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Brazilian Families Affected by Zika i...
Recife
By Flavio Forner
26 Jan 2016

Photos of Brazilian families affected by the outbreak of the Zika virus in the city of Recife, in northeast Brazil, as mothers seek help for their babies born with microcephaly.

The Brazilian army is deployed on the streets of Recife in a door-to-door campaign in search of vestiges of Aedes mosquito larvae, responsible for spreading the Zika virus. The population receives instructions on how best to protect and prevent the emergence of mosquitoes in their homes.

The Zika virus, first detected about 40 years ago in Uganda, has long been seen as a less-painful cousin to Dengue and Chikunguya, which are spread by the same Aedes mosquito. Brazilian health authorities are convinced that microcephaly is related to the Zika virus when a pregnant woman is bitten by this insect. This rare condition known as microcephaly often results in mental retardation.

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Recife
By Flavio Forner
20 Jan 2016

Mother holds her baby, born with microcephaly, waiting medical attention at Oswaldo Cruz Hospital in Recife, Brazil.

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Recife
By Flavio Forner
20 Jan 2016

Pregnant woman waits for consultation at a clinic in Recife, Brazil.

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Recife
By Flavio Forner
19 Jan 2016

Nadja Gomes Bezerra, 42, a telemarketing operator, takes her 4 month-old daughter Alice to a medical consultation by Dr. Vanessa Van Der Linden. Alice was born with microcephaly.

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Recife
By Flavio Forner
19 Jan 2016

Dr. Vanessa Van Der Linden measures Alice's skull. The 4 month-old baby was born with microcephaly. Alice's mother is Nadja Gomes Bezerra, 42, a telemarketing operator.

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Recife
By Flavio Forner
18 Jan 2016

Recife's Health Department workers and soldiers from the Brazilian military work together in detecting mosquito outbreaks.The municipality in Recife wants to introduce penalties for its citizens who don't follow the instructions on preventing the spread of the mosquito Aedes aegypti.

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Recife
By Flavio Forner
18 Jan 2016

A Brazilian army soldier checking a house in Recife for Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. The municipality in Recife wants to introduce penalties for its citizens who don't follow the instructions on preventing the spread of the Aedes Aegypti. The city now gets the help of the Brazilian military in detecting mosquito outbreaks.

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Recife
By Flavio Forner
18 Jan 2016

A Brazilian army soldier and Recife's Health Department worker talk to local resident to check for Aedes Aegypti mosquitoes. The municipality in Recife wants to introduce penalties for its citizens who don't follow the instructions on preventing the spread of the Aedes aegypti. The city now gets the help of the Brazilian military in detecting mosquito outbreaks.

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Recife
By Flavio Forner
18 Jan 2016

A biologist works in a laboratory at Fiocruz Research Institute in Recife, Brazil. Across the country, scientists race against the clock to develop a vaccine for the Zika virus. Other scientists from Africa and the US flew to Brazil to help.

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Recife
By Flavio Forner
18 Jan 2016

Biologist Constancia Ayres from Fiocruz Research Institute in Recife, Brazil. Across the country, scientists race against the clock to develop a vaccine for the Zika virus. Other scientists from Africa and the US flew to Brazil to help.

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Recife
By Flavio Forner
18 Jan 2016

Biologist Constancia Ayres from Fiocruz Research Institute in Recife, Brazil, where she studies the evolution of the mosquito since Africa. Across the country, scientists race against the clock to develop a vaccine for the Zika virus. Other scientists from Africa and the US flew to Brazil to help.

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Recife
By Flavio Forner
18 Jan 2016

The mosquito Aedes aegypti spreads four different types of Dengue and Chikungunya, and now the Zika virus.

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Recife
By Flavio Forner
18 Jan 2016

Biologist Constancia Ayres from Fiocruz Research Institute in Recife, Brazil, where she studies the evolution of the mosquito since Africa. Across the country, scientists race against the clock to develop a vaccine for the Zika virus. Other scientists from Africa and the US flew to Brazil to help.

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Recife
By Flavio Forner
18 Jan 2016

Because of the mild symptoms of Zika virus, few people visit a doctor so the government does not know how many Brazilians are already infected. Pernambuco state is the leader with 33 percent probability of microcephaly. The regional government declared a state of emergency in last September.

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Recife
By Flavio Forner
18 Jan 2016

The mosquito Aedes aegypti spreads four different types of Dengue and Chikungunya, and now the Zika virus.

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Recife
By Flavio Forner
17 Jan 2016

Dr. Angela Rocha, 67, infectologist at the Oswaldo Cruz hospital in Recife, Pernambuco (Brazil).

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Recife
By Flavio Forner
17 Jan 2016

Mothers awaiting care in the waiting room at Oswaldo Cruz Hospital in Recife.

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Recife
By Flavio Forner
17 Jan 2016

Nadja Gomes Bezerra, 42, a telemarketing operator with her 4 month-old daughter Alice, one of many Brazilians babies born in the recent months with microcephaly: a skull that is smaller at birth than 32 cm.

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Recife
By Flavio Forner
17 Jan 2016

Erika Roque with her son Eric, born with microcephaly, at the Oswaldo Cruz Hospital in Recife, where he receives physical therapy.

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Recife
By Flavio Forner
17 Jan 2016

Dr. Angela, infectious disease specialist at the Oswaldo Cruz Hospital in Recife, shows an image of the skull of a child with microcephaly.

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Recife
By Flavio Forner
17 Jan 2016

Rafael, an official from Recife's Health Department at a meeting on actions to combat the Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, insect that spreads the Zika virus.

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Recife
By Flavio Forner
16 Jan 2016

Joao Bezerra, 46, luggage worker at Recife airport, holds his daughter Alice, one of many Brazilian babies born in the recent months with microcephaly: a skull that is smaller at birth than 32 cm.

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Recife
By Flavio Forner
16 Jan 2016

Jonathan Gomes Bezerra, a 14 year-old student, holds his sister Alice, one of many Brazilians babies born in the recent months with microcephaly: a skull that is smaller at birth than 32 cm.

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Recife
By Flavio Forner
16 Jan 2016

Nadja Gomes Bezerra, 42, a telemarketing operator baths her daughter Alice, one of many Brazilians babies born in recent months with microcephaly: a skull that is smaller at birth than 32 cm.

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Recife
By Flavio Forner
16 Jan 2016

Joao Bezerra, 46, worker at Recife airport, and Nadja Gomes bezerra, 42, a telemarketing operator, with their daughter Alice, one of many Brazilians babies born in recent months with microcephaly: a skull that is smaller at birth than 32 cm.

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Recife
By Flavio Forner
16 Jan 2016

Joao Bezerra, 46, luggage worker at Recife airport, holds his crying daughter Alice. She is one of many Brazilians babies born in recent months with microcephaly: a skull that is smaller at birth than 32 cm.

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The Kurdish 'Saturday Mothers'
Istanbul
By Piero Castellano
18 Oct 2014

October 18, 2014
Istanbul, Turkey

For 299 Saturdays Ersoy Tan, a 41 year old Turkish journalist from Istanbul, has photographed the same thing: protest held by the mothers of Kurdish men who disappeared during Turkey's 'Dirty War' against the Kurdish PKK in the 1980's and 1990's. His photos of Turkey’s dark legacy can help to explain its puzzling attitude over the fate of a Kurdish border town in Syria, sieged by ISIS terrorists while the world holds its breath.

Every Saturday a group of women, some in black, some in traditional Kurdish attire, gather at noon on the iconic Galatasaray square, in Istanbul. Each woman carries a placard with a portrait, a name, and a date: that of their children or husbands, with the date when they were arrested by security forces or snatched by unknown men in civilian clothes. Many of them were never seen again, the others were found dead, some with signs of torture.

“Most people don’t know what really happened. I didn’t know. But peace is the only solution, and to have peace we have to seek Justice.” The 498th meeting was focused on the ongoing siege of the Syrian-Kurdish town, with a press statement urging its relief. On October 25th, the 500th meeting will be a huge demonstration.

Ersoy will be there: “We want to make sure that everybody knows what happened, and that it will never happen again.”

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The Kurdish "Saturday Mothers"
Istanbul, Turkey
By Piero Castellano
17 Oct 2014

Istanbul (Turkey) October 18th, 2014: a man at the ÒSaturday MothersÓ 499th meeting holds a placard reading ÒFor 17 years from the disappearance we are asking ÔWhere is Yusuf Nergiz?ÕÓ (Photo by Piero Castellano)

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The Kurdish "Saturday Mothers"
Istanbul, Turkey
By Piero Castellano
17 Oct 2014

Istanbul (Turkey) October 18th, 2014: Ersoy Tan, a freelance journalist from Istanbul, takes photo of the 499th meeting of the so-called ÒSaturday Mothers,Ó Kurdish women protesting every Saturday for their children, who disappeared while in custody of Security Forces. (Photo by Piero Castellano)

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The Kurdish "Saturday Mothers"
Istanbul, Turkey
By Piero Castellano
17 Oct 2014

Istanbul (Turkey) October 18th, 2014: Some of the so-called ÒSaturday MothersÓ, Kurdish women who protest every Saturday about their childrenÕs disappearance while in custody of Security Forces. Dozens, then hundreds of people have joined their quest to know their children or
husbandsÕ fate.

During the 1980s and 1990s, hundreds of political activists, journalists or suspected sympathizers of the outlawed Kurdistan Workers Party, PKK, were detained by security forces and never seen alive again. PKK is considered a terrorist group by Turkey, the EU and USA.
(Photo by Piero Castellano)

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The Kurdish "Saturday Mothers"
Istanbul, Turkey
By Piero Castellano
17 Oct 2014

Istanbul (Turkey) October 18th, 2014: Three of the so-called ÒSaturday MothersÓ holding portraits of their disappeared relatives. The group was dubbed ÒMothersÓ by the press for the similarities with the Argentinian Mothers of Plaza de Mayo, who have often showed their solidarity with the Kurdish women. (Photo by Piero Castellano)

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The Kurdish "Saturday Mothers"
Istanbul, Turkey
By Piero Castellano
17 Oct 2014

Istanbul (Turkey) October 18th, 2014: Freelance journalist Ersoy Tan hugs another activist at the ÒSaturday MothersÕÓ 499th meeting. Mr. Tan has followed and photographed the latest 299 meetings of the group who asks to know the fate of people disappeared while in custody. (Photo by Piero Castellano)

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The Kurdish "Saturday Mothers"
Istanbul, Turkey
By Piero Castellano
17 Oct 2014

Istanbul (Turkey) October 18th, 2014: Freelance journalist Ersoy Tan shows a gift he has received from a Kurdish youth: a stick, decorated with traditional Kurdish colors red, green and yellow and the word ÒRojava,Ó the Kurdish region in Syria fighting against ISIS. (Photo by Piero Castellano)

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The Kurdish "Saturday Mothers"
Istanbul, Turkey
By Piero Castellano
17 Oct 2014

Istanbul (Turkey) October 18th, 2014: A woman in traditional Kurdish attire bows her head in despair while holding the portrait of her husband, detained by security forces in May 1994 and then disappeared, during the ÒSaturday MothersÓ 499th meeting. (Photo by Piero Castellano)

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The Kurdish "Saturday Mothers"
Istanbul, Turkey
By Piero Castellano
17 Oct 2014

Istanbul (Turkey) October 18th, 2014: red carnations and portraits of disappeared people over a banner laid on the ground, reading ÒPerpetrators are known, where are the disappeared?Ó at the ÒSaturday MothersÓ 499th meeting. Red carnations are a symbol of left wing activism and mourning in Turkey. (Photo by Piero Castellano)

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The Kurdish "Saturday Mothers"
Istanbul, Turkey
By Piero Castellano
17 Oct 2014

Istanbul (Turkey) October 18th, 2014: A young girl hold the portrait of a relative disappeared while in custody, long before she was born, at the ÒSaturday MothersÕÓ 499th meeting. (Photo by Piero Castellano)

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The Kurdish "Saturday Mothers"
Istanbul, Turkey
By Piero Castellano
17 Oct 2014

Istanbul (Turkey) October 18th, 2014: Hanim Tosun (center), wife of Fehmi Tosun, who was detained in Istanbul in 1995 for being a Kurdish activist and never seen again, is hugged by another woman while holding her granddaughter, who never met her grandfather, at the ÒSaturday MothersÕÓ 499th meeting. (Photo by Piero Castellano)

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The Kurdish "Saturday Mothers"
Istanbul, Turkey
By Piero Castellano
17 Oct 2014

Istanbul (Turkey) October 18th, 2014: A woman in traditional Kurdish attire looks for the photos of her disappeared daughter at the ÒSaturday MothersÕÓ 499th
meeting.

Despite undeniable improvements in the past ten years, and especially after the ceasefire and the Òpeace processÓ in the last two, tensions among Kurds, Nationalists, and security forces have led to bloody riots the past month, connected with a perceived inaction of TurkeyÕs government in the border crisis at Kobane. (Photo by Piero Castellano)

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The Kurdish "Saturday Mothers"
Istanbul, Turkey
By Piero Castellano
17 Oct 2014

Istanbul (Turkey) October 18th, 2014: After the ÒSaturday MothersÕÓ 499th meeting, the group traditionally gathers in a nearby cafŽ to drink ay, the traditional Turkish tea, and discuss the current situation. In these days, the main topics are the siege of Kobane, the ISIS offensive, and TurkeyÕs government attitude towards Kurds. (Photo by Piero Castellano)

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The Kurdish "Saturday Mothers"
Istanbul, Turkey
By Piero Castellano
17 Oct 2014

Istanbul (Turkey) October 18th, 2014: One of the so-called ÒSaturday MothersÓ does the defiant communist salute at the cafŽ where they traditionally gather after a meeting. Many of the disappeared people were left wing sympathizers or labor union activists, suspected by security forces to be close to PKK. (Photo by Piero Castellano)