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TALPAPRIL2017-32
London
By Tom Price
23 Mar 2017

Still photography selection from various assignments and projects.

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TALPAPRIL2017-33
London
By Tom Price
23 Mar 2017

Still photography selection from various assignments and projects.

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TALPAPRIL2017-31
London
By Tom Price
22 Mar 2017

Still photography selection from various assignments and projects.

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Amot Ogol
London
By Tom Price
20 Mar 2017

Amot, 19, travelled to Juba by walking barefoot ANDREW HAS STORY ON TAPE

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TALPAPRIL2017-29
London
By Tom Price
18 Mar 2017

Still photography selection from various assignments and projects.

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TALPAPRIL2017-24
London
By Tom Price
20 Oct 2016

Loveness Gunda, 6.

Chagunda village.

Salima district, Malawi.

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TALPAPRIL2017-25
London
By Tom Price
20 Oct 2016

Vincent Manda, 10.

Chagunda village.

Salima district, Malawi.

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Filipino Child
Mindanao
By Ralf Falbe
15 Feb 2016

An infant at the NGO German Doctors Hospital in Valencia, Mindanao, Philippines.

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German Doctors Hospital
Mindanao
By Ralf Falbe
15 Feb 2016

Desperate Grandmother with a sick child seeks help at the Hospital of the German Doctors in Valencia, Mindanao, Philippines. The NGO offers free medical treatment for poor hill tribe people.

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German Doctors Provide Free Treatment
Mindanao
By Ralf Falbe
15 Feb 2016

Hilltribe people get free medical treatment in the hospital of the German Doctors in Valencia, Mindanao, Philippines.

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Filipino
Cebu City
By Ralf Falbe
12 Feb 2016

Filipino man with his arm raised in Cebu City. Here the locals are getting free medical treatment once a week by the NGO German Doctors and Filipino Volunteers.

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Children of a Philippines Slum
Cebu City
By Ralf Falbe
12 Feb 2016

Children in a Shanty Town in Cebu City, Philippines. The NGO German Doctors offers free medical treatment to the people here.

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German Doctors NGO
Cebu City
By Ralf Falbe
12 Feb 2016

A Filipina volunteer nurse works with the NGO German Doctors to provide free medical treatment in a village of trash collectors near Cebu City in the Philippines.

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German Doctors Hospital
Cebu City
By Ralf Falbe
12 Feb 2016

A nurse examines a child at the German Doctors Hospital in Cebu City, Philippines. The NGO German Doctors offers free medical treatment to the city's slum dwellers.

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Slum Dogs in Shanty Town
Cebu City
By Ralf Falbe
12 Feb 2016

Friends in a shanty town in Cebu City, Philippines. Documentary for the NGO German Doctors.

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Chinese Cemetery
Cebu City
By Ralf Falbe
11 Feb 2016

Chinese cemetery in Cebu City, Philippines

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Filipina Girl
Cebu City
By Ralf Falbe
11 Feb 2016

A young Filipina girl in the slums of Cebu City, Phlippinies where the NGO German Doctors offers free medical treatment.

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Homeless Children in Shanty Town
Cebu City
By Ralf Falbe
11 Feb 2016

Homeless children play with an umbrella, while their parents wait for a free consultation with doctors in Cebu City, Philippines. Homeless people live in the tombs at the Chinese cemetery and get free medical treatment once a week provided by the German Doctors and Filipino volunteers.

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CARE 70th Anniversary & Syrian Refugees
Gaziantep
By Mike Cerre
17 Dec 2015

November, 2015 marked the 70th anniversary of the international humanitarian organization CARE. The US-based NGO was formed in 1945, shipping boxes containing food, clothing and other aid items to Word War II refugees in Europe, the boxes that came to be known as CARE Packages.
CARE continues to provide aid to refugees, now from Syria and other areas of conflict, but the box has become a plastic debit card.

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TALPAPRIL2017-14
London
By Tom Price
16 Sep 2015

Lakshmi Bunker (21) with her 11 month daughter Varsh. She is currently seven months pregnant. Virol village.

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TALPAPRIL2017-13
London
By Tom Price
14 Sep 2015

Pregnant women and lactating mothers chat after a group counselling session in Sakad village.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 20
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
20 May 2015

Yaya Ouahara (right) collects food distributed by the local NGO Bona Voluntat en Accio, in Barcelona, as part of the food support program to help migrants and people at risk of exclusion.
Yaya, 36, from Ivory Coast, arrived to Spain in 2009 by a small boat and after three years traveling through Africa. Yaya fled the civil war in his country and he recently got residence permit to stay in Spain permanently.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 21
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
20 May 2015

Yaya Ouahara (right) collects food distributed by the local NGO Bona Voluntat en Accio, in Barcelona, as part of the food support program to help migrants and people at risk of exclusion.
Yaya, 36 years old from Ivory Coast, arrived in Spain in 2009 by a small boat and after three years traveling through Africa. Yaya fled the civil war in his country and he recently got residence permit to stay in Spain permanently.

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Life in the Largest Syrian Refugee Ca...
Erbil
By Younes Mohammad
30 Mar 2015

March 30, 2015

Erbil, Iraqi Kurdistan



Syrian refugees fled their country and arrived in Iraqi Kurdistan looking for assistance and a safe place to settle after the heavy clashes between the YPG and Al-Nusra front that took place in Rojava. The Kawrgosk refugee camp is currently the largest in Iraq but many of the refugees prefer to live on the outskirts of the city of Erbil. Iraq has recorded a total of 19, 844 Syrian refugees in the camps and aid is distributed to them by the UN, NGOs, and local and national bodies.

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Syrian Kurdish Refugees Find a Home i...
Akre
By Mat Wolf
20 Mar 2015

March 20, 2015
Akre, Iraqi Kurdistan 


Housed inside a former detention facility, Syrian Kurds who fled fighting in their homeland are doing their best to restore normalcy in their lives in the mountainous Iraqi Kurdish city of Akre in the Dohuk government.
 
At the Akre settlement for Syrian Kurds—housed inside a former prison and Baathist military base—parents look on as their children run around the facility’s courtyard setting off fireworks. Youngsters are also working on a mural covering part of the two-story, yellow brick facility’s walls and stairwells in an art project sponsored by the Rise Foundation NGO and local teachers. Cartoon characters, animals and hearts are popular themes in the artwork.
 
“I like the trees, flowers, woods—the natural views,” says English teacher and fellow refugee Nazim Qamr, 29. He adds he’d prefer the children avoid cartoon characters, but it’s not up to him.
 
“We ask the children and listen to their opinions about what they like and don’t like,” Qamr says. 
 
As rays of sun occasionally poke through the clouds on an otherwise gloomy March 20, Iraqi Kurdistan’s mountains and postcard beauty makes it easy to forget the Akre settlement is a refugee camp. Housing just under 1,500 people—many of them small children—its residents are afforded small apartments converted from prison cells, and many admit they’re superior to the UN tents and ad-hoc structures that define many of the region’s refugee camps.
 
“They gave each family a room,” says 24-year-old English teacher Kawther Ahmed, originally from Damascus. She came to Akre with her family a year and a half ago, and said camp administrators from Iraq’s Kurdistan Regional Government have done their best to ensure the Syrian Kurds feel welcome. “Compared to the tents, this building is better than the tents,” she says.
 
Because the Syrians at Akre have been taken in by their fellow Kurds, they’re also allowed more privileges than the local government typically allows non-Kurdish refugees. Residents of the Akre settlement are allowed to freely come and go from the camp once they’ve filed residency paperwork, and can seek work in the local community. But despite some advantages given to Kurdish refugees in Kurdish territory, many of Akre’s Syrians still bear the scars of their homeland’s complex civil war, and have faced difficulties in adjusting to life in Iraq.
 
Adnan Mahmoud, 35, says he is originally a mechanic from Qamishli who fled the forces of the so-called Islamic State in Syria and came to Iraq a year and half ago. Since that time he’s developed a cataract in his left eye, and he says he’s gone partially blind. “It’s a simple surgery, but they don’t have doctors here to do it, and I’ve filed paperwork to go to a hospital that can, but nothing’s working,” he says.

He adds his young daughter Haifa has suffered a knee injury, and has had an X-ray done, but she also needs surgery and the refugees at Akre can’t find basic medical care.
 
Mahmoud’s friend and neighbor Samir Mohamed Saleh, 31, is a former restaurant worker who lived in both Syria and Lebanon before fleeing to Iraq a year and a half ago. He adds that in addition to insufficient medical care, work opportunities for Syrian Kurds in Iraq are limited and low paying.
 
They both say they’d like to be able to find real, serious work like they had in Syria. Like other men in the camp, they’ve found work packing and loading gravel, but they say the salary is poor and the work exhausting, sometimes for as little as $1.30 a day.
 
“We need real work, we need self-respect,” Samir says.
 
He adds however he thinks the Iraqi Kurds have been gracious, and that at least in Akre he has a roof over his head and food to eat.
 
“It’s good here, we have bread, electricity, food and water,” he says. “The Kurds in Iraq have helped us a lot, I mean we’re the same nation, but we still need more.” 

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TALPAPRIL2017-12
London
By Tom Price
10 Mar 2015

Still photography selection from various assignments and projects.

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Syria's Orphans Stuck in Limbo
Reyhanli
By Isabel Hunter
03 Feb 2015

Reyhanli, Turkey

February 3, 2015

As Turkey’s urban refugee population skyrockets, keeping track of the most vulnerable children is becoming impossible and the risk of sexual and work exploitation is increasing. Turkey's traditionally effective orphan care system is overwhelmed and cannot cope with the burden. In such cases, adoption is often a part of the solution. However, adoption remains extremely rare for both cultural reasons and a lack of infrastructure to manage safe and secure adoptions.

Syrian NGO Maram started an orphanage to help protect some of these children. Ruba Shalish, 11, arrived to the orphanage two weeks ago. She had lived with her grandfather, 75-year-old Nadir, in his small garage-house for one year after losing both of her parents in Syria. She is happy at the orphanage and interacting very well with her friends, as shown by her confident performance in a show organized by the orphanage management. While the orphanage can take 75 children, founder Yakzan Shishakly refuses to allow them to be adopted, despite frequent inquiries, fearing that the unregulated adoption system could easily lead to human trafficking. For many, the most logical solution to the crisis is to expand the existing orphanage infrastructure. However, alleviating the growing problem remains a distant reality.

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Malawi: Deadly Floods Displace Thousands
Chikwawa, Malawi
By Arjen van de Merwe
10 Jan 2015

Malawi, a landlocked country in Southern Africa, has seen devastating floods in the southern part of the country. In some areas, a month’s worth of rain came down in 24 hours at the beginning of the rainy season, leaving villages, roads, bridges and fields destroyed. The death toll is estimated to be anywhere between dozens and nearly two-hundred, while 14,000 households are known to be displaced (an estimated 70.000 people). However, some areas have yet to be reached, so these figures are expected to rise.

The government of Malawi has declared fifteen southern districts disaster zones and has appealed for international aid. To British government has already dedicated GBP 3.8 million to help rescue and rebuilding efforts, and many other governments are soon to follow.

The aid operation carried out by the Government of Malawi, the military and a range of international organisations, MSF and UNICEF having a prominent presence among them, is in full speed. The Malawian army is leading the evacuation of affected and vulnerable communities, using boats and helicopters, and improvised camps are being set up with tents and medical facilities. As always after flooding, prevention of waterborne diseases such as cholera is priority.

Bad weather continued to hinder the aid operations until Friday 16 January when the rain ceased. However, rising temperatures made for uncomfortable circumstances in the camps and outside.

The Malawian Police Force is setting up Victim Support Units and Child Protection units in the camps, while the international agencies such as UNICEF and UNFPA provide blankets, tents and food, and also first aid for rape cases and safe delivery kits. MSF is also participating, setting up and operating a mobile health clinic.

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Iraqi Refugees Desperate for Healthcare
Diyala
By mushtaq mohammed
09 Dec 2014

November 9, 2014
Khanaqin, Diyala, Iraq

Refugees in the UNHCR camp, near the town of Khanaqin, are living in life threatening conditions. They were promised free check ups and treatment by the local government and NGOs but have so far received none. Forced to flee their homes in Mosul and other parts of the Nineveh province, after ISIS took over vast areas of northern Iraq, many of the refugees require urgent medical attention or suffer from incurable diseases. In desperation, some are using what little money they have for appointments with independent doctors who charge 1500 Iraqi Dinars ($1.30) just for a check up.

Transcription:

Um Majed, refugee, (Woman, Arabic):
(02:06-02:28) "I am a refugee from al-Saadeya, al-Asreya village. We fled five months ago. We were not offered any doctors or medication. I am sick and I have a slipped disc in my spinal chord. I cannot afford to go to a doctor. My husband had a stroke two years ago, we have to buy his medications for 4000-5000 Dinar ($3-4) a box and we cannot afford it. Nobody has came to check on us."

Mustafa, refugee, (Man, Arabic):
(03:06-03:33) "I am a sick man, I suffer from five illnesses. I have had a heart attack and a stroke, I have diabetes, hight blood pressure and asthma. I suffer from so many diseases and we are here in the camp. We have no medication. My five year-old son has diabetes, it started six months ago, ever since the problems started."

Abdulqader, refugee, (Man, Arabic):
(03:59-04:22) "If a doctor comes here, he charges 1500 Dinar ($1.30), We ask him to minimize the charge, he says that he has official receipts form the health directory of Diala. For chronic diseases he charges 1500 Dinar. How can people afford that? The doctor writes the prescription, and without providing any medications, he charges 1500 Dinar. None of the refugees have an income to afford that."

Abu Mohamed, refugee, (Man, Arabic): (04:44-04:56) "I have been running to help my daughter who is sick. I took her to the health care unit, and they have no medication. I spent over 40,000 Dinar ($35) on my sick daughters, all of them are sick."

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Slovakia: Bratislava's White-Gloved H...
Bratislava
By danubestory
09 Dec 2014

Donning dapper navy blue uniforms and traditional caps, complete with pristine white gloves, a few of Bratislava’s homeless have revived the role of the traditional baggage porter.

Bratislava Railway Station is a dowdy, yet charming old building with scarce facilities and no modern equipment, making it less accessible to elderly people, families traveling with children, and people carrying heavy luggage. Getting to the train with heavy bags and baby strollers is a real challenge. Meanwhile, outside the train station approximately four to five thousand homeless people face harsh conditions with little chance of find work. A local NGO called Proti Prudu (Against the Stream) works with the homeless, providing them with a street paper called Nota Bene, that they offer to passers by in exchange for spare change. Now, they have launched an ingenious project offering part-time jobs to seven of the homeless they work with to attack both issues. They pay the porters for part-time work helping people with their bags, free of charge. These men who once depended completely on the help of others are finding a bit of much needed economic stability and a new sense of social pride by offering a much appreciated hand to others.

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Slovakia: Bratislava's White-Gloved H...
Bratislava
By danubestory
08 Dec 2014

Donning dapper navy blue uniforms and traditional caps, complete with pristine white gloves, a few of Bratislava’s homeless have revived the role of the traditional baggage porter.

Bratislava Railway Station is a dowdy, yet charming old building with scarce facilities and no modern equipment, making it less accessible to elderly people, families traveling with children, and people carrying heavy luggage. Getting to the train with heavy bags and baby strollers is a real challenge. Meanwhile, outside the train station approximately four to five thousand homeless people face harsh conditions with little chance of find work. A local NGO called Proti Prudu (Against the Stream) works with the homeless, providing them with a street paper called Nota Bene, that they offer to passers by in exchange for spare change. Now, they have launched an ingenious project offering part-time jobs to seven of the homeless they work with to attack both issues. They pay the porters for part-time work helping people with their bags, free of charge. These men who once depended completely on the help of others are finding a bit of much needed economic stability and a new sense of social pride by offering a much appreciated hand to others.

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In The Name of Haiti - Humanitarian R...
Port-au-Prince, Haiti
By Corentin Fohlen
08 Apr 2014

Since the 2010 earthquake, hundreds of religious American NGOs like "Healing Haiti", "Food for the Poor" and "Hope Alive!" have flocked to Haiti. In addition to their humanitarian activities, they organize volunteering tours for anyone who wants to help Haiti.
Every week, new teams of American volunteers land in the little country. They help distribute water in the slum of Cité Soleil - one of the most dangerous areas of the country. They visit orphanages and schools where they distribute chewing gum, and go to the beach with orphans. But in the end, most of their days will be consumed by taking photos with orphans and locals.
Jeff Gacek and Alyn Shannon founded Healing Haiti, a Christian NGO that organizes tours for volunteers. They have decided to dedicate themselves to the country in the name of God. "We didn’t choose Haiti ... God chose Haiti for us", they say.
According to the American Embassy in Haiti, approximately 200,000 American citizens land in Haiti each year. They feel invested with a divine mission where charity and religious proselytism mix. There is no State control and it is very easy for foreign organizations to create their own NGO and open churches, a schools or orphanages.
However, their legitimacy is questioned by bigger international NGOs such as MSF (Médecins sans Frontières - Doctors Without Borders), Acted and ACF (Action contre la Faim). According to them, these American NGOs are doing the contrary of humanitarian work by only doing charity. A French humanitarian working for an international NGO says: "at best, what they are doing is useless. At best ... ".

By doing the State’s jobs in healthcare, education, economy, housing and food, those NGOs disempower local authorities. They also take away jobs such as water distribution that could be given to local people. As a result, the Haitian State relies more and more on those organizations and disengages from its responsibilities.
Unfortunately, people trained by foreign NGOs tend to leave the country before the State is prepared to take over.
These American NGO’s are all evangelists. During the weekly trips on the island, they practice a non-official proselytism through masses, shared prayers and distributions of cartoons related to Jesus's life for the children. According to Haitian director Raoul Peck who made a documentary about this topic, this type of humanitarian work resembles a type of colonialism where white people are providers while Haitian people are receivers, which creates dependence between the two sides.
Trips are also a very important source of incomes for NGOs. Each aspiring humanitarian worker has to pay for his or her plane ticket and fees to the organization which vary between $700 to $1000 per week.

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Art Helps a Syrian Refugee Child Cope...
Bekaa
By Transterra Editor
03 Apr 2014

April 3rd, 2014

Bekaa Valley, Lebanon

The Lebanese NGO "Beyond" is helping a young Syrian refugee girl cope with psychological problems through art. After the death of her father in Syria, eleven year old Fatima fled the civil war with her mother, brother and sister to the Debagha Camp in Zahle in the eastern Bekaa Valley. But her mother died of Meningitis in January causing Fatima to isolate herself from her surroundings. Art lessons given by "Beyond" instructors are helping Fatima express herself and they say she has been able to improve her social communication skills through her drawings.
Social workers and activists from the NGO are visiting refugee camps in Lebanon to study the behavior of children and organize social and educational activities to help them.

Interviews:

Fatima:
My father is dead and we came here me and my mother and my sister and my brother, we came here and we had debts, we worked in harvesting potatoes, and then my mother died in the time of the storm.
I drew a house and our family, I drew two ducks and a rose covered arch, I drew a house and flowers all around, and the sea.

Racha Obeid - Social Worker (Beyond):
Throughout our research and our field trips, I noticed that Fatima was isolated when she sits in her classes, doesn’t communicate well with her friends, on her own in the playground, of course the death of her mother affected her and caused her emotional emptiness, lack of affection. Our purpose is to get her out if this condition. We directed her to take art classes to express herself and improve her artistic talent.

Khaled - Art Teacher:
At first she used to draw natural scenes, such as a house, trees … After what she went through she started saying: “I miss the sea, I want to be at the sea at watch the ships” so she started drawing the sea.
So I started teaching her how to express her feelings though drawing, and now she is being able to produce drawings.

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A village’s struggle to preserve its ...
Long La
By Corentin Fohlen
28 Mar 2014

Forests are the heart of Long La's development. In a country ravaged by deforestation, this village of 500 inhabitants has become a model of sustainable development. With the help of Speri, a vietnamese NGO, Long La has found a way to preserve its forest thanks to agroecology.

The forest is rich in medicinal plants and rare species and generates wealth for the community. Prior to 2004, it was threatened by timber exploitation. But its inhabitants soon realized that the water shortages they were facing were not normal and that the air was drier than it should have been in this tropical region.

It did not take long before they began to blame deforestation, which also adversely affects agricultural production. Today, forests cover 40% of the territory of Laos, whereas they made up 70% in the 1950s. In order to protect their forest, villagers in Long La reserved certain areas for the production of timber and others for medicinal plants. In some areas, it is now strictly forbidden to gather wood. They also enacted strict rules to preserve the forest, such as keeping farm animals in paddocks to prevent them from damaging trees.

In 2005, the Laotian government recognized Long La inhabitants' know-how and put them in charge of managing the village's forest. Doing so came naturally to the inhabitants since they all belong to the Hmong community, an animist ethnic group that considers the forest sacred. In Long La, the forest is even believed to host a venerated spirit: the Patongxenh.

Deforestation is being driven by corruption as well as poorly managed industrial-scale plantations for things like rubber. Yet Long La's management of the forest has proven that preservation can lead to development and wealth. Thanks to the forest, the village now cultivates Zong Zwa, a plant with bright yellow flowers that tastes similar to rocca. The village also produces 12 tons of organic vegetables each year which they sell to hotels and restaurants in Luang Prabang. Speri now works with 12 other villages to implement Long La's model. In 2012, the NGO and the villagers created a rural school to train local residents in agroecology.