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Trailing the Mughals 26
Delhi, India
By Cherine Yazbeck
01 Mar 2015

A classic scene of washerwomen washing publicly the family clothes in the waters of the Lake Pichola.

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Trailing the Mughals 28
Delhi, India
By Cherine Yazbeck
01 Mar 2015

Elephant ride is Classic on the streets of Udaipur. Usually the rider asks for tips in order to feed his elephant. He also proposes paid elephant rides and tourists are usually enthusiastic about elephant riding.

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Trailing the Mughals 24
Delhi, India
By Cherine Yazbeck
28 Feb 2015

A soup kitchen located in the lower-income neighborhood of Jagdish Temple serves daily meals for underprivileged people.

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Trailing the Mughals 25
Delhi, India
By Cherine Yazbeck
28 Feb 2015

This is a fountain in the Sahelion ki Bari, the garden of maidens, that was built by Maharana Sangram Singh in the mid-18th century. There are pools with kiosks, flowerbeds, lawns, pools, fountains, along with an array of trees. There is also a sitting room decorated with paintings and glass mosaics in the garden. The main fountain at the extreme end of the garden is flanked with 4 massive elephants carved in a single piece of Agra marble.

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Trailing the Mughals 27
Delhi, India
By Cherine Yazbeck
28 Feb 2015

Lake Pichola, situated in Udaipur city in the Indian state of Rajasthan, is an artificial fresh water lake, created in the year 1362 AD, named after the nearby Picholi village. It is one of the several contiguous lakes, and developed over the last few centuries in and around the famous Udaipur city. The lakes around Udaipur were primarily created by building dams to meet the drinking water and irrigation needs of the city and its neighborhood. Two islands, Jag Niwas and Jag Mandir are located within Pichola Lake, and have been developed with several palaces to provide views of the lake.

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Trailing the Mughals 22
Delhi, India
By Cherine Yazbeck
27 Feb 2015

A classic scene of two men sitting on the pavement of a street of Udaipur.

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Trailing the Mughals 23
Delhi, India
By Cherine Yazbeck
27 Feb 2015

A man dressed in traditional India man sari with a red 9-meter-turban covering his head.

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Trailing the Mughals 29
Delhi, India
By Cherine Yazbeck
27 Feb 2015

Amazing carved columns in the renowned Jain temple at Ranakpur. The temple is a tribute to Tirthankara Adinatha. Local legend has it that Dharma Shah, a local Jain businessperson, started construction of the temple in the 5th century following a divine vision. The temple honors Adinath, the first Tirthankar and founder of the Jain religion. Inspired by a dream of a celestial vehicle, Dhanna Shah, a Porwal, commenced its construction, under the patronage of Rana Kumbha, then ruler of Mewar. The architect who oversaw the project was named Deepaka. There is an inscription on a pillar near the main shrine stating that in 1439 Deepaka, an architect, constructed the temple at the direction of Dharanka, a devoted Jain.
Nowadays, Ranakpur is the one of the most spiritual stops to understand the Jain sect and to understand the philosophy of this religion.

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Trailing the Mughals 17
Delhi, India
By Cherine Yazbeck
26 Feb 2015

Details of a sculpture from a silver palanquin taken at the Mehrangarh Fort in Jodphur. The palanquin is a covered litter for one passenger, consisting of a large box carried on two horizontal poles by four or six bearers.

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Trailing the Mughals 18
Delhi, India
By Cherine Yazbeck
26 Feb 2015

Picture taken from the Mehrangarh Fort that overlooks the city of Jodhpur. It is the second largest city in the Indian state of Rajasthan. It was formerly the seat of a princely state of the same name, the capital of the kingdom known as Marwar. Jodhpur is a popular tourist destination, featuring many palaces, forts and temples, set in the stark landscape of the Thar Desert.
The city is known as the "Sun City" for the bright, sunny weather it enjoys all the year round. It is also referred to as the "Blue City" due to the vivid blue-painted houses at the feet of the Fort. The old city circles the fort and is bounded by a wall with several gates.

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Trailing the Mughals 19
Delhi, India
By Cherine Yazbeck
26 Feb 2015

An old woman is sweeping her floor in the old city of Jodhpur. Her house is blue as the city is known as "the blue city". Some say the colour is associated closely with the Brahmins, India's priestly caste, and the blue houses of the old city belong to families of that caste. Consequently, you might well hear the properties referred to as the 'Brahmin Houses'.

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Trailing the Mughals 20
Delhi, India
By Cherine Yazbeck
26 Feb 2015

A classic scene of a man sitting on the pavement in front of a statue celebrating a divinity.

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Trailing the Mughals 21
Delhi, India
By Cherine Yazbeck
26 Feb 2015

On Jodphur streets, two hermaphrodites are wandering in the old souk after celebrating the Holi in which colored vegetable powder is spread on devotees. In India, hermaphrodites or hijras are part of one of the most neglected groups of our society.

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Trailing the Mughals 16
Delhi, India
By Cherine Yazbeck
24 Feb 2015

Hawa Mahal is made of rare sand stone, that is a classic regional stone used to built the main monuments of Northern India. It is impressive to wander inside the palace and to take a look at the city for the tiny windows that were once the only way for women to connect with the city life.
Hawa Mahal or Palace of Winds is a palace in Jaipur. It is so named because it was essentially a high screen wall built so the women of the royal household could observe street festivities while unseen from the outside. Constructed of red and pink sandstone, the palace sits on the edge of the City Palace, and extends to the zenana, or women's chambers.

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Trailing the Mughals 01
Delhi, India
By Cherine Yazbeck
24 Feb 2015

In 1928, Narayan Niwas hotel Jaipur was erected by General Amar Singh, Thakur of Kanota, a confidant of Maharaja Sawai Man Singh and Commander of the erstwhile Jaipur State Force. It was named after his father, Thakur Narain Singh. The palace was used as a country residence by him, which he used for staying during his hunting expeditions and family vacations. It has now been turned into a heritage hotel in Jaipur, which is managed by the Kanota Family.
The picture of the Maharajah is a classic posture of the grandiose Era of the former rules of India.

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Trailing the Mughals 12
Delhi, India
By Cherine Yazbeck
23 Feb 2015

One of the highlights of a visit to the stunning Amer Fort is the elephant ride up the hill to the main entrance. These venerated animals are decorated with traditional painted patterns and effortlessly transport visitors up the steep slope to the fort.

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Trailing the Mughals 13
Delhi, India
By Cherine Yazbeck
23 Feb 2015

Amber Fort is a city that was ruled by raja man Singh. It is a perfect example of a Hindu style fort. Wide ramparts, carved gates and cobbled paths of the fort overlooks the Maota Lake.
The palace was lived in by the Rajput Maharajas and their families. At the entrance to the palace near the fort’s Ganesh Gate, there is also a temple dedicated to Sila Devi, a goddess of the Chaitanya cult which was given to Raja Man Singh when he had defeated the Raja of Jessore, Bengal in 1604.
At the Amber Fort, musicians play traditional India music and there is a restaurant overlooking the city that serves amazing regional food in the evening.

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Trailing the Mughals 14
Delhi, India
By Cherine Yazbeck
23 Feb 2015

Savoury snacks are popular in India. They can be found at each corner of the city. Bhelpuri is a savoury Indian snack, and is also a type of chaat. It is made out of puffed rice, vegetables and a tangy tamarind sauce. Bhelpuri is thought to have originated within the Gucafes and street food stalls of Mumbai, and the recipe has spread to most parts of India where it has been modified to suit local food availability. It is also said to be originated from Bhadang, a spicy namkeen from Western Maharashtra.

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Trailing the Mughals 15
Delhi, India
By Cherine Yazbeck
23 Feb 2015

Tourists are invited to visit textile workshops that are spread in the old city. Hand prints is the landmark of Jaipur City. Sober, low toned colors and delicate lines, creating finer designs like the poppy, rose and lotus, usually against a white background, are well known characteristic of fabrics that are printed at Sanganer. While the motifs are conventionally big and bold in Bagru, with the dabu (resist-printing) and the dyeing process producing a reddish black shade- with wild flowers, buds and foliage providing inspiration to the printers of Bagru.Legend has it that it was probably towards the end of the 17th century that this art form developed here. Thanks to the constant wars with the Mughals and Marathas, many printers migrated from Gujarat to Rajasthan. Under the royal patronage, by the end of the 18th century this industry was fully developed in Sanganer. Dyeing of Jaipur Printed Cloth is by use of vegetable colors.

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Trailing the Mughals 10
Delhi, India
By Cherine Yazbeck
22 Feb 2015

The column has craving from different civilisation influence such as Hindu, Persian, Christian, Buddhist and Jain.
The city of Fatehpur Sikri was founded in 1569 by the Mughal emperor Akbar and served as the capital of the Mughal Empire from 1571 to 1585. After his military victories over Chittor and Ranthambore, Akbar decided to move his capital from Agra to a Fatehpur in order to honor the Sufi Salim Chishti. Here he commenced the construction of a planned walled city. He supervised the construction of a series of royal palaces, harems, courts, a mosque and many other facilities. The city's name means victorious

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Trailing the Mughals 11
Delhi, India
By Cherine Yazbeck
22 Feb 2015

A duo of young boys playing traditional India music. The dancer boy is dressed like a girl to attract tourists.The musician is playing the sitar. The sitar is a plucked stringed instrument used mainly in Hindustani music and Indian classical music. The instrument is believed to have been derived from the veena, an ancient Indian instrument, which was modified by a Mughal court musician to conform with the tastes of his Persian patrons and named after a Persian instrument called the Setar.

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Trailing the Mughals 08
Delhi, India
By Cherine Yazbeck
21 Feb 2015

Cycling is one of the most popular modes of transport in India. It is powered by man and doesn't require any additional cost. That is the reason why in this emergent country, a great number of people use their bicycle to commute.

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Trailing the Mughals 09
Delhi, India
By Cherine Yazbeck
21 Feb 2015

Indians are proud of their most impressive castle, the Taj Mahal. It is also the most romantic story in India history.The crown of palaces is a white marble mausoleum located in Agra, Uttar Pradesh, India. Commissioned in 1632 by the Mughal emperor Shah Jahan to house the worldly remains of his third wife, Mumtaz Mahal. His loss was terrible and he was in a great depression. Shah Jahan spent 20 years supervising the work of his late wife's Mausoleum. The Taj Mahal stands on the southern bank of the Yamuna River. The mausoleum is widely recognized as "the jewel of Muslim art in India" and remains as one of the world’s most celebrated structures and a symbol of India’s rich history.
This is a perfect example of Mughal architecture, a perfect blend of elements from Islamic, Persian, Ottoman Turkish as well as Indian style.

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Trailing the Mughals 02
Delhi, India
By Cherine Yazbeck
20 Feb 2015

The great mosque of Old Delhi is the largest in India, with a courtyard capable of holding 25,000 devotees. Built in 1644, it is one of the greatest achievements of the architectural extravagance of Shah Jahan, the Mughal emperor who built the Taj Mahal and the Red Fort. In order to enter the Friday Mosque tourists are asked to wear a special gown handed over at the entrance and to visit the Mosque barefoot. The mosque is a gathering point for Indian families and devotees who flock to pray there from all over India.

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Trailing the Mughals 03
Delhi, India
By Cherine Yazbeck
20 Feb 2015

Chandni Chowk is Delhi's most famous and exciting bazaar. The "moonlit square" or "moonlit market", is one of the oldest and busiest markets in Old Delhi, now in central north Delhi, India. Built in the 17th century by the Mughal Emperor of India, Shah Jahan, and designed by his daughter Jahan Ara, the market was once divided by canals to reflect the moonlight. It remains one of India's largest wholesale markets. It is exciting to stroll around its alleyways and to discover the tiny shops selling food, textile and jewels.

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Trailing the Mughals
Delhi, India
By Cherine Yazbeck
20 Feb 2015

Street vendor selling Bhel puri, one of the most common all-day snacks in northern India: a crunchy, cold, sweet-and-sour mix of puffed rice, sev, chopped onion, potato and tamarind chutney. It has to be mixed and eaten on the spot, and most vendors will concoct their own variations.

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Trailing the Mughals 05
Delhi, India
By Cherine Yazbeck
20 Feb 2015

The feet of a rickshaw driver. With his own strength, he pulls up to three clients at a time. Though rapidly being replaced by motorized three-wheeled rickshaws, the bicycle rickshaw still has a strong presence in much of Old Delhi.

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Trailing the Mughals 06
Delhi, India
By Cherine Yazbeck
20 Feb 2015

This is a typical column in Qutab Minar monument. Qutab Minar is 73m high "victory tower" built in 1193 by Qutab-ud-din Aibak immediately after he defeated Delhi's last Hindu kingdom. At the foot of the tower is the Quwwat-ul-Islam Mosque. It is the very first mosque that was built in India. Qutab-ud-din Aibak, the first Muslim ruler of Delhi, began construction of the Qutab Minar in 1200 AD. The unfinished monument was then completed by his successor, Iltutmush who added three more stories. It was not only 1368 that Firoz Shah Tughlak erected the fifth and the last storey.

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Trailing the Mughals 07
Delhi, India
By Cherine Yazbeck
20 Feb 2015

Paras Komar, a Bihar marble-stone craftsman, showcases his trade at Handicrafts Museum in Delhi, India.

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Life in ship recycling yard in bangla...
Dhaka
By zakir hossain chowdhury
06 Jan 2015

A child playing with child dog inside ship recycling yard near the Buriganga River in Dhaka.There are more than 35 shipyards in Old Dhakas Keraniganj area in the bank of the river Burigonga, where small ships, launches and steamers are built and repaired around the clock.About 15,000 people are working in extremely dangerous conditions earn Tk. 300-400 BDT (1 USD = 78 BDT) as they don't get safety gear from the dock owners and accidents are common.Most of the private shipyards use plate, engine, component and machinery of old merchant ship collected from many ship recycling industries located in Bangladesh. But frequent accident and heavy human causalities of inland vessels often raise question about the quality of ships produced in local shipyards.Bangladesh are now exporting small and medium-sized ships for the highly competitive European market. The vessels were built for countries including Denmark, Germany and Finland. Bangladesh shipbuilding is being compared with giants such as China, Japan and South Korea.

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Life in ship recycling yard in bangla...
Dhaka
By zakir hossain chowdhury
06 Jan 2015

School children near ship recycling yard in Dhaka.Shipyard workers near the Buriganga River in Dhaka.There are more than 35 shipyards in Old Dhakas Keraniganj area in the bank of the river Burigonga, where small ships, launches and steamers are built and repaired around the clock.About 15,000 people are working in extremely dangerous conditions earn Tk. 300-400 BDT (1 USD = 78 BDT) as they don't get safety gear from the dock owners and accidents are common.Most of the private shipyards use plate, engine, component and machinery of old merchant ship collected from many ship recycling industries located in Bangladesh. But frequent accident and heavy human causalities of inland vessels often raise question about the quality of ships produced in local shipyards.Bangladesh are now exporting small and medium-sized ships for the highly competitive European market. The vessels were built for countries including Denmark, Germany and Finland. Bangladesh shipbuilding is being compared with giants such as China, Japan and South Korea.

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Life in ship recycling yard in bangla...
Dhaka
By zakir hossain chowdhury
06 Jan 2015

School children near ship recycling yard in Dhaka.Shipyard workers near the Buriganga River in Dhaka.There are more than 35 shipyards in Old Dhakas Keraniganj area in the bank of the river Burigonga, where small ships, launches and steamers are built and repaired around the clock.About 15,000 people are working in extremely dangerous conditions earn Tk. 300-400 BDT (1 USD = 78 BDT) as they don't get safety gear from the dock owners and accidents are common.Most of the private shipyards use plate, engine, component and machinery of old merchant ship collected from many ship recycling industries located in Bangladesh. But frequent accident and heavy human causalities of inland vessels often raise question about the quality of ships produced in local shipyards.Bangladesh are now exporting small and medium-sized ships for the highly competitive European market. The vessels were built for countries including Denmark, Germany and Finland. Bangladesh shipbuilding is being compared with giants such as China, Japan and South Korea.

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Life in ship recycling yard in bangla...
Dhaka
By zakir hossain chowdhury
06 Jan 2015

School children near ship recycling yard in Dhaka.Shipyard workers near the Buriganga River in Dhaka.There are more than 35 shipyards in Old Dhakas Keraniganj area in the bank of the river Burigonga, where small ships, launches and steamers are built and repaired around the clock.About 15,000 people are working in extremely dangerous conditions earn Tk. 300-400 BDT (1 USD = 78 BDT) as they don't get safety gear from the dock owners and accidents are common.Most of the private shipyards use plate, engine, component and machinery of old merchant ship collected from many ship recycling industries located in Bangladesh. But frequent accident and heavy human causalities of inland vessels often raise question about the quality of ships produced in local shipyards.Bangladesh are now exporting small and medium-sized ships for the highly competitive European market. The vessels were built for countries including Denmark, Germany and Finland. Bangladesh shipbuilding is being compared with giants such as China, Japan and South Korea.

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Life in ship recycling yard in bangla...
Dhaka
By zakir hossain chowdhury
06 Jan 2015

School children playing near ship recycling yard in Dhaka.Shipyard workers near the Buriganga River in Dhaka.There are more than 35 shipyards in Old Dhakas Keraniganj area in the bank of the river Burigonga, where small ships, launches and steamers are built and repaired around the clock.About 15,000 people are working in extremely dangerous conditions earn Tk. 300-400 BDT (1 USD = 78 BDT) as they don't get safety gear from the dock owners and accidents are common.Most of the private shipyards use plate, engine, component and machinery of old merchant ship collected from many ship recycling industries located in Bangladesh. But frequent accident and heavy human causalities of inland vessels often raise question about the quality of ships produced in local shipyards.Bangladesh are now exporting small and medium-sized ships for the highly competitive European market. The vessels were built for countries including Denmark, Germany and Finland. Bangladesh shipbuilding is being compared with giants such as China, Japan and South Korea

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Life in ship recycling yard in bangla...
Dhaka
By zakir hossain chowdhury
06 Jan 2015

Shipyard workers near the Buriganga River in Dhaka.There are more than 35 shipyards in Old Dhakas Keraniganj area in the bank of the river Burigonga, where small ships, launches and steamers are built and repaired around the clock.About 15,000 people are working in extremely dangerous conditions earn Tk. 300-400 BDT (1 USD = 78 BDT) as they don't get safety gear from the dock owners and accidents are common.Most of the private shipyards use plate, engine, component and machinery of old merchant ship collected from many ship recycling industries located in Bangladesh. But frequent accident and heavy human causalities of inland vessels often raise question about the quality of ships produced in local shipyards.Bangladesh are now exporting small and medium-sized ships for the highly competitive European market. The vessels were built for countries including Denmark, Germany and Finland. Bangladesh shipbuilding is being compared with giants such as China, Japan and South Korea.

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Life in ship recycling yard in bangla...
Dhaka
By zakir hossain chowdhury
06 Jan 2015

Shipyard workers near the Buriganga River in Dhaka.There are more than 35 shipyards in Old Dhakas Keraniganj area in the bank of the river Burigonga, where small ships, launches and steamers are built and repaired around the clock.About 15,000 people are working in extremely dangerous conditions earn Tk. 300-400 BDT (1 USD = 78 BDT) as they don't get safety gear from the dock owners and accidents are common.Most of the private shipyards use plate, engine, component and machinery of old merchant ship collected from many ship recycling industries located in Bangladesh. But frequent accident and heavy human causalities of inland vessels often raise question about the quality of ships produced in local shipyards.Bangladesh are now exporting small and medium-sized ships for the highly competitive European market. The vessels were built for countries including Denmark, Germany and Finland. Bangladesh shipbuilding is being compared with giants such as China, Japan and South Korea.

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Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 17
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
05 Jan 2015

A primary school is situated near this yard, and children make their way to their classes using a dangerous path inside the shipyard, some of them using it as a playground, though a dangerous one.

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Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 19
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
05 Jan 2015

About 15,000 people are working in extremely dangerous conditions as they don't get safety gear from the dock owners and accidents are common.

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Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 20
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
05 Jan 2015

An old ship is maneuvered into place in a shipyard outside Dhaka where it will be either repaired or dismantled for parts and scrap metal.

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Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 22
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
05 Jan 2015

Frequent accidents and heavy human causalities on inland vessels often raise question about the quality of ships produced in local shipyards. Bangladesh are now exporting small and medium-sized ships for the highly competitive European market.