagger have a specific shape, different from the one in Maareb, Taaz al-Mohabsha, Al-hadarmi, and Sanaa, which has a very special collection.

The best dagger currently is al-Azizi dagger, and al-Sefani, which dates back to 400-600 years. It is made from the horn Rhinoceros. There is a difference between the daggers made from the horn of the Rhinoceros and the Kerk dagger made from the horn of bulls, and the Chinese dagger, which ruined the market.
There has been a ban on hunting rhinos since 1982 enforced by The United Nations, especially for Yemenis, so we had to rely on Kerk daggers made of bull’s horns, so we can keep selling and not lose our profession and preserve this Yemeni accessory. Each country has it’s own accessory type, in Oman for example they used daggers, in the Gulf they use “Oqal” (the white head dress), every country has its own traditions.

I want to correct some misunderstood information about daggers; they say that Yemenis use daggers used as weapons. I want to correct this piece of information to say that; they used them as weapons back in the time when they used to travel from a city to another, and go through long roads, and face wild animals, that is the only case when they used daggers as weapons. Other than that case, they are only used as an accessory, even 2-4 year old children carry daggers that are made for them, different from al-Sefani daggers.

(07:04-07:32) As for the blade, the sharp metal part, we get it from Hadramout, We have different types, Jubi, Adani (from Adan), Taazi (from Taaz), Senaani (from Sanaa). I currently have all types.

Shot List:

Various shots of daggers in al-Azizi shop
Various shots show the production of the daggers in al-Aziz workshop
Various shots of grooms with daggers on their waists
Various shots of grooms dancing “al-Baraa” traditional Yemeni dance in a mass wedding

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Tree Planting in Western Canada
Alberta, Canada
By Luc Forsyth
19 Aug 2014

Tree planters sleep on the ground, work in the rain and snow, battle swarms of insects, and bend over thousands of times a day – all in the pursuit of money. Tree planting is part adventure and part iconic right of passage. The ultimate goal is to earn as much as possible before the season ends. While some “rookie” planters might struggle to earn enough to cover their expenses, a motivated and experienced planter can expect to earn upwards of $300 every day. The very best earn even more still. Many tree planters return to this job year after year in pursuit of a large payout, whether for tuition, travel, or investment.

Carrying all their equipment on their backs, and heavy loads of tree seedings makes tree planting a physically exhausting experience. In a national study, it was determined that a tree planter can burn up to 8000 calories in a single day of work.

Known nationally as one of the hardest jobs a young person can do, this story follows a camp of 42 tree planters over a difficult four month season in northern Alberta.

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Balkan migrant route 14
Bogovadja
By Mauro Prandelli
25 Jul 2014

The population of Bogovadja has different opinions on the presence of the migrants. Some of them accuse the migrants of small robberies, others see them as an economic source. In the winter of 2014 the citizens, also supported by extreme right wing groups, made a demonstration in Bogovadja to ask for control and safety against the migrants. After some months the citizens have got used to their presence.

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Balkan migrant route 15
Bogovadja
By Mauro Prandelli
25 Jul 2014

The contacts with the taxi drivers who bring the migrants to the Hungarian borders take place at the cafes, one of which is at the begging of the wood and the other at the end of the wood, along the road which passes through the whole country. To reach the Hungarian borders the taxi drivers ask the migrants to pay from 50 to 300 Euros. Many drivers work for the immigration racket, others prefer to work alone with their customers.

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Balkan migrant route 12
Bogovadja
By Mauro Prandelli
24 Jul 2014

During the Ramadan groups of migrants meet in the wood in the evening to share the Iftar, the only allowed meal during the Ramadan. Each migrant shares with the others what he can afford. After the Iftar those who stay at the reception camps go back to the center, the others seek shelter in the wood.

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Balkan migrant route 13
Bogovadja
By Mauro Prandelli
24 Jul 2014

In the evening the migrants who do not stay in the reception camp go back to the wood in Bogovadja. S., a man from Sudan, was sent away from Macedonia, where he lived with his fiancée, due to legal problems and he is now trying to reach Europe to have a new life and start the legal steps to meet his son.

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Balkan migrant route 16
Bogovadja
By Mauro Prandelli
24 Jul 2014

Afghanistan and Syrian migrants wait for the taxi to go to collect the money from a bank which is at few kilometers from Bogovadja. The day after they will leave for the Hungarian borders with the help of a taxi driver for 50 Euros per person.

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Balkan migrant route 11
Bogovadja
By Mauro Prandelli
23 Jul 2014

The migrants on the Balkan route use the reception camps to rest before continuing their journeys. After signing some documents at the police office they can get a permission lasting for three days; after the three days they can either leave Serbia or ask for political asylum. Some centers offer legal support to start the requests.

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Balkan migrant route 10
Bogovadja
By Mauro Prandelli
21 Jul 2014

Minors and families are admitted in the camp of Bogovadja. If the weather is bad some migrants, who are not accepted in the camp, are allowed to sleep under the portico to protect from the rain.

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Balkan migrant route 18
Banja Koviljaca
By Mauro Prandelli
21 Jul 2014

M., 20 years old, is North African but he declared to the authorities to be Syrian to be accepted by the reception camp and seek shelter in Europe as a refugee of the Syrian civil war.

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Balkan migrant route 19
Banja Koviljaca
By Mauro Prandelli
21 Jul 2014

An Iraqi refugee has been given hospitality by the center of Banja Koviljaca. After staying in the center for some years he applied for the political asylum in Serbia and got it. Anyway, he can neither expatriate nor ask to join his family in Serbia. He is stuck in this bureaucratic limbo and, in the meantime, he helps as cultural mediator the people working in the center.

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Balkan migrant route 20
Banja Koviljaca
By Mauro Prandelli
21 Jul 2014

S., 22 years old, has reached Serbia from Niger after three months and he is now waiting for some friends and relatives to get some money to continue his journey. Many migrants, especially if they are political refugees, fear to be recognized by the police and by the secret services of their origin countries and consequently fear possible retaliations on their families.

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Balkan migrant route 21
Banja Koviljaca
By Mauro Prandelli
21 Jul 2014

In the center of Banja Koviljaca, as in many others reception centers, the migrants can use the internet access and thus maintain the contacts with their friends and their families.

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Balkan migrant route 22
Banja Koviljaca
By Mauro Prandelli
21 Jul 2014

At Banja Koviljaca, at the border between Bosnia, Herzegovina and Serbia, the migrants are received in a center which was opened in 1991 to offer help during the Yugoslavian wars. In 2006 this center was renewed with the help of the UNHCR and of the INTERSOS and can now receive about 85 people.

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Balkan migrant route 23
Bogovadja
By Mauro Prandelli
21 Jul 2014

The camp of Bogovadja accepts minors and families. The migrants who are not accepted by the center report that although there are available rooms the operators refuse to accept them even only to take a shower. The center director says that some rooms are kept free to eventually receive minors or families. The migrants also report that there were some cases of extortion and of request of sexual favors by the operators in exchange for hospitality in the center.

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North Korea in Color 005
By Ulrik Pedersen
12 Jun 2014

This truck runs on firewood and/or coal, due to a lack of gasoline which has to be imported. The government has limited access to dollars with which to import goods such as gasoline.

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Balkan migrant route 02
Obrenovac
By Mauro Prandelli
15 Jan 2014

“The first time the immigrants arrived in the village we were surprised and worried. I had never seen such black men in all my life”. The inhabitants of the Serbian countries, where the migrants seek shelter, are surprised to see them. At first suspicious and worried, then they realize that the migrants can be an economic resource for their activities. In Belgrade, not far from Obrenovac, where there is one of the biggest reception camps, the atmosphere is tense also due to the presence of extreme right wing and xenophobic groups which act inside the football supporters teams of the capital.

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Balkan migrant route 24
Obrenovac
By Mauro Prandelli
15 Jan 2014

“Each day thirty or forty people ask for hospitality” reports the person in charge of the reception center “Hotel Obrenovac”, near the village of Obrenovac at thirty minutes from Belgrado. Here the center director is the only one who can decide the assignment of the hotel rooms to the migrants who have the papers for the asylum request. At the Hoyel Obrenovac the migrants have three meals per day and as it is an open center they can go out and stay in the village. It is reported of occasional conflicts between the migrants and the inhabitants of Obrenovac. The Hotel Obrenovac was damaged only during the flood in May 2014.

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Balkan migrant route 09
Obrenovac
By Mauro Prandelli
14 Jan 2014

In the reception camp of Senica a woman has just arrived from the hospital after giving birth to a baby. The Syrian couple left the previous month from Aleppo, Syria, to go to Germany; the Syrian family can choose to stop in Serbia and start to apply for the political asylum or continue its journey to Europe.

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Balkan migrant route 17
Presevo
By Mauro Prandelli
08 Jan 2014

Near the city of Presevo, close to the borders between Serbia and Macedonia, the border police makes controls to stop the human trafficking. The arrested traffickers’ cars are kept in custody at the deposit of the barrack. The traffickers make different parts of the journey : the journey from Macedonia to Serbia is usually made by Albanian groups, while the journey inside Serbia is generally made by Serbian taxi drivers helped by some migrants dislocated near the Serbian reception camps.

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Balkan migrant route 06
Senica
By Mauro Prandelli
05 Jan 2014

M. is a 23 years old Sudanese boy. Together with his wife he arrived in Serbia through the east corridor of the Balkan route. He left Greece and then passed through Albania and Montenegro to arrive to the camp in Senica, Serbia, at few kilometers from the border with Montenegro.

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Balkan migrant route 03
Bogovadja, Belgrade
By Mauro Prandelli
02 Jan 2014

In the wood in Bogovadja the migrants find shelter in old, abandoned houses. A group of Sudanese, escaped from a famine first and from a civil war then, prepare something to eat with makeshift means.

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Balkan migrant route 04
Bogovadja
By Mauro Prandelli
02 Jan 2014

Migrants who find refuge in the woods organize everyday life . Who procures the wood with makeshift equipment to warm up and who collects money for grocery shopping and prepare at least one hot meal .
Migrants tend to different houses to be occupied by nationality, although often the groups are made up of migrants from different places .

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Balkan migrant route 05
Bogovadja, Belgrade
By Mauro Prandelli
02 Jan 2014

The migrants who find shelter in the wood organize their daily lives. Some of them get the wood to get warm by makeshift means, others collect money to buy something to eat and prepare at least a hot meal. The migrants of the same nationality tend to occupy the same houses, but sometimes the groups are made of migrants coming from different countries.

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Balkan migrant route 01
Bogovadja
By Mauro Prandelli
01 Jan 2014

The Balkan route is a corridor which passes through Macedonia and Serbia to arrive to the borders of Hungary. Since the situation in Greece has become more difficult due to the economic crisis and the difficult life conditions, the migrants escape from the Hellenic peninsula and try to go through the former Yugoslavia to arrive in Hungary and then try to enter into Europe. After passing the border with Macedonia the migrants seek makeshift shelters in the Serbian woods and in the reception camps spread among the country.

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Balkan migrant route 08
Bogovadja
By Mauro Prandelli
01 Jan 2014

M. arrived at the wood in Bogovadja during the night. Together with other compatriots he found a shelter in an abandoned house in the wood where he could rest. In the afternoon, with the help of a friend, he wants to leave for Hungary and then reach his family in Germany.

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Balkan migrant route 07
Bogovadja
By Mauro Prandelli
31 Dec 2013

After staying in Greece for seven years working in various cooperatives in Athens, this Afgan decided to leave for Germany due to continuous persecutions from extreme right wing Greek groups. In Athens he left his fiancée hoping to meet her again in France. “If you see the world from far away, as from where God sees it, or with google maps, for instance, you will not see any border, but the closer you go, the more yellow lines you see. Who made all those lines? Certainly not God, but the human beings”.

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Traditional oil wells East Java Indon...
Cepu, Indonesia
By Jeffrey Bright
17 Sep 2013

Traditional oil miner gathers buckets of crude oil to begin the distillation process of converting it into diesel fuel. Distillation is accomplished by heating the filtered crude oil to between 200 °C (392 °F) and 350 °C (662 °F). Cepu, Indonesia. 25/01/2011

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Traditional oil wells East Java Indon...
Cepu, Indonesia
By Jeffrey Bright
17 Sep 2013

Motorcycle is loaded with drums of diesel and transported to nearby villages to be sold. Cepu, Indonesia. 25/01/2011

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The 13th Istanbul Biennial, “Mom, am ...
Istanbul, Turkey
By Claudia Wiens
11 Sep 2013

Istanbul, Turkey. 11th September 2013. The 13th Istanbul Biennial, “Mom, am I barbarian?”, curated by Fulya Erdemci, runs from 14 September untill 20 October. Admission to the biennial exhibitions is free, overlapping with the biennial’s vision to create a public space and be accessible to everyone. Art by Claire Pentecost. © Claudia Wiens

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Pottery Workshop In Gaza (1 of 35)
Gaza
By AhmedDeeb
11 Jun 2013

Hassan Atallah, 32 years old, puts wood shavings into mud kiln to melt the mud by the fire. This pottery factory in Gaza has been a source of income and pride for the Attallah family for generations. Gaza Strip, June, 2013.

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Olive Wood Carving for tourism in Pal...
bayt Jala, Palestine
By Firas S Mukarker
13 Feb 2013

A very ancient handcraft in Bethlehem, Palestine, was inherited thousands of years ago by the time of Romans in the Holy Land , until today, you can find all this work in souvenir shops in Bethlehem, mostly camels and religious statues for Christians Jews and Muslims .