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Refugees Await Registration in a Camp...
Metylene, Lesbos
By Bartek Langer
13 Jan 2016

Refugees, who succeed to cross the maritime border between Turkey and Greece are being brought to the Moria Camp near the city of Mitylene, on the island of Lesbos, where the European border agency Frontex identify and screen them, before they may go to the Greek mainland. 

Moria Camp reminds us of a war zone. People are queuing, often for many days. They lie in the mud and sleep in tents because there is not enough space in the shelters. Human rights activists call the camp “Europe's shame”.

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Metylene, Moria Camp
By Bartek Langer
13 Jan 2016

The refugee camp of Moria is a two-parted facility. On the so called Afghan Hill refugees must spend the night in tents.

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Metylene, Moria Camp
By Bartek Langer
13 Jan 2016

The refugee camp of Moria is a two-parted facility. On the so called Afghan Hill refugees must spend the night in tents.

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Metylene, Moria Camp
By Bartek Langer
13 Jan 2016

A refugee waits for registration in the Moria camp.

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Metylene, Moria Camp
By Bartek Langer
13 Jan 2016

A refugee waits for registration in the Moria camp.

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Metylene, Moria Camp
By Bartek Langer
13 Jan 2016

Refugees wait for registration in the Moria camp

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Metylene, Moria Camp
By Bartek Langer
13 Jan 2016

A refugee waits for registration in the Moria camp.

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Metylene, Moria Camp
By Bartek Langer
13 Jan 2016

A refugee waits for registration in the Moria camp.

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Metylene, Moria Camp
By Bartek Langer
13 Jan 2016

A refugee waits for registration in the Moria camp.

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Metylene, Moria Camp
By Bartek Langer
13 Jan 2016

A refugee charges his mobile phone at a charging station in the Moria camp.

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Metylene, Moria Camp
By Bartek Langer
13 Jan 2016

The refugee camp of Moria is a two-parted facility. On the so called Afghan Hill refugees must spend the night in tents.

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Metylene, Moria Camp
By Bartek Langer
13 Jan 2016

A refugee from Afghanistan sits between the tents on the Afghan Hill in the Moria camp.

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Metylene, Moria Camp
By Bartek Langer
13 Jan 2016

A refugee family from Afghanistan wait for registration in the Moria camp.

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Metylene, Moria Camp
By Bartek Langer
13 Jan 2016

A young girl from Afghanistan waits with her family for registration in the Moria camp.

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Metylene, Moria Camp
By Bartek Langer
13 Jan 2016

Refugees walk between container accommodations by the UNHCR in the Moria camp.

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Metylene, Moria Camp
By Bartek Langer
13 Jan 2016

Refugees wait for registration in the Moria camp.

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Metylene, Moria Camp
By Bartek Langer
13 Jan 2016

A refugee enjoys his meal at the Afghan Hill in the Moria camp.

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Metylene, Moria Camp
By Bartek Langer
09 Jan 2016

A mother with her son wait for medical care in the refugee camp of Moria on Lesbos.

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Metylene, Moria Camp
By Bartek Langer
09 Jan 2016

Refugees warm up at a fire bin in the refugee camp of Moria in Lesbos.

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Metylene, Moria Camp
By Bartek Langer
09 Jan 2016

Refugees warm up at a fire bin in the Refugee Camp Moria in Lesbos.

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Refugees Stranded at Croatia Border
Croatia
By francesca mannocchi
23 Sep 2015

B-Roll footage of refugees stranded at Croatia border crossing with Serbia.

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Refugees in Red Cross Tents in Austri...
Nickelsdorf, Austria
By danubestory
07 Sep 2015

Thousands of refugees entered Austria on foot from Hungary on Saturday and Sunday. Austria and Germany opened borders for them after they got stuck in Budapest train station Keleti for several days. Refugees walked on foot and were later taken by 60 buses from Hungarian authorities to the border which they crossed on foot. After stopping buses, some people decided to walk to Austria, some were donated with train and bus tickets from Hungarian citizens and charities and some were driven to the border by people in private cars.
In Austria, exausted refugees got warm welcome from Red Cross people, social workers of Bundeswehr and volunteers. People donated food, drinks, clothes, toys to them.
In the bordertown of Nickelsdorf, refugees can rest and wait for trains and buses to Vienna and Germany. German police took controll over the situation and trains are guarded by German policemen. Refugees wait near railway station or in the hangar built originally for famous Nova Rock music festival. There are hygienical facilities, warm blankets, field beds, food, drinks, donated clothers and shoes. For children, toys and various activities are prepared.
Numbers of refugees resting in hangar are changing. At this time, approximately 300 people are waiting for next transport to Germany. Another 100 is waiting in the railway station. For those crossing the border by foot, the buses are waiting directly there and transport them to the train.
„Austria is perfect,“ thanks Ibrahim, young man from Syria for everything. „Austrian people gave us smile, hug, food. We feel welcomed here.“ They blame Hungary for getting them closed in railway station in Budapest with no facilities and for police actions they experienced there. Despite all, children are full of energy. They discover new toys and want to try each facility the hangar and outside land offer to them. They can draw, paint, bicycle, play footbal, take toys which they like. They want to spend every moment by playing and doing things so natural for their age – and different from those they experienced along their journey from war zones.
There are also newborn babies. Nadja whose parents are from Afghanistan was born on the way, in Greece, six weeks ago. Her young mother managed to continue walking to Austria.
Further she will continue in comfortable speed train, offered for free by Austrian and German authorities.
During the weekend, 12 000 asylum seekers entered Austria and continued towards Germany.

00:00: W/S: Hangar originally built for Nova Rock music festival is now full of refugees who rest here before last part of their journey, to Germany.
00:07: W/S: Young men playing football in front of a hangar in Nickelsdorf while waiting for transport to Germany.
00:14: M/S: Man resting in front of a hangar in Nickelsdorf while waiting for transport to Germany.
00:21: W/S: People resting after exhausting walk thru Hungary towards Austrian border.
00:28: M/S: Refugees discussing while resting and waiting for transport to Germany in a hangar in Nickelsdorf.
00:35: M/S: Refugees receiving food from volunteers in hangar in Nickelsdorf, Austria.
00:42: M/S: Refugees receiving food from volunteers in hangar in Nickelsdorf, Austria.
00:49: M/S: Refugees resting and waiting for transport to Germany in a hangar in Nickelsdorf.
00:56: D/S: Man resting before next journey to the Germany.
01:03: SOT: Sabine Lamberti, a volunteer:
No, not really. Why sould we be afraid? I mean, there are bad people, maybe there are bad people, but you also have bad people in Austria. Do you know what I mean? I mean in every country you have good people and you have bad people. It does have nothing to do with the nationality.
01:28: D/S: Welcome to Europe – Austrian volunteers have written on the Hungarian – Austrian border to show to the refugees different attitude towards them as they experienced in Budapest.
01:35: D/S: Sabine Lamberti welcoming new refugees who already reached Austria.
01:45: D/S: Woman trying to find suitable clean clothers for her family among things donated by Austrian people.
01:53: W/S: Ambulance vehicles and mobile toilets near the railway station in bordertown of Nickelsdorf from where special refugee trains to Vienna and Germany depart.
01:59: M/S: Refugees waiting for train to Germany in Nickelsdorf railway station.
02:07: M/S: TV crews working on Nickelsdorf railway station, covering the migration crisis.
02:15: W/S: Refugees entering the special train in railway station in Nickelsdorf which will transport them to Vienna for the next train to Germany.
02:22: W/S: Refugees entering the special train in railway station in Nickelsdorf which will transport them to Vienna for the next train to Germany.
02:29: W/S: Special train for refugees is departing from Nickelsdorf.

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Refugees in Red Cross Tents in Austria
Nickelsdorf, Austria
By danubestory
07 Sep 2015

Thousands of refugees entered Austria on foot from Hungary on Saturday and Sunday. Austria and Germany opened borders for them after they got stuck in Budapest train station Keleti for several days. Refugees walked on foot and were later taken by 60 buses from Hungarian authorities to the border which they crossed on foot. After stopping buses, some people decided to walk to Austria, some were donated with train and bus tickets from Hungarian citizens and charities and some were driven to the border by people in private cars.
In Austria, exausted refugees got warm welcome from Red Cross people, social workers of Bundeswehr and volunteers. People donated food, drinks, clothes, toys to them.
In the bordertown of Nickelsdorf, refugees can rest and wait for trains and buses to Vienna and Germany. German police took controll over the situation and trains are guarded by German policemen. Refugees wait near railway station or in the hangar built originally for famous Nova Rock music festival. There are hygienical facilities, warm blankets, field beds, food, drinks, donated clothers and shoes. For children, toys and various activities are prepared.
Numbers of refugees resting in hangar are changing. At this time, approximately 300 people are waiting for next transport to Germany. Another 100 is waiting in the railway station. For those crossing the border by foot, the buses are waiting directly there and transport them to the train.
"Austria is perfect,“ thanks Ibrahim, young man from Syria for everything. "Austrian people gave us smile, hug, food. We feel welcomed here." They blame Hungary for getting them closed in railway station in Budapest with no facilities and for police actions they experienced there. Despite all, children are full of energy. They discover new toys and want to try each facility the hangar and outside land offer to them. They can draw, paint, bicycle, play footbal, take toys which they like. They want to spend every moment by playing and doing things so natural for their age – and different from those they experienced along their journey from war zones.
There are also newborn babies. Nadja whose parents are from Afghanistan was born on the way, in Greece, six weeks ago. Her young mother managed to continue walking to Austria.
Further she will continue in comfortable speed train, offered for free by Austrian and German authorities.
During the weekend, 12 000 asylum seekers entered Austria and continued towards Germany.

Shotlist:
00:00 SOT: Sabine Lamberti, a Austrian volunteer:
No, not really. Why sould we be afraid? I mean, there are bad people, maybe there are bad people, but you also have bad people in Austria. Do you know what I mean? I mean in every country you have good people and you have bad people. It does have nothing to do with the nationality. I by myself I own a castle, Schloss Konigshof, that´s in Bruckneudorf, and I should get first refugees next week who will live in my castle because my castle is very big, I have 60 500 square metres just living alone with two dogs. So I said: Okay, there are such a lot of people who are sleeping on the street in Traiskirchen who don´t have anymore a place, living in tents in the street, on the floor. So I open my castle and I will have the people to say: Welcome and live in my castle. Next week I should get the first.
I am here because I want to help that people who are such a long time on the trip to come in a country where is no war, where nobody is behind them, and to help them and to say: Hello, welcome, welcome, welcome.
There were people with who I was crying when the came from the bus. They are so nice. They are coming here with nothing, with flipflops on their feet, and yesterday evening it was so cold and such a wind. And to help them – everybody has to do it. They are human beings and we should all together help them.
00:09: W/S: Hangar originally built for Nova Rock music festival is now full of refugees who rest here before last part of their journey, to Germany.
00:16: W/S: Young men playing football in front of a hangar in Nickelsdorf while waiting for transport to Germany.
00:23: M/S: Man resting in front of a hangar in Nickelsdorf while waiting for transport to Germany.
00:30: W/S: People resting after exhausting walk thru Hungary towards Austrian border.
00:38: M/S: Refugees discussing while resting and waiting for transport to Germany in a hangar in Nickelsdorf.
00:44: M/S: Refugees receiving food from volunteers in hangar in Nickelsdorf, Austria.
00:51: M/S: Refugees receiving food from volunteers in hangar in Nickelsdorf, Austria.
00:58: M/S: Refugees resting and waiting for transport to Germany in a hangar in Nickelsdorf.
01:05: D/S: Man resting before next journey to the Germany.
01:12: SOT: Sabine Lamberti, a volunteer
01:20: D/S: Welcome to Europe – Austrian volunteers have written on the Hungarian – Austrian border to show to the refugees different attitude towards them as they experienced in Budapest.
01:28: D/S: Sabine Lamberti welcoming new refugees who already reached Austria.
01:38: D/S: Woman trying to find suitable clean clothers for her family among things donated by Austrian people.
01:45: W/S: Ambulance vehicles and mobile toilets near the railway station in bordertown of Nickelsdorf from where special refugee trains to Vienna and Germany depart.
01:52: M/S: Refugees waiting for train to Germany in Nickelsdorf railway station.
01:59: M/S: TV crews working on Nickelsdorf railway station, covering the migration crisis.
02:27: W/S: Refugees entering the special train in railway station in Nickelsdorf which will transport them to Vienna for the next train to Germany.
02:15: W/S: Refugees entering the special train in railway station in Nickelsdorf which will transport them to Vienna for the next train to Germany.
02:22: W/S: Special train for refugees is departing from Nickelsdorf.

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Global Refugee Crisis: The Worst Sinc...
Beirut
By b.yaacoub
11 Jun 2015

June 20 is World Refugee Day.

In 2014, global refugee numbers were higher than they have ever been since World War II. In 2015, the problem has only gotten worse.

There are currently over 50 million refugees in the world and more than %50 of them are children. Approximately half of the world's refugees are from just three countries: Afghanistan, Syria, and Somalia.

The response to this massive international crisis has been limited, with most refugee aid programs desperately underfunded. Amnesty International has called the lack of robust international response "A Conspiracy of Neglect." With little help on the way, the future of the world's displaced remains uncertain.

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Displaced Yezidi Still Stuck on Mt Si...
Sinjar, Iraq
By Balint Szlanko
26 May 2015

Nearly a year after they were forced to flee to Mount Sinjar following an attack by Islamic State militants on their villages, thousands of Yezidi refugees still remain on the mountain, despite a lack of water, food, and housing.

Almost all food and water has to be hauled up from the plains and the displaced are reduced to eating bred and some vegetables, though some families managed to rescue and bring their animals with them, providing them with milk and occasionally meat.

Some say they are unwilling to go to the official IDP camps in the north as they have relatives fighting with Kurdish forces against IS and don't want to abandon them. Others say they simply don't want to live in the camps and prefer it on the mountain, close to their ancestral land, despite the difficulties they face here.

Many still have relatives missing, too, as IS took thousands of women and children as hostage, many of whom are understood to be kept in sexual slavery.

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Human Trafficking: A Migrant's Story
Kafranbel
By Transterra Editor
30 Apr 2015

Majd Bayoush is a 22-year-old who fled his hometown of Kafranbel in north Syria with the aim of smuggling himself into Europe. After a perilous and complicated journey that lasted for nearly three months, he reached Germany, where he is waiting for the final procedures before he is granted political asylum.

The following is his story as told to Transterra Media.

I arrived to the port city of Izmir, Turkey on September 22, 2014. On the same day, I took an inflatable boat with 47 other migrants and sailed to the Greek island of Samos. We reached our destination after 2.5 hours. The boat deflated and sank after it hit the rocky shore.   

We had agreed with the smuggler Abu Abdu, a Syrian man nicknamed ‘the Tiger’, to surrender to the Greek police once we reach the island. Before leaving Turkey, I deposited 8,000 euros at a money transfer office called ‘al-Saeed’ controlled by the smuggling gang.  [This transfer company has offices in other countries.] Abu Abdu took 2,500 euros out of that sum.

We climbed a mountain on the island of Samos and reached a police station, where policemen confiscated all our possessions, including our mobile phones, and detained us for three days. On Sept. 25, the police authorities placed us below the deck in a cruise boat, which headed to an island near Samos. I do not know its name. There was a camp that held other captured illegal migrants who were Afghans, Asians and Palestinians. However, most of them were Syrians. 

FULL TEXT IS AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST

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Samos
By Transterra Editor
28 Apr 2015

Majd and other migrants at the ferry boat dock before the voyage to Athens after being released from a detention camp near Samos, Greece.

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Human Trafficking: A Migrant's Story ...
Kafranbel
By Transterra Editor
27 Apr 2015

Majd Bayoush is a 22-year-old who fled his hometown of Kafranbel in north Syria with the aim of smuggling himself into Europe. After a perilous and complicated journey that lasted for nearly three months, he reached Germany, where he is waiting for the final procedures before he is granted political asylum.

SHOTLIST

Shot of migrants on climbing a mountain after reaching the Greek island of Samos

OFF CAMERA
00:09 – 00:16
“This is the boat after UNINTELLIGIBLE."

Shot of the migrants on the boat to Athens

NAT Sound
01:01 – 01:03
“Film where we were staying.”

01:08 – 01:11
“Film the mountain there.” Shot of the migrants walking along railroad tracks from Greece to Macedonia

OFF CAMERA
01:31 – 01:32
“The road to Macedonia.”

Shot of migrant encampment near the Greek-Macedonian border

NAT Sound
01:52- 01:56
“I hope you have not filmed me.”

02:07 – 02:10
“We need light bulb and electricity.”

Shot of a Macedonian soldier overseeing the migrant’s tents on the border after burning them

OFF CAMERA
02:25 – 02:31
“The Macedonian army. The Greek-Macedonian border.” 02:39 - 02:43
“All you do is film.” Shot of burnt tents near the Greek-Macedonian border
Shot of migrants around a fire in Gevgilija, Macedonia

OFF CAMERA
03:16 -03:24
“The Macedonian-Greek border. Syrian and Iraqi refugee.”

Shot of migrants in the outdoors in an unnamed area near the Macedonian-Serbian border
Shot of migrants walking railroad tracks near the Greek-Macedonian border

OFF CAMERA
03:54 – 03:56
“The Macedonian border.”

Shot inside the central prison in Gazi Baba, Skpoje

OFF CAMERA
04:30 – 05:14
“This is the bathroom. This is where we wash. Even animals are washed in a better place. Animals are washed in a place that is better than this. These are the sinks. We are in Skopje.[SHOWING A WATER HEATER] They have cut the wires so that we do not shower with hot water. This is the toilet.”

Shot of migrants arriving to a house owned by a Pakistani smuggler who called himself Ahmad.

OFF CAMERA
05:18
“The Macedonian-Serbian border.” 05:34
“The Macedonian-Serbian border.”

Shot of the courtyard of a house owned by a Pakistani smuggler who called himself Ahmad
Shot of migrants walking at night in the outdoors in Serbia

NAT Sound
05:57
“-Are you filming? -Yes.”

Shot of migrants being transported by tractor in Serbia

Shot of migrants walking at night in the outdoors in Serbia
Exterior shot of the house in which Majd lives in the village of Tönning near Hamburg

06:38
OFF CAMERA
“This is the house to which I was moved in Hamburg. They gave me this house until my residency permit is issued. This is a village called Tunning to the north of Hamburg.”

Traveling shot of a street in Tönning, near Hamburg

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Trench Shields Shiite Iraqi Province ...
Karbala
By mushtaq mohammed
27 Mar 2015

Karabala, Iraq
March 27, 2015

A trench is being dug on the border of the southern Shiite-majority Iraqi province of Karbala with the provinces of al-Anbar and Babel. The ditch, which extends for 50km, is 6m deep and 10m wide and is guarded by surveillance towers and checkpoints manned by Iraqi government forces and a Shiite militia known as the Al-Abbas Combat Division.

Colonel Hassan al-Silawi, the commander of the 33rd Infantry Brigade in the Iraqi army, said in an interview that this trench aims to keep ISIS fighters from entering Karbala from al-Anbar province. Silawi denied that this obstacle was conceived to separate Sunni and Shiite populations.

Another interviewed officer denied claims made by Sunni politicians that the aim of the trench was to annex territory to the province Karbala. The city of Karbala hosts the tomb of Imam Hussein, one of the holiest shrines for Shiite Muslims.

SHOTLIST AND TRANSCRIPT

Wide of soldiers standing next to surveillance tower
Wide of trench
Various of soldiers guarding trench
Wide of Iraqi army Humvee and soldier
Wide of soldiers running on sand barrier
Interview with Colonel Hassan al-Silawi, Commander of the 33rd Infantry Brigade
Wide of soldiers next to sand barricade
Various of soldier manning machinegun behind sand barricade
Various of soldiers guarding trench
Various of soldiers and military vehicles next to sand barricade
Interview with Colonel Hassan al-Silawi, Commander of the 33rd Infantry Brigade
Various of soldiers and military vehicles
Wide of pickup truck moving and banner with Shiite religious symbols
Wide of tents and Iraqi flags
Interview with Major Jaber Ahmed, Infantry Platoon Commander
Various of trench
Various of soldier in surveillance tower looking through binoculars
Wide of soldiers and vehicles at checkpoint. Phrase written with bricks in Arabic reads: “Long live Iraq.”
Wide of solider next to Iraqi flag
Wide of Iraqi soldier on guard

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Colonel Hassan al-Silawi, Commander of the 33rd Infantry Brigade
01:18 – 02:50

“The trench extends for about 50km along the administrative border between the provinces of Babel and Karbala. No, it is not about Sunni or Shiite provinces. This trench is an obstacle set up for military purposes. It has nothing to do with whether an area is Sunni or Shiite. This is a desert. These lands do not belong to any individual; they belong to the Ministry of Agriculture.

"The trench will be guarded by platoons from the 33rd Infantry Brigade in addition to groups from the Popular Mobilization [Shiite militia umbrella], especially the Al-Abbas Combat Division. The trench was dug by the province of the holy Karbala in agreement with the local governments of neighboring provinces. This system involves surveillance towers and cameras, as well as a dirt barrier that is 5m high and 6m wide.

"This trench was dug in the desert – an unpopulated area. There are no agricultural areas or shepherds. This is a desert, barren land. The aim of digging the trench is to stop the terrorist ISIS organization from training in this area.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Colonel Hassan al-Silawi, Commander of the 33rd Infantry Brigade
04:00- 04:48

"The soldiers are not scared because it is their duty to fight. We are terrorizing ISIS; ISIS is scared of us. The proof is that we liberated areas with the support of the Popular Mobilizations forces. This is a border of separation in desert areas neighboring the province of Karbala. The trench goes along the administrative border of three regions – Babel, Ramadi and the province of Karbala.

"There is no transgression. There is an agreement among local governments. This [trench] serves all the provinces. The public interest comes ahead of everything, especially when it comes to security. There are no lands that belong to the state or agricultural land, either. It is a desert area."

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Major Jaber Ahmed, Infantry Platoon Commander
05:12 – 05:51

“Thanks be to God, so far no security breach has been recorded in this district. Thanks be to God, it was because of the efforts of the head of operations, the commander of the 33rd Brigade."

Interviewer: "How would describe your morale?"

"Our morale is very high, thanks to [the military commanders]. God willing, the operations to liberate Falluja, which is close to us, as well as Tikrit, have started. God willing, operations will also start within Al-Anbar. God willing, the operations will keep going. We are guarding the northern district of the province of Karbala. Our morale is high, thanks be to God.”

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Death and Destruction after Ambush Ag...
Aden, Yemen
By Dhaifallah Homran
27 Mar 2015

Aden, Yemen
March, 27th

THIS VIDEO CONTAINS GRAPHIC IMAGES

Clashes between Houthi rebels and Sunni militia fighters, who support the President Abed Rabbu Mansour Hadi, have left a number of dead and wounded from both sides on a road between the port city of Aden and Lahij on Friday, March 27th.
This video shows the aftermath of an ambush set up by the Popular Resistance Committees, a pro-Hadi militia, against Houthi rebels and other fighters loyal to former President Ali Abdallah Saleh, who is supporting the Houthis.
Images of burned military vehicles belonging to the rebels be seen in the video. In the port city of Aden, pro-Hadi fighters patrol the streets and have set up tents as temporary military barracks.

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From Cannes Film Festival to Refugee ...
Atmeh
By AmmarParis
29 Jan 2015

"The English class birds pose next to the class tent" Comment by Wiam Simav Bedirxan, Syrian director and activist who lives now in the camp of Atmeh, north-west of Syria, where she teaches English and spends time with the self-ruled camp children, in January 2015. Photo by Wiam Simav Bedirxan / Transterra Media

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From Cannes Film Festival to Refugee ...
Atmeh
By AmmarParis
29 Jan 2015

"The English class birds pose next to the class tent" Comment by Wiam Simav Bedirxan, Syrian director and activist who lives now in the camp of Atmeh, north-west of Syria, where she teaches English and spends time with the self-ruled camp children, in January 2015. Photo by Wiam Simav Bedirxan / Transterra Media

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From Cannes Film Festival to Refugee ...
Atmeh
By AmmarParis
15 Jan 2015

"Ambulatory individual efforts of young Syrians in the collection and distribution of clothing for the displaced in the severe cold wave.." Comment by Wiam Simav Bedirxan, Syrian director and activist who lives now in the camp of Atmeh, north-west of Syria, where she teaches English and spends time with the self-ruled camp children, in January 2015. Photo by Wiam Simav Bedirxan / Transterra Media

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From Cannes Film Festival to Refugee ...
Atmeh
By AmmarParis
15 Jan 2015

"Mud of betrayal... Feet from my country..." Comment by Wiam Simav Bedirxan, Syrian director and activist who lives now in the camp of Atmeh, north-west of Syria, where she teaches English and spends time with the self-ruled camp children, in January 2015. Photo by Wiam Simav Bedirxan / Transterra Media

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From Cannes Film Festival to Refugee ...
Atmeh
By AmmarParis
15 Jan 2015

"Mud of betrayal... Feet from my country..." Comment by Wiam Simav Bedirxan, Syrian director and activist who lives now in the camp of Atmeh, north-west of Syria, where she teaches English and spends time with the self-ruled camp children, in January 2015. Photo by Wiam Simav Bedirxan / Transterra Media

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From Cannes Film Festival to Refugee ...
Atmeh
By AmmarParis
15 Jan 2015

"Sewage between displaced tents is among the most important problems in the camp.." Comment by Wiam Simav Bedirxan, Syrian director and activist who lives now in the camp of Atmeh, north-west of Syria, where she teaches English and spends time with the self-ruled camp children, in January 2015. Photo by Wiam Simav Bedirxan / Transterra Media

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From Cannes Film Festival to Refugee ...
Atmeh
By AmmarParis
15 Jan 2015

"Ambulatory individual efforts of young Syrians in the collection and distribution of clothing for the displaced in the severe cold wave.." Comment by Wiam Simav Bedirxan, Syrian director and activist who lives now in the camp of Atmeh, north-west of Syria, where she teaches English and spends time with the self-ruled camp children, in January 2015. Photo by Wiam Simav Bedirxan / Transterra Media

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From Cannes Film Festival to Refugee ...
Atmeh
By AmmarParis
15 Jan 2015

"Even you, mud, you are besieging our displaced tents... This is what they say..." Comment by Wiam Simav Bedirxan, Syrian director and activist who lives now in the camp of Atmeh, north-west of Syria, where she teaches English and spends time with the self-ruled camp children, in January 2015. Photo by Wiam Simav Bedirxan / Transterra Media

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From Cannes Film Festival to Refugee ...
Atmeh
By AmmarParis
15 Jan 2015

"Glass balls of displaced children still rolling between small dreams." Comment by Wiam Simav Bedirxan, Syrian director and activist who lives now in the camp of Atmeh, north-west of Syria, where she teaches English and spends time with the self-ruled camp children, in January 2015. Photo by Wiam Simav Bedirxan / Transterra Media