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Arab-Kurdish Coalition Retakes Strate...
Menbij
By TTM Mena Desk
10 Jun 2016

June 10, 2016
Menbij, Syria

Video Shows Arab and Kurdish fighters holding positions on the western frontline overlooking ISIS-held Manbij, a border city northwest of Raqqa, the defacto capital of ISIS.
The fighters were able to seize control over strategic al-Etihad university, previously an ISIS base.
Supported by U.S.-led air strikes and American Special Forces, the Syrian Democratic Forces have launched an offensive to retake ISIS-controlled Raqqa.

Arrad, Field Commander: “Today we were able to retake al-Etihad University, and cut the road between Aleppo and Menbij. We have also seized control over villages around Menbij from four sides and now we are waiting for the Zero hour to enter Menbij.”

No name given, Field Commander:
“We are now near al-Etihad university, 4 to 5 km east of Menjib. Menbij is besieged from all sides, our forces are besieging from north, east, and south, and we are here on the western side. Our forces reached the Osajli road. The situation is great thanks God, we were able to kill scores from ISIS and we are waiting for the Zero hour to enter Menbij.”

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YPG and FSA Fighters on the Outskirts...
Tal Abiyad, Syria
By hosheen issa
15 Jun 2015

Kurdish Army and Free Syrian Army fighters gather on the outskirts of Tal Abiyad while the battle to wrestle the frontier town from ISIS remains underway. The offensive launched by the fighting groups was eventually successful with anti-ISIS forces taking full control of the town. 

Tal Abiyad was a strategic conduit for supplies going to the Islamic State Group's self-declared capital of Raqqa. By capturing the town, YPG and FSA forces dealt a strategic blow to ISIS' hold on northereastern Syria 

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YPG and FSA Fighters in Tal Abiyad 02
Tal Abiyad
By hosheen issa
15 Jun 2015

Free Syrian Army fighters, who coordinated the offensive with the Kurdish YPG, pray beside a river in the vicinity of Tal Abiyad.

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YPG and FSA Fighters in Tal Abiyad 03
Tal Abiyad
By hosheen issa
15 Jun 2015

Free Syrian Army fighters patrol the areas around Tal Abiyad.

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YPG and FSA Fighters in Tal Abiyad 04
Tal Abiyad
By hosheen issa
15 Jun 2015

Fighters relax against a combat embankment on the outskirts of Tal Abiyad.

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YPG and FSA Fighters in Tal Abiyad 05
Tal Abiyad
By hosheen issa
15 Jun 2015

Kurdish YPG fighters with an improvised armored vehicle on the outskirts of Tal Abiyad.

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YPG and FSA Fighters in Tal Abiyad 07
Tal Abiyad
By hosheen issa
15 Jun 2015

Female Kurdish YPG fighters relax on the outskirts of Tal Abiyad.

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YPG and FSA Fighters in Tal Abiyad 08
Tal Abiyad
By hosheen issa
15 Jun 2015

Male and Female Kurdish YPG fighters gather on the outskirts of Tal Abiyad.

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YPG and FSA Fighters in Tal Abiyad 09
Tal Abiyad
By hosheen issa
15 Jun 2015

Fighters keep watch of the area in the vicinity of Tal Abiyad.

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YPG and FSA Fighters in Tal Abiyad 10
Tal Abiyad
By hosheen issa
15 Jun 2015

A female Kurdish YPG fighters watches the battle of Tal Abiyad unfold in the distance.

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YPG and FSA Fighters in Tal Abiyad 12
Tal Abiyad
By hosheen issa
15 Jun 2015

An anti-ISIS fighter photographs a destroyed ISIS sign on a road on the outskirts of Tal Abiyad.

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YPG and FSA Fighters in Tal Abiyad 13
Tal Abiyad
By hosheen issa
15 Jun 2015

Kurdish YPG fighters pose for a photo on the outskirts of Tal Abiyad.

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President of Kurdistan Meets Arab Tribes
Dohuk
By Jawdat Ahmed
16 Mar 2015

March 15, 2015
Duhuk, Iraq


(IraqiNews.com) President of Kurdistan Massoud Barzani said on Sunday, that the doors are open for Arabs to fight in the ranks of the Kurdish Peshmerga forces, calling the federal government to do its duty in the liberated areas. Barzani said during a meeting with Arab tribal elders attended by IraqiNews.com, “The doors are open for Arabs to join the Peshmerga ranks in their fight against terrorism, and without discrimination,” urging the federal government to do its duty and provide services in the liberated areas. Barzani added, “We should not feed grudges and hatred. Those who refused loyalty to ISIS must live freely and with dignity, while those who chose to be with ISIS, their fate will be like ISIS’ fate.” “All Kurdish areas have been liberated and are now ready to contribute in the operations to liberate the rest of Iraq,” calling on everyone to cooperate in order to build a spirit of cooperation and brotherhood.

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Norwegian Shiaa Militia Commander: "I...
Karbala
By mushtaq mohammed
20 Feb 2015

February 18, 2015
Karbala, Iraq

Norwegian Shiite Militia Commander Abass al Assadi appears in a second video, interviewed at his home in Karbala. Despite video evidence and what he claimed in is first video on Transterra Media, he now says that he did not and will not take his son to war. The Transterra contributor visited Abass at his home in Hay al-Ghadir, Karbala, where he lives with his wife and two sons Ali and Hussein. The day before the interview Abass had arrived home for a nine-day vacation, but he then received a call from his commanders with orders to head back to Samarrah with some of his fighters. Accodring to Abass his eldest son Ahmed, who travels between California and Oslo, has been arrested and questioned by the Norwegian authorities before being released. The same thing happened to his own brother who also lives in Oslo. In the previous video Abass and his youngest son Hussein appeared to be in a training camp for the al-Hashid al-Shaabi or “Popular Crowd”, Shiite militias, where the boy is seen spending time in training with the fighters and firing a weapon. The boy said that he had participated in battles against ISIS, such as in Jurf al-Sakher.

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Norwegian Shiaa Militia Commander: "I...
Karbala
By mushtaq mohammed
18 Feb 2015

February 18, 2015
Karbala, Iraq

Norwegian Shiite Militia Commander Abass al Assadi appears in a second video, interviewed at his home in Karbala. Despite video evidence and what he claimed in is first video on Transterra Media, he now says that he did not and will not take his son to war.

The Transterra contributor visited Abass at his home in Hay al-Ghadir, Karbala, where he lives with his wife and two sons Ali and Hussein. The day before the interview Abass had arrived home for a nine-day vacation, but he then received a call from his commanders with orders to head back to Samarrah with some of his fighters.

Accodring to Abass his eldest son Ahmed, who travels between California and Oslo, has been arrested and questioned by the Norwegian authorities before being released. The same thing happened to his own brother who also lives in Oslo.

In the previous video Abass and his youngest son Hussein appeared to be in a training camp for the al-Hashid al-Shaabi or “Popular Crowd”, Shiite militias, where the boy is seen spending time in training with the fighters and firing a weapon.
The boy said that he had participated in battles against ISIS, such as in Jurf al-Sakher.

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Boy) Hussein al-Assadi , Iraqi-Norwegian Teenage Fighter
09:17 – 12:19
Why do you not speak Norwegian?
I do not know how to.
Why?
I came to Iraq a long time ago and I cannot speak [Norwegian].
Did you not learn Norwegian at school?
I was young. When I came from Norway I was young. I had not gone to school.
How old were you?
About four years old.
Do you wish to return?
Yes.
Why? Why do you want to return?
The country there is better and safer.
What are you doing in Iraq?
I study at the hawza [Shiite religious school].
UNINTELLIGIBLE QUESTION
In Iraq there are holy shrines which I visited. My father came here to practice jihad. He went to Jarf al-Sakhr. I am proud of him for practicing jihad. I went with him after they liberated the area. I wore his military vest and went with him.
That was after the liberation?
Yes, after the liberation was over.
UNINTELLIGIBLE QUESTION
I am proud of him. I am proud of my father and his position as an Iraqi military.
Do you feel scared sometimes?
No.
Do you feel scared that ISIS is killing people in Iraq?
No. I do not feel scared.
You do not feel scared?
No.
Are you scared of getting killed?
No, I am not.
Why not?
There is nothing to worry about here.
Did you participate in any major battle?
No. I used to go with my father to [the battlefield] after the battle was over.
Do you not think that you are too young [to be part of an armed group]?
No.
I have not fought. I used to go to a certain area after the liberation was over.
Do you think that young men of your age should come from Norway and other European countries to fight against ISIS?
No.
Do you think that young men of your age should come from Norway to and other European countries to fight against ISIS?
I did not come to Iraq to fight. I came to study and be with my people and near the holy shrines.
Is there anything that you miss in Norway? Do you miss any people? Do you have certain good memories? Do you miss any friends or neighbors?
I miss them sometimes but we came to Iraq for the sake of the Imams and to study.

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Norwegian Shiaa Militia Commander: "I...
Karbala
By mushtaq mohammed
18 Feb 2015

February 18, 2015
Karbala, Iraq

Norwegian Shiite Militia Commander Abass al Assadi appears in a second video, interviewed at his home in Karbala. Despite video evidence and what he claimed in is first video on Transterra Media, he now says that he did not and will not take his son to war.

The Transterra contributor visited Abass at his home in Hay al-Ghadir, Karbala, where he lives with his wife and two sons Ali and Hussein. The day before the interview Abass had arrived home for a nine-day vacation, but he then received a call from his commanders with orders to head back to Samarrah with some of his fighters.

Accodring to Abass his eldest son Ahmed, who travels between California and Oslo, has been arrested and questioned by the Norwegian authorities before being released. The same thing happened to his own brother who also lives in Oslo.

In the previous video Abass and his youngest son Hussein appeared to be in a training camp for the al-Hashid al-Shaabi or “Popular Crowd”, Shiite militias, where the boy is seen spending time in training with the fighters and firing a weapon.
The boy said that he had participated in battles against ISIS, such as in Jurf al-Sakher.

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Abbas al-Assadi , Iraqi-Norwegian Shiaa Militia Commander:

Abbas al-Asadi: “I will be heading to Samaraa, after this interview a car will come and pick us up and we will go there.

Interviewer: Did you just return from Samaraa for this interview?

Abbas: “No, I came to see my family but they [Army commanders] called me and told me to return. I am now in the army fighting ISIS but I need to return. They need me there. I took a few days off and went there, but now they need me, they called me and I have to return.”

Interviewer: Don't you think you are breaking the Norwegian law, or technically the law in all of Europe, by letting your children participate in war?

Abbas: “I will not break the Norwegian law or the Arabic law. My children came with me after the area was liberated, after the area became safe and the families returned to it. But my little child likes to wear my uniform and I taught him how to shoot just so he can have some experience. But he does not participate in war with me. I know he cannot participate in war, war is not for him.”

Interviewer: The last time we met with them, your children told us that they participated in war and in victories and in fighting ISIS. What is the reason for such statements?

Abbas: “He considers himself to be one with his father, and since his father participated and he entered Jurf al-Sakher after it was liberated, he considered himself as a participant. Of course he did not participate in the battles in Jurf al-Sakher, do you think I would want death for my son? It is impossible.”

Interviewer: When was the last time you went to Norway?

Abbas: “I was there last in 2008.”

Interviewer: Do you intend to return to Norway and if so, when?

Abbas: “Yes I intend to return to Norway, after the war with ISIS ends.”

Interviewer: How many are in your family?

Abbas: “Some of them are living in Oslo, and I have another son who is a doctor in America. According to our beliefs, a person who leaves jihad is an infidel. We ask God to help us and support us.”

Interviewer: Is your wife pleased with what you are doing?

Abbas: “Yes my wife is proud of me because I am fighting with the good people against the enemies.”
Interviewer: What do you want to tell the Norwegian government and the European Union who might think that you brought your son to participate in war?
Abbas: “I did not and will not involve my son in war, I repeat that, I did not and will not involve any of my youngest children in war. They go to school.. just like in anywhere else. When we liberated the area, many people and journalists came and my son was one of those people. He wanted to wear my uniform, and I allowed him to. It has nothing to do with war. We fought him the Arabic traditions, such as shooting, horseback riding, and other simple things. If a war happens in Norway, God forbid, I am willing to fight alongside them. If Norway or Europe needs me to fight, I will definitely help them. Norway is my country and Iraq is my country.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Boy) Hussein al-Assadi , Iraqi-Norwegian Teenage Fighter
09:17 – 12:19
Why do you not speak Norwegian?
I do not know how to.
Why?
I came to Iraq a long time ago and I cannot speak [Norwegian].
Did you not learn Norwegian at school?
I was young. When I came from Norway I was young. I had not gone to school.
How old were you?
About four years old.
Do you wish to return?
Yes.
Why? Why do you want to return?
The country there is better and safer.
What are you doing in Iraq?
I study at the hawza [Shiite religious school].
UNINTELLIGIBLE QUESTION
In Iraq there are holy shrines which I visited. My father came here to practice jihad. He went to Jarf al-Sakhr. I am proud of him for practicing jihad. I went with him after they liberated the area. I wore his military vest and went with him.
That was after the liberation?
Yes, after the liberation was over.
UNINTELLIGIBLE QUESTION
I am proud of him. I am proud of my father and his position as an Iraqi military.
Do you feel scared sometimes?
No.
Do you feel scared that ISIS is killing people in Iraq?
No. I do not feel scared.
You do not feel scared?
No.
Are you scared of getting killed?
No, I am not.
Why not?
There is nothing to worry about here.
Did you participate in any major battle?
No. I used to go with my father to [the battlefield] after the battle was over.
Do you not think that you are too young [to be part of an armed group]?
No.
I have not fought. I used to go to a certain area after the liberation was over.
Do you think that young men of your age should come from Norway and other European countries to fight against ISIS?
No.
Do you think that young men of your age should come from Norway to and other European countries to fight against ISIS?
I did not come to Iraq to fight. I came to study and be with my people and near the holy shrines.
Is there anything that you miss in Norway? Do you miss any people? Do you have certain good memories? Do you miss any friends or neighbors?
I miss them sometimes but we came to Iraq for the sake of the Imams and to study.

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Al Aqsa and the Conflict in Jerusalem
Jerusalem, Israel
By Iliay
27 Nov 2014

November 2014
Jerusalem

As tensions in Jerusalem boil over into open conflict between Israelis and Palestinians, the issue of the Al-Aqsa Mosque complex remains one of the key issues in the conflict. This story explores the cultural and religious significance of the complex to the two sides and illustrates how the area has yet again become a catalyst for violence. Some fear this newest round of violence may lead to a third Palestinian Intifada.

Tents and Tombstones: Bedouins in Isr...
Al-Araqib
By Vinciane Jacquet
10 Nov 2014

November 12, 2014
al-Araqib, Israel

Al Araqib is one of the 46 Bedouin villages in the Negev desert that the state of Israel refuses to recognize. The residents of the village, both past and present, inherited these lands from their fathers and grandfathers. Harassment from the Israeli Army and vigilanties has become commonplace for the Araqib Bedouin. The harassment dates back to 1948, when a gang of Zionist militants rounded up 14 Bedouin men working in a field in al-Araqib and summarily executed them. Since 1948, homes and properties in al-Araqib have been regularly destroyed and stolen. On July 27th, 2010, the village was totally demolished. Since then, the village has been re-built and destroyed 33 times. However, many residents were unable to stay and moved to the recognized village of Rahat. Those who did choose to stay are confined to the area of the Al-Turi cemetary and have been living under harsh conditions, always scared of an unexpected visit from the soldiers.

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Erasing palestine- historic village n...
By Vinciane Jacquet
06 Sep 2014

September, 7, 2014
Lifta, Israel

On a sign giving directions to the village, the Arabic writing of "Lifta" has scratched out of the sign.

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Erasing palestine- historic village n...
By Vinciane Jacquet
06 Sep 2014

September 7, 2014
Lifta, Israel

In the village, "Palestine" written in Arabic on the leaf of a prickly pear tree.

Dying Trades in the Holy Land
By dafnatal7
04 Sep 2014

A look at some of Israel's last family businesses, which are being crushed by changing times. For some of the most traditional Jewish and Arab businesses, it won't be long before their doors close for the last time. New technologies, large corporations, and the draw of the modern world mean that the next generation of consumers and the heirs to the businesses no longer have an interest in the businesses' futures.

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The First Arab Female MMA Fighter
Beirut
By Andreanewilliams
15 Aug 2014

August, 2014
Beirut, Lebanon

This past July, Rachel Abou Abdallah, from Lebanon, became the first female Arab MMA fighter to compete in the IMMF World MMA Championships in Las Vegas. She brought home the silver medal and her success has encouraged her to continue trailblazing. Mixed Martial Arts is a controversial sport for its violence, but it is also a male dominated sport and Rachel is participating in a male dominated sport in a largely patriarchal society. Despite the challenges she faces, she still finds time to continues to study architecture.

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Caliber 3 - 1
Gush Etzyon, Israel
By giulianocamarda
04 Nov 2013

Sign at the entrance of Caliber 3 Academy in West Bank area of Gush Etzyon. It was established in 2002 by Col. Sharon Gat. Caliber 3 works in close cooperation with the Israel Defense Forces (IDF) in the field of counter-terrorism. The place is dedicated to Capt. Hagai Hayim Lev, a 24 years old Israeli soldier killed in 2002 during a military operation in southern Gaza Strip.

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Caliber 3 - 3
Gush Etzyon
By giulianocamarda
04 Nov 2013

A group of Israeli trainees praying during a course for becoming security guards on the light train in Jerusalem

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Caliber 3 - 4
Gush Etzyon
By giulianocamarda
04 Nov 2013

Professional team of Caliber 3 during a demonstration of a V.I.P. protection operation

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Caliber 3 - 5
Gush Etzyon, Israel
By giulianocamarda
04 Nov 2013

Mary from Fishers, Indiana, during a shooting session with a hand gun. She came with all her family to have a unique experience in Israel. They came just for fun and they thoroughly enjoyed it.

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Caliber 3 - 6
Gush Etzyon, Israel
By giulianocamarda
04 Nov 2013

Eitan Cohen, Combat and Krav Maga instructor, during a basic shooting training session with a group of American and Russian tourists.

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Caliber 3 - 7
Gush Etzyon, Israel
By giulianocamarda
04 Nov 2013

One of the three shooting rangea at Caliber 3 Academy, in the West Bank area of Gush Etzyon.

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Caliber 3 - 9
Gush Etzyon, Israel
By giulianocamarda
04 Nov 2013

Professional team of Caliber 3 during a demonstration of a V.I.P. protection operation.

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Caliber 3 - 8
Gush Etzyon
By giulianocamarda
04 Nov 2013

Eitan Cohen, Combat and Krav Maga instructor, during a basic shooting training session with a group of American and Russian tourists.

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Caliber 3 - 10
Gush Etzyon
By giulianocamarda
04 Nov 2013

A group of Israeli young men during a Krav Maga lesson. Krav Maga is a self-defense system developed for military in Israel and Hungary that consists of a wide combination of techniques sourced from boxing, Muay Thai, Wing Chun, Judo, jiu-jitsu, wrestling, and grappling, along with realistic fight training.

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Caliber 3 - 11
Gush Etzyon
By giulianocamarda
04 Nov 2013

Professional team of Caliber 3 during a demonstration of a V.I.P. protection operation

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Caliber 3 - 12
Gush Etzyon
By giulianocamarda
04 Nov 2013

Samuel from Fishers, Indiana, during a shooting session with a hand gun. He came with his family to make a unique experience in Israel. They came just for fun.

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Caliber 3 - 13
Gush Etzyon, West Bank
By giulianocamarda
04 Nov 2013

Professional team of Caliber 3 during a demonstration of a V.I.P. protection operation.

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Caliber 3 - 14
Gush Etzyon
By giulianocamarda
04 Nov 2013

Professional team of Caliber 3 during a demonstration of a V.I.P. protection operation.

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Caliber 3 - 15
Gush Etzyon, West Bank
By giulianocamarda
04 Nov 2013

Alex Baramba, Combat and Krav Maga instructor, teaching a group of Russian tourists how to shoot with a hand gun.

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Caliber 3 - 17
Gush Etzyon, West Bank
By giulianocamarda
04 Nov 2013

Eitan Cohen is a Combat and Krav Maga instructor who has worked at Caliber 3 for two years. In the past, he took part in several special missions in Mexico, Nigeria and India as a contractor. He's also a Muay Thai athlete.